A_55_305_EF
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A/55/305 A-55-305_e.pdf (English)A/55/305 A-55-305_f.pdf (French)
United Nations A/55/305–S/2000/809 General Assembly Security Council Distr.: General 21 August 2000 Original: English 00-59470 (E) 180800 ````````` General Assembly Security Council Fifty-fifth session Fifty-fifth year Item 87 of the provisional agenda* Comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects Identical letters dated 21 August 2000 from the Secretary-General to the President of the General Assembly and the President of the Security Council On 7 March 2000, I convened a high-level Panel to undertake a thorough review of the United Nations peace and security activities, and to present a clear set of specific, concrete and practical recommendations to assist the United Nations in conducting such activities better in the future. I asked Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi, the former Foreign Minister of Algeria, to chair the Panel, which included the following eminent personalities from around the world, with a wide range of experience in the fields of peacekeeping, peace-building, development and humanitarian assistance: Mr. J. Brian Atwood, Ambassador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Mr. Richard Monk, General Klaus Naumann (retd.), Ms. Hisako Shimura, Ambassador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda and Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga. I would be grateful if the Panel’s report, which has been transmitted to me in the enclosed letter dated 17 August 2000 from the Chairman of the Panel, could be brought to the attention of Member States. The Panel’s analysis is frank yet fair; its recommendations are far-reaching yet sensible and practical. The expeditious implementation of the Panel’s recommendations, in my view, is essential to make the United Nations truly credible as a force for peace. Many of the Panel’s recommendations relate to matters fully within the purview of the Secretary-General, while others will need the approval and support of the legislative bodies of the United Nations. I urge all Member States to join me in considering, approving and supporting the implementation of those recommendations. In this connection, I am pleased to inform you that I have designated the Deputy Secretary-General to follow up on the report’s recommendations and to oversee the preparation of a detailed implementation plan, which I shall submit to the General Assembly and the Security Council. * A/55/150.ii A/55/305 S/2000/809 I very much hope that the report of the Panel, in particular its Executive Summary, will be brought to the attention of all the leaders who will be coming to New York in September 2000 to participate in the Millennium Summit. That highleeve and historic meeting presents a unique opportunity for us to commence the process of renewing the United Nations capacity to secure and build peace. I ask for the support of the General Assembly and Security Council in converting into reality the far-reaching agenda laid out in the report. (Signed) Kofi A. Annaniii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Letter dated 17 August 2000 from the Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations to the Secretary-General The Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, which you convened in March 2000, was privileged to have been asked by you to assess the United Nations ability to conduct peace operations effectively, and to offer frank, specific and realistic recommendations for ways in which to enhance that capacity. Mr. Brian Atwood, Ambassador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Mr. Richard Monk, General (ret.) Klaus Naumann, Ms. Hisako Shimura, Ambassador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda, Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga and I accepted this challenge out of deep respect for you and because each of us believes fervently that the United Nations system can do better in the cause of peace. We admired greatly your willingness to undertake past highly critical analyses of United Nations operations in Rwanda and Srebrenica. This degree of self-criticism is rare for any large organization and particularly rare for the United Nations. We also would like to pay tribute to Deputy Secretary-General Louise Fréchette and Chef de Cabinet S. Iqbal Riza, who remained with us throughout our meetings and who answered our many questions with unfailing patience and clarity. They have given us much of their time and we benefited immensely from their intimate knowledge of the United Nations present limitations and future requirements. Producing a review and recommendations for reform of a system with the scope and complexity of United Nations peace operations, in only four months, was a daunting task. It would have been impossible but for the dedication and hard work of Dr. William Durch (with support from staff at the Stimson Center), Mr. Salman Ahmed of the United Nations and the willingness of United Nations officials throughout the system, including serving heads of mission, to share their insights both in interviews and in often comprehensive critiques of their own organizations and experiences. Former heads of peace operations and force commanders, academics and representatives of non-governmental organizations were equally helpful. The Panel engaged in intense discussion and debate. Long hours were devoted to reviewing recommendations and supporting analysis that we knew would be subject to scrutiny and interpretation. Over three separate three-day meetings in New York, Geneva and then New York again, we forged the letter and the spirit of the attached report. Its analysis and recommendations reflect our consensus, which we convey to you with our hope that it serve the cause of systematic reform and renewal of this core function of the United Nations. As we say in the report, we are aware that you are engaged in conducting a comprehensive reform of the Secretariat. We thus hope that our recommendations fit within that wider process, with slight adjustments if necessary. We realize that not all of our recommendations can be implemented overnight, but many of them do require urgent action and the unequivocal support of Member States. Throughout these months, we have read and heard encouraging words from Member States, large and small, from the South and from the North, stressing the necessity for urgent improvement in the ways the United Nations addresses conflictiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 situations. We urge them to act decisively to translate into reality those of our recommendations that require formal action by them. The Panel has full confidence that the official we suggest you designate to oversee the implementation of our recommendations, both inside the Secretariat and with Member States, will have your full support, in line with your conviction to transform the United Nations into the type of twenty-first century institution it needs to be to effectively meet the current and future threats to world peace. Finally, if I may be allowed to add a personal note, I wish to express my deepest gratitude to each of my colleagues on this Panel. Together, they have contributed to the project an impressive sum of knowledge and experience. They have consistently shown the highest degree of commitment to the Organization and a deep understanding of its needs. During our meetings and our contacts from afar, they have all been extremely kind to me, invariably helpful, patient and generous, thus making the otherwise intimidating task as their Chairman relatively easier and truly enjoyable. (Signed) Lakhdar Brahimi Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operationsv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Contents Paragraphs Page Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii I. The need for change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 1 II. Doctrine, strategy and decision-making for peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–83 2 A. Defining the elements of peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 2 B. Experience of the past. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–28 3 C. Implications for preventive action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–34 5 Summary of key recommendations on preventive action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 6 D. Implications for peace-building strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–47 6 Summary of key recommendations on peace-building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 8 E. Implications for peacekeeping doctrine and strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48–55 9 Summary of key recommendation on peacekeeping doctrine and strategy. . . . 55 10 F. Clear, credible and achievable mandates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–64 10 Summary of key recommendations on clear, credible and achievable mandates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 11 G. Information-gathering, analysis and strategic planning capacities . . . . . . . . . . 65–75 12 Summary of key recommendation on information and strategic analysis. . . . . 75 13 H. The challenge of transitional civil administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–83 13 Summary of key recommendation on transitional civil administration. . . . . . . 83 14 III. United Nations capacities to deploy operations rapidly and effectively . . . . . . . . . . 84–169 14 A. Defining what “rapid and effective deployment” entails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–91 15 Summary of key recommendation on determining deployment timelines . . . . . 91 16 B. Effective mission leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–101 16 Summary of key recommendations on mission leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 17 C. Military personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–117 17 Summary of key recommendations on military personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 20 D. Civilian police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–126 20 Summary of key recommendations on civilian police personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 21 E. Civilian specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127–145 21 1. Lack of standby systems to respond to unexpected or high-volume surge demands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128–132 22vi A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. Difficulties in attracting and retaining the best external recruits . . . . . . . 133–135 23 3. Shortages in administrative and support functions at the mid-to-senior levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 23 4. Penalizing field deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–138 23 5. Obsolescence in the Field Service category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139–140 24 6. Lack of a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations. . . . . . . . 141–145 24 Summary of key recommendations on civilian specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 25 F. Public information capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146–150 25 Summary of key recommendation on rapidly deployable capacity for public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 26 G. Logistics support, the procurement process and expenditure management . . . 151–169 26 Summary of key recommendations on logistics support and expenditure management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 28 IV. Headquarters resources and structure for planning and supporting peacekeeping operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170–245 29 A. Staffing-levels and funding for Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172–197 29 Summary of key recommendations on funding Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 34 B. Need and proposal for the establishment of Integrated Mission Task Forces . 198–217 34 Summary of key recommendation on integrated mission planning and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 37 C. Other structural adjustments required in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218–233 37 1. Military and Civilian Police Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219–225 37 2. Field Administration and Logistics Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226–228 38 3. Lessons Learned Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229–230 39 4. Senior management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231–233 39 Summary of key recommendations on other structural adjustments in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 39 D. Structural adjustments needed outside the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234–245 40 1. Operational support for public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235–238 40 Summary of key recommendation on structural adjustments in public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 40vii A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs . . . . . . . . . 239–243 40 Summary of key recommendations for peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 41 3. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244–245 41 Summary of key recommendation on strengthening the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 41 V. Peace operations and the information age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246–264 42 A. Information technology in peace operations: strategy and policy issues . . . . . 247–251 42 Summary of key recommendation on information technology strategy and policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 42 B. Tools for knowledge management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252–258 43 Summary of key recommendations on information technology tools in peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 43 C. Improving the timeliness of Internet-based public information . . . . . . . . . . . . 259–264 44 Summary of key recommendation on the timeliness of Internet-based public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 44 VI. Challenges to implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265–280 44 Annexes I. Members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 II. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 III. Summary of recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54viii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Executive Summary The United Nations was founded, in the words of its Charter, in order “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Meeting this challenge is the most important function of the Organization, and to a very significant degree it is the yardstick with which the Organization is judged by the peoples it exists to serve. Over the last decade, the United Nations has repeatedly failed to meet the challenge, and it can do no better today. Without renewed commitment on the part of Member States, significant institutional change and increased financial support, the United Nations will not be capable of executing the critical peacekeeping and peacebuilldin tasks that the Member States assign to it in coming months and years. There are many tasks which United Nations peacekeeping forces should not be asked to undertake and many places they should not go. But when the United Nations does send its forces to uphold the peace, they must be prepared to confront the lingering forces of war and violence, with the ability and determination to defeat them.The Secretary-General has asked the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, composed of individuals experienced in various aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building, to assess the shortcomings of the existing system and to make frank, specific and realistic recommendations for change. Our recommendations focus not only on politics and strategy but also and perhaps even more so on operational and organizational areas of need. For preventive initiatives to succeed in reducing tension and averting conflict, the Secretary-General needs clear, strong and sustained political support from Member States. Furthermore, as the United Nations has bitterly and repeatedly discovered over the last decade, no amount of good intentions can substitute for the fundamental ability to project credible force if complex peacekeeping, in particular, is to succeed. But force alone cannot create peace; it can only create the space in which peace may be built. Moreover, the changes that the Panel recommends will have no lasting impact unless Member States summon the political will to support the United Nations politically, financially and operationally to enable the United Nations to be truly credible as a force for peace. Each of the recommendations contained in the present report is designed to remedy a serious problem in strategic direction, decision-making, rapid deployment, operational planning and support, and the use of modern information technology. Key assessments and recommendations are highlighted below, largely in the order in which they appear in the body of the text (the numbers of the relevant paragraphs in the main text are provided in parentheses). In addition, a summary of recommendations is contained in annex III. Experience of the past (paras. 15-28) It should have come as no surprise to anyone that some of the missions of the past decade would be particularly hard to accomplish: they tended to deploy where conflict had not resulted in victory for any side, where a military stalemate or international pressure or both had brought fighting to a halt but at least some of the parties to the conflict were not seriously committed to ending the confrontation. United Nations operations thus did not deploy into post-conflict situations but tried to create them. In such complex operations, peacekeepers work to maintain a secure local environment while peacebuilders work to make that environment self-sustaining.ix A/55/305 S/2000/809 Only such an environment offers a ready exit to peacekeeping forces, making peacekeepers and peacebuilders inseparable partners. Implications for preventive action and peace-building: the need for strategy and support (paras. 29-47) The United Nations and its members face a pressing need to establish more effective strategies for conflict prevention, in both the long and short terms. In this context, the Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report (A/54/2000) and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000. It also encourages the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension in support of short-term crisispreveentiv action. Furthermore, the Security Council and the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, conscious that the United Nations will continue to face the prospect of having to assist communities and nations in making the transition from war to peace, have each recognized and acknowledged the key role of peace-building in complex peace operations. This will require that the United Nations system address what has hitherto been a fundamental deficiency in the way it has conceived of, funded and implemented peace-building strategies and activities. Thus, the Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) present to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. Among the changes that the Panel supports are: a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police and related rule of law elements in peace operations that emphasizes a team approach to upholding the rule of law and respect for human rights and helping communities coming out of a conflict to achieve national reconciliation; consolidation of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations in their first phase; flexibility for heads of United Nations peace operations to fund “quick impact projects” that make a real difference in the lives of people in the mission area; and better integration of electoral assistance into a broader strategy for the support of governance institutions. Implications for peacekeeping: the need for robust doctrine and realistic mandates (paras. 48-64) The Panel concurs that consent of the local parties, impartiality and the use of force only in self-defence should remain the bedrock principles of peacekeeping. Experience shows, however, that in the context of intra-State/transnational conflicts, consent may be manipulated in many ways. Impartiality for United Nations operations must therefore mean adherence to the principles of the Charter: where one party to a peace agreement clearly and incontrovertibly is violating its terms, continued equal treatment of all parties by the United Nations can in the best case result in ineffectiveness and in the worst may amount to complicity with evil. No failure did more to damage the standing and credibility of United Nations peacekeeping in the 1990s than its reluctance to distinguish victim from aggressor.xA/55/305 S/2000/809 In the past, the United Nations has often found itself unable to respond effectively to such challenges. It is a fundamental premise of the present report, however, that it must be able to do so. Once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandate professionally and successfully. This means that United Nations military units must be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate. Rules of engagement should be sufficiently robust and not force United Nations contingents to cede the initiative to their attackers. This means, in turn, that the Secretariat must not apply best-case planning assumptions to situations where the local actors have historically exhibited worstcaas behaviour. It means that mandates should specify an operation’s authority to use force. It means bigger forces, better equipped and more costly but able to be a credible deterrent. In particular, United Nations forces for complex operations should be afforded the field intelligence and other capabilities needed to mount an effective defence against violent challengers. Moreover, United Nations peacekeepers — troops or police — who witness violence against civilians should be presumed to be authorized to stop it, within their means, in support of basic United Nations principles. However, operations given a broad and explicit mandate for civilian protection must be given the specific resources needed to carry out that mandate. The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when recommending force and other resource levels for a new mission, and it must set those levels according to realistic scenarios that take into account likely challenges to implementation. Security Council mandates, in turn, should reflect the clarity that peacekeeping operations require for unity of effort when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations. The current practice is for the Secretary-General to be given a Security Council resolution specifying troop levels on paper, not knowing whether he will be given the troops and other personnel that the mission needs to function effectively, or whether they will be properly equipped. The Panel is of the view that, once realistic mission requirements have been set and agreed to, the Council should leave its authorizing resolution in draft form until the Secretary-General confirms that he has received troop and other commitments from Member States sufficient to meet those requirements. Member States that do commit formed military units to an operation should be invited to consult with the members of the Security Council during mandate formulation; such advice might usefully be institutionalized via the establishment of ad hoc subsidiary organs of the Council, as provided for in Article 29 of the Charter. Troop contributors should also be invited to attend Secretariat briefings of the Security Council pertaining to crises that affect the safety and security of mission personnel or to a change or reinterpretation of the mandate regarding the use of force. New headquarters capacity for information management and strategic analysis (paras. 65-75) The Panel recommends that a new information-gathering and analysis entity be created to support the informational and analytical needs of the Secretary-Generalxi A/55/305 S/2000/809 and the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS). Without such capacity, the Secretariat will remain a reactive institution, unable to get ahead of daily events, and the ECPS will not be able to fulfil the role for which it was created. The Panel’s proposed ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS) would create and maintain integrated databases on peace and security issues, distribute that knowledge efficiently within the United Nations system, generate policy analyses, formulate long-term strategies for ECPS and bring budding crises to the attention of the ECPS leadership. It could also propose and manage the agenda of ECPS itself, helping to transform it into the decision-making body anticipated in the Secretary-General’s initial reforms. The Panel proposes that EISAS be created by consolidating the existing Situation Centre of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) with a number of small, scattered policy planning offices, and adding a small team of military analysts, experts in international criminal networks and information systems specialists. EISAS should serve the needs of all members of ECPS. Improved mission guidance and leadership (paras. 92-101) The Panel believes it is essential to assemble the leadership of a new mission as early as possible at United Nations Headquarters, to participate in shaping a mission’s concept of operations, support plan, budget, staffing and Headquarters mission guidance. To that end, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General compile, in a systematic fashion and with input from Member States, a comprehensive list of potential special representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs), force commanders, civilian police commissioners, their potential deputies and potential heads of other components of a mission, representing a broad geographic and equitable gender distribution. Rapid deployment standards and “on-call” expertise (paras. 86-91 and 102-169) The first 6 to 12 weeks following a ceasefire or peace accord are often the most critical ones for establishing both a stable peace and the credibility of a new operation. Opportunities lost during that period are hard to regain. The Panel recommends that the United Nations define “rapid and effective deployment capacity” as the ability to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing such an operation, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. The Panel recommends that the United Nations standby arrangements system (UNSAS) be developed further to include several coherent, multinational, brigadesiiz forces and the necessary enabling forces, created by Member States working in partnership, in order to better meet the need for the robust peacekeeping forces that the Panel has advocated. The Panel also recommends that the Secretariat send a team to confirm the readiness of each potential troop contributor to meet the requisite United Nations training and equipment requirements for peacekeeping operations, prior to deployment. Units that do not meet the requirements must not be deployed.xii A/55/305 S/2000/809 To support such rapid and effective deployment, the Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 experienced, well qualified military officers, carefully vetted and accepted by DPKO, be created within UNSAS. Teams drawn from this list and available for duty on seven days’ notice would translate broad, strategic-level mission concepts developed at Headquarters into concrete operational and tactical plans in advance of the deployment of troop contingents, and would augment a core element from DPKO to serve as part of a mission start-up team. Parallel on-call lists of civilian police, international judicial experts, penal experts and human rights specialists must be available in sufficient numbers to strengthen rule of law institutions, as needed, and should also be part of UNSAS. Pre-trained teams could then be drawn from this list to precede the main body of civilian police and related specialists into a new mission area, facilitating the rapid and effective deployment of the law and order component into the mission. The Panel also calls upon Member States to establish enhanced national “pools” of police officers and related experts, earmarked for deployment to United Nations peace operations, to help meet the high demand for civilian police and related criminal justice/rule of law expertise in peace operations dealing with intra-State conflict. The Panel also urges Member States to consider forming joint regional partnerships and programmes for the purpose of training members of the respective national pools to United Nations civilian police doctrine and standards. The Secretariat should also address, on an urgent basis, the needs: to put in place a transparent and decentralized recruitment mechanism for civilian field personnel; to improve the retention of the civilian specialists that are needed in every complex peace operation; and to create standby arrangements for their rapid deployment. Finally, the Panel recommends that the Secretariat radically alter the systems and procedures in place for peacekeeping procurement in order to facilitate rapid deployment. It recommends that responsibilities for peacekeeping budgeting and procurement be moved out of the Department of Management and placed in DPKO. The Panel proposes the creation of a new and distinct body of streamlined field procurement policies and procedures; increased delegation of procurement authority to the field; and greater flexibility for field missions in the management of their budgets. The Panel also urges that the Secretary-General formulate and submit to the General Assembly, for its approval, a global logistics support strategy governing the stockpiling of equipment reserves and standing contracts with the private sector for common goods and services. In the interim, the Panel recommends that additional “start-up kits” of essential equipment be maintained at the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) in Brindisi, Italy. The Panel also recommends that the Secretary-General be given authority, with the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) to commit up to $50 million well in advance of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a new operation once it becomes clear that an operation is likely to be established.xiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Enhance Headquarters capacity to plan and support peace operations (paras. 170-197) The Panel recommends that Headquarters support for peacekeeping be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements should be funded through the regular budget of the Organization. DPKO and other offices that plan and support peacekeeping are currently primarily funded by the Support Account, which is renewed each year and funds only temporary posts. That approach to funding and staff seems to confuse the temporary nature of specific operations with the evident permanence of peacekeeping and other peace operations activities as core functions of the United Nations, which is obviously an untenable state of affairs. The total cost of DPKO and related Headquarters support offices for peacekeeping does not exceed $50 million per annum, or roughly 2 per cent of total peacekeeping costs. Additional resources for those offices are urgently needed to ensure that more than $2 billion spent on peacekeeping in 2001 are well spent. The Panel therefore recommends that the Secretary-General submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining the Organization’s requirements in full. The Panel believes that a methodical management review of DPKO should be conducted but also believes that staff shortages in certain areas are plainly obvious. For example, it is clearly not enough to have 32 officers providing military planning and guidance to 27,000 troops in the field, nine civilian police staff to identify, vet and provide guidance for up to 8,600 police, and 15 political desk officers for 14 current operations and two new ones, or to allocate just 1.25 per cent of the total costs of peacekeeping to Headquarters administrative and logistics support. Establish Integrated Mission Task Forces for mission planning and support (paras. 198-245) The Panel recommends that Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs) be created, with staff from throughout the United Nations system seconded to them, to plan new missions and help them reach full deployment, significantly enhancing the support that Headquarters provides to the field. There is currently no integrated planning or support cell in the Secretariat that brings together those responsible for political analysis, military operations, civilian police, electoral assistance, human rights, development, humanitarian assistance, refugees and displaced persons, public information, logistics, finance and recruitment. Structural adjustments are also required in other elements of DPKO, in particular to the Military and Civilian Police Division, which should be reorganized into two separate divisions, and the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD), which should be split into two divisions. The Lessons Learned Unit should be strengthened and moved into the DPKO Office of Operations. Public information planning and support at Headquarters also needs strengthening, as do elements in the Department of Political Affairs (DPA), particularly the electoral unit. Outside the Secretariat, the ability of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to plan and support the human rights components of peace operations needs to be reinforced.xiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Consideration should be given to allocating a third Assistant Secretary-General to DPKO and designating one of them as “Principal Assistant Secretary-General”, functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. Adapting peace operations to the information age (paras. 246-264) Modern, well utilized information technology (IT) is a key enabler of many of the above-mentioned objectives, but gaps in strategy, policy and practice impede its effective use. In particular, Headquarters lacks a sufficiently strong responsibility centre for user-level IT strategy and policy in peace operations. A senior official with such responsibility in the peace and security arena should be appointed and located within EISAS, with counterparts in the offices of the SRSG in every United Nations peace operation. Headquarters and the field missions alike also need a substantive, global, Peace Operations Extranet (POE), through which missions would have access to, among other things, EISAS databases and analyses and lessons learned. Challenges to implementation (paras. 265-280) The Panel believes that the above recommendations fall well within the bounds of what can be reasonably demanded of the Organization’s Member States. Implementing some of them will require additional resources for the Organization, but we do not mean to suggest that the best way to solve the problems of the United Nations is merely to throw additional resources at them. Indeed, no amount of money or resources can substitute for the significant changes that are urgently needed in the culture of the Organization. The Panel calls on the Secretariat to heed the Secretary-General’s initiatives to reach out to the institutions of civil society; to constantly keep in mind that the United Nations they serve is the universal organization. People everywhere are fully entitled to consider that it is their organization, and as such to pass judgement on its activities and the people who serve in it. Furthermore, wide disparities in staff quality exist and those in the system are the first to acknowledge it; better performers are given unreasonable workloads to compensate for those who are less capable. Unless the United Nations takes steps to become a true meritocracy, it will not be able to reverse the alarming trend of qualified personnel, the young among them in particular, leaving the Organization. Moreover, qualified people will have no incentive to join it. Unless managers at all levels, beginning with the Secretary-General and his senior staff, seriously address this problem on a priority basis, reward excellence and remove incompetence, additional resources will be wasted and lasting reform will become impossible. Member States also acknowledge that they need to reflect on their working culture and methods. It is incumbent upon Security Council members, for example, and the membership at large to breathe life into the words that they produce, as did, for instance, the Security Council delegation that flew to Jakarta and Dili in the wake of the East Timor crisis in 1999, an example of effective Council action at its best: res, non verba. We — the members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations — call on the leaders of the world assembled at the Millennium Summit, as they renew their commitment to the ideals of the United Nations, to commit as well toxv A/55/305 S/2000/809 strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to fully accomplish the mission which is, indeed, its very raison d’être: to help communities engulfed in strife and to maintain or restore peace. While building consensus for the recommendations in the present report, we have also come to a shared vision of a United Nations, extending a strong helping hand to a community, country or region to avert conflict or to end violence. We see an SRSG ending a mission well accomplished, having given the people of a country the opportunity to do for themselves what they could not do before: to build and hold onto peace, to find reconciliation, to strengthen democracy, to secure human rights. We see, above all, a United Nations that has not only the will but also the ability to fulfil its great promise, and to justify the confidence and trust placed in it by the overwhelming majority of humankind.1 A/55/305 S/2000/809 I. The need for change 1. The United Nations was founded, in the words of its Charter, in order “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Meeting this challenge is the most important function of the Organization, and, to a very significant degree, the yardstick by which it is judged by the peoples it exists to serve. Over the last decade, the United Nations has repeatedly failed to meet the challenge; and it can do no better today. Without significant institutional change, increased financial support, and renewed commitment on the part of Member States, the United Nations will not be capable of executing the critical peacekeeping and peace-building tasks that the Member States assign it in coming months and years. There are many tasks which the United Nations peacekeeping forces should not be asked to undertake, and many places they should not go. But when the United Nations does send its forces to uphold the peace, they must be prepared to confront the lingering forces of war and violence with the ability and determination to defeat them. 2. The Secretary-General has asked the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, composed of individuals experienced in various aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building (Panel members are listed in annex I), to assess the shortcomings of the existing system and to make frank, specific and realistic recommendations for change. Our recommendations focus not only on politics and strategy but also on operational and organizational areas of need. 3. For preventive initiatives to reduce tension and avert conflict, the Secretary-General needs clear, strong and sustained political support from Member States. For peacekeeping to accomplish its mission, as the United Nations has discovered repeatedly over the last decade, no amount of good intentions can substitute for the fundamental ability to project credible force. However, force alone cannot create peace; it can only create a space in which peace can be built. 4. In other words, the key conditions for the success of future complex operations are political support, rapid deployment with a robust force posture and a sound peace-building strategy. Every recommendation in the present report is meant, in one way or another, to help ensure that these three conditions are met. The need for change has been rendered even more urgent by recent events in Sierra Leone and by the daunting prospect of expanded United Nations operations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 5. These changes — while essential — will have no lasting impact unless the Member States of the Organization take seriously their responsibility to train and equip their own forces and to mandate and enable their collective instrument, so that together they may succeed in meeting threats to peace. They must summon the political will to support the United Nations politically, financially and operationally — once they have decided to act as the United Nations — if the Organization is to be credible as a force for peace. 6. The recommendations that the Panel presents balance principle and pragmatism, while honouring the spirit and letter of the Charter of the United Nations and the respective roles of the Organization’s legislative bodies. They are based on the following premises: (a) The essential responsibility of Member States for the maintenance of international peace and security, and the need to strengthen both the quality and quantity of support provided to the United Nations system to carry out that responsibility; (b) The pivotal importance of clear, credible and adequately resourced Security Council mandates; (c) A focus by the United Nations system on conflict prevention and its early engagement, wherever possible; (d) The need to have more effective collection and assessment of information at United Nations Headquarters, including an enhanced conflict early warning system that can detect and recognize the threat or risk of conflict or genocide; (e) The essential importance of the United Nations system adhering to and promoting international human rights instruments and standards and international humanitarian law in all aspects of its peace and security activities; (f) The need to build the United Nations capacity to contribute to peace-building, both preventive and post-conflict, in a genuinely integrated manner; (g) The critical need to improve Headquarters planning (including contingency planning) for peace operations;2A/55/305 S/2000/809 (h) The recognition that while the United Nations has acquired considerable expertise in planning, mounting and executing traditional peacekeeping operations, it has yet to acquire the capacity needed to deploy more complex operations rapidly and to sustain them effectively; (i) The necessity to provide field missions with high-quality leaders and managers who are granted greater flexibility and autonomy by Headquarters, within clear mandate parameters and with clear standards of accountability for both spending and results; (j) The imperative to set and adhere to a high standard of competence and integrity for both Headquarters and field personnel, who must be provided the training and support necessary to do their jobs and to progress in their careers, guided by modern management practices that reward meritorious performance and weed out incompetence; (k) The importance of holding individual officials at Headquarters and in the field accountable for their performance, recognizing that they need to be given commensurate responsibility, authority and resources to fulfil their assigned tasks. 7. In the present report, the Panel has addressed itself to many compelling needs for change within the United Nations system. The Panel views its recommendations as the minimum threshold of change needed to give the United Nations system the opportunity to be an effective, operational, twenty-first century institution. (Key recommendations are summarized in bold type throughout the text; they are also combined in a single summary in annex III.) 8. The blunt criticisms contained in the present report reflect the Panel’s collective experience as well as interviews conducted at every level of the system. More than 200 people were either interviewed or provided written input to the Panel. Sources included the Permanent Missions of Member States, including the Security Council members; the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations; and personnel in peace and security-related departments at United Nations Headquarters in New York, in the United Nations Office at Geneva, at the headquarters of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), at the headquarters of other United Nations funds and programmes; at the World Bank and in every current United Nations peace operation. (A list of references is contained in annex II.) II. Doctrine, strategy and decisionmakkin for peace operations 9. The United Nations system — namely the Member States, Security Council, General Assembly and Secretariat — must commit to peace operations carefully, reflecting honestly on the record of its performance over the past decade. It must adjust accordingly the doctrine upon which peace operations are established; fine-tune its analytical and decisionmakkin capacities to respond to existing realities and anticipate future requirements; and summon the creativity, imagination and will required to implement new and alternative solutions to those situations into which peacekeepers cannot or should not go. A. Defining the elements of peace operations 10. United Nations peace operations entail three principal activities: conflict prevention and peacemaking; peacekeeping; and peace-building. Longteer conflict prevention addresses the structural sources of conflict in order to build a solid foundation for peace. Where those foundations are crumbling, conflict prevention attempts to reinforce them, usually in the form of a diplomatic initiative. Such preventive action is, by definition, a low-profile activity; when successful, it may even go unnoticed altogether. 11. Peacemaking addresses conflicts in progress, attempting to bring them to a halt, using the tools of diplomacy and mediation. Peacemakers may be envoys of Governments, groups of States, regional organizations or the United Nations, or they may be unofficial and non-governmental groups, as was the case, for example, in the negotiations leading up to a peace accord for Mozambique. Peacemaking may even be the work of a prominent personality, working independently. 12. Peacekeeping is a 50-year-old enterprise that has evolved rapidly in the past decade from a traditional, primarily military model of observing ceasefires and force separations after inter-State wars, to incorporate a complex model of many elements, military and3 A/55/305 S/2000/809 civilian, working together to build peace in the dangerous aftermath of civil wars. 13. Peace-building is a term of more recent origin that, as used in the present report, defines activities undertaken on the far side of conflict to reassemble the foundations of peace and provide the tools for building on those foundations something that is more than just the absence of war. Thus, peace-building includes but is not limited to reintegrating former combatants into civilian society, strengthening the rule of law (for example, through training and restructuring of local police, and judicial and penal reform); improving respect for human rights through the monitoring, education and investigation of past and existing abuses; providing technical assistance for democratic development (including electoral assistance and support for free media); and promoting conflict resolution and reconciliation techniques. 14. Essential complements to effective peacebuilldin include support for the fight against corruption, the implementation of humanitarian demining programmes, emphasis on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education and control, and action against other infectious diseases. B. Experience of the past 15. The quiet successes of short-term conflict prevention and peacemaking are often, as noted, politically invisible. Personal envoys and representatives of the Secretary-General (RSGs) or special representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs) have at times complemented the diplomatic initiatives of Member States and, at other times, have taken initiatives that Member States could not readily duplicate. Examples of the latter initiatives (drawn from peacemaking as well as preventive diplomacy) include the achievement of a ceasefire in the Islamic Republic of Iran-Iraq war in 1988, the freeing of the last Western hostages in Lebanon in 1991, and avoidance of war between the Islamic Republic of Iran and Afghanistan in 1998. 16. Those who favour focusing on the underlying causes of conflicts argue that such crisis-related efforts often prove either too little or too late. Attempted earlier, however, diplomatic initiatives may be rebuffed by a government that does not see or will not acknowledge a looming problem, or that may itself be part of the problem. Thus, long-term preventive strategies are a necessary complement to short-term initiatives. 17. Until the end of the cold war, United Nations peacekeeping operations mostly had traditional ceasefire-monitoring mandates and no direct peacebuilldin responsibilities. The “entry strategy” or sequence of events and decisions leading to United Nations deployment was straightforward: war, ceasefire, invitation to monitor ceasefire compliance and deployment of military observers or units to do so, while efforts continued for a political settlement. Intelligence requirements were also fairly straightforward and risks to troops were relatively low. But traditional peacekeeping, which treats the symptoms rather than sources of conflict, has no builtii exit strategy and associated peacemaking was often slow to make progress. As a result, traditional peacekeepers have remained in place for 10, 20, 30 or even 50 years (as in Cyprus, the Middle East and India/Pakistan). By the standards of more complex operations, they are relatively low cost and politically easier to maintain than to remove. However, they are also difficult to justify unless accompanied by serious and sustained peacemaking efforts that seek to transform a ceasefire accord into a durable and lasting peace settlement. 18. Since the end of the cold war, United Nations peacekeeping has often combined with peace-building in complex peace operations deployed into settings of intra-State conflict. Those conflict settings, however, both affect and are affected by outside actors: political patrons; arms vendors; buyers of illicit commodity exports; regional powers that send their own forces into the fray; and neighbouring States that host refugees who are sometimes systematically forced to flee their homes. With such significant cross-border effects by state and non-state actors alike, these conflicts are often decidedly “transnational” in character. 19. Risks and costs for operations that must function in such circumstances are much greater than for traditional peacekeeping. Moreover, the complexity of the tasks assigned to these missions and the volatility of the situation on the ground tend to increase together. Since the end of the cold war, such complex and risky mandates have been the rule rather than the exception: United Nations operations have been given reliefesccor duties where the security situation was so4A/55/305 S/2000/809 dangerous that humanitarian operations could not continue without high risk for humanitarian personnel; they have been given mandates to protect civilian victims of conflict where potential victims were at greatest risk, and mandates to control heavy weapons in possession of local parties when those weapons were being used to threaten the mission and the local population alike. In two extreme situations, United Nations operations were given executive law enforcement and administrative authority where local authority did not exist or was not able to function. 20. It should have come as no surprise to anyone that these missions would be hard to accomplish. Initially, the 1990s offered more positive prospects: operations implementing peace accords were time-limited, rather than of indefinite duration, and successful conduct of national elections seemed to offer a ready exit strategy. However, United Nations operations since then have tended to deploy where conflict has not resulted in victory for any side: it may be that the conflict is stalemated militarily or that international pressure has brought fighting to a halt, but in any event the conflict is unfinished. United Nations operations thus do not deploy into post-conflict situations so much as they deploy to create such situations. That is, they work to divert the unfinished conflict, and the personal, political or other agendas that drove it, from the military to the political arena, and to make that diversion permanent. 21. As the United Nations soon discovered, local parties sign peace accords for a variety of reasons, not all of them favourable to peace. “Spoilers” — groups (including signatories) who renege on their commitments or otherwise seek to undermine a peace accord by violence — challenged peace implementation in Cambodia, threw Angola, Somalia and Sierra Leone back into civil war, and orchestrated the murder of no fewer than 800,000 people in Rwanda. The United Nations must be prepared to deal effectively with spoilers if it expects to achieve a consistent record of success in peacekeeping or peacebuilldin in situations of intrastate/transnational conflict. 22. A growing number of reports on such conflicts have highlighted the fact that would-be spoilers have the greatest incentive to defect from peace accords when they have an independent source of income that pays soldiers, buys guns, enriches faction leaders and may even have been the motive for war. Recent history indicates that, where such income streams from the export of illicit narcotics, gemstones or other highvaalu commodities cannot be pinched off, peace is unsustainable. 23. Neighbouring States can contribute to the problem by allowing passage of conflict-supporting contraband, serving as middlemen for it or providing base areas for fighters. To counter such conflictsuppoortin neighbours, a peace operation will require the active political, logistical and/or military support of one or more great powers, or of major regional powers. The tougher the operation, the more important such backing becomes. 24. Other variables that affect the difficulty of peace implementation include, first, the sources of the conflict. These can range from economics (e.g., issues of poverty, distribution, discrimination or corruption), politics (an unalloyed contest for power) and resource and other environmental issues (such as competition for scarce water) to issues of ethnicity, religion or gross violations of human rights. Political and economic objectives may be more fluid and open to compromise than objectives related to resource needs, ethnicity or religion. Second, the complexity of negotiating and implementing peace will tend to rise with the number of local parties and the divergence of their goals (e.g., some may seek unity, others separation). Third, the level of casualties, population displacement and infrastructure damage will affect the level of wargeneerate grievance, and thus the difficulty of reconciliation, which requires that past human rights violations be addressed, as well as the cost and complexity of reconstruction. 25. A relatively less dangerous environment — just two parties, committed to peace, with competitive but congruent aims, lacking illicit sources of income, with neighbours and patrons committed to peace — is a fairly forgiving one. In less forgiving, more dangerous environments — three or more parties, of varying commitment to peace, with divergent aims, with independent sources of income and arms, and with neighbours who are willing to buy, sell and transit illicit goods — United Nations missions put not only their own people but peace itself at risk unless they perform their tasks with the competence and efficiency that the situation requires and have serious great power backing.5 A/55/305 S/2000/809 26. It is vitally important that negotiators, the Security Council, Secretariat mission planners, and mission participants alike understand which of these political-military environments they are entering, how the environment may change under their feet once they arrive, and what they realistically plan to do if and when it does change. Each of these must be factored into an operation’s entry strategy and, indeed, into the basic decision about whether an operation is feasible and should even be attempted. 27. It is equally important, in this context, to judge the extent to which local authorities are willing and able to take difficult but necessary political and economic decisions and to participate in the establishment of processes and mechanisms to manage internal disputes and pre-empt violence or the reemerrgenc of conflict. These are factors over which a field mission and the United Nations have little control, yet such a cooperative environment is critical in determining the successful outcome of a peace operation. 28. When complex peace operations do go into the field, it is the task of the operation’s peacekeepers to maintain a secure local environment for peacebuillding and the peacebuilders’ task to support the political, social and economic changes that create a secure environment that is self-sustaining. Only such an environment offers a ready exit to peacekeeping forces, unless the international community is willing to tolerate recurrence of conflict when such forces depart. History has taught that peacekeepers and peacebuilders are inseparable partners in complex operations: while the peacebuilders may not be able to function without the peacekeepers’ support, the peacekeepers have no exit without the peacebuilders’ work. C. Implications for preventive action 29. United Nations peace operations addressed no more than one third of the conflict situations of the 1990s. Because even much-improved mechanisms for creation and support of United Nations peacekeeping operations will not enable the United Nations system to respond with such operations in the case of all conflict everywhere, there is a pressing need for the United Nations and its Member States to establish a more effective system for long-term conflict prevention. Prevention is clearly far more preferable for those who would otherwise suffer the consequences of war, and is a less costly option for the international community than military action, emergency humanitarian relief or reconstruction after a war has run its course. As the Secretary-General noted in his recent Millennium Report (A/54/2000), “every step taken towards reducing poverty and achieving broad-based economic growth is a step toward conflict prevention”. In many cases of internal conflict, “poverty is coupled with sharp ethnic or religious cleavages”, in which minority rights “are insufficiently respected [and] the institutions of government are insufficiently inclusive”. Long-term preventive strategies in such instances must therefore work “to promote human rights, to protect minority rights and to institute political arrangements in which all groups are represented. ... Every group needs to become convinced that the state belongs to all people”. 30. The Panel wishes to commend the United Nations ongoing internal Task Force on Peace and Security for its work in the area of long-term prevention, in particular the notion that development entities in the United Nations system should view humanitarian and development work through a “conflict prevention lens” and make long-term prevention a key focus of their work, adapting current tools, such as the common country assessment and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF), to that end. 31. To improve early United Nations focus on potential new complex emergencies and thus shortteer conflict prevention, about two years ago the Headquarters Departments that sit on the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) created the Inter-Agency/Interdepartmental Framework for Coordination, in which 10 departments, funds, programmes and agencies now participate. The active element, the Framework Team, meets at the Director level monthly to decide on areas at risk, schedule country (or situation) review meetings and identify preventive measures. The Framework mechanism has improved interdepartmental contacts but has not accumulated knowledge in a structured way, and does no strategic planning. This may have contributed to the Secretariat’s difficulty in persuading Member States of the advantages of backing their professed commitment to both long-and short-term conflict prevention measures with the requisite political and financial support. In the interim, the Secretary-General’s annual reports of 1997 and 1999 (A/52/1 and A/54/1) focused6A/55/305 S/2000/809 specifically on conflict prevention. The Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict and the United Nations Association of the United States of America, among others, also have contributed valuable studies on the subject. And more than 400 staff in the United Nations have undergone systematic training in “early warning” at the United Nations Staff College in Turin. 32. At the heart of the question of short-term prevention lies the use of fact-finding missions and other key initiatives by the Secretary-General. These have, however, usually met with two key impediments. First, there is the understandable and legitimate concern of Member States, especially the small and weak among them, about sovereignty. Such concerns are all the greater in the face of initiatives taken by another Member State, especially a stronger neighbour, or by a regional organization that is dominated by one of its members. A state facing internal difficulties would more readily accept overtures by the Secretary-General because of the recognized independence and moral high ground of his position and in view of the letter and spirit of the Charter, which requires that the Secretary-General offer his assistance and expects the Member States to give the United Nations “every assistance” as indicated, in particular, in Article 2 (5) of the Charter. Fact-finding missions are one tool by which the Secretary-General can facilitate the provision of his good offices. 33. The second impediment to effective crisispreveentiv action is the gap between verbal postures and financial and political support for prevention. The Millennium Assembly offers all concerned the opportunity to reassess their commitment to this area and consider the prevention-related recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s Millennium Report and in his recent remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention. There, the Secretary-General emphasized the need for closer collaboration between the Security Council and other principal organs of the United Nations on conflict prevention issues, and ways to interact more closely with non-state actors, including the corporate sector, in helping to defuse or avoid conflicts. 34. Summary of key recommendations on preventive action: (a) The Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000, in particular his appeal to “all who are engaged in conflict prevention and development — the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, Governments and civil society organizations — [to] address these challenges in a more integrated fashion”; (b) The Panel supports the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension, and stresses Member States’ obligations, under Article 2 (5) of the Charter, to give “every assistance” to such activities of the United Nations. D. Implications for peace-building strategy 35. The Security Council and the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peace-keeping Operations have each recognized and acknowledged the importance of peace-building as integral to the success of peacekeeping operations. In this regard, on 29 December 1998 the Security Council adopted a presidential statement that encouraged the Secretary-General to “explore the possibility of establishing postconfflic peace-building structures as part of efforts by the United Nations system to achieve a lasting peaceful solution to conflicts ...”. The Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, in its own report earlier in 2000, stressed the importance of defining and identifying elements of peace-building before they are incorporated into the mandates of complex peace operations, so as to facilitate later consideration by the General Assembly of continuing support for key elements of peace-building after a complex operation draws to a close. 36. Peace-building support offices or United Nations political offices may be established as follow-ons to other peace operations, as in Tajikistan or Haiti, or as independent initiatives, as in Guatemala or Guinea-Bissau. They help to support the consolidation of peace in post-conflict countries, working with both Governments and non-governmental parties and complementing what may be ongoing United Nations development activities, which strive to remain apart from politics while nonetheless targeting assistance at the sources of conflict.7 A/55/305 S/2000/809 37. Effective peace-building requires active engagement with the local parties, and that engagement should be multidimensional in nature. First, all peace operations should be given the capacity to make a demonstrable difference in the lives of the people in their mission area, relatively early in the life of the mission. The head of mission should have authority to apply a small percentage of mission funds to “quick impact projects” aimed at real improvements in quality of life, to help establish the credibility of a new mission. The resident coordinator/humanitarian coordinator of the pre-existing United Nations country team should serve as chief adviser for such projects in order to ensure efficient spending and to avoid conflict with other development or humanitarian assistance programmes. 38. Second, “free and fair” elections should be viewed as part of broader efforts to strengthen governance institutions. Elections will be successfully held only in an environment in which a population recovering from war comes to accept the ballot over the bullet as an appropriate and credible mechanism through which their views on government are represented. Elections need the support of a broader process of democratization and civil society building that includes effective civilian governance and a culture of respect for basic human rights, lest elections merely ratify a tyranny of the majority or be overturned by force after a peace operation leaves. 39. Third, United Nations civilian police monitors are not peacebuilders if they simply document or attempt to discourage by their presence abusive or other unacceptable behaviour of local police officers — a traditional and somewhat narrow perspective of civilian police capabilities. Today, missions may require civilian police to be tasked to reform, train and restructure local police forces according to international standards for democratic policing and human rights, as well as having the capacity to respond effectively to civil disorder and for self-defence. The courts, too, into which local police officers bring alleged criminals and the penal system to which the law commits prisoners also must be politically impartial and free from intimidation or duress. Where peace-building missions require it, international judicial experts, penal experts and human rights specialists, as well as civilian police, must be available in sufficient numbers to strengthen rule of law institutions. Where justice, reconciliation and the fight against impunity require it, the Security Council should authorize such experts, as well as relevant criminal investigators and forensic specialists, to further the work of apprehension and prosecution of persons indicted for war crimes in support of United Nations international criminal tribunals. 40. While this team approach may seem self-evident, the United Nations has faced situations in the past decade where the Security Council has authorized the deployment of several thousand police in a peacekeeping operation but has resisted the notion of providing the same operations with even 20 or 30 criminal justice experts. Further, the modern role of civilian police needs to be better understood and developed. In short, a doctrinal shift is required in how the Organization conceives of and utilizes civilian police in peace operations, as well as the need for an adequately resourced team approach to upholding the rule of law and respect for human rights, through judicial, penal, human rights and policing experts working together in a coordinated and collegial manner. 41. Fourth, the human rights component of a peace operation is indeed critical to effective peace-building. United Nations human rights personnel can play a leading role, for example, in helping to implement a comprehensive programme for national reconciliation. The human rights components within peace operations have not always received the political and administrative support that they require, however, nor are their functions always clearly understood by other components. Thus, the Panel stresses the importance of training military, police and other civilian personnel on human rights issues and on the relevant provisions of international humanitarian law. In this respect, the Panel commends the Secretary-General’s bulletin of 6 August 1999 entitled “Observance by United Nations forces of international humanitarian law” (ST/SGB/1999/13). 42. Fifth, the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants — key to immediate post-conflict stability and reduced likelihood of conflict recurrence — is an area in which peace-building makes a direct contribution to public security and law and order. But the basic objective of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is not met unless all three elements of the programme are implemented. Demobilized fighters (who almost never fully disarm) will tend to return to a life of violence if8A/55/305 S/2000/809 they find no legitimate livelihood, that is, if they are not “reintegrated” into the local economy. The reintegration element of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is voluntarily funded, however, and that funding has sometimes badly lagged behind requirements. 43. Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration has been a feature of at least 15 peacekeeping operations in the past 10 years. More than a dozen United Nations agencies and programmes as well as international and local NGOs, fund these programmes. Partly because so many actors are involved in planning or supporting disarmament, demobilization and reintegration, it lacks a designated focal point within the United Nations system. 44. Effective peace-building also requires a focal point to coordinate the many different activities that building peace entails. In the view of the Panel, the United Nations should be considered the focal point for peace-building activities by the donor community. To that end, there is great merit in creating a consolidated and permanent institutional capacity within the United Nations system. The Panel therefore believes that the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, in his/her capacity as Convener of ECPS, should serve as the focal point for peace-building. The Panel also supports efforts under way by the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to jointly strengthen United Nations capacity in this area, because effective peace-building is, in effect, a hybrid of political and development activities targeted at the sources of conflict. 45. DPA, the Department of Political Affairs, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Department of Disarmament Affairs (DDA), the Office of Legal Affairs (OLA), UNDP, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), OHCHR, UNHCR, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, and the United Nations Security Coordinator are represented in ECPS; the World Bank Group has been invited to participate as well. ECPS thus provides the ideal forum for the formulation of peace-building strategies. 46. Nonetheless, a distinction should be made between strategy formulation and the implementation of such strategies, based upon a rational division of labour among ECPS members. In the Panel's view, UNDP has untapped potential in this area, and UNDP, in cooperation with other United Nations agencies, funds and programmes and the World Bank, are best placed to take the lead in implementing peace-building activities. The Panel therefore recommends that ECPS propose to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to develop peacebuilldin strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. That plan should also indicate the criteria for determining when the appointment of a senior political envoy or representative of the Secretary-General may be warranted to raise the profile and sharpen the political focus of peace-building activities in a particular region or country recovering from conflict. 47. Summary of key recommendations on peacebuillding (a) A small percentage of a mission’s firstyeea budget should be made available to the representative or special representative of the Secretary-General leading the mission to fund quick impact projects in its area of operations, with the advice of the United Nations country team’s resident coordinator; (b) The Panel recommends a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police, other rule of law elements and human rights experts in complex peace operations to reflect an increased focus on strengthening rule of law institutions and improving respect for human rights in post-conflict environments; (c) The Panel recommends that the legislative bodies consider bringing demobilization and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations for the first phase of an operation in order to facilitate the rapid disassembly of fighting factions and reduce the likelihood of resumed conflict; (d) The Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security discuss and recommend to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies.9 A/55/305 S/2000/809 E. Implications for peacekeeping doctrine and strategy 48. The Panel concurs that consent of the local parties, impartiality and use of force only in selfdeffenc should remain the bedrock principles of peacekeeping. Experience shows, however, that in the context of modern peace operations dealing with intra-State/transnational conflicts, consent may be manipulated in many ways by the local parties. A party may give its consent to United Nations presence merely to gain time to retool its fighting forces and withdraw consent when the peacekeeping operation no longer serves its interests. A party may seek to limit an operation’s freedom of movement, adopt a policy of persistent non-compliance with the provisions of an agreement or withdraw its consent altogether. Moreover, regardless of faction leaders’ commitment to the peace, fighting forces may simply be under much looser control than the conventional armies with which traditional peacekeepers work, and such forces may split into factions whose existence and implications were not contemplated in the peace agreement under the colour of which the United Nations mission operates. 49. In the past, the United Nations has often found itself unable to respond effectively to such challenges. It is a fundamental premise of the present report, however, that it must be able to do so. Once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandate professionally and successfully. This means that United Nations military units must be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate. Rules of engagement should not limit contingents to stroke-forstrrok responses but should allow ripostes sufficient to silence a source of deadly fire that is directed at United Nations troops or at the people they are charged to protect and, in particularly dangerous situations, should not force United Nations contingents to cede the initiative to their attackers. 50. Impartiality for such operations must therefore mean adherence to the principles of the Charter and to the objectives of a mandate that is rooted in those Charter principles. Such impartiality is not the same as neutrality or equal treatment of all parties in all cases for all time, which can amount to a policy of appeasement. In some cases, local parties consist not of moral equals but of obvious aggressors and victims, and peacekeepers may not only be operationally justified in using force but morally compelled to do so. Genocide in Rwanda went as far as it did in part because the international community failed to use or to reinforce the operation then on the ground in that country to oppose obvious evil. The Security Council has since established, in its resolution 1296 (2000), that the targeting of civilians in armed conflict and the denial of humanitarian access to civilian populations afflicted by war may themselves constitute threats to international peace and security and thus be triggers for Security Council action. If a United Nations peace operation is already on the ground, carrying out those actions may become its responsibility, and it should be prepared. 51. This means, in turn, that the Secretariat must not apply best-case planning assumptions to situations where the local actors have historically exhibited worst-case behaviour. It means that mandates should specify an operation’s authority to use force. It means bigger forces, better equipped and more costly, but able to pose a credible deterrent threat, in contrast to the symbolic and non-threatening presence that characterizes traditional peacekeeping. United Nations forces for complex operations should be sized and configured so as to leave no doubt in the minds of would-be spoilers as to which of the two approaches the Organization has adopted. Such forces should be afforded the field intelligence and other capabilities needed to mount a defence against violent challengers. 52. Willingness of Member States to contribute troops to a credible operation of this sort also implies a willingness to accept the risk of casualties on behalf of the mandate. Reluctance to accept that risk has grown since the difficult missions of the mid-1990s, partly because Member States are not clear about how to define their national interests in taking such risks, and partly because they may be unclear about the risks themselves. In seeking contributions of forces, therefore, the Secretary-General must be able to make the case that troop contributors and indeed all Member States have a stake in the management and resolution of the conflict, if only as part of the larger enterprise of establishing peace that the United Nations represents. In so doing, the Secretary-General should be able to give would-be troop contributors an assessment of risk that describes what the conflict and the peace are about, evaluates the capabilities and objectives of the local parties, and assesses the independent financial10 A/55/305 S/2000/809 resources at their disposal and the implications of those resources for the maintenance of peace. The Security Council and the Secretariat also must be able to win the confidence of troop contributors that the strategy and concept of operations for a new mission are sound and that they will be sending troops or police to serve under a competent mission with effective leadership. 53. The Panel recognizes that the United Nations does not wage war. Where enforcement action is required, it has consistently been entrusted to coalitions of willing States, with the authorization of the Security Council, acting under Chapter VII of the Charter. 54. The Charter clearly encourages cooperation with regional and subregional organizations to resolve conflict and establish and maintain peace and security. The United Nations is actively and successfully engaged in many such cooperation programmes in the field of conflict prevention, peacemaking, elections and electoral assistance, human rights monitoring and humanitarian work and other peace-building activities in various parts of the world. Where peacekeeping operations are concerned, however, caution seems appropriate, because military resources and capability are unevenly distributed around the world, and troops in the most crisis-prone areas are often less prepared for the demands of modern peacekeeping than is the case elsewhere. Providing training, equipment, logistical support and other resources to regional and subregional organizations could enable peacekeepers from all regions to participate in a United Nations peacekeeping operation or to set up regional peacekeeping operations on the basis of a Security Council resolution. 55. Summary of key recommendation on peacekeeping doctrine and strategy: once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandates professionally and successfully and be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate, with robust rules of engagement, against those who renege on their commitments to a peace accord or otherwise seek to undermine it by violence. F. Clear, credible and achievable mandates 56. As a political body, the Security Council focuses on consensus-building, even though it can take decisions with less than unanimity. But the compromises required to build consensus can be made at the expense of specificity, and the resulting ambiguity can have serious consequences in the field if the mandate is then subject to varying interpretation by different elements of a peace operation, or if local actors perceive a less than complete Council commitment to peace implementation that offers encouragement to spoilers. Ambiguity may also paper over differences that emerge later, under pressure of a crisis, to prevent urgent Council action. While it acknowledges the utility of political compromise in many cases, the Panel comes down in this case on the side of clarity, especially for operations that will deploy into dangerous circumstances. Rather than send an operation into danger with unclear instructions, the Panel urges that the Council refrain from mandating such a mission. 57. The outlines of a possible United Nations peace operation often first appear when negotiators working toward a peace agreement contemplate United Nations implementation of that agreement. Although peace negotiators (peacemakers) may be skilled professionals in their craft, they are much less likely to know in detail the operational requirements of soldiers, police, relief providers or electoral advisers in United Nations field missions. Non-United Nations peacemakers may have even less knowledge of those requirements. Yet the Secretariat has, in recent years, found itself required to execute mandates that were developed elsewhere and delivered to it via the Security Council with but minor changes. 58. The Panel believes that the Secretariat must be able to make a strong case to the Security Council that requests for United Nations implementation of ceasefires or peace agreements need to meet certain minimum conditions before the Council commits United Nations-led forces to implement such accords, including the opportunity to have adviser-observers present at the peace negotiations; that any agreement be consistent with prevailing international human rights standards and humanitarian law; and that tasks to be undertaken by the United Nations are operationally achievable — with local responsibility for supporting11 A/55/305 S/2000/809 them specified — and either contribute to addressing the sources of conflict or provide the space required for others to do so. Since competent advice to negotiators may depend on detailed knowledge of the situation on the ground, the Secretary-General should be preauthoorize to commit funds from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund sufficient to conduct a preliminary site survey in the prospective mission area. 59. In advising the Council on mission requirements, the Secretariat must not set mission force and other resource levels according to what it presumes to be acceptable to the Council politically. By self-censoring in that manner, the Secretariat sets up itself and the mission not just to fail but to be the scapegoats for failure. Although presenting and justifying planning estimates according to high operational standards might reduce the likelihood of an operation going forward, Member States must not be led to believe that they are doing something useful for countries in trouble when — by under-resourcing missions — they are more likely agreeing to a waste of human resources, time and money. 60. Moreover, the Panel believes that until the Secretary-General is able to obtain solid commitments from Member States for the forces that he or she does believe necessary to carry out an operation, it should not go forward at all. To deploy a partial force incapable of solidifying a fragile peace would first raise and then dash the hopes of a population engulfed in conflict or recovering from war, and damage the credibility of the United Nations as a whole. In such circumstances, the Panel believes that the Security Council should leave in draft form a resolution that contemplated sizeable force levels for a new peacekeeping operation until such time as the Secretary-General could confirm that the necessary troop commitments had been received from Member States. 61. There are several ways to diminish the likelihood of such commitment gaps, including better coordination and consultation between potential troop contributors and the members of the Security Council during the mandate formulation process. Troop contributor advice to the Security Council might usefully be institutionalized via the establishment of ad hoc subsidiary organs of the Council, as provided for in Article 29 of the Charter. Member States contributing formed military units to an operation should as a matter of course be invited to attend Secretariat briefings of the Security Council pertaining to crises that affect the safety and security of the mission’s personnel or to a change or reinterpretation of a mission’s mandate with respect to the use of force. 62. Finally, the desire on the part of the Secretary-General to extend additional protection to civilians in armed conflicts and the actions of the Security Council to give United Nations peacekeepers explicit authority to protect civilians in conflict situations are positive developments. Indeed, peacekeepers — troops or police — who witness violence against civilians should be presumed to be authorized to stop it, within their means, in support of basic United Nations principles and, as stated in the report of the Independent Inquiry on Rwanda, consistent with “the perception and the expectation of protection created by [an operation’s] very presence” (see S/1999/1257, p. 51). 63. However, the Panel is concerned about the credibility and achievability of a blanket mandate in this area. There are hundreds of thousands of civilians in current United Nations mission areas who are exposed to potential risk of violence, and United Nations forces currently deployed could not protect more than a small fraction of them even if directed to do so. Promising to extend such protection establishes a very high threshold of expectation. The potentially large mismatch between desired objective and resources available to meet it raises the prospect of continuing disappointment with United Nations followthrroug in this area. If an operation is given a mandate to protect civilians, therefore, it also must be given the specific resources needed to carry out that mandate. 64. Summary of key recommendations on clear, credible and achievable mandates: (a) The Panel recommends that, before the Security Council agrees to implement a ceasefire or peace agreement with a United Nations-led peacekeeping operation, the Council assure itself that the agreement meets threshold conditions, such as consistency with international human rights standards and practicability of specified tasks and timelines; (b) The Security Council should leave in draft form resolutions authorizing missions with sizeable troop levels until such time as the Secretary-General has firm commitments of troops and other critical mission support elements,12 A/55/305 S/2000/809 including peace-building elements, from Member States; (c) Security Council resolutions should meet the requirements of peacekeeping operations when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations, especially the need for a clear chain of command and unity of effort; (d) The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when formulating or changing mission mandates, and countries that have committed military units to an operation should have access to Secretariat briefings to the Council on matters affecting the safety and security of their personnel, especially those meetings with implications for a mission’s use of force. G. Information-gathering, analysis, and strategic planning capacities 65. A strategic approach by the United Nations to conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building will require that the Secretariat’s key implementing departments in peace and security work more closely together. To do so, they will need sharper tools to gather and analyse relevant information and to support ECPS, the nominal high-level decision-making forum for peace and security issues. 66. ECPS is one of four “sectoral” executive committees established in the Secretary-General’s initial reform package of early 1997 (see A/51/829, sect. A). The Committees for Economic and Social Affairs, Development Operations, and Humanitarian Affairs were also established. OHCHR is a member of all four. These committees were designed to “facilitate more concerted and coordinated management” across participating departments and were given “executive decision-making as well as coordinating powers.” Chaired by the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, ECPS has promoted greater exchange of information across and cooperation between departments, but it has not yet become the decisionmakkin body that the 1997 reforms envisioned, which its participants acknowledge. 67. Current Secretariat staffing levels and job demands in the peace and security sector more or less preclude departmental policy planning. Although most ECPS members have policy or planning units, they tend to be drawn into day-to-day issues. Yet without significant knowledge generating and analytic capacity, the Secretariat will remain a reactive institution unable to get ahead of daily events, and ECPS will not be able to fulfil the role for which it was created. 68. The Secretary-General and the members of ECPS need a professional system in the Secretariat for accumulating knowledge about conflict situations, distributing that knowledge efficiently to a wide user base, generating policy analyses and formulating longteer strategies. That system does not exist at present. The Panel proposes that it be created as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat, or EISAS. 69. The bulk of EISAS should be formed by consolidation of the various departmental units that are assigned policy and information analysis roles related to peace and security, including the Policy Analysis Unit and the Situation Centre of DPKO; the Policy Planning Unit of DPA; the Policy Development Unit (or elements thereof) of OCHA; and the Media Monitoring and Analysis Section of the Department of Public Information (DPI). 70. Additional staff would be required to give EISAS expertise that does not exist elsewhere in the system or that cannot be taken from existing structures. These additions would include a head of the staff (at Director level), a small team of military analysts, police experts and highly qualified information systems analysts who would be responsible for managing the design and maintenance of EISAS databases and their accessibility to both Headquarters and field offices and missions. 71. Close affiliates of EISAS should include the Strategic Planning Unit of the Office of the Secretary-General; the Emergency Response Division of UNDP; the Peace-building Unit (see paras. 239-243 below); the Information Analysis Unit of OCHA (which supports Relief Web); the New York liaison offices of OHCHR and UNHCR; the Office of the United Nations Security Coordinator; and the Monitoring, Database and Information Branch of DDA. The World Bank Group should be invited to maintain liaison, using appropriate elements, such as the Bank’s Post-Conflict Unit. 72. As a common service, EISAS would be of both short-term and long-term value to ECPS members. It would strengthen the daily reporting function of the DPKO Situation Centre, generating all-source updates13 A/55/305 S/2000/809 on mission activity and relevant global events. It could bring a budding crisis to the attention of ECPS leadership and brief them on that crisis using modern presentation techniques. It could serve as a focal point for timely analysis of cross-cutting thematic issues and preparation of reports for the Secretary-General on such issues. Finally, based on the prevailing mix of missions, crises, interests of the legislative bodies and inputs from ECPS members, EISAS could propose and manage the agenda of ECPS itself, support its deliberations and help to transform it into the decisionmakkin body anticipated in the Secretary-General’s initial reforms. 73. EISAS should be able to draw upon the best available expertise — inside and outside the United Nations system — to fine-tune its analyses with regard to particular places and circumstances. It should provide the Secretary-General and ECPS members with consolidated assessments of United Nations and other efforts to address the sources and symptoms of ongoing and looming conflicts, and should be able to assess the potential utility — and implications — of further United Nations involvement. It should provide the basic background information for the initial work of the Integrated Mission Task Forces (ITMFs) that the Panel recommends below (see paras. 198-217), be established to plan and support the set up of peace operations, and continue to provide analyses and manage the information flow between mission and Task Force once the mission has been established. 74. EISAS should create, maintain and draw upon shared, integrated, databases that would eventually replace the proliferated copies of code cables, daily situation reports, daily news feeds and informal connections with knowledgeable colleagues that desk officers and decision makers alike currently use to keep informed of events in their areas of responsibility. With appropriate safeguards, such databases could be made available to users of a peace operations Intranet (see paras. 255 and 256 below). Such databases, potentially available to Headquarters and field alike via increasingly cheap commercial broadband communications services, would help to revolutionize the manner in which the United Nations accumulates knowledge and analyses key peace and security issues. EISAS should also eventually supersede the Framework for Coordination mechanism. 75. Summary of key recommendation on information and strategic analysis: the Secretary-General should establish an entity, referred to here as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS), that would support the information and analysis needs of all members of ECPS; for management purposes, it should be administered by and report jointly to the heads of DPA and DPKO. H. The challenge of transitional civil administration 76. Until mid-1999, the United Nations had conducted just a small handful of field operations with elements of civil administration conduct or oversight. In June 1999, however, the Secretariat found itself directed to develop a transitional civil administration for Kosovo, and three months later for East Timor. The struggles of the United Nations to set up and manage those operations are part of the backdrop to the narratives on rapid deployment and on Headquarters staffing and structure in the present report. 77. These operations face challenges and responsibilities that are unique among United Nations field operations. No other operations must set and enforce the law, establish customs services and regulations, set and collect business and personal taxes, attract foreign investment, adjudicate property disputes and liabilities for war damage, reconstruct and operate all public utilities, create a banking system, run schools and pay teachers and collect the garbage — in a wardammage society, using voluntary contributions, because the assessed mission budget, even for such “transitional administration” missions, does not fund local administration itself. In addition to such tasks, these missions must also try to rebuild civil society and promote respect for human rights, in places where grievance is widespread and grudges run deep. 78. Beyond such challenges lies the larger question of whether the United Nations should be in this business at all, and if so whether it should be considered an element of peace operations or should be managed by some other structure. Although the Security Council may not again direct the United Nations to do transitional civil administration, no one expected it to do so with respect to Kosovo or East Timor either. Intra-State conflicts continue and future instability is hard to predict, so that despite evident ambivalence about civil administration among United Nations Member States and within the Secretariat, other such14 A/55/305 S/2000/809 missions may indeed be established in the future and on an equally urgent basis. Thus, the Secretariat faces an unpleasant dilemma: to assume that transitional administration is a transitory responsibility, not prepare for additional missions and do badly if it is once again flung into the breach, or to prepare well and be asked to undertake them more often because it is well prepared. Certainly, if the Secretariat anticipates future transitional administrations as the rule rather than the exception, then a dedicated and distinct responsibility centre for those tasks must be created somewhere within the United Nations system. In the interim, DPKO has to continue to support this function. 79. Meanwhile, there is a pressing issue in transitional civil administration that must be addressed, and that is the issue of “applicable law.” In the two locales where United Nations operations now have law enforcement responsibility, local judicial and legal capacity was found to be non-existent, out of practice or subject to intimidation by armed elements. Moreover, in both places, the law and legal systems prevailing prior to the conflict were questioned or rejected by key groups considered to be the victims of the conflicts. 80. Even if the choice of local legal code were clear, however, a mission’s justice team would face the prospect of learning that code and its associated procedures well enough to prosecute and adjudicate cases in court. Differences in language, culture, custom and experience mean that the learning process could easily take six months or longer. The United Nations currently has no answer to the question of what such an operation should do while its law and order team inches up such a learning curve. Powerful local political factions can and have taken advantage of the learning period to set up their own parallel administrations, and crime syndicates gladly exploit whatever legal or enforcement vacuums they can find. 81. These missions’ tasks would have been much easier if a common United Nations justice package had allowed them to apply an interim legal code to which mission personnel could have been pre-trained while the final answer to the “applicable law” question was being worked out. Although no work is currently under way within Secretariat legal offices on this issue, interviews with researchers indicate that some headway toward dealing with the problem has been made outside the United Nations system, emphasizing the principles, guidelines, codes and procedures contained in several dozen international conventions and declarations relating to human rights, humanitarian law, and guidelines for police, prosecutors and penal systems. 82. Such research aims at a code that contains the basics of both law and procedure to enable an operation to apply due process using international jurists and internationally agreed standards in the case of such crimes as murder, rape, arson, kidnapping and aggravated assault. Property law would probably remain beyond reach of such a “model code”, but at least an operation would be able to prosecute effectively those who burned their neighbours’ homes while the property law issue was being addressed. 83. Summary of key recommendation on transitional civil administration: the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General invite a panel of international legal experts, including individuals with experience in United Nations operations that have transitional administration mandates, to evaluate the feasibility and utility of developing an interim criminal code, including any regional adaptations potentially required, for use by such operations pending the re-establishment of local rule of law and local law enforcement capacity. III. United Nations capacities to deploy operations rapidly and effectively 84. Many observers have questioned why it takes so long for the United Nations to fully deploy operations following the adoption of a Security Council resolution. The reasons are several. The United Nations does not have a standing army, and it does not have a standing police force designed for field operations. There is no reserve corps of mission leadership: special representatives of the Secretary-General and heads of mission, force commanders, police commissioners, directors of administration and other leadership components are not sought until urgently needed. The Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS) currently in place for potential government-provided military, police and civilian expertise has yet to become a dependable supply of resources. The stockpile of essential equipment recycled from the large missions of the mid-1990s to the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) at Brindisi, Italy, has been depleted by the current surge in missions and there is as yet no budgetary vehicle for rebuilding it quickly. The15 A/55/305 S/2000/809 peacekeeping procurement process may not adequately balance its responsibilities for cost-effectiveness and financial responsibility against overriding operational needs for timely response and mission credibility. The need for standby arrangements for the recruitment of civilian personnel in substantive and support areas has long been recognized but not yet implemented. And finally, the Secretary-General lacks most of the authority to acquire, hire and preposition the goods and people needed to deploy an operation rapidly before the Security Council adopts the resolution to establish it, however likely such an operation may seem. 85. In short, few of the basic building blocks are in place for the United Nations to rapidly acquire and deploy the human and material resources required to mount any complex peace operation in the future. A. Defining what “rapid and effective deployment” entails 86. The proceedings of the Security Council, the reports of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and input provided to the Panel by the field missions, the Secretariat and the Member States all agree on the need for the United Nations to significantly strengthen capacity to deploy new field operations rapidly and effectively. In order to strengthen these capacities, the United Nations must first agree on basic parameters for defining what “rapidity” and “effectiveness” entail. 87. The first six to 12 weeks following a ceasefire or peace accord is often the most critical period for establishing both a stable peace and the credibility of the peacekeepers. Credibility and political momentum lost during this period can often be difficult to regain. Deployment timelines should thus be tailored accordingly. However, the speedy deployment of military, civilian police and civilian expertise will not help to solidify a fragile peace and establish the credibility of an operation if these personnel are not equipped to do their job. To be effective, the missions’ personnel need materiel (equipment and logistics support), finance (cash in hand to procure goods and services) information assets (training and briefing), an operational strategy and, for operations deploying into uncertain circumstances, a military and political “centre of gravity” sufficient to enable it to anticipate and overcome one or more of the parties’ second thoughts about taking a peace process forward. 88. Timelines for rapid and effective deployment will naturally vary in accordance with the politico-military situations that are unique to each post-conflict environment. Nevertheless, the first step in enhancing the United Nations capacity for rapid deployment must begin with agreeing upon a standard towards which the Organization should strive. No such standard yet exists. The Panel thus proposes that the United Nations develop the operational capabilities to fully deploy “traditional” peacekeeping operations within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and complex peacekeeping operations within 90 days. In the case of the latter, the mission headquarters should be fully installed and functioning within 15 days. 89. In order to meet these timelines, the Secretariat would need one or a combination of the following: (a) standing reserves of military, civilian police and civilian expertise, materiel and financing; (b) extremely reliable standby capacities to be called upon on short notice; or (c) sufficient lead-time to acquire these resources, which would require the ability to foresee, plan for and initiate spending for potential new missions several months ahead of time. A number of the Panel’s recommendations are directed at strengthening the Secretariat’s analytical capacities and aligning them with the mission planning process in order to help the United Nations be better prepared for potential new operations. However, neither the outbreak of war nor the conclusion of peace can always be predicted well in advance. In fact, experience has shown that this is often not the case. Thus, the Secretariat must be able to maintain a certain generic level of preparedness, through the establishment of new standing capacities and enhancement of existing standby capacities, so as to be prepared for unforeseen demands. 90. Many Member States have argued against the establishment of a standing United Nations army or police force, resisted entering into reliable standby arrangements, cautioned against the incursion of financial expenses for building a reserve of equipment or discouraged the Secretariat from undertaking planning for potential operations prior to the Secretary-General having been granted specific, crisis-driven legislative authority to do so. Under these circumstances, the United Nations cannot deploy operations “rapidly and effectively” within the timelines suggested. The analysis that follows argues16 A/55/305 S/2000/809 that at least some of these circumstances must change to make rapid and effective deployment possible. 91. Summary of key recommendation on determining deployment timelines: the United Nations should define “rapid and effective deployment capacities” as the ability, from an operational perspective, to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days after the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. B. Effective mission leadership 92. Effective, dynamic leadership can make the difference between a cohesive mission with high morale and effectiveness despite adverse circumstances, and one that struggles to maintain any of those attributes. That is, the tenor of an entire mission can be heavily influenced by the character and ability of those who lead it. 93. Given this critical role, the current United Nations approach to recruiting, selecting, training and supporting its mission leaders leaves major room for improvement. Lists of potential candidates are informally maintained. RSGs and SRSGs, heads of mission, force commanders, civilian police commissioners and their respective deputies may not be selected until close to or even after adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a new mission. They and other heads of substantive and administrative components may not meet one another until they reach the mission area, following a few days of introductory meetings with Headquarters officials. They will be given generic terms of reference that spell out their overall roles and responsibilities, but rarely will they leave Headquarters with mission-specific policy or operational guidance in hand. Initially, at least, they will determine on their own how to implement the Security Council’s mandate and how to deal with potential challenges to implementation. They must develop a strategy for implementing the mandate while trying to establish the mission’s political/military centre of gravity and sustain a potentially fragile peace process. 94. Factoring in the politics of selection makes the process somewhat more understandable. Political sensitivities about a new mission may preclude the Secretary-General’s canvassing potential candidates much before a mission has been established. In selecting SRSGs, RSGs or other heads of mission, the Secretary-General must consider the views of Security Council members, the States within the region and the local parties, the confidence of each of whom an RSG/SRSG needs in order to be effective. The choice of one or more deputy SRSGs may be influenced by the need to achieve geographic distribution within the mission’s leadership. The nationality of the force commander, the police commissioner and their deputies will need to reflect the composition of the military and police components, and will also need to consider the political sensitivities of the local parties. 95. Although political and geographic considerations are legitimate, in the Panel’s view managerial talent and experience must be accorded at least equal priority in choosing mission leadership. Based on the personal experiences of several of its members in leading field operations, the Panel endorses the need to assemble the leadership of a mission as early as possible, so that they can jointly help to shape a mission’s concept of operations, its support plan, its budget and its staffing arrangements. 96. To facilitate early selection, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General compile, in a systematic fashion, and with input from Member States, a comprehensive list of potential SRSGs, force commanders, police commissioners and potential deputies, as well as candidates to head other substantive components of a mission, representing a broad geographic and equitable gender distribution. Such a database would facilitate early identification and selection of the leadership group. 97. The Secretariat should, as a matter of standard practice, provide mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation and, whenever possible, formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. The leadership should also consult widely with the United Nations resident country team and with NGOs working in the mission area to broaden and deepen its local knowledge, which is critical to implementing a comprehensive strategy for transition from war to peace. The country team’s resident coordinator should be included more frequently in the formal mission planning process.17 A/55/305 S/2000/809 98. The Panel believes that there should always be at least one member of the senior management team of a mission with relevant United Nations experience, preferably both in a field mission and at Headquarters. Such an individual would facilitate the work of those members of the management team from outside the United Nations system, shortening the time they would otherwise need to become familiar with the Organization’s rules, regulations, policies and working methods, answering the sorts of questions that predeplooymen training cannot anticipate. 99. The Panel notes the precedent of appointing the resident coordinator/humanitarian coordinator of the team of United Nations agencies, funds and programmes engaged in development work and humanitarian assistance in a particular country as one of the deputies to the SRSG of a complex peace operation. In our view, this practice should be emulated wherever possible. 100. Conversely, it is critical that field representatives of United Nations agencies, funds and programmes facilitate the work of an SRSG or RSG in his or her role as the coordinator of all United Nations activities in the country concerned. On a number of occasions, attempts to perform this role have been hampered by overly bureaucratic resistance to coordination. Such tendencies do not do justice to the concept of the United Nations family that the Secretary-General has tried hard to encourage. 101. Summary of key recommendations on mission leadership: (a) The Secretary-General should systematize the method of selecting mission leaders, beginning with the compilation of a comprehensive list of potential representatives or special representatives of the Secretary-General, force commanders, civilian police commissioners and their deputies and other heads of substantive and administrative components, within a fair geographic and gender distribution and with input from Member States; (b) The entire leadership of a mission should be selected and assembled at Headquarters as early as possible in order to enable their participation in key aspects of the mission planning process, for briefings on the situation in the mission area and to meet and work with their colleagues in mission leadership; (c) The Secretariat should routinely provide the mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation and, whenever possible, should formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. C. Military personnel 102. The United Nations launched UNSAS in the mid-1990s in order to enhance its rapid deployment capabilities and to enable it to respond to the unpredictable and exponential growth in the establishment of the new generation of complex peacekeeping operations. UNSAS is a database of military, civilian police and civilian assets and expertise indicated by Governments to be available, in theory, for deployment to United Nations peacekeeping operations at seven, 15, 30, 60 or 90 days’ notice. The database currently includes 147,900 personnel from 87 Member States: 85,000 in military combat units; 56,700 in military support elements; 1,600 military observers; 2,150 civilian police; and 2,450 other civilian specialists. Of the 87 participating States, 31 have concluded memoranda of understanding with the United Nations enumerating their responsibilities for preparedness of the personnel concerned, but the same memoranda also codify the conditional nature of their commitment. In essence, the memorandum of understanding confirms that States maintain their sovereign right to “just say no” to a request from the Secretary-General to contribute those assets to an operation. 103. The absence of detailed statistics on responses notwithstanding, many Member States are saying “no” to deploying formed military units to United Nationslle peacekeeping operations, far more often than they are saying “yes”. In contrast to the long tradition of developed countries providing the bulk of the troops for United Nations peacekeeping operations during the Organization’s first 50 years, in the last few years 77 per cent of the troops in formed military units deployed in United Nations peacekeeping operations, as of end-June 2000, were contributed by developing countries. 104. The five Permanent Members of the Security Council are currently contributing far fewer troops to United Nations-led operations, but four of the five have contributed sizeable forces to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led operations in Bosnia and18 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Herzegovina and Kosovo that provide a secure environment in which the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH) and the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) can function. The United Kingdom also deployed troops to Sierra Leone at a critical point in the crisis (outside United Nations operational control), providing a valuable stabilizing influence, but no developed country currently contributes troops to the most difficult United Nations-led peacekeeping operations from a security perspective, namely the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) and the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC). 105. Memories of peacekeepers murdered in Mogadishu and Kigali and taken hostage in Sierra Leone help to explain the difficulties Member States are having in convincing their national legislatures and public that they should support the deployment of their troops to United Nations-led operations, particularly in Africa. Moreover, developed States tend not to see strategic national interests at stake. The downsizing of national military forces and the growth in European regional peacekeeping initiatives further depletes the pool of well-trained and well-equipped military contingents from developed countries to serve in United Nations-led operations. 106. Thus, the United Nations is facing a very serious dilemma. A mission such as UNAMSIL would probably not have faced the difficulties that it did in spring 2000 had it been provided with forces as strong as those currently keeping the peace as part of KFOR in Kosovo. The Panel is convinced that NATO military planners would not have agreed to deploy to Sierra Leone with only the 6,000 troops initially authorized. Yet, the likelihood of a KFOR-type operation being deployed in Africa in the near future seems remote given current trends. Even if the United Nations were to attempt to deploy a KFOR-type force, it is not clear, given current standby arrangements, where the troops and equipment would come from. 107. A number of developing countries do respond to requests for peacekeeping forces with troops who serve with distinction and dedication according to very high professional standards, and in accord with new contingent-owned equipment (COE) procedures (“wet lease” agreements) adopted by the General Assembly, which provide that national troop contingents are to bring with them almost all the equipment and supplies required to sustain their troops. The United Nations commits to reimburse troop contributors for use of their equipment and to provide those services and support not covered under the new COE procedures. In return, the troop contributing nations undertake to honour the memoranda of understanding on COE procedures that they sign. 108. Yet, the Secretary-General finds himself in an untenable position. He is given a Security Council resolution specifying troop levels on paper, but without knowing whether he will be given the troops to put on the ground. The troops that eventually arrive in theatre may still be underequipped: Some countries have provided soldiers without rifles, or with rifles but no helmets, or with helmets but no flak jackets, or with no organic transport capability (trucks or troops carriers). Troops may be untrained in peacekeeping operations, and in any case the various contingents in an operation are unlikely to have trained or worked together before. Some units may have no personnel who can speak the mission language. Even if language is not a problem, they may lack common operating procedures and have differing interpretations of key elements of command and control and of the mission’s rules of engagement, and may have differing expectations about mission requirements for the use of force. 109. This must stop. Troop-contributing countries that cannot meet the terms of their memoranda of understanding should so indicate to the United Nations, and must not deploy. To that end, the Secretary-General should be given the resources and support needed to assess potential troop contributors’ preparedness prior to deployment, and to confirm that the provisions of the memoranda will be met. 110. A further step towards improving the current situation would be to give the Secretary-General a capability for assembling, on short notice, military planners, staff officers and other military technical experts, preferably with prior United Nations mission experience, to liaise with mission planners at Headquarters and to then deploy to the field with a core element from DPKO to help establish a mission’s military headquarters, as authorized by the Security Council. Using the current Standby Arrangements System, an “on-call list” of such personnel, nominated by Member States within a fair geographic distribution and carefully vetted and accepted by DPKO, could be formed for this purpose and for strengthening ongoing missions in times of crisis. Personnel assigned to this19 A/55/305 S/2000/809 on-call list of about 100 officers would be at the rank of Major to Colonel and would be treated, upon their short-notice call-up, as United Nations military observers, with appropriate modifications. 111. Personnel selected for inclusion in the on-call list would be pre-qualified medically and administratively for deployment worldwide, would participate in advance training and would incur a commitment of up to two years for immediate deployment within 7-days notification. Every three months, the on-call list would be updated with some 10 to 15 new personnel, as nominated by Member States, to be trained during an initial three-month period. With continuous updating every three months, the on-call list would contain about five to seven teams ready for short-notice deployment. Initial team training would include at the outset a pre-qualification and education phase (brief one-week classroom and apprentice instruction in United Nations systems), followed by a hands-on professional development phase (deployment to an ongoing United Nations peacekeeping operation as a military observer team for about 10 weeks). After this initial three-month team training period, individual officers would then return to their countries and assume an on-call status. 112. Upon Security Council authorization, one or more of these teams could be called up for immediate duty. They would travel to United Nations Headquarters for refresher orientation and specific mission guidance, as necessary, and interaction with the planners of the Integrated Mission Task Force (see paras. 198-217 below) for that operation, before deploying to the field. The teams’ mission would be to translate the broad strategic-level concepts of the mission developed by IMTF into concrete operational and tactical plans, and to undertake immediate coordination and liaison tasks in advance of the deployment of troop contingents. Once deployed, an advance team would remain operational until replaced by deploying contingents (usually about 2 to 3 months, but longer if necessary, up to a six-month term). 113. Funding for a team's initial training would come from the budget of the ongoing mission in which the team is deployed for initial training, and funding for an on-call deployment would come from the prospective peacekeeping mission budget. The United Nations would incur no costs for such personnel while they were on on-call status in their home country as they would be performing normal duties in their national armed forces. The Panel recommends that the Secretary-General outline this proposal with implementing details to the Member States for immediate implementation within the parameters of the existing Standby Arrangements System. 114. Such an emergency military field planning and liaison staff capacity would not be enough, however, to ensure force coherence. In our view, in order to function as a coherent force the troop contingents themselves should at least have been trained and equipped according to a common standard, supplemented by joint planning at the contingents’ command level. Ideally, they will have had the opportunity to conduct joint training field exercises. 115. If United Nations military planners assess that a brigade (approximately 5,000 troops) is what is required to effectively deter or deal with violent challenges to the implementation of an operation’s mandate, then the military component of that United Nations operation ought to deploy as a brigade formation, not as a collection of battalions that are unfamiliar with one another’s doctrine, leadership and operational practices. That brigade would have to come from a group of countries that have been working together as suggested above to develop common training and equipment standards, common doctrine, and common arrangements for the operational control of the force. Ideally, UNSAS should contain several coherent such brigade-size forces, with the necessary enabling forces, available for full deployment to an operation within 30 days in the case of traditional peacekeeping operations and within 90 days in the case of complex operations. 116. To that end, the United Nations should establish the minimum training, equipment and other standards required for forces to participate in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Member States with the means to do so could form partnerships, within the context of UNSAS, to provide financial, equipment, training and other assistance to troop contributors from less developed countries to enable them to reach and maintain that minimum standard, with the goal that each of the brigades so established should be of comparably high quality and be able to call upon effective levels of operational support. Such a formation has been the objective of the Standing High-Readiness Brigade (SHIRBRIG) group of States, who have also established a command-level planning element that works together routinely. However, the20 A/55/305 S/2000/809 proposed arrangement is not intended as a mechanism for relieving some States from their responsibilities to participate actively in United Nations peacekeeping operations or for precluding the participation of smaller States in such operations. 117. Summary of key recommendations on military personnel: (a) Member States should be encouraged, where appropriate, to enter into partnerships with one another, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS), to form several coherent brigade-size forces, with necessary enabling forces, ready for effective deployment within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a traditional peacekeeping operation and within 90 days for complex peacekeeping operations; (b) The Secretary-General should be given the authority to formally canvass Member States participating in UNSAS regarding their willingness to contribute troops to a potential operation once it appeared likely that a ceasefire accord or agreement envisaging an implementing role for the United Nations might be reached; (c) The Secretariat should, as a standard practice, send a team to confirm the preparedness of each potential troop contributor to meet the provisions of the memoranda of understanding on the requisite training and equipment requirements, prior to deployment; those that do not meet the requirements must not deploy; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 military officers be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice to augment nuclei of DPKO planners with teams trained to create a mission headquarters for a new peacekeeping operation. D. Civilian police 118. Civilian police are second only to military forces in numbers of international personnel involved in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Demand for civilian police operations dealing with intra-State conflict is likely to remain high on any list of requirements for helping a war-torn society restore conditions for social, economic and political stability. The fairness and impartiality of the local police force, which civilian police monitor and train, is crucial to maintaining a safe and secure environment, and its effectiveness is vital where intimidation and criminal networks continue to obstruct progress on the political and economic fronts. 119. The Panel has accordingly argued (see paras. 39, 40 and 47 (b) above) for a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police in United Nations peace operations, to focus primarily on the reform and restructuring of local police forces in addition to traditional advisory, training and monitoring tasks. This shift will require Member States to provide the United Nations with even more well-trained and specialized police experts, at a time when they face difficulties meeting current requirements. As of 1 August 2000, 25 per cent of the 8,641 police positions authorized for United Nations operations remained vacant. 120. Whereas Member States may face domestic political difficulties in sending military units to United Nations peace operations, Governments tend to face fewer political constraints in contributing their civilian police to peace operations. However, Member States still have practical difficulties doing so, because the size and configuration of their police forces tend to be tailored to domestic needs alone. 121. Under the circumstances, the process of identifying, securing the release of and training police and related justice experts for mission service is often time-consuming, and prevents the United Nations from deploying a mission’s civilian police component rapidly and effectively. Moreover, the police component of a mission may comprise officers drawn from up to 40 countries who have never met one another before, have little or no United Nations experience, and have received little relevant training or mission-specific briefings, and whose policing practices and doctrines may vary widely. Moreover, civilian police generally rotate out of operations after six months to one year. All of those factors make it extremely difficult for missions’ civilian police commissioners to transform a disparate group of officers into a cohesive and effective force. 122. The Panel therefore calls upon Member States to establish national pools of serving police officers (augmented, if necessary, by recently retired police officers who meet the professional and physical requirements) who are administratively and medically21 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System. The size of the pool will naturally vary with each country’s size and capacity. The Civilian Police Unit of DPKO should assist Member States in determining the selection criteria and training requirements for police officers within these pools, by identifying the specialities and expertise required and issuing common guidelines on the professional standards to be met. Once deployed in a United Nations mission, civilian police officers should serve for at least one year to ensure a minimum level of continuity. 123. The Panel believes that the cohesion of police components would be further enhanced if policecontriibutin States were to develop joint training exercises, and therefore recommends that Member States, where appropriate, enter into new regional training partnerships and strengthen existing ones. The Panel also calls upon Member States in a position to do so to offer assistance (e.g., training and equipment) to smaller police-contributing States to maintain the requisite level of preparedness, according to guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards promulgated by the United Nations. 124. The Panel also recommends that Member States designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures to be responsible for coordinating and managing the provision of police personnel to United Nations peace operations. 125. The Panel believes that the Secretary-General should be given a capability for assembling, on short notice, senior civilian police planners and technical experts, preferably with prior United Nations mission experience, to liaise with mission planners at Headquarters and to then deploy to the field to help establish a mission’s civilian police headquarters, as authorized by the Security Council, in a standby arrangement that parallels the military headquarters oncaal list and its procedures. Upon call-up, members of the on-call list would have the same contractual and legal status as other civilian police in United Nations operations. The training and deployment arrangements for members of the on-call list also could be the same as those of its military counterpart. Furthermore, joint training and planning between the military and civilian police officers on the respective lists would further enhance mission cohesion and cooperation across components at the start-up of a new operation. 126. Summary of key recommendations on civilian police personnel: (a) Member States are encouraged to each establish a national pool of civilian police officers that would be ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations on short notice, within the context of the United Nations standby arrangements system; (b) Member States are encouraged to enter into regional training partnerships for civilian police in the respective national pools in order to promote a common level of preparedness in accordance with guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards to be promulgated by the United Nations; (c) Members States are encouraged to designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures for the provision of civilian police to United Nations peace operations; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving on-call list of about 100 police officers and related experts be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice with teams trained to create the civilian police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train incoming personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date; (e) The Panel recommends that parallel arrangements to recommendations (a), (b) and (c) above be established for judicial, penal, human rights and other relevant specialists, who with specialist civilian police will make up collegial “rule of law” teams. E. Civilian specialists 127. To date, the Secretariat has been unable to identify, recruit and deploy suitably qualified civilian personnel in substantive and support functions either at the right time or in the numbers required. Currently, about 50 per cent of field positions in substantive areas and up to 40 per cent of the positions in administrative and logistics areas are vacant, in missions that were established six months to one year ago and remain in desperate need of the requisite specialists. Some of those who have been deployed have found themselves in positions that do not match their previous experience, such as in the civil administration22 A/55/305 S/2000/809 components of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and UNMIK. Furthermore, the rate of recruitment is nearly matched by the rate of departure by mission personnel fed up with the working conditions that they face, including the short-staffing itself. High vacancy and turnover rates foreshadow a disturbing scenario for the start-up and maintenance of the next complex peacekeeping operation, and hamper the full deployment of current missions. Those problems are compounded by several factors. 1. Lack of standby systems to respond to unexpected or high-volume surge demands 128. Each new complex task assigned to the new generation of peacekeeping operations creates demands that the United Nations system is not able to meet on short notice. This phenomenon first emerged in the early 1990s, with the establishment of the following operations to implement peace accords: the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC), the United Nations Observer Mission in El Salvador (ONUSAL), the United Nations Angola Verification Mission (UNAVEM) and the United Nations Operation in Mozambique (ONUMOZ). The system struggled to recruit experts on short notice in electoral assistance, economic reconstruction and rehabilitation, human rights monitoring, radio and television production, judicial affairs and institution-building. By middeccade the system had created a cadre of individuals, which had acquired on-the-job expertise in these areas, hitherto not present in the system. However, for reasons explained below, many of those individuals have since left the system. 129. The Secretariat was again taken by surprise in 1999, when it had to staff missions with responsibilities for governance in East Timor and Kosovo. Few staff within the Secretariat, or within United Nations agencies, funds or programmes possess the technical expertise and experience required to run a municipality or national ministry. Neither could Member States themselves fill the gap immediately, because they, too, had done no advance planning to identify qualified and available candidates within their national structures. Moreover, the understaffed transitional administration missions themselves took some time to even specify precisely what they required. Eventually, a few Member States offered to provide candidates (some at no cost to the United Nations) to satisfy substantial elements of the demand. However, the Secretariat did not fully avail itself of those offers, partly to avoid the resulting lopsided geographic distribution in the missions’ staffing. The idea of individual Member States taking over entire sectors of administration (sectoral responsibility) was also floated, apparently too late in the process to iron out the details. This idea is worth revisiting, at least for the provision of small teams of civil administrators with specialized expertise. 130. In order to respond quickly, ensure quality control and satisfy the volume of even foreseeable demands, the Secretariat would require the existence and maintenance of a roster of civilian candidates. The roster (which would be distinct from UNSAS) should include the names of individuals in a variety of fields, who have been actively sought out (on an individual basis or through partnerships with and/or the assistance of the members of the United Nations family, governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernnmenta organizations), pre-vetted, interviewed, pre-selected, medically cleared and provided with the basic orientation material applicable to field mission service in general, and who have indicated their availability on short notice. 131. No such roster currently exists. As a result, urgent phone calls have to be made to Member States, United Nations departments and agencies and the field missions themselves to identify suitable candidates at the last minute, and to then expect those candidates to be in a position to drop everything overnight. Through this method, the Secretariat has managed to recruit and deploy at least 1,500 new staff over the last year, not including the managed reassignments of existing staff within the United Nations system, but quality control has suffered. 132. A central Intranet-based roster should be created, along the lines proposed above, that is accessible to and maintained by the relevant members of ECPS. The roster should include the names of their own staff whom ECPS members would agree to release for mission service. Some additional resources would be required to maintain these rosters, but accepted external candidates could be reminded automatically to update their own records via the Internet, particularly as regards availability, and they should be able to access on-line briefing and training materials via the Internet, as well. Field missions should be granted access and delegated the authority to recruit candidates23 A/55/305 S/2000/809 from the roster, in accordance with guidelines to be promulgated by the Secretariat for ensuring fair geographic and gender distribution. 2. Difficulties in attracting and retaining the best external recruits 133. As ad hoc as the recruitment system has been, the United Nations has managed to recruit some very qualified and dedicated individuals for field assignments throughout the 1990s. They have managed ballots in Cambodia, dodged bullets in Somalia, evacuated just in time from Liberia and came to accept artillery fire in former Yugoslavia as a feature of their daily life. Yet, the United Nations system has not yet found a contractual mechanism to appropriately recognize and reward their service by offering them some job security. While it is true that mission recruits are explicitly told not to harbour false expectations about future employment because external recruits are brought in to fill a “temporary” demand, such conditions of service do not attract and retain the best performers for long. In general, there is a need to rethink the historically prevailing view of peacekeeping as a temporary aberration rather than a core function of the United Nations. 134. Thus, at least a percentage of the best external recruits should be offered longer-term career prospects beyond the limited-duration contracts that they are currently offered, and some of them should be actively recruited for positions in the Secretariat’s complex emergency departments in order to increase the number of Headquarters staff with field experience. A limited number of mission recruits have managed to secure positions at Headquarters, but apparently on an ad hoc and individual basis rather than according to a concerted and transparent strategy. 135. Proposals are currently being formulated to address this situation by enabling mission recruits who have served for four years in the field to be offered “continuing appointments”, whenever possible; unlike current contracts, these would not be restricted to the duration of a specific mission mandate. Such initiatives, if adopted, would help to address the problem for those who joined the field in mid-decade and remain in the system. They might not, however, go far enough to attract new recruits, who would generally have to take up six-month to one-year assignments at a time, without necessarily knowing if there would be a position for them once the assignment had been completed. The thought of having to live in limbo for four years might be inhibiting for some of the best candidates, particularly for those with families, who have ample alternative employment opportunities (often with more competitive conditions of service). Consideration should therefore be given to offering continuing appointments to those external recruits who have served with particular distinction for at least two years in a peace operation. 3. Shortages in administrative and support functions at the mid-to senior-levels 136. Critical shortfalls in key administrative areas (procurement, finance, budget, personnel) and in logistics support areas (contracts managers, engineers, information systems analysts, logistics planners) plagued United Nations peace operations throughout the 1990s. The unique and specific nature of the Organization’s administrative rules, regulations and internal procedures preclude new recruits from taking on these administrative and logistics functions in the dynamic conditions of mission start-up, without a substantial amount of training. While ad hoc training programmes for such personnel were initiated in 1995, they have yet to be institutionalized because the most experienced individuals, the would-be trainers, could not be spared from their full-time line responsibilities. In general, training and the production of user-friendly guidance documents are the first projects to be set aside when new missions have to be staffed on an urgent basis. Accordingly, the updated version of the 1992 field administration handbook still remains in draft form. 4. Penalizing field deployment 137. Headquarters staff who are familiar with the rules, regulations and procedures do not readily deploy to the field. Staff in both administrative and substantive areas must volunteer for field duty and their managers must agree to release them. Heads of departments often discourage, dissuade and/or refuse to release their best performers for field assignments because of shortages of competent staff in their own offices, which they fear temporary replacements cannot resolve. Potential volunteers are further discouraged because they know colleagues who were passed over for promotion because they were “out of sight, out of mind.” Most field operations are “non-family assignments” given security considerations, another factor which reduces24 A/55/305 S/2000/809 the numbers of volunteers. A number of the fieldorieente United Nations agencies, funds and programmes (UNHCR, the World Food Programme (WFP), UNICEF, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UNDP) do have a number of potentially well qualified candidates for peacekeeping service, but also face resource constraints, and the staffing needs of their own field operations generally take first priority. 138. The Office of Human Resources Management, supported by a number of interdepartmental task forces, has proposed a series of progressive reforms that address some of these problems. They require mobility within the Secretariat, and aim to encourage rotation between Headquarters and the field by rewarding mission service during promotion considerations. They seek to reduce recruitment delays and grant full recruitment authority to heads of departments. The Panel feels it is essential that these initiatives be approved expeditiously. 5. Obsolescence in the Field Service category 139. The Field Service is the only category of staff within the United Nations designed specifically for service in peacekeeping operations (and whose conditions of service and contracts are designed accordingly and whose salaries and benefits are paid for entirely from mission budgets). It has lost much of its value, however, because the Organization has not dedicated enough resources to career development for the Field Service Officers. This category was developed in the 1950s to provide a highly mobile cadre of technical specialists to support in particular the military contingents of peacekeeping operations. As the nature of the operations changed, so too did the functions the Field Service Officers were asked to perform. Eventually, some ascended through the ranks by the late 1980s and early 1990s to assume managerial functions in the administrative and logistics components of peacekeeping operations. 140. The most experienced and seasoned of the group are now in limited supply, deployed in current missions, and many are at or near retirement. Many of those who remain lack the managerial skills or training required to effectively run the key administrative components of complex peace operations. Others’ technical knowledge is dated. Thus, the Field Service’s composition no longer matches all or many of the administrative and logistics support needs of the newer generation of peacekeeping operations. The Panel therefore encourages the urgent revision of the Field Service’s composition and raison d’être, to better match the present and future demands of field operations, with particular emphasis on mid-to seniorleeve managers in key administrative and logistics areas. Staff development and training for this category of personnel, on a continual basis, should also be treated as a high priority, and the conditions of service should be revised to attract and retain the best candidates. 6. Lack of a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations 141. There is no comprehensive staffing strategy to ensure the right mix of civilian personnel in any operation. There are talents within the United Nations system that must be tapped, gaps to be filled through external recruitment and a range of other options that fall in between, such as the use of United Nations Volunteers, subcontracted personnel, commercial services, and nationally-recruited staff. The United Nations has turned to all of these sources of personnel throughout the past decade, but on a case-by-case basis rather than according to a global strategy. Such a strategy is required to ensure cost-effectiveness and efficiency, as well as to promote mission cohesion and staff morale. 142. This staffing strategy should address the use of United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations, on a priority basis. Since 1992, more than 4,000 United Nations Volunteers have served in 19 different peacekeeping operations. Approximately 1,500 United Nations Volunteers have been assigned to new missions in East Timor, Kosovo and Sierra Leone in the last 18 months alone, in civil administration, electoral affairs, human rights, administrative and logistics support roles. United Nations Volunteers have historically proven to be dedicated and competent in their fields of work. The legislative bodies have encouraged greater use of United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations based on their exemplary past performance, but using United Nations Volunteers as a form of cheap labour risks corrupting the programme and can be damaging to mission morale. Many United Nations Volunteers work alongside colleagues who are making three or four times their salary for similar functions. DPKO is currently in discussion with the United Nations Volunteers Programme on the conclusion of a global memorandum of understanding for the use of25 A/55/305 S/2000/809 United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations. It is essential that such a memorandum be part of a broader comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations. 143. This strategy should also include, in particular, detailed proposals for the establishment of a Civilian Standby Arrangements System (CSAS). CSAS should contain a list of personnel within the United Nations system who have been pre-selected, medically cleared and committed by their parent offices to join a mission start-up team on 72 hours’ notice. The relevant members of the United Nations family should be delegated authority and responsibility, for occupational groups within their respective expertise, to initiate partnerships and memoranda of understanding with intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, for the provision of personnel to supplement mission start-up teams drawn from within the United Nations system. 144. The fact that responsibility for developing a global staffing strategy and civilian standby arrangements has rested solely within the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD), acting on its own initiative whenever there are a few moments to spare, is itself an indication that the Secretariat has not dedicated enough attention to this critical issue. The staffing of a mission, from the top down, is perhaps one of the most important building blocks for successful mission execution. This subject should therefore be accorded the highest priority by the Secretariat’s senior management. 145. Summary of key recommendations on civilian specialists: (a) The Secretariat should establish a central Internet/Intranet-based roster of pre-selected civilian candidates available to deploy to peace operations on short notice. The field missions should be granted access to and delegated authority to recruit candidates from it, in accordance with guidelines on fair geographic and gender distribution to be promulgated by the Secretariat; (b) The Field Service category of personnel should be reformed to mirror the recurrent demands faced by all peace operations, especially at the mid-to senior-levels in the administrative and logistics areas; (c) Conditions of service for externally recruited civilian staff should be revised to enable the United Nations to attract the most highly qualified candidates, and to then offer those who have served with distinction greater career prospects; (d) DPKO should formulate a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations, outlining, among other issues, the use of United Nations Volunteers, standby arrangements for the provision of civilian personnel on 72 hours’ notice to facilitate mission start-up, and the divisions of responsibility among the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security for implementing that strategy. F. Public information capacity 146. An effective public information and communications capacity in mission areas is an operational necessity for virtually all United Nations peace operations. Effective communication helps to dispel rumour, to counter disinformation and to secure the cooperation of local populations. It can provide leverage in dealing with leaders of rival groups, enhance security of United Nations personnel and serve as a force multiplier. It is thus essential that every peace operation formulate public information campaign strategies, particularly for key aspects of a mission’s mandate, and that such strategies and the personnel required to implement them be included in the very first elements deployed to help start up a new mission. 147. Field missions need competent spokespeople who are integrated into the senior management team and project its daily face to the world. To be effective, the spokesperson must have journalistic experience and instincts, and knowledge of how both the mission and United Nations Headquarters work. He or she must also enjoy the confidence of the SRSG and establish good relationship with other members of the mission leadership. The Secretariat must therefore increase its efforts to develop and retain a pool of such personnel. 148. United Nations field operations also need to be able to speak effectively to their own people, to keep staff informed of mission policy and developments and to build links between components and both up and down the chain of command. New information technology provides effective tools for such communications, and should be included in the start-up kits and equipment reserves at UNLB in Brindisi.26 A/55/305 S/2000/809 149. Resources devoted to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links, which now infrequently exceed one per cent of a mission’s operating budget, should be increased in accordance with a mission’s mandate, size and needs. 150. Summary of key recommendation on rapidly deployable capacity for public information: additional resources should be devoted in mission budgets to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links. G. Logistics support, the procurement process and expenditure management 151. The depletion of the United Nations reserve of equipment, long lead-times even for systems contracts, bottlenecks in the procurement process and delays in obtaining cash in hand to conduct procurement in the field further constrain the rapid deployment and effective functioning of missions that do actually manage to reach authorized staffing levels. Without effective logistics support, missions cannot function effectively. 152. The lead-times required for the United Nations to provide field missions with basic equipment and commercial services required for mission start-up and full deployment are dictated by the United Nations procurement process. That process is governed by the Financial Regulations and Rules promulgated by the General Assembly and the Secretariat’s interpretations of those regulations and rules (known as “policies and procedures” in United Nations parlance). The regulations, rules, policies and procedures have been translated into a roughly eight-step process that Headquarters must follow to provide field missions with the equipment and services it requires, as follows: 1. Identify the requirements and raise a requisition. 2. Certify that finances are available to procure the item. 3. Initiate an invitation to bid (ITB) or request for proposal (RFP). 4. Evaluate tenders. 5. Present cases to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts (HCC). 6. Award a contract and place an order for production. 7. Await production of the item. 8. Deliver the item to the mission. 153. Most governmental organizations and commercial companies follow similar processes, though not all of them take as long as that of the United Nations. For example, this entire process in the United Nations can take 20 weeks in the case of office furniture, 17 to 21 weeks for generators, 23 to 27 weeks for prefabricated buildings, 27 weeks for heavy vehicles and 17 to 21 weeks for communications equipment. Naturally, none of these lead-times enable full mission deployment within the timelines suggested if the majority of the processes are commencing only after an operation has been established. 154. The United Nations launched the “start-up kit” concept during the boom in peacekeeping operations in the mid-1990s to partially address this problem. The start-up kits contain the basic equipment required to establish and sustain a 100-person mission headquarters for the first 100 days of deployment, prepurchhased packaged and waiting and ready to deploy at a moment’s notice at Brindisi. Assessed contributions from the mission to which the kits are deployed are then used to reconstitute new start-up kits, and once liquidated a mission’s non-disposable and durable equipment is returned to Brindisi and held in reserve, in addition to the start-up kits. 155. However, the wear and tear on light vehicles and other items in post-war environments may sometimes render the shipping and servicing costs more expensive than selling off the item or cannibalizing it for parts and then purchasing a new item altogether. Thus, the United Nations has moved towards auctioning such items in situ more frequently, although the Secretariat is not authorized to use the funds acquired through this process to purchase new equipment but must return it to Member States. Consideration should be given to enabling the Secretariat to use the funds acquired through these means to purchase new equipment to be held in reserve at Brindisi. Furthermore, consideration should also be given to a general authorization for field missions to donate, in consultation with the United Nations resident coordinator, at least a percentage of27 A/55/305 S/2000/809 such equipment to reputable local non-governmental organizations as a means of assisting the development of nascent civil society. 156. Nonetheless, the existence of these start-up kits and reserves of equipment appears to have greatly facilitated the rapid deployment of the smaller operations mounted in the mid-to-late 1990s. However, the establishment and expansion of new missions has now outpaced the closure of existing operations, so that UNLB has been virtually depleted of the long lead-time items required for full mission deployment. Unless one of the large operations currently in place closes down today and its equipment is all shipped to UNLB in good condition, the United Nations will not have in hand the equipment required to support the start-up and rapid full deployment of a large mission in the near future. 157. There are, of course, limits to how much equipment the United Nations can and should keep in reserve at UNLB or elsewhere. Mechanical equipment in storage needs to be maintained, which can be an expensive proposition, and if not addressed properly can result in missions receiving long awaited items that are inoperable. Furthermore, the commercial and public sectors at the national level have moved increasingly towards “just-in-time” inventory and/or “just-in-time delivery” because of the high opportunity costs of keeping funds tied up in equipment that may not be deployed for some time. Furthermore, the current pace of technological advancements renders certain items, such as communications equipment and information systems hardware, obsolete within a matter of months, let alone years. 158. The United Nations has accordingly also moved in that direction over the past few years, and has concluded some 20 standing commercial systems contracts for the provision of common equipment for peace operations, particularly those required for mission start-up and expansion. Under the systems contracts, the United Nations has been able to cut down lead-times considerably by selecting the vendors ahead of time, and keeping them on standby for production requests. Nevertheless, the production of light vehicles under the current systems contract takes 14 weeks and requires an additional four weeks for delivery. 159. The General Assembly has taken a number of steps to address this lead-time issue. The establishment of the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, which when fully capitalized amounts to $150 million, provided a standing pool of money from which to draw quickly. The Secretary-General can seek the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) to draw up to $50 million from the Fund to facilitate the start-up of a new mission or for unforeseen expansion of an existing one. The Fund is then replenished from the mission budgets once it has been approved or increased. For commitment requests in excess of $50 million, the General Assembly’s approval is required. 160. In exceptional cases, the General Assembly, on the advice of ACABQ, has granted the Secretary-General authority to commit up to $200 million in spending to facilitate the start-up of larger missions (UNTAET, UNMIK and MONUC), pending submission of the necessary detailed budget proposals, which can take months of preparation. These are all welcome developments and are indicative of the Member States’ support for enhancing the Organization’s rapid deployment capacities. 161. At the same time, all of these developments are only applicable after a Security Council resolution has been adopted authorizing the establishment of a mission or its advance elements. Unless some of these measures are applied well in advance of the desired date of mission deployment or are modified to help and maintain a minimum reserve of equipment requiring long lead-times to procure, the suggested targets for rapid and effective deployment cannot be met. 162. The Secretariat should thus formulate a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the deployment timelines proposed. That strategy should be formulated based on a cost-benefit analysis of the appropriate level of long lead-time items that should be kept in reserve and those best acquired through standing contracts, factoring in the cost of compressed delivery times, as required, to support such a strategy. The substantive elements of the peace and security departments would need to give logistics planners an estimate of the number and types of operations that might need to be established over 12 to 18 months. The Secretary-General should submit periodically to the General Assembly, for its review and approval, a detailed proposal for implementing that strategy, which could entail considerable financial implications.28 A/55/305 S/2000/809 163. In the interim, the General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure for the creation of three new start-up kits at Brindisi (for a total of five), which would then automatically be replenished from the budgets of the missions that drew upon the kits. 164. The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to $50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution authorizing a mission’s establishment but with the approval of ACABQ, to facilitate the rapid and effective deployment of operations within the proposed timelines. The Fund should be automatically replenished from assessed contributions to the missions that used it. The Secretary-General should request that the General Assembly consider augmenting the size of the Fund, should he determine that it had been depleted due to the establishment of a number of missions in rapid succession. 165. Well beyond mission start-up, the field missions often wait for months to receive items that they need, particularly when initial planning assumptions prove to be inaccurate or mission requirements change in response to new developments. Even if such items are available locally, there are several constraints on local procurement. First, field missions have limited flexibility and authority, for example, to quickly transfer savings from one line item in a budget to another to meet unforeseen demands. Second, missions are generally delegated procurement authority for no more than $200,000 per purchase order. Purchases above that amount must be referred to Headquarters and its eight-step decision process (see para. 152 above). 166. The Panel supports measures that reduce Headquarters micro-management of the field missions and provide them with the authority and flexibility required to maintain mission credibility and effectiveness, while at the same time holding them accountable. Where Headquarters’ involvement adds real value, however, as with respect to standing contracts, Headquarters should retain procurement responsibility. 167. Statistics from the Procurement Division indicate that of the 184 purchase orders raised by Headquarters in 1999 in support of peacekeeping operations, for values of goods and services between US$ 200,000 and US$ 500,000, 93 per cent related to aircraft and shipping services, motor vehicles and computers, which were either handled through international tenders or are currently covered under systems contracts. Provided that systems contracts are activated quickly and result in the timely provision of goods and services, it appears that the Headquarters’ involvement in those instances makes good sense. The systems contracts and international tenders presumably enable bulk purchases of items and services more cheaply than would be possible locally, and in many instances involve goods and services not available in the mission areas at all. 168. However, it is not entirely clear what real value Headquarters involvement adds to the procurement process for those goods and services that are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts and are more readily available locally at cheaper prices. In such instances, it would make sense to delegate the authority to the field to procure those items, and to monitor the process and its financial controls through the audit mechanism. Accordingly, the Secretariat should assign priority to building capacity in the field to assume a higher level of procurement authority as quickly as possible (e.g., through recruitment and training of the appropriate field personnel and the production of user-friendly guidance documents) for all goods and services that are available locally and not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts (up to US$ 1 million, depending on mission size and needs). 169. Summary of key recommendations on logistics support and expenditure management: (a) The Secretariat should prepare a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the timelines proposed and corresponding to planning assumptions established by the substantive offices of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations; (b) The General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure to maintain at least five mission start-up kits in Brindisi, which should include rapidly deployable communications equipment. The start-up kits should then be routinely replenished with funding from the assessed contributions to the operations that drew on them;29 A/55/305 S/2000/809 (c) The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to US$ 50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund once it became clear that an operation was likely to be established, with the approval of ACABQ but prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution; (d) The Secretariat should undertake a review of the entire procurement policies and procedures (with proposals to the General Assembly for amendments to the Financial Rules and Regulations, as required), to facilitate in particular the rapid and full deployment of an operation within the proposed timelines; (e) The Secretariat should conduct a review of the policies and procedures governing the management of financial resources in the field missions with a view to providing field missions with much greater flexibility in the management of their budgets; (f) The Secretariat should increase the level of procurement authority delegated to the field missions (from $200,000 to as high as $1 million, depending on mission size and needs) for all goods and services that are available locally and are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts. IV. Headquarters resources and structure for planning and supporting peacekeeping operations 170. Creating effective Headquarters support capacity for peace operations means addressing the three issues of quantity, structure and quality, that is, the number of staff needed to get the job done; the organizational structures and procedures that facilitate effective support; and quality people and methods of work within those structures. In the present section, the Panel examines and makes recommendations on primarily the first two issues; in section VI below, it addresses the issue of personnel quality and organizational culture. 171. The Panel sees a clear need for increased resources in support of peacekeeping operations. There is particular need for increased resources in DPKO, the primary department responsible for the planning and support of the United Nations’ most complex and highproofil field operations. A. Staffing-levels and funding for Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations 172. Expenditures for Headquarters staffing and related costs to plan and support all peacekeeping operations in the field can be considered the United Nations direct, non-field support costs for peacekeeping operations. They have not exceeded 6 per cent of the total cost of peacekeeping operations in the last half decade (see table 4.1). They are currently closer to three per cent and will fall below two per cent in the current peacekeeping budget year, based on existing plans for expansion of some missions, such as MONUC in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the full deployment of others, such as UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone, and the establishment of a new operation in Eritrea and Ethiopia. A management analyst familiar with the operational requirements of large organizations, public or private, that operate substantial field-deployed elements might well conclude that an organization trying to run a field-oriented enterprise on two per cent central support costs was undersupporting its field people and very likely burning out its support structures in the process. 173. Table 4.1 lists the total budgets for peacekeeping operations from mid-1996 through mid-2001 (peacekeeping budget cycles run from July to June, offset six months from the United Nations regular budget cycle). It also lists total Headquarters costs in support of peacekeeping, whether inside or outside of DPKO, and whether funded from the regular budget or the Support Account for Peacekeeping Operations (the regular budget covers two years and its costs are apportioned among Member States according to the regular scale of assessment; the Support Account covers one year — the intent being that Secretariat staffing levels should ebb and flow with the level of field operations — and its costs are apportioned according to the peacekeeping scale of assessment).30 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Table 4.1 Ratio of total Headquarters support costs to total peacekeeping operations budgets, 1996-2001 (Millions of United States dollars) July 1996-June 1997 July 1997-June 1998 July 1998-June 1999 July 1999-June 2000 July 2000-June 2001a Peacekeeping budgets 1 260 911.7 812.9 1 417 2 582b Related Headquarters support costsc 49.2 52.8 41.0 41.7 50.2 Headquarters: field cost ratio 3.90% 5.79% 5.05% 2.95% 1.94% a Based on financing reports of the Secretary-General; excluding missions completed by 30 June 2000; including rough estimate for full deployment of MONUC, for which a budget has not yet been prepared. b Estimated. c Figures obtained from the Financial Controller of the United Nations, including all posts in the Secretariat (primarily in DPKO) funded through the regular biennium budget and the Support Account; figures also factor in what the costs would have been for in-kind contributions or “gratis personnel” had they been fully funded. 174. The Support Account funds 85 per cent of the DPKO budget, or about $40 million annually. Another $6 million for DPKO comes from the regular biennium budget. This $46 million combined largely funds the salaries and associated costs of DPKO’s 231 civilian, military and police Professionals and 173 General Service staff (but does not include the Mine Action Service, which is funded through voluntary contributions). The Support Account also funds posts in other parts of the Secretariat engaged in peacekeeping support, such as the Peacekeeping Financing Division and parts of the Procurement Division in the Department of Management, the Office of Legal Affairs and DPI. 175. Until mid-decade, the Support Account was calculated as 8.5 per cent of the total civilian staff costs of peacekeeping operations, but it did not take into consideration the costs of supporting civilian police personnel and United Nations Volunteers, or the costs of supporting private contractors or military troops. The fixed-percentage approach was replaced by the annual justification of every post funded by the Support Account. DPKO staffing levels grew little under the new system, however, partly because the Secretariat seems to have tailored its submissions to what it thought the political market would bear. 176. Clearly, DPKO and the other Secretariat offices supporting peacekeeping should expand and contract to some degree in relation to the level of activity in the field, but to require DPKO to rejustify, every year, seven out of eight posts in the Department is to treat it as though it were a temporary creation and peacekeeping a temporary responsibility of the Organization. Fifty-two years of operations would argue otherwise and recent history would argue further that continuing preparedness is essential, even during downturns in field activity, because events are only marginally predictable and staff capacity and experience, once lost, can take a long time to rebuild, as DPKO has painfully learned in the past two years. 177. Because the Support Account funds virtually all of DPKO on a year-by-year basis, that Department and the other offices funded by the Support Account have no predictable baseline level of funding and posts against which they can recruit and retain staff. Personnel brought in from the field on Support Account-funded posts do not know if those posts will exist for them one year later. Given current working conditions and the career uncertainty that Support Account funding entails, it is impressive that DPKO has managed to hold together at all. 178. Member States and the Secretariat have long recognized the need to define a baseline staffing/funding level and a separate mechanism to enable growth and retrenchment in DPKO in response to changing needs. However, without a review of DPKO staffing needs based on some objective management and productivity criteria, an appropriate baseline is difficult to define. While it is not in a position to conduct such a methodical management review of DPKO, the Panel believes that such a review should be conducted. In the meantime, the Panel believes that certain current staff shortages are plainly obvious and merit highlighting. 179. The Military and Civilian Police Division in DPKO, headed by the United Nations Military Adviser, has an authorized strength of 32 military officers and nine civilian police officers. The Civilian Police Unit has been assigned to support all aspects of United Nations international police operations, from doctrinal development through selection and deployment of31 A/55/305 S/2000/809 officers into field operations. It can, at present, do little more than identify personnel, attempt to pre-screen them with visiting selection assistance teams (an effort that occupies roughly half of the staff) and then see that they get to the field. Moreover, there is no unit within DPKO (or any other part of the United Nations system) that is responsible for planning and supporting the rule of law elements of an operation that in turn support effective police work, whether advisory or executive. 180. Eleven officers in the Military Adviser’s office support the identification and rotation of military units for all peacekeeping operations, and provide military advice to the political officers in DPKO. DPKO’s military officers are also supposed to find time to “train the trainers” at the Member State level, to draft guidelines, manuals and other briefing material, and to work with FALD to identify the logistics and other operational requirements of the military and police components of field missions. However, under existing staffing levels, the Training Unit consists of only five military officers in total. Ten officers in the Military Planning Service are the principal operational-level military mission planners within DPKO; six more posts have been authorized but have not yet all been filled. These 16 planning officers combined represent the full complement of military staff available to determine force requirements for mission start-up and expansion, participate in technical surveys and assess the preparedness of potential troop contributors. Of the 10 military planners originally authorized, one was assigned to draft the rules of engagement and directives to force commanders for all operations. Only one officer is available, part time, to manage the UNSAS database. 181. Table 4.2 contrasts the deployed strength of military and police contingents with the authorized strength of their respective Headquarters support staffs. No national Government would send 27,000 troops into the field with just 32 officers back home to provide them with substantive and operational military guidance. No police organization would deploy 8,000 police officers with only nine headquarters staff to provide them with substantive and operational policing support. Table 4.2 Ratio of military and civilian police staff at Headquarters to military and civilian police personnel in the fielda Military personnel Civilian police Peacekeeping operations 27 365 8 641 Headquarters 32 9 Headquarters: field ratio 0.1% 0.1% a Authorized military strength as of 15 June 2000 and civilian police as of 1 August 2000. 182. The Office of Operations in DPKO, in which the political Desk Officers or substantive focal points for particular peacekeeping operations reside, is another area that seems considerably understaffed. It currently has 15 Professionals serving as the focal points for 14 current and two potential new peace operations, or less than one officer per mission on average. While one officer may be able to handle the needs of one or even two smaller missions, this seems untenable in the case of the larger missions, such as UNTAET in East Timor, UNMIK in Kosovo, UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone and MONUC in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Similar circumstances apply to the logistics and personnel officers in DPKO’s Field Administration and Logistics Division, and to related support personnel in the Department of Management, the Office of Legal Affairs, the Department of Public Information and other offices which support their work. Table 4.3 depicts the total number of staff in DPKO and elsewhere in the Secretariat dedicated, full-time, to supporting the larger missions, along with their annual mission budgets and authorized staffing levels. 183. The general shortage of staff means that in many instances key personnel have no back-up, no way to cover more than one shift in a day when a crisis occurs six to 12 time zones away except by covering two shifts themselves, and no way to take a vacation, get sick or visit the mission without leaving their32 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Table 4.3 Total staff assigned on a full-time basis to support complex peacekeeping operations established in 1999 UNMIK (Kosovo) UNAMSIL (Sierra Leone) UNTAET (East Timor) MONUC (Democratic Republic of the Congo) Budget (estimated) July 2000-June 2001 $410 million $465 million $540 million $535 million Current authorized strength of key components 4 718 police 1 000-plus international civilians 13 000 military 8 950 military 1 640 police 1 185 international civilians 5 537 military 500 military observers Professional staff at Headquarters assigned full-time to support the operation Total Headquarters support staff 1 political officer 2 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 6 1 political officer 2 military 1 logistics coord. 1 finance specialist _______ 5 1 political officer 2 military 1 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 7 1 political officer 3 military 1 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 8 backstopping duties largely uncovered. In the current arrangements, compromises among competing demands are inevitable and support for the field may suffer as a result. In New York, Headquarters-related tasks, such as reporting obligations to the legislative bodies, tend to get priority because Member States’ representatives press for action, often in person. The field, by contrast, is represented in New York by an emaail a cable or the jotted notes of a phone conversation. Thus, in the war for a desk officer’s time, field operations often lose out and are left to solve problems on their own. Yet they should be accorded first priority. People in the field face difficult circumstances, sometimes life-threatening. They deserve better, as do the staff at Headquarters who wish to support them more effectively. 184. Although there appears to be some duplication in the functions performed by desk officers in DPKO and their counterparts in the regional divisions of DPA, closer examination suggests otherwise. The UNMIK desk officer’s counterpart in DPA, for example, follows developments in all of Southeastern Europe and the counterpart in OCHA covers all of the Balkans plus parts of the Commonwealth of Independent States. While it is essential that the officers in DPA and OCHA be given the opportunity to contribute what they can, their efforts combined yield less than one additional full-time-equivalent officer to support UNMIK. 185. The three Regional Directors in the Office of Operations should be visiting the missions regularly and engaging in a constant policy dialogue with the SRSGs and heads of components on the obstacles that Headquarters could help them overcome. Instead, they are drawn into the processes that occupy their desk officers’ time because the latter need the back-up. 186. These competing demands are even more pronounced for the Under-Secretary-General and Assistant Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations. The Under-Secretary-General and Assistant Secretary-General provide advice to the Secretary-General, liaise with Member State delegations and capitals, and one or the other vets every report on peacekeeping operations (40 in the first half of 2000) submitted to the Secretary-General for his approval and signature, prior to submission to the legislative bodies. Since January 2000, the two have briefed the Council in person over 50 times, in sessions lasting up to three hours and requiring several hours of staff preparation in the field and at Headquarters. Coordination meetings take further time away from substantive dialogue with the field missions, from field visits, from reflection on ways to improve the United Nations conduct of peacekeeping and from attentive management.33 A/55/305 S/2000/809 187. The staff shortages faced by the substantive side of DPKO may be exceeded by those in the administrative and logistics support areas, particularly in FALD. At this juncture, FALD provides support not only to peacekeeping operations but also to other field offices, such as the Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator in the Occupied Territories (UNSCO) in Gaza, the United Nations Verification Mission in Guatemala (MINUGUA) and a dozen other small offices, not to mention continuing involvement in managing and reconciling the liquidation of terminated missions. All of FALD adds approximately 1.25 per cent to the total cost of peacekeeping and other field operations. If the United Nations were to subcontract the administrative and logistics support functions performed by FALD, the Panel is convinced that it would be hard pressed to find a commercial company to take on the equivalent task for the equivalent fee. 188. A few examples will illustrate FALD’s pronounced staff shortages: the Staffing Section in FALD’s Personnel Management and Support Service (PMSS), which handles recruitment and travel for all civilian personnel as well as travel for civilian police and military observers, has just 10 professional recruitment officers, four of whom have been assigned to review and acknowledge the 150 unsolicited employment applications that the office now receives every day. The other six officers handle the actual selection process: one full-time and one half-time for Kosovo, one full-time and one half-time for East Timor, and three to cover all other field missions combined. Three recruitment officers are trying to identify suitable candidates to staff two civil administration missions that need hundreds of experienced administrators across a multitude of fields and disciplines. Nine to 12 months after they got under way, neither UNMIK nor UNTAET is fully deployed. 189. The Member States must give the Secretary-General some flexibility and the financial resources to bring in the staff he needs to ensure that the credibility of the Organization is not tarnished by its failure to respond to emergencies as a professional organization should. The Secretary-General must be given the resources to increase the capacity of the Secretariat to react immediately to unforeseen demands. 190. The responsibility for providing the people in the field the goods and services they need to do their jobs falls primarily on FALD’s Logistics and Communications Service (LCS). The job description of one of the 14 logistics coordinators in LCS might help to illustrate the workload that the entire Service currently endures. This individual is the lead logistics planner for the expansion of both the mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) and for the expansion of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) in Lebanon. The same individual is also responsible for drafting the logistics policies and procedures for the critical United Nations Logistics Base in Brindisi and for coordinating the preparation of the entire Service’s annual budget submissions. 191. Based on this cursory review alone and bearing in mind that the total support cost for DPKO and related Headquarters peacekeeping support offices does not even exceed $50 million per annum, the Panel is convinced that additional resources for that Department and the others which support it would be an essential investment to ensure that the over $2 billion the Member States will spend on peacekeeping operations in 2001 will be well spent. The Panel therefore recommends a substantial increase in resources for this purpose, and urge the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining the Organization’s requirements in full. 192. The Panel also believes that peacekeeping should cease to be treated as a temporary requirement and DPKO a temporary organizational structure. It requires a consistent and predictable baseline of funding to do more than keep existing missions afloat. It should have resources to plan for potential contingencies six months to a year down the road; to develop managerial tools to help missions perform better in the future; to study the potential impact of modern technology on different aspects of peacekeeping; to implement the lessons learned from previous operations; and to implement recommendations contained in the evaluation reports of the Office of Internal Oversight Services over the past five years. Staff should be given the opportunity to design and conduct training programmes for newly recruited staff at Headquarters and in the field. They should finish the guidelines and handbooks that could help new mission personnel do their jobs more professionally and in accordance with United Nations rules, regulations and procedures, but that now sit half finished in a dozen offices all around DPKO, because their authors are busy meeting other needs. 193. The Panel therefore recommends that Headquarters support for peacekeeping be treated as a34 A/55/305 S/2000/809 core activity of the United Nations, and as such that the majority of its resource requirements be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennial programme budget of the Organization. Pending the preparation of the next regular budget, it recommends that the Secretary-General approach the General Assembly as soon as possible with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the last Support Account submission. 194. The specific allocation of resources should be determined according to a professional and objective review of requirements, but gross levels should reflect historical experience of peacekeeping. One approach would be to calculate the regular budget baseline for Headquarters support of peacekeeping as a percentage of the average cost of peacekeeping over the preceding five years. The resulting baseline budget would reflect the expected level of activity for which the Secretariat should be prepared. Based on the figures provided by the Controller (see table 4.1), the average for the last five years (including the current budget year) is $1.4 billion. Pegging the baseline at five per cent of the average cost would yield, for example, a baseline budget of $70 million, roughly $20 million more than the current annual Headquarters support budget for peacekeeping. 195. To fund above-average or “surge” activity levels, consideration should be given to a simple percentage charge against missions whose budgets carry peacekeeping operations spending above the baseline level. For example, the roughly $2.6 billion in peacekeeping activity estimated for the current budget year exceeds the $1.4 billion hypothetical baseline by $1.2 billion. A one per cent surcharge on that $1.2 billion would yield an additional $12 million to enable Headquarters to deal effectively with that increase. A two per cent surcharge would yield $24 million. 196. Such a direct method of providing for surge capacity should replace the current, annual, post-bypoos justification required for the Support Account submissions. The Secretary-General should be given the flexibility to determine how such funds should best be utilized to meet a surge in activity, and emergency recruitment measures should apply in such instances so that temporary posts associated with surge requirements could be filled immediately. 197. Summary of key recommendations on funding headquarters support for peacekeeping operations: (a) The Panel recommends a substantial increase in resources for Headquarters support of peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining his requirements in full; (b) Headquarters support for peacekeeping should be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements for that purpose should be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennium programme budget of the Organization; (c) Pending the preparation of the next regular budget submission, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General approach the General Assembly with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the Support Account to allow immediate recruitment of additional personnel, particularly in DPKO. B. Need and proposal for the establishment of Integrated Mission Task Forces 198. There is currently no integrated planning or support cell in DPKO in which those responsible for political analysis, military operations, civilian police, electoral assistance, human rights, development, humanitarian assistance, refugees and displaced persons, public information, logistics, finance and personnel recruitment, among others, are represented. On the contrary, as described above, DPKO has no more than a handful of officers dedicated full-time to planning and supporting even the large complex operations, such as those in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL), Kosovo (UNMIK) and East Timor (UNTAET). In the case of a political peace mission or peace-building office, these functions are discharged within DPA, with equally limited human resources. 199. DPKO’s Office of Operations is responsible for pulling together an overall concept of operations for new peacekeeping missions. In this regard, it bears a heavy dual burden for political analysis and for internal coordination with the other elements of DPKO that are responsible for military and civilian police matters, logistics, finance and personnel. But each of these other elements has a separate organizational reporting chain, and many of them, in fact, are physically scattered across several different buildings. Moreover,35 A/55/305 S/2000/809 DPA, UNDP, OCHA, UNHCR, OHCHR, DPI, and several other departments, agencies, funds and programmes have an increasingly important role to play in planning for any future operation, especially complex operations, and need to be formally included in the planning process. 200. Collaboration across divisions, departments and agencies does occur, but relies too heavily on personal networks and ad hoc support. There are task forces convened for planning major peacekeeping operations, pulling together various parts of the system, but they function more as sounding boards than executive bodies. Moreover, current task forces tend to meet infrequently or even disperse once an operation has begun to deploy, and well before it has fully deployed. 201. Reversing the perspective, once an operation has been deployed, SRSGs in the field have overall coordinating authority for United Nations activities in their mission area but have no single working-level focal point at Headquarters that can address all of their concerns quickly. For example, the desk officer or his/her regional director in DPKO fields political questions for peacekeeping operations but usually cannot directly respond to queries about military, police, humanitarian, human rights, electoral, legal or other elements of an operation, and they do not necessarily have a ready counterpart in each of those areas. A mission impatient for answers will eventually find the right primary contacts themselves and may do so in dozens of instances, building its own networks with different parts of the Secretariat and relevant agencies. 202. The missions should not feel the need to build their own contact networks. They should know exactly who to turn to for the answers and support that they need, especially in the critical early months when a mission is working towards full deployment and coping with daily crises. Moreover, they should be able to contact just one place for those answers, an entity that includes all of the backstopping people and expertise for the mission, drawn from an array of Headquarters elements that mirrors the functions of the mission itself. The Panel would call that entity an Integrated Mission Task Force (IMTF). 203. This concept builds upon but considerably extends the cooperative measures contained in the guidelines for implementing the “lead” department concept that DPKO and DPA agreed to in June 2000, in a joint departmental meeting chaired by the Secretary-General. The Panel would recommend, for example, that DPKO and DPA jointly determine the leader of each new Task Force but not necessarily limit their choice to the current staff of either Department. There may be occasions when the existing workloads of the regional directors or political officers in either department preclude them from taking on the role fulltiime In those instances, it might be best to bring in someone from the field for this purpose. Such flexibility, including the flexibility to assign the task to the most qualified person for the job, would require the approval of funding mechanisms to respond to surge demands, as recommended above. 204. ECPS or a designated subgroup thereof should collectively determine the general composition of an IMTF, which the Panel envisages forming quite early in a process of conflict prevention, peacemaking, prospective peacekeeping or prospective deployment of a peace-building support office. That is, the notion of integrated, one-stop support for United Nations peaceanndsecurity field activities should extend across the whole range of peace operations, with the size, substantive composition, meeting venue and leadership matching the needs of the operation. 205. Leadership and the lead department concept have posed some problems in the past when the principal focus of United Nations presence on the ground has changed from political to peacekeeping or vice versa, causing not only a shift in the field’s primary Headquarters contact but a shift in the whole Headquarters supporting cast. As the Panel sees the IMTF working, the supporting cast would remain substantially the same during and after such transitions, with additions or subtractions as the nature of the operation changed but with no changes in core Task Force personnel for those functions that bridge the transition. IMTF leadership would pass from one member of the group to another (e.g., from a DPKO regional director or political officer to his or her DPA counterpart). 206. Size and composition would match the nature and the phase of the field activity being supported. Crisisrellate preventive action would require well informed political support that would keep a United Nations envoy apprised of political evolution within the region and other factors key to the success of his or her effort. Peacemakers working to end a conflict would need to know more about peacekeeping and peace-building36 A/55/305 S/2000/809 options, so that their potential and their limitations are both reflected in any peace accord that would involve United Nations implementation. Adviser-observers from the Secretariat working with the peacemaker would be affiliated with the IMTF that supports the negotiations, and keep it posted on progress. The IMTF leader could, in turn, serve as the peacemaker’s routine contact point at Headquarters, with rapid access to higher echelons of the Secretariat for answers to sensitive political queries. 207. An IMTF of the sort just described could be a “virtual” body, meeting periodically but not physically co-located, its members operating from their workday offices and tied together by modern information technology. To support their work, each should feed as well as have access to the data and analyses created and placed on the United Nations Intranet by EISAS, the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat proposed in paragraphs 65 to 75 above. 208. IMTFs created to plan potential peace operations could also begin as virtual bodies. As an operation seemed more likely to go forward, the Task Force should assume physical form, with all of its members co-located in one space, prepared to work together as a team on a continuing basis for as long as needed to bring a new mission to full deployment. That period may be up to six months, assuming that the rapid deployment reforms recommended in paragraphs 84-169 above have been implemented. 209. Task Force members should be formally seconded to IMTF for such duration by their home division, department, agency, fund or programme. That is, an IMTF should be much more than a coordinating committee or task force of the type now set up at Headquarters. It should be a temporary but coherent staff created for a specific purpose, able to be increased or decreased in size or composition in response to mission needs. 210. Each Task Force member should be authorized to serve not only as a liaison between the Task Force and his or her home base but as its key working-level decision maker for the mission in question. The leader of the IMTF — reporting to the Assistant Secretary-General for Operations of DPKO in the case of peacekeeping operations, and the relevant Assistant Secretary-General of DPA in the case of peacemaking efforts, peace-building support offices and special political missions — should in turn have line authority over his or her Task Force members for the period of their secondment, and should serve as the first level of contact for the peace operations for all aspects of their work. Matters related to long-term policy and strategy should be dealt with at the Assistant Secretary-General/Under-Secretary-General level in ECPS, supported by EISAS. 211. For the United Nations system to be prepared to contribute staff to an IMTF, responsibility centres for each major substantive component of peace operations need to be established. Departments and agencies need to agree in advance on procedures for secondment and on their support for the IMTF concept, in writing if necessary. 212. The Panel is not in a position to suggest “lead” offices for each potential component of a peace operation but believes that ECPS should think through this issue collectively and assign one of its members responsibility for maintaining a level of preparedness for each potential component of a peace operation other than the military, police and judicial, and logistics/administration areas, which should remain DPKO’s responsibility. The designated lead agency should be responsible for devising generic concepts of operations, job descriptions, staffing and equipment requirements, critical path/deployment timetables, standard databases, civilian standby arrangements and rosters of other potential candidates for that component, as well as for participation in the IMTFs. 213. IMTFs offer a flexible approach to dealing with time-critical, resource-intensive but ultimately temporary requirements to support mission planning, start-up and initial sustainment. The concept borrows heavily from the notion of “matrix management”, used extensively by large organizations that need to be able to assign the necessary talent to specific projects without reorganizing themselves every time a project arises. Used by such diverse entities as the RAND Corporation and the World Bank, it gives each staff member a permanent “home” or “parent” department but allows — indeed, expects — staff to function in support of projects as the need arises. A matrix management approach to Headquarters planning and support of peace operations would allow departments, agencies, funds and programmes — internally organized as suits their overall needs — to contribute staff to coherent, interdepartmental/inter-agency task forces built to provide that support.37 A/55/305 S/2000/809 214. The IMTF structure could have significant implications for how DPKO’s Office of Operations is currently structured, and in effect would supplant the Regional Divisions structure. For example, the larger operations, such as those in Sierra Leone, East Timor and Kosovo, each would warrant separate IMTFs, headed by Director-level officers. Other missions, such as the long-established “traditional” peacekeeping operations in Asia and the Middle East, might be grouped into another IMTF. The number of IMTFs that could be formed would largely depend on the amount of additional resources allocated to DPKO, DPA and related departments, agencies, funds and programmes. As the number of IMTFs increased, the organizational structure of the Office of Operations would become flatter. There could be similar implications for the Assistant Secretaries-General of DPA, to whom the heads of the IMTFs would report during the peacemaking phase or when setting up a large peacebuilldin support operation either as a follow-on presence to a peacekeeping operation or as a separate initiative. 215. While the regional directors of DPKO (and DPA in those cases where they were appointed as IMTF heads) would be in charge of overseeing fewer missions than at present, they would actually be managing a larger number of staff, such as those seconded full-time from the Military and Civilian Police Advisers’ Offices, FALD (or its successor divisions) and other departments, agencies, funds and programmes, as required. The size of the IMTFs will also depend on the amount of additional resources provided, without which participating entities would not be in a position to second their staff on a full-time basis. 216. It should also be noted that in order for the IMTF concept to work effectively, its members must be physically co-located during the planning and initial deployment phases. This will not be possible at present without major adjustments to current office space allocations in the Secretariat. 217. Summary of key recommendation on integrated mission planning and support: Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs), with members seconded from throughout the United Nations system, as necessary, should be the standard vehicle for mission-specific planning and support. IMTFs should serve as the first point of contact for all such support, and IMTF leaders should have temporary line authority over seconded personnel, in accordance with agreements between DPKO, DPA and other contributing departments, programmes, funds and agencies. C. Other structural adjustments required in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations 218. The IMTF concept would strengthen the capacity of DPKO’s Office of Operations to function as a real focal point for all aspects of a peacekeeping operation. However, structural adjustments are also required in other elements of DPKO, in particular to the Military and Civilian Police Division, FALD and the Lessons Learned Unit. 1. Military and Civilian Police Division 219. All civilian police officials interviewed at Headquarters and in the field expressed frustration with having police functions in DPKO included in a military reporting chain. The Panel agrees that there seems to be little administrative or substantive value added in this arrangement. 220. Military and civilian police officers in DPKO serve for three years because the United Nations requires that they be on active duty. If they wish to remain longer and would even leave their national military or police services to do so, United Nations personnel policy precludes their being hired into their previous position. Hence the turnover rate in the military and police offices of DPKO is high. Since lessons learned in Headquarters practice are not routinely captured, since comprehensive training programmes for new arrivals are non-existent and since user-friendly manuals and standard operating procedures remain half-complete, high turnover means routine loss of institutional memory that takes months of on-the-job learning to replace. Current staff shortages also mean that military and civilian police officers find themselves assigned to functions that do not necessarily match their expertise. Those who have specialized in operations (J3) or plans (J5) might find themselves engaged in quasi-diplomatic work or functioning as personnel and administration officers (J1), managing the continual turnover of people and units in the field, to the detriment of their ability to monitor operational activity in the field.38 A/55/305 S/2000/809 221. DPKO’s lack of continuity in these areas may also explain why, after over 50 years of deploying military observers to monitor ceasefire violations, DPKO still does not have a standard database that could be provided to military observers in the field to document ceasefire violations and generate statistics. At present, if one wanted to know how many violations had occurred over a six-month period in a particular country where an operation is deployed, someone would have to physically count each one in the paper copies of the daily situation reports for that period. Where such databases do exist, they have been created by the missions themselves on an ad hoc basis. The same applies to the variety of crime statistics and other information common to most civilian police missions. Technological advances have also revolutionized the way in which ceasefire violations and movements in demilitarized zones and removal of weapons from storage sites can be monitored. However, there is no one in DPKO’s Military and Civilian Police Division currently assigned to addressing these issues. 222. The Panel recommends that the Military and Police Division be separated into two separate entities, one for the military and the other for the civilian police. The Military Adviser’s Office of DPKO should be enlarged and restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured, so as to provide more effective support to the field and better informed military advice to senior officials in the Secretariat. The Civilian Police Unit should also be provided with substantial additional resources, and consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser. 223. To ensure a minimum of continuity of DPKO’s military and civilian police capacity, the Panel recommends that a percentage of the added positions in these two units be reserved for military and civilian police personnel who have prior United Nations experience and have recently left their national services, to be appointed as regular staff members. This would follow the precedent set in the Logistics and Communications Service of FALD, which includes a number of former military officers. 224. Civilian police in the field are increasingly involved in the restructuring and reform of local police forces, and the Panel has recommended a doctrinal shift that would make such activities a primary focus for civilian police in future peace operations (see paras. 39, 40 and 47 (b) above). However, to date, the Civilian Police Unit formulates plans and requirements for the police components of peace operations without the benefit of the requisite legal advice on local judicial structures, criminal laws, codes and procedures in effect in the country concerned. This is vital information for civilian police planners, yet it is not a function for which resources have hitherto been allocated from the Support Account, either to OLA, DPKO or any other department in the Secretariat. 225. The Panel therefore recommends that a new, separate unit be established in DPKO, staffed with the requisite experts in criminal law, specifically for the purpose of providing advice to the Civilian Police Adviser’s Office on those rule of law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in peace operations. This unit should also work closely with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva, the Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention in Vienna, and other parts of the United Nations system that focus on the reform of rule of law institutions and respect for human rights. 2. Field Administration and Logistics Division 226. FALD does not have the authority to finalize and present the budgets for the field operations that it plans, nor to actually procure the goods and services they need. That authority rests with the Peacekeeping Financing and Procurement Divisions of DM. All Headquarters-based procurement requests are processed by the 16 Support Account-funded procurement officers in the Procurement Division, who prepare the larger contracts (roughly 300 in 1999) for presentation to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts, negotiate and award contracts for goods and services not procured locally by the field missions, and formulate United Nations policies and procedures for both global and local mission procurement. The combination of staffing constraints and the extra steps entailed in this process appears to contribute to the procurement delays reported by field missions. 227. Procurement efficiency could be enhanced by delegating peacekeeping budgeting and presentation, allotment issuance and procurement authority to DPKO for a two-year trial period, with the corresponding transfer of posts and staff. In order to ensure accountability and transparency, DM should retain authority for accounts, assessment of Member States and treasury functions. It should also retain its overall39 A/55/305 S/2000/809 policy setting and monitoring role, as it has in the case of recruitment and administration of field personnel, authority and responsibility, which are already delegated to DPKO. 228. Furthermore, to avoid allegations of impropriety that may arise from having those responsible for budgeting and procurement working in the same division as those identifying the requirements, the Panel recommends that FALD be separated into two divisions: one for Administrative Services, in which the personnel, budget/finance and procurement functions would reside, and the other for Integrated Support Services (e.g., logistics, transport, communications). 3. Lessons Learned Unit 229. All are agreed on the need to exploit cumulating field experience but not enough has been done to improve the system’s ability to tap that experience or to feed it back into the development of operational doctrine, plans, procedures or mandates. The work of DPKO’s existing Lessons Learned Unit does not seem to have had a great deal of impact on peace operations practice, and the compilation of lessons learned seems to occur mostly after a mission has ended. This is unfortunate because the peacekeeping system is generating new experience — new lessons — on a daily basis. That experience should be captured and retained for the benefit of other current operators and future operations. Lessons learned should be thought of as a facet of information management that contributes to improving operations on a daily basis. Post-action reports would then be just one part of a larger learning process, the capstone summary rather than the principal objective of the entire process. 230. The Panel feels that this function is in urgent need of enhancement and recommends that it be located where it can work closely with and contribute effectively to ongoing operations as well as mission planning and doctrine/guidelines development. The Panel suggests that this might best be in the Office of Operations, which will oversee the functions of the Integrated Mission Task Forces that the Panel has proposed to integrate Headquarters planning and support for peace operations (see paras. 198-217 above). Located in an element of DPKO that will routinely incorporate representatives from many departments and agencies, the unit could serve as the peace operations “learning manager” for all of those entities, maintaining and updating the institutional memory that missions and task forces alike could draw upon for problem solving, best practices and practices to avoid. 4. Senior management 231. There are currently two Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO: one for the Office of Operations and the other for the Office of Logistics, Management and Mine Action (FALD and the Mine Action Service). The Military Adviser, who concurrently serves as the Director of the Military and Civilian Police Division, currently reports to the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations through one of the two Assistant Secretaries-General or directly to the Under-Secretary-General, depending on the nature of the issue concerned. 232. In the light of the various staff increases and structural adjustments proposed in the preceding sections, the Panel believes that there is a strong case to be made for the Department to be provided with a third Assistant Secretary-General. The Panel further believes that one of the three Assistant Secretaries-General should be designated as a “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and function as deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. 233. Summary of key recommendations on other structural adjustments in DPKO: (a) The current Military and Civilian Police Division should be restructured, moving the Civilian Police Unit out of the military reporting chain. Consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser; (b) The Military Adviser’s Office in DPKO should be restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military field headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured; (c) A new unit should be established in DPKO and staffed with the relevant expertise for the provision of advice on criminal law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in United Nations peace operations; (d) The Under-Secretary-General for Management should delegate authority and responsibility for peacekeeping-related budgeting and procurement functions to the Under-Secretary40 A/55/305 S/2000/809 General for Peacekeeping Operations for a two-year trial period; (e) The Lessons Learned Unit should be substantially enhanced and moved into a revamped DPKO Office of Operations; (f) Consideration should be given to increasing the number of Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO from two to three, with one of the three designated as the “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. D. Structural adjustments needed outside the Department of Peacekeeping Operations 234. Public information planning and support at Headquarters needs strengthening, as do elements in DPA that support and coordinate peace-building activities and provide electoral support. Outside the Secretariat, the ability of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to plan and support the human rights components of peace operations needs to be reinforced. 1. Operational support for public information 235. Unlike military, civilian police, mine action, logistics, telecommunications and other mission components, no unit at Headquarters has specific line responsibility for the operational requirements of public information components in peace operations. The most concentrated responsibility for missionrellate public information rests with the Office of the Spokesman of the Secretary General and the respective spokespersons and public information offices in the missions themselves. At Headquarters, four professional officers in the Peace and Security Section, nested within the Promotion and Planning Service of the Public Affairs Division in DPI, are responsible for producing publications, developing and updating web site content on peace operations, and dealing with other issues ranging from disarmament to humanitarian assistance. While the Section produces and manages information about peacekeeping, it has had little capacity to create doctrine, strategy or standard operating procedures for public information functions in the field, other than on a sporadic and ad hoc basis. 236. The DPI Peace and Security Section is being expanded somewhat through internal DPI redeployment of staff, but it should either be substantially expanded and made operational or the support function should be moved into DPKO, with some of its officers perhaps seconded from DPI. 237. Wherever the function is located, it should anticipate public information needs and the technology and people to meet them, set priorities and standard field operating procedures, provide support in the startuu phase of new missions, and provide continuing support and guidance through participation in the Integrated Mission Task Forces. 238. Summary of key recommendation on structural adjustments in public information: a unit for operational planning and support of public information in peace operations should be established, either within DPKO or within a new Peace and Security Information Service in DPI reporting directly to the Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information. 2. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs 239. The Department of Political Affairs (DPA) is the designated focal point for United Nations peacebuilldin efforts and currently has responsibility for setting up, supporting and/or advising peace-building offices and special political missions in a dozen countries, plus the activities of five envoys and representatives of the Secretary-General who have been given peacemaking or conflict prevention assignments. Regular budget funds that support these activities through the next calendar year are expected to fall $31 million or 25 per cent below need. Such assessed funding is in fact relatively rare in peace-building, where most activities are funded by voluntary donations. 240. DPA’s nascent Peace-building Support Unit is one such activity. In his capacity as Convener of ECPS and focal point for peace-building strategies, the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs must be able to coordinate the formulation of such strategies with the members of ECPS and other elements of the United Nations system, particularly those in the development and humanitarian fields given the cross-cutting nature of peace-building itself. To do so, the Secretariat is assembling voluntary funds from a number of donors41 A/55/305 S/2000/809 for a three-year pilot project in support of the unit. As the planning for this pilot unit evolves, the Panel urges DPA to consult with all stakeholders in the United Nations system that can contribute to its success, in particular UNDP, which is placing renewed emphasis on democracy/governance and other transition-related areas. 241. DPA’s executive office supports some of the operational efforts for which it is responsible, but it is neither designed nor equipped to be a field support office. FALD also provides support to some of the field missions managed by DPA, but neither those missions’ budgets nor DPA’s budget allocate additional resources to FALD for this purpose. FALD attempts to meet the demands of the smaller peace-building operations but acknowledges that the larger operations make severe, high-priority demands on its current staffing. Thus the needs of smaller missions tend to suffer. DPA has had satisfactory experience with support from the United Nations Office of Project Services (UNOPS), a fiveyeearold spin-off from UNDP that manages programmes and funds for many clients within the United Nations system, using modern management practices and drawing all of its core funding from a management charge of up to 13 per cent. UNOPS can provide logistics, management and recruitment support for smaller missions fairly quickly. 242. DPA’s Electoral Assistance Division (EAD) also relies on voluntary money to meet growing demand for its technical advice, needs assessment missions and other activities not directly involving electoral observation. As of June 2000, 41 requests for assistance were pending from Member States but the trust fund supporting such “non-earmarked” activities held just 8 per cent of the funding required to meet current requests through the end of calendar year 2001. So, as demand surges for a key element of democratic institution-building endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 46/137, EAD staff must first raise the programme funds needed to do their jobs. 243. Summary of key recommendations for peacebuilldin support in the Department of Political Affairs: (a) The Panel supports the Secretariat’s effort to create a pilot Peace-building Unit within DPA in cooperation with other integral United Nations elements, and suggests that regular budgetary support for the unit be revisited by the membership if the pilot programme works well. The programme should be evaluated in the context of guidance the Panel has provided in paragraph 46 above, and if considered the best available option for strengthening United Nations peace-building capacity it should be presented to the Secretary-General as per the recommendation contained in paragraph 47 (d) above; (b) The Panel recommends that regular budget resources for Electoral Assistance Division programmatic expenses be substantially increased to meet the rapidly growing demand for its services, in lieu of voluntary contributions; (c) To relieve demand on FALD and the executive office of DPA, and to improve support services rendered to smaller political and peacebuilldin field offices, the Panel recommends that procurement, logistics, staff recruitment and other support services for all such smaller, non-military field missions be provided by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). 3. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 244. OHCHR needs to be more closely involved in planning and executing the elements of peace operations that address human rights, especially complex operations. At present, OHCHR has inadequate resources to be so involved or to provide personnel for service in the field. If United Nations operations are to have effective human rights components, OHCHR should be able to coordinate and institutionalize human rights field work in peace operations; second personnel to Integrated Mission Task Forces in New York; recruit human rights field personnel; organize human rights training for all personnel in peace operations, including the law and order components; and create model databases for human rights field work. 245. Summary of key recommendation on strengthening the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: the Panel recommends substantially enhancing the field mission planning and preparation capacity of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with funding partly from the42 A/55/305 S/2000/809 regular budget and partly from peace operations mission budgets. V. Peace operations and the information age 246. Threaded through many parts of the present report are references to the need to better link the peace and security system together; to facilitate communications and data sharing; to give staff the tools that they need to do their work; and ultimately to allow the United Nations to be more effective at preventing conflict and helping societies find their way back from war. Modern, well utilized information technology (IT) is a key enabler of many of these objectives. The present section notes the gaps in strategy, policy and practice that impede the United Nations effective use of IT, and offers recommendations to bridge them. A. Information technology in peace operations: strategy and policy issues 247. The problem of IT strategy and policy is bigger than peace operations and extends to the entire United Nations system. That larger IT context is generally beyond the Panel’s mandate, but the larger issues should not preclude the adoption of common IT user standards for peace operations and for the Headquarters units that give support to them. FALD’s Communications Service can provide the satellite links and the local connectivity upon which missions can build effective IT networks and databases, but a better strategy and policy needs to be developed for the user community to help it take advantage of the technology foundations that are now being laid. 248. When the United Nations deploys a mission into the field, it is critical that its elements be able to exchange data easily. All complex peace operations bring together many different actors: agencies, funds, and programmes from throughout the United Nations system, as well as the Departments of the Secretariat; mission recruits who are new to the United Nations system; on occasion, regional organizations; frequently, bilateral aid agencies; and always, dozens to hundreds of humanitarian and development NGOs. All of them need a mechanism that makes it easier to share information and ideas efficiently, the more so because each is but the small tip of a very large bureaucratic iceberg with its own culture, working methods and objectives. 249. Poorly planned and poorly integrated IT can pose obstacles to such cooperation. When there are no agreed standards for data structure and interchange at the application level, the “interface” between the two is laborious manual recoding, which tends to defeat the purposes of investing in a networked and computerheeav working environment. The consequences can also be more serious than wasted labour, ranging from miscommunication of policy to a failure to “get the word” on security threats or other major changes in the operational environment. 250. The irony of distributed and decentralized data systems is that they need such common standards to function. Common solutions to common IT problems are difficult to produce at higher levels — between substantive components of an operation, between substantive offices at Headquarters, or between Headquarters and the rest of the United Nations system — in part because existing operational information systems policy formulation is scattered. Headquarters lacks a sufficiently strong responsibility centre for user-level IT strategy and policy in peace operations, in particular. In government or industry, such responsibility would rest with a “Chief Information Officer”. The Panel believes the United Nations needs someone at Headquarters, most usefully in EISAS, to play such a role, supervising development and implementation of IT strategy and user standards. He or she should also develop and oversee IT training programmes, both field manuals and hands-on training — the need for which is substantial and not to be underestimated. Counterparts in the SRSG’s office in each field mission should oversee implementation of the common IT strategy and supervise field training, both complementing and building on the work of FALD and the Information Technology Services Division (ITSD) in the Department of Management in providing basic IT structures and services. 251. Summary of key recommendation on information technology strategy and policy: Headquarters peace and security departments need a responsibility centre to devise and oversee the implementation of common information technology strategy and training for peace operations, residing in EISAS. Mission counterparts to that responsibility centre should also be appointed to43 A/55/305 S/2000/809 serve in the offices of the SRSGs in complex peace operations to oversee the implementation of that strategy. B. Tools for knowledge management 252. Technology can help to capture as well as disseminate information and experience. It could be much better utilized to help a wide variety of actors working in a United Nations mission’s area of operation to acquire and share data in a systematic and mutually supportive manner. United Nations development and humanitarian relief communities, for example, work in most of the places where the United Nations has deployed peace operations. These United Nations country teams, plus the NGOs that do complementary work at the grass-roots level, will have been in the region long before a complex peace operation arrives and will remain after it has left. Together, they hold a wealth of local knowledge and experience that could be helpful to peace operations planning and implementation. An electronic data clearing house, managed by EISAS to share this data, could assist mission planning and execution and also aid conflict prevention and assessment. Proper melding of these data and data gathered subsequent to deployment by the various components of a peace operation and their use with geographic information systems (GIS) could create powerful tools for tracking needs and problems in the mission area and for tracking the impact of action plans. GIS specialists should be assigned to every mission team, together with GIS training resources. 253. Current examples of GIS applications can be seen in the humanitarian and reconstruction work done in Kosovo since 1998. The Humanitarian Community Information Centre has pooled GIS data produced by such sources as the Western European Satellite Centre, the Geneva Centre for Humanitarian Demining, KFOR, the Yugoslav Institute of Statistics and the International Management Group. Those data have been combined to create an atlas that is available publicly on their web site, on CD-ROMs for those with slow or non-existent Internet access and in hard copy. 254. Computer simulations can be powerful learning tools for mission personnel and for the local parties. Simulations can, in principle, be created for any component of an operation. They can facilitate group problem-solving and reveal to local parties the sometimes unintended consequences of their policy choices. With appropriate broadband Internet links, simulations can be part of distance learning packages tailored to a new operation and used to pre-train new mission recruits. 255. An enhanced peace and security area on the United Nations Intranet (the Organization’s information network that is open to a specified set of users) would be a valuable addition to peace operations planning, analysis, and execution. A subset of the larger network, it would focus on drawing together issues and information that directly pertain to peace and security, including EISAS analyses, situation reports, GIS maps and linkages to lessons learned. Varying levels of security access could facilitate the sharing of sensitive information among restricted groups. 256. The data in the Intranet should be linked to a Peace Operations Extranet (POE) that would use existing and planned wide area network communications to link Headquarters databases in EISAS and the substantive offices with the field, and field missions with one another. POE could easily contain all administrative, procedural and legal information for peace operations, and could provide single-point access to information generated by many sources, give planners the ability to produce comprehensive reports more quickly and improve response time to emergency situations. 257. Some mission components, such as civilian police and related criminal justice units and human rights investigators, require added network security, as well as the hardware and software that can support the required levels of data storage, transmission and analysis. Two key technologies for civilian police are GIS and crime mapping software, used to convert raw data into geographical representations that illustrate crime trends and other key information, facilitate recognition of patterns of events, or highlight special features of problem areas, improving the ability of civilian police to fight crime or to advise their local counterparts. 258. Summary of key recommendations on information technology tools in peace operations: (a) EISAS, in cooperation with ITSD, should implement an enhanced peace operations element on the current United Nations Intranet and link it44 A/55/305 S/2000/809 to the missions through a Peace Operations Extranet (POE); (b) Peace operations could benefit greatly from more extensive use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, which quickly integrates operational information with electronic maps of the mission area, for applications as diverse as demobilization, civilian policing, voter registration, human rights monitoring and reconstruction; (c) The IT needs of mission components with unique information technology needs, such as civilian police and human rights, should be anticipated and met more consistently in mission planning and implementation. C. Improving the timeliness of Internetbaase public information 259. As the Panel noted in section III above, effectively communicating the work of United Nations peace operations to the public is essential to creating and maintaining support for current and future missions. Not only is it essential to develop a positive image early on to promote a conducive working environment but it is also important to maintain a solid public information campaign to garner and retain support from the international community. 260. The body now officially responsible for communicating the work of United Nations peace operations is the Peace and Security Section of DPI in Headquarters, as discussed in section IV above. One person in DPI is responsible for the actual posting of all peace and security content on the web site, as well as for posting all mission inputs to the web, to ensure that information posted is consistent and compatible with Headquarters web standards. 261. The Panel endorses the application of standards but standardized need not mean centralized. The current process of news production and posting of data to the United Nations web site slows down the cycle of updates, yet daily updates could be important to a mission in a fast-moving situation. It also limits the amount of information that can be presented on each mission. 262. DPI and field staff have expressed interest in relieving this bottleneck through the development of a “web site co-management” model. This seems to the Panel to be an appropriate solution to this particular information bottleneck. 263. Summary of key recommendation on timeliness of Internet-based public information: the Panel encourages the development of web site comanaggemen by Headquarters and the field missions, in which Headquarters would maintain oversight but individual missions would have staff authorized to produce and post web content that conforms to basic presentational standards and policy. * * * 264. In the present report, the Panel has emphasized the need to change the structure and practices of the Organization in order to enable it to pursue more effectively its responsibilities in support of international peace and security and respect for human rights. Some of those changes would not be feasible without the new capacities that networked information technologies provide. The report itself would have been impossible to produce without the technologies already in place at United Nations Headquarters and accessible to members of the Panel in every region of the world. People use effective tools, and effective information technology could be much better utilized in the service of peace. VI. Challenges to implementation 265. The present report targets two groups in presenting its recommendations for reform: the Member States and the Secretariat. We recognize that reform will not occur unless Member States genuinely pursue it. At the same time, we believe that the changes we recommend for the Secretariat must be actively advanced by the Secretary-General and implemented by his senior staff. 266. Member States must recognize that the United Nations is the sum of its parts and accept that the primary responsibility for reform lies with them. The failures of the United Nations are not those of the Secretariat alone, or troop commanders or the leaders of field missions. Most occurred because the Security Council and the Member States crafted and supported ambiguous, inconsistent and under-funded mandates and then stood back and watched as they failed, sometimes even adding critical public commentary as45 A/55/305 S/2000/809 the credibility of the United Nations underwent its severest tests. 267. The problems of command and control that recently arose in Sierra Leone are the most recent illustration of what cannot be tolerated any longer. Troop contributors must ensure that the troops they provide fully understand the importance of an integrated chain of command, the operational control of the Secretary-General and the standard operating procedures and rules of engagement of the mission. It is essential that the chain of command in an operation be understood and respected, and the onus is on national capitals to refrain from instructing their contingent commanders on operational matters. 268. We are aware that the Secretary-General is implementing a comprehensive reform programme and realize that our recommendations may need to be adjusted to fit within this bigger picture. Furthermore, the reforms we have recommended for the Secretariat and the United Nations system in general will not be accomplished overnight, though some require urgent action. We recognize that there is a normal resistance to change in any bureaucracy, and are encouraged that some of the changes we have embraced as recommendations originate from within the system. We are also encouraged by the commitment of the Secretary-General to lead the Secretariat toward reform even if it means that long-standing organizational and procedural lines will have to be breached, and that aspects of the Secretariat’s priorities and culture will need to be challenged and changed. In this connection, we urge the Secretary-General to appoint a senior official with responsibility for overseeing the implementation of the recommendations contained in the present report. 269. The Secretary-General has consistently emphasized the need for the United Nations to reach out to civil society and to strengthen relations with non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and the media, who can be useful partners in the promotion of peace and security for all. We call on the Secretariat to take heed of the Secretary-General’s approach and implement it in its work in peace and security. We call on them to constantly keep in mind that the United Nations they serve is the universal organization. People everywhere are fully entitled to consider that it is their organization, and as such to pass judgement on its activities and the people who serve in it. 270. There is wide variation in quality among Secretariat staff supporting the peace and security functions in DPKO, DPA and the other departments concerned. This observation applies to the civilians recruited by the Secretariat as well as to the military and civilian police personnel proposed by Member States. These disparities are widely recognized by those in the system. Better performers are given unreasonable workloads to compensate for those who are less capable. Naturally, this can be bad for morale and can create resentment, particularly among those who rightly point out that the United Nations has not dedicated enough attention over the years to career development, training and mentoring or the institution of modern management practices. Put simply, the United Nations is far from being a meritocracy today, and unless it takes steps to become one it will not be able to reverse the alarming trend of qualified personnel, the young among them in particular, leaving the Organization. If the hiring, promotion and delegation of responsibility rely heavily on seniority or personal or political connections, qualified people will have no incentive to join the Organization or stay with it. Unless managers at all levels, beginning with the Secretary-General and his senior staff, seriously address this problem on a priority basis, reward excellence and remove incompetent staff, additional resources will be wasted and lasting reform will become impossible. 271. The same level of scrutiny should apply to United Nations personnel in the field missions. The majority of them embody the spirit of what it means to be an international civil servant, travelling to war-torn lands and dangerous environments to help improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable communities. They do so with considerable personal sacrifice, and at times with great risks to their own physical safety and mental health. They deserve the world’s recognition and appreciation. Over the years, many of them have given their lives in the service of peace and we take this opportunity to honour their memory. 272. United Nations personnel in the field, perhaps more than any others, are obliged to respect local norms, culture and practices. They must go out of their way to demonstrate that respect, as a start, by getting to know their host environment and trying to learn as much of the local culture and language as they can. They must behave with the understanding that they are guests in someone else’s home, however destroyed that46 A/55/305 S/2000/809 home might be, particularly when the United Nations takes on a transitional administration role. And they must also treat one another with respect and dignity, with particular sensitivity towards gender and cultural differences. 273. In short, we believe that a very high standard should be maintained for the selection and conduct of personnel at Headquarters and in the field. When United Nations personnel fail to meet such standards, they should be held accountable. In the past, the Secretariat has had difficulty in holding senior officials in the field accountable for their performance because those officials could point to insufficient resources, unclear instructions or lack of appropriate command and control arrangements as the main impediments to successful implementation of a mission’s mandate. These deficiencies should be addressed but should not be allowed to offer cover to poor performers. The future of nations, the lives of those whom the United Nations has come to help and protect, the success of a mission and the credibility of the Organization can all hinge on what a few individuals do or fail to do. Anyone who turns out to be unsuited to the task that he or she has agreed to perform must be removed from a mission, no matter how high or how low they may be on the ladder. 274. Member States themselves acknowledge that they, too, need to reflect on their working culture and methods, at least as concerns the conduct of United Nations peace and security activities. The tradition of the recitation of statements, followed by a painstaking process of achieving consensus, places considerable emphasis on the diplomatic process over operational product. While one of the United Nations main virtues is that it provides a forum for 189 Member States to exchange views on pressing global issues, sometimes dialogue alone is not enough to ensure that billiondollla peacekeeping operations, vital conflict prevention measures or critical peacemaking efforts succeed in the face of great odds. Expressions of general support in the form of statements and resolutions must be followed up with tangible action. 275. Moreover, Member States may send conflicting messages regarding the actions they advocate, with their representatives voicing political support in one body but denying financial support in another. Such inconsistencies have appeared between the Fifth Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Matters on the one hand, and the Security Council and the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations on the other. 276. On the political level, many of the local parties with whom peacekeepers and peacemakers are dealing on a daily basis may neither respect nor fear verbal condemnation by the Security Council. It is therefore incumbent that Council members and the membership at large breathe life into the words that they produce, as did the Security Council delegation that flew to Jakarta and Dili in the wake of the East Timor crisis last year, an example of effective Council action at its best: res, non verba. 277. Meanwhile, the financial constraints under which the United Nations labours continue to cause serious damage to its ability to conduct peace operations in a credible and professional manner. We therefore urge that Member States uphold their treaty obligations and pay their dues in full, on time and without condition. 278. We are also aware that there are other issues which, directly or indirectly, hamper effective United Nations action in the field of peace and security, including two unresolved issues that are beyond the scope of the Panel’s mandate but critical to peace operations and that only the Member States can address. They are the disagreements about how assessments in support of peacekeeping operations are apportioned and about equitable representation on the Security Council. We can only hope that the Member States will find a way to resolve their differences on these issues in the interests of upholding their collective international responsibility as prescribed in the Charter. 279. We call on the leaders of the world assembled at the Millennium Summit, as they renew their commitment to the ideals of the United Nations, to commit as well to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to fully accomplish the mission which is, indeed, its very raison d’être: to help communities engulfed in strife and to maintain or restore peace. 280. While building consensus for the recommendations in the present report, we — the members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations — have also come to a shared vision of a United Nations, extending a strong helping hand to a community, country or region to avert conflict or to end violence. We see an SRSG ending a mission well accomplished, having given the people of a country the opportunity to do for themselves what they could not47 A/55/305 S/2000/809 do before: to build and hold onto peace, to find reconciliation, to strengthen democracy, to secure human rights. We see, above all, a United Nations that has not only the will but also the ability to fulfil its great promise and to justify the confidence and trust placed in it by the overwhelming majority of humankind.48 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex I Members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Mr. J. Brian Atwood (United States), President, Citizens International; former President, National Democratic Institute; former Administrator, United States Agency for International Development. Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi (Algeria), former Foreign Minister; Chairman of the Panel. Ambassador Colin Granderson (Trinidad and Tobago), Executive Director of Organization of American States (OAS)/United Nations International Civilian Mission in Haiti, 1993-2000; head of OAS election observation missions in Haiti (1995 and 1997) and Suriname (2000). Dame Ann Hercus (New Zealand), former Cabinet Minister and Permanent Representative of New Zealand to the United Nations; Head of Mission of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), 1998-1999. Mr. Richard Monk (United Kingdom), former member of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Government adviser on international policing matters; Commissioner of the United Nations International Police Task Force in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1998-1999. General (ret.) Klaus Naumann (Germany), Chief of Defence, 1991-1996; Chairman of the Military Committee of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), 1996-1999, with oversight responsibility for NATO Implementation Force/Stabilization Force operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the NATO Kosovo air campaign. Ms. Hisako Shimura (Japan), President of Tsuda College, Tokyo; served for 24 years in the United Nations Secretariat, retiring from United Nations service in 1995 as Director, Europe and Latin America Division of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations. Ambassador Vladimir Shustov (Russian Federation), Ambassador at large, with 30 years association with the United Nations; former Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York; former representative of the Russian Federation to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. General Philip Sibanda (Zimbabwe), Chief of Staff, Operations and Training, Zimbabwe Army Headquarters, Harare; former Force Commander of the United Nations Angola Verification Mission (UNAVEM III) and the United Nations Observer Mission in Angola (MONUA), 1995-1998. Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga (Switzerland), President of the Foundation of Moral Rearmament, Caux, and of the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining; former President of the International Committee of the Red Cross, 1987-1999. * * *49 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Office of the Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Dr. William Durch, Senior Associate, Henry L. Stimson Center; Project Director Mr. Salman Ahmed, Political Affairs Officer, United Nations Secretariat Ms. Clare Kane, Personal Assistant, United Nations Secretariat Ms. Caroline Earle, Research Associate, Stimson Center Mr. J. Edward Palmisano, Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellow, Stimson Center50 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex II References United Nations documents Annan, Kofi A. Preventing war and disaster: a growing global challenge. Annual report on the work of the Organization, 1999. (A/54/1) ________ Partnerships for global community. Annual report on the work of the Organization, 1998. (A/53/1) ________ Facing the humanitarian challenge: towards a culture of prevention. (ST/DPI/2070) ________ We the peoples: the role of the United Nations in the twenty-first century. The Millennium Report. (A/54/2000) Economic and Social Council: Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “In-depth evaluation of peacekeeping operations: start-up phase”. (E/AC.51/1995/2 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “In-depth evaluation of peacekeeping operations: termination phase”. (E/AC.51/1996/3 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “Triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its thirty-fifth session on the evaluation of peacekeeping operations: start-up phase”. (E/AC.51/1998/4 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “Triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its thirty-sixth session on the evaluation of peacekeeping operations: termination phase”. (E/AC.51/1999/5) General Assembly. Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on the review of the Field Administration and Logistics Division, Department of Peacekeeping Operations. (A/49/959) ________ Report of the Secretary-General entitled “Renewing the United Nations: A Programme for Reform”. (A/51/950) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa. (A/52/871) ________ Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/87 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on the audit of the management of service and ration contracts in peacekeeping missions. (A/54/335) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the annual report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services for the period 1 July 1998 to 30 June 1999. (A/54/393) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict entitled “Protection of children affected by armed conflict”. (A/54/430) ________ Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to General Assembly resolution 53/55, entitled “The fall of Srebrenica”. (A/54/549) ________ Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/839) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of the recommendations of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/670) General Assembly and Security Council. Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to the statement adopted by the Summit Meeting of the Security Council on 31 January 1992, entitled “An Agenda for Peace: preventive diplomacy, peacemaking and peace-keeping”. (A/47/277-S/24111)51 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ________ Position paper of the Secretary-General on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, entitled “Supplement to an Agenda for Peace”. (A/50/60-S/1995/1) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict. (A/55/163-S/2000/712) Security Council. Report of the Secretary-General on protection for humanitarian assistance to refugees and others in conflict situations. (S/1998/883) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the enhancement of African peacekeeping capacity. (S/1999/171) ________ Progress report of the Secretary-General on standby arrangements for peacekeeping. (S/1999/361) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the protection of civilians in armed conflict. (S/1999/957) ________ Letter dated 15 December 1999 from the Secretary-General addressed to the President of the Security Council, enclosing the report of the Independent Inquiry into the actions of the United Nations during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. (S/1999/1257) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the role of United Nations peacekeeping in disarmament, demobilization and reintegration. (S/2000/101) Letter dated 10 March 2000 from the Chairman of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) concerning the situation in Angola addressed to the President of the Security Council, enclosing the report of the Panel of Experts on Violations of Security Council Sanctions against UNITA. (S/2000/203) Secretary-General’s press release. Statement made by the Secretary-General at Georgetown University. (SG/SM/6901) Secretary-General’s Bulletin. Observance by United Nations forces of international humanitarian law. (ST/SGB/1999/13) United Nations Development Programme. Governance foundations for post-conflict situations: UNDP’s experience. Discussion paper prepared by the UNDP Management Development and Governance Division, January 2000. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Annual appeal 2000: overview of activities and financial requirements. Geneva. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Catalogue of emergency response tools. Document prepared by the Emergency Preparedness and Response Section. Geneva, 2000. United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), Institute of Policy Studies of Singapore (IPS) and National Institute for Research Advancement of Japan. Report of the 1997 Singapore Conference: humanitarian action and peacekeeping operations. New York, 1997. UNITAR, IPS and Japan Institute of International Affairs. The nexus between peacekeeping and peace-building: debriefing and lessons. Draft report of the 1999 Singapore Conference. New York, 2000. Goulding, Marrack. Practical measures to enhance the United Nations effectiveness in the field of peace and security. Report submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. New York, 30 June 1997. Other sources Berdal, Mats, and David M. Malone, eds. Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000. Berman, Eric G., and Katie E. Sams. Peacekeeping in Africa: capabilities and culpabilities. (UNIDIR/2000/3) Bigombe, Betty, Paul Collier and Nicholas Sambanis. Policies for building post-conflict peace. Paper presented at an ad hoc expert group meeting on the economics of civil conflicts in Africa, 7 and 8 April 2000, organized by the Economic Commission for Africa. Blechman, Barry M., William J. Durch, Wendy Eaton and Julie Werbel. Effective transitions from peace operations to sustainable peace: final report. DFI International, Washington, D.C., September 1997. Childers, Erskine, and Brian Urquhart. Towards a More Effective United Nations: Two Studies. Uppsala, Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, 1992.52 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Collier, Paul. Economic causes of civil conflict and their implications for policy. In Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall, Managing Global Chaos. Washington, D.C., United States Institute of Peace, forthcoming. Cousens, Elizabeth M., Donald Rothchild and Stephen John Stedman, eds. Ending Civil Wars, vol. II, Evaluating Peace Implementation. New York, Center for International Security and Cooperation of Stanford University and International Peace Academy, forthcoming. DeSoto, Alvaro, and Graciana del Castillo. Implementation of comprehensive peace agreements: staying the course in El Salvador. Global Governance, vol. 1, No. 2 (May-June 1995). Doyle, Michael W., and Nicholas Sambanis. International peace-building: a theoretical and quantitative analysis. Paper presented at a conference of the Center of International Studies and the World Bank, Princeton University, 17 and 18 March 2000. Fafo Programme for International Cooperation and Conflict Resolution. Command from the saddle: managing United Nations peace-building missions. Recommendations report of a forum on special representatives of the Secretary-General on the theme “Shaping the United Nations role in peace implementation”. Oslo, Peace Implementation Network, 1999. Fainberg, Anthony, Alan Shaw, Dean Cheng, Xavier Maruyama and Donald Gallagher. Technology for international peace operations. Washington, D.C., Institute for Technology Assessment, March 1998. Forman, Shepard, Stewart Patrick and Dirk Salomons. Recovering from conflict: strategy for an international response. New York University, Center on International Cooperation, February 2000. Government of Canada. Towards a Rapid Reaction Capability for the United Nations. Ottawa, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Department of National Defence, 1995. Griffin, Michèle and Bruce Jones. Building peace through transitional authority: new directions, major challenges. International Peacekeeping, vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 2000). Henkin, Alice H., ed. Honouring Human Rights and Keeping the Peace: Lessons from El Salvador, Cambodia and Haiti. Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1995. ________ Honouring Human Rights, from Peace to Justice: Recommendations to the International Community. Summary edition of Henkin, op. cit., Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1999. Holm, Tor Tanke, and Espen Barth Eide, eds. Peacebuilding and Police Reform. International Peacekeeping, vol. 6, No. 4 (Special issue, Winter 1999). Humanitarian Community Information Centre, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat. Kosovo atlas. Pristina, February 2000. Jett, Dennis C. Why Peacekeeping Fails. New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2000. Latter, Richard. Monitoring and verifying peace agreements. Report based on a Wilton Park conference 597 on the monitoring and verification of peace agreements, 24-26 March 2000, April 2000. Lehman, Ingrid A. Peacekeeping and Public Information: Caught in the Crossfire. London, Frank Cass, 1999. Lord Christopher. Advisory note for Stimson Center/United Nations Panel on Peace Operations. Prague, Prague Project on Emergency Criminal Justice Principles, Institute of International Relations, 27 June 2000. Moore, Jonathan, ed. Hard Choices. Lanham, Maryland, Rowman and Littlefield for the International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva, 1998. Plunkett, Mark. Justice re-establishment in United Nations peacekeeping: methods and techniques for the re-establishment of the rule of law in United Nations peace operations. 18 April 2000. Salerno, Reynolds M., Michael G. Vannoni, David S. Barber, Randall R. Parish and Rebecca L.53 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Frerichs. Enhanced peacekeeping with monitoring technologies. Sandia report. Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratories, 2000. Smillie, Ian, Lansana Gberie and Ralph Hazleton. The heart of the matter: Sierra Leone, diamonds and human security. Ottawa, Partnership Africa Canada, January 2000. Stedman, Stephen John. Spoiler problems in peace processes. International Security, vol. 22, No. 2 (Fall 1997). Stewart, Frances and A. Berry. The real causes of inequality. Challenge, vol. 43, No. 1 (2000). Stewart, Frances, Frank P. Humphreys and Nick Lee. Civil conflict in developing countries over the last quarter of a century: an empirical overview of economic and social consequences. Oxford Journal of Development Studies, vol. 25, No. 1 (February 1997). Thant, Myint-U and Elizabeth Sellwood. Knowledge and Multilateral Interventions: The United Nations Experiences in Cambodia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Royal Institute of International Affairs Discussion Paper, No. 83. London, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2000. Wallensteen, Peter, and Margareta Sollenberg. Armed conflict and regional conflict complexes, 1989-1997. Journal of Peace Research, vol. 35, No. 5 (1998). World Bank Institute and Interworks. The Transition from War to Peace: An Overview. Washington, D.C., 1999.54 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex III Summary of recommendations 1. Preventive action: (a) The Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000, in particular his appeal to “all who are engaged in conflict prevention and development — the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, Governments and civil society organizations — [to] address these challenges in a more integrated fashion”; (b) The Panel supports the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension, and stresses Member States’ obligations, under Article 2(5) of the Charter, to give “every assistance” to such activities of the United Nations. 2. Peace-building strategy: (a) A small percentage of a mission’s first-year budget should be made available to the representative or special representative of the Secretary-General leading the mission to fund quick impact projects in its area of operations, with the advice of the United Nations country team’s resident coordinator; (b) The Panel recommends a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police, other rule of law elements and human rights experts in complex peace operations to reflect an increased focus on strengthening rule of law institutions and improving respect for human rights in post-conflict environments; (c) The Panel recommends that the legislative bodies consider bringing demobilization and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations for the first phase of an operation in order to facilitate the rapid disassembly of fighting factions and reduce the likelihood of resumed conflict; (d) The Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) discuss and recommend to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. 3. Peacekeeping doctrine and strategy: once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandates professionally and successfully and be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate, with robust rules of engagement, against those who renege on their commitments to a peace accord or otherwise seek to undermine it by violence. 4. Clear, credible and achievable mandates: (a) The Panel recommends that, before the Security Council agrees to implement a ceasefire or peace agreement with a United Nations-led peacekeeping operation, the Council assure itself that the agreement meets threshold conditions, such as consistency with international human rights standards and practicability of specified tasks and timelines; (b) The Security Council should leave in draft form resolutions authorizing missions with sizeable troop levels until such time as the Secretary-General has firm commitments of troops and other critical mission support elements, including peace-building elements, from Member States; (c) Security Council resolutions should meet the requirements of peacekeeping operations when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations, especially the need for a clear chain of command and unity of effort;(d) The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when formulating or changing mission mandates, and countries that have committed military units to an operation should have access to Secretariat briefings to the Council on matters affecting the safety and security of their personnel, especially those meetings with implications for a mission’s use of force. 5. Information and strategic analysis: the Secretary-General should establish an entity, referred to here as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS), which would support the information and analysis needs of all members of ECPS; for management purposes, it should be administered by and report jointly to the heads of the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO).55 A/55/305 S/2000/809 6. Transitional civil administration: the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General invite a panel of international legal experts, including individuals with experience in United Nations operations that have transitional administration mandates, to evaluate the feasibility and utility of developing an interim criminal code, including any regional adaptations potentially required, for use by such operations pending the reestabllishmen of local rule of law and local law enforcement capacity. 7. Determining deployment timelines: the United Nations should define “rapid and effective deployment capacities” as the ability, from an operational perspective, to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days after the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. 8. Mission leadership: (a) The Secretary-General should systematize the method of selecting mission leaders, beginning with the compilation of a comprehensive list of potential representatives or special representatives of the Secretary-General, force commanders, civilian police commissioners, and their deputies and other heads of substantive and administrative components, within a fair geographic and gender distribution and with input from Member States; (b) The entire leadership of a mission should be selected and assembled at Headquarters as early as possible in order to enable their participation in key aspects of the mission planning process, for briefings on the situation in the mission area and to meet and work with their colleagues in mission leadership; (c) The Secretariat should routinely provide the mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation, and whenever possible should formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. 9. Military personnel: (a) Member States should be encouraged, where appropriate, to enter into partnerships with one another, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS), to form several coherent brigade-size forces, with necessary enabling forces, ready for effective deployment within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a traditional peacekeeping operation and within 90 days for complex peacekeeping operations; (b) The Secretary-General should be given the authority to formally canvass Member States participating in UNSAS regarding their willingness to contribute troops to a potential operation, once it appeared likely that a ceasefire accord or agreement envisaging an implementing role for the United Nations, might be reached; (c) The Secretariat should, as a standard practice, send a team to confirm the preparedness of each potential troop contributor to meet the provisions of the memoranda of understanding on the requisite training and equipment requirements, prior to deployment; those that do not meet the requirements must not deploy; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 military officers be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice to augment nuclei of DPKO planners with teams trained to create a mission headquarters for a new peacekeeping operation. 10. Civilian police personnel: (a) Member States are encouraged to each establish a national pool of civilian police officers that would be ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations on short notice, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System; (b) Member States are encouraged to enter into regional training partnerships for civilian police in the respective national pools, to promote a common level of preparedness in accordance with guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards to be promulgated by the United Nations; (c) Members States are encouraged to designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures for the provision of civilian police to United Nations peace operations; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving on-call list of about 100 police officers and related experts be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice with teams trained to create the civilian police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train incoming personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date;56 A/55/305 S/2000/809 (e) The Panel recommends that parallel arrangements to recommendations (a), (b) and (c) above be established for judicial, penal, human rights and other relevant specialists, who with specialist civilian police will make up collegial “rule of law” teams. 11. Civilian specialists: (a) The Secretariat should establish a central Internet/Intranet-based roster of pre-selected civilian candidates available to deploy to peace operations on short notice. The field missions should be granted access to and delegated authority to recruit candidates from it, in accordance with guidelines on fair geographic and gender distribution to be promulgated by the Secretariat; (b) The Field Service category of personnel should be reformed to mirror the recurrent demands faced by all peace operations, especially at the mid-to senior-levels in the administrative and logistics areas; (c) Conditions of service for externally recruited civilian staff should be revised to enable the United Nations to attract the most highly qualified candidates, and to then offer those who have served with distinction greater career prospects; (d) DPKO should formulate a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations, outlining, among other issues, the use of United Nations Volunteers, standby arrangements for the provision of civilian personnel on 72 hours' notice to facilitate mission startuup and the divisions of responsibility among the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security for implementing that strategy. 12. Rapidly deployable capacity for public information: additional resources should be devoted in mission budgets to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links. 13. Logistics support and expenditure management: (a) The Secretariat should prepare a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the timelines proposed and corresponding to planning assumptions established by the substantive offices of DPKO; (b) The General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure to maintain at least five mission start-up kits in Brindisi, which should include rapidly deployable communications equipment. These start-up kits should then be routinely replenished with funding from the assessed contributions to the operations that drew on them; (c) The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to US$50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, once it became clear that an operation was likely to be established, with the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) but prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution; (d) The Secretariat should undertake a review of the entire procurement policies and procedures (with proposals to the General Assembly for amendments to the Financial Rules and Regulations, as required), to facilitate in particular the rapid and full deployment of an operation within the proposed timelines; (e) The Secretariat should conduct a review of the policies and procedures governing the management of financial resources in the field missions with a view to providing field missions with much greater flexibility in the management of their budgets; (f) The Secretariat should increase the level of procurement authority delegated to the field missions (from $200,000 to as high as $1 million, depending on mission size and needs) for all goods and services that are available locally and are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts. 14. Funding Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations: (a) The Panel recommends a substantial increase in resources for Headquarters support of peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining his requirements in full; (b) Headquarters support for peacekeeping should be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements for this purpose should be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennial programme budget of the Organization; (c) Pending the preparation of the next regular budget submission, the Panel recommends that the57 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Secretary-General approach the General Assembly with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the Support Account to allow immediate recruitment of additional personnel, particularly in DPKO. 15. Integrated mission planning and support: Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs), with members seconded from throughout the United Nations system, as necessary, should be the standard vehicle for mission-specific planning and support. IMTFs should serve as the first point of contact for all such support, and IMTF leaders should have temporary line authority over seconded personnel, in accordance with agreements between DPKO, DPA and other contributing departments, programmes, funds and agencies. 16. Other structural adjustments in DPKO: (a) The current Military and Civilian Police Division should be restructured, moving the Civilian Police Unit out of the military reporting chain. Consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser; (b) The Military Adviser’s Office in DPKO should be restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military field headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured; (c) A new unit should be established in DPKO and staffed with the relevant expertise for the provision of advice on criminal law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in the United Nations peace operations; (d) The Under-Secretary-General for Management should delegate authority and responsibility for peacekeeping-related budgeting and procurement functions to the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations for a two-year trial period; (e) The Lessons Learned Unit should be substantially enhanced and moved into a revamped DPKO Office of Operations; (f) Consideration should be given to increasing the number of Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO from two to three, with one of the three designated as the “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. 17. Operational support for public information: a unit for operational planning and support of public information in peace operations should be established, either within DPKO or within a new Peace and Security Information Service in the Department of Public Information (DPI) reporting directly to the Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information. 18. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs: (a) The Panel supports the Secretariat’s effort to create a pilot Peace-building Unit within DPA, in cooperation with other integral United Nations elements, and suggests that regular budgetary support for this unit be revisited by the membership if the pilot programme works well. This programme should be evaluated in the context of guidance the Panel has provided in paragraph 46 above, and if considered the best available option for strengthening United Nations peace-building capacity it should be presented to the Secretary-General within the context of the Panel’s recommendation contained in paragraph 47 (d) above; (b) The Panel recommends that regular budget resources for Electoral Assistance Division programmatic expenses be substantially increased to meet the rapidly growing demand for its services, in lieu of voluntary contributions; (c) To relieve demand on the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD) and the executive office of DPA, and to improve support services rendered to smaller political and peacebuilldin field offices, the Panel recommends that procurement, logistics, staff recruitment and other support services for all such smaller, non-military field missions be provided by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). 19. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: the Panel recommends substantially enhancing the field mission planning and preparation capacity of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with funding partly from the regular budget and partly from peace operations mission budgets. 20. Peace operations and the information age: (a) Headquarters peace and security departments need a responsibility centre to devise and58 A/55/305 S/2000/809 oversee the implementation of common information technology strategy and training for peace operations, residing in EISAS. Mission counterparts to the responsibility centre should also be appointed to serve in the offices of the special representatives of the Secretary-General in complex peace operations to oversee the implementation of that strategy; (b) EISAS, in cooperation with the Information Technology Services Division (ITSD), should implement an enhanced peace operations element on the current United Nations Intranet and link it to the missions through a Peace Operations Extranet (POE); (c) Peace operations could benefit greatly from more extensive use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, which quickly integrates operational information with electronic maps of the mission area, for applications as diverse as demobilization, civilian policing, voter registration, human rights monitoring and reconstruction; (d) The IT needs of mission components with unique information technology needs, such as civilian police and human rights, should be anticipated and met more consistently in mission planning and implementation; (e) The Panel encourages the development of web site co-management by Headquarters and the field missions, in which Headquarters would maintain oversight but individual missions would have staff authorized to produce and post web content that conforms to basic presentational standards and policy.Nations Unies A/55/305–S/2000/809 Assemblée générale Conseil de sécurité Distr. générale 21 août 2000 Français Original: anglais 00-59471 (F) 180800 180800 ````````` Assemblée générale Cinquante-cinquième session Point 87 de l’ordre du jour provisoire* Étude d’ensemble de toute la question des opérations de maintien de la paix sous tous leurs aspects Conseil de sécurité Cinquante-cinquième année Lettres identiques datées du 21 août 2000, adressées au Président de l’Assemblée générale et au Président du Conseil de sécurité par le Secrétaire général Le 7 mars 2000, j’ai chargé un groupe de haut niveau d’entreprendre une étude approfondie des activités de l’ONU dans le domaine de la paix et de la sécurité, et de présenter un ensemble clair de recommandations précises, concrètes et pratiques afin de permettre à l’ONU de mener ces activités de façon plus satisfaisante à l’avenir. J’ai prié M. Lakhdar Brahimi, ancien Ministre algérien des affaires étrangèrees de présider le groupe, qui se compose des éminentes personnalités ci-après, venaan de toutes les régions du monde, et qui ont une vaste expérience en matière de maintien de la paix, consolidation de la paix, développement et assistance humanitaair : M. J. Brian Atwood, M. Colin Granderson, Mme Ann Hercus, M. Richard Monk, le général Klaus Naumann (c. r.), Mme Hisako Shimura, M. Vladimir Shustoov le général Philip Sibanda et M. Cornelio Sommaruga. Je vous serais reconnaissant de porter le rapport du Groupe de travail, que m’a communiqué son président sous une lettre de couverture en date du 17 août 2000, et qui figure ci-joint, à l’attention des États Membres. L’analyse réalisée par le Groupe est franche mais équitable; ses recommandations impliquent de profonds changemennts mais elles sont réalistes et concrètes. Leur mise en oeuvre rapide est, selon moi, essentielle pour que l’ONU devienne véritablement une force crédible de paix. Nombre des recommandations du Groupe concernent des questions qui relèveen de la seule compétence du Secrétaire général, alors que d’autres doivent être approuvées et appuyées par les organes délibérants de l’ONU. J’exhorte tous les États Membres à examiner et à approuver à leur tour ces recommandations, et à en appuyer l’application. À cet égard, j’ai le plaisir de vous faire savoir que j’ai chargé la Vice-Secrétaire générale d’y donner suite et de superviser les préparatifs d’un plan d’application détaillé, que je présenterai à l’Assemblée générale et au Conseil * A/55/150.ii n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 de sécurité. Je souhaite vivement que le rapport du Groupe, et en particulier son résumé, soit porté à l’attention de tous les dirigeants qui viendront à New York en septembre 2000 pour participer au Sommet du millénaire. Cette réunion historique de haut niveea nous offre une occasion exceptionnelle d’engager le processus de renouvellemeen de la capacité de l’ONU à instaurer et à conforter la paix. Je demande à l’Assemblée générale et au Conseil de sécurité de m’aider à faire du vaste prograamm recommandé par le Groupe dans son rapport une réalité. (Signé) Kofi A. Annann0059471.doc iii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Lettre datée du 17 août 2000, adressée au Secrétaire général par le Président du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies Le Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies, qui a été constitué à votre demande en mars 2000, a eu l’honneur de se voir confier l’évaluation de l’aptitude des Nations Unies à mener des opérations de paix efficacees et d’être appelé à formuler des recommandations franches, précises et réalistes sur les moyens d’améliorer cette aptitude. M. Brian Atwood, l’Ambassadeur Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, M. Richard Monk, le général Klaus Naumann, Mme Hisako Shimura, l’Ambassadeur Vladimir Shustov, le général Philip Sibanda, M. Cornelio Sommaruga et moi-même avons accepté de relever ce défi à cause du profond respect que nous éprouvons pour vous et parce que chacun d’entre nous est fermement convaincu que le système des Nations Unies peut mieux servir la cause de la paix. Nous vous admirons profondément d’avoir accepté que soient réalisées des analyses extrêmement critiques des opérations des Nations Unies menées au Rwanda et à Srebrenica. Un tel degré d’autocritique est rare de la part de toute grande organisation et en particulier de la part de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Nous tenons également à rendre hommage à la Vice-Secrétaire générale, Mme Louise Fréchette, et au Chef de cabinet, M. S. Iqbal Riza, qui sont restés à nos côtés pendant toutes nos réunions et qui ont toujours clairement répondu à nos nombreuses questions avec une patience indéfectible. Ils n’ont pas été avares de leur temps, et nous avons retiré un immense profit de leur connaissance intime des déficiences actuelles de l’Organisation des Nations Unies et de ses besoins futurs. Évaluer un système aussi important et aussi complexe que les opérations de paix des Nations Unies et formuler des recommandations en vue d’une réforme en l’espace de quatre mois seulement a représenté une énorme tâche qu’il aurait été impossible de mener à bien sans le dévouement et le travail acharné de M. William Durch (secondé par le personnel du Centre Stimson) et de M. Salman Ahmed du Secrétariat de l’ONU, et sans la coopération de fonctionnaires des Nations Unies de tout le système, notamment des chefs de mission en exercice, qui ont sans hésitation accepté de répondre avec franchise à nos questions et ont souvent procédé à une critique approfondie de leur propre organisation et de leur propre expérience. D’anciens chefs d’opérations de paix et d’anciens commandants de forces des Nations Unies, des universitaires et des représentants d’organisations non gouvernementales nous ont aussi beaucoup aidés. Le Groupe d’étude s’est lancé dans un vif débat. De longues heures ont été consacrées à l’examen de recommandations et d’analyses qui – nous le savions – seraient passées au crible et interprétées. Au cours de trois réunions de trois jours chacune, tenues à New York, Genève puis New York de nouveau, nous avons forgé la lettre et l’esprit du rapport ci-joint. L’analyse et les recommandations que celui-ci contient sont l’expression de notre consensus et nous vous les livrons dans l’espoir qu’elles serviront la cause de la réforme systématique et du renouveau de cette fonction essentielle de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Comme nous le disons dans le rapport, nous avons conscience que vous procédde actuellement à une ample réforme du Secrétariat. Nous espérons donc que nos recommandations s’insèrent dans ce processus plus large, moyennant, au besoin, deiv n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 légères modifications. Nous savons bien que toutes nos recommandations ne pourroon être appliquées du jour au lendemain, mais bon nombre d’entre elles nécessitent que des mesures soient prises d’urgence et l’appui sans faille des États Membres. Tous ces derniers mois, nous avons lu et entendu des propos encourageants émanant d’États Membres, petits et grands, du Sud et du Nord, qui soulignaient la nécessité d’améliorer d’urgence la façon dont l’Organisation des Nations Unies fait face aux situations de conflit. Nous les prions instamment d’agir énergiquement afin que se concrétisent celles de nos recommandations qui nécessitent des mesures de leur part. Le Groupe ne doute nullement que le haut fonctionnaire que nous souhaiteriion vous voir désigner pour superviser l’application de nos recommandations, à la fois au sein même du Secrétariat et avec les États Membres, bénéficiera de votre plein appui, puisque vous êtes résolu à faire de l’Organisation des Nations Unies le type d’institution du XXIe siècle qu’elle se doit d’être pour désamorcer effectivemeen les menaces actuelles et futures contre la paix mondiale. Enfin – si je peux me permettre une note personnelle – je tiens à exprimer ma plus profonde gratitude à chacun de mes collègues du Groupe d’étude. Ils ont collectiivemen fait bénéficier ce projet d’une masse impressionnante de connaissances et de données d’expérience. Ils ont toujours fait montre d’un attachement indéfectibbl à l’Organisation et apporté la preuve qu’ils comprennent parfaitement ses besoiins Lors de nos réunions et à l’occasion de nos contacts à distance, ils se sont toujours montrés extrêmement aimables à mon égard, et ont toujours été d’un grand secours, patients et généreux, facilitant ainsi ma tâche de Président, qui aurait pu être ingrate, et me permettant de l’assumer avec un réel plaisir. Le Président du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies (Signé) Lakhdar Brahimin0059471.doc v A/55/305 S/2000/809 Rapport du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix de l’Organisation des Nations Unies Table des matières Paragraphe Page Résumé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii I. Impératif du changement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 1 II. Doctrine, stratégie et prise de décisions concernant les opérations de paix . . . . . . . 9–83 2 A. Définition des éléments des opérations de paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 2 B. Les leçons du passé. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–28 3 C. Implications pour l’action préventive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–34 6 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant l’action préventive . . . 34 7 D. Implications pour la stratégie de consolidation de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–47 7 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la consolidation de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 9 E. Implications pour la doctrine et la stratégie de maintien de la paix . . . . . . . . . 48–55 10 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la doctrine et la stratégie de maintien de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 11 F. Des mandats clairs, crédibles et réalistes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–64 11 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant les mandats . . . . . . . . . 64 13 G. Capacités en matière de collecte et d’analyse d’informations et de planification stratégique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65–75 13 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la gestion de l’information et l’analyse stratégique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 15 H. Problèmes posés par la mise en place d’une administration civile transitoire . 76–83 15 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant l’administration civile transitoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 16 III. Capacités de l’ONU à mener une opération rapidement et efficacement . . . . . . . . . 84–169 16 A. Ce qui implique un « déploiement rapide et efficace » . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–91 17 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la détermination des calendriers de déploiement des opérations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 18 B. Une équipe dirigeante efficace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–101 18 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la direction des missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 19 C. Personnel militaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–117 20 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le personnel militaire . 117 23vi n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 D. Police civile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–126 23 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le personnel de police civile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 24 E. Spécialistes civils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127–145 25 1. Absence d’arrangements relatifs aux forces en attente qui permettent de répondre à des demandes inattendues ou importantes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128–132 25 2. Difficultés rencontrées pour ce qui est d’attirer et de retenir les meilleurs éléments externes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133–135 26 3. Pénuries de personnel dans les services administratifs et d’appui (postes de rang intermédiaire ou supérieur) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 27 4. Une pénalisation de fait du personnel des missions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–138 27 5. Obsolescence de la catégorie Service mobile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139–140 28 6. Absence de stratégie d’ensemble pour le recrutement du personnel des opérations de paix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141–144 28 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant les spécialistes civils . 145 29 F. Capacité d’information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146–150 29 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la création d’une capacité d’information rapidement déployable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 30 G. Soutien logistique, passation des marchés et gestion des dépenses . . . . . . . . . 151–169 30 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le soutien logistique et la gestion des dépenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 33 IV. Planification des opérations de maintien de la paix et services d’appui : moyens et structure disponibles au Siège . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170–245 33 A. Niveau des effectifs et financement des services d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix situés au Siège . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172–197 34 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le financement de l’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix fourni par le Siège . . . . . . . . . . 197 39 B. Création d’équipes spéciales intégrées : justification et proposition . . . . . . . . 198–217 40 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant une planification et un soutien intégrés dans le cadre des missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 43 C. Autres ajustements structurels à apporter au sein du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218–233 43 1. Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219–225 44 2. Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions . . . . . . . . . . 226–228 45 3. Groupe des enseignements tirés des missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229–230 45n0059471.doc vii A/55/305 S/2000/809 4. Personnel de direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231–233 46 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant les autres ajustements structurels proposés pour le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 46 D. Ajustements structurels requis hors du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234–245 47 1. Appui opérationnel en matière d’information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235–238 47 Résumé de la principale recommandation concernant les ajustements structurels requis en matière d’information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 47 2. Département des affaires politiques : appui aux activités de consolidation de la paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239–243 47 Résumé des principales recommandations concernant l’appui aux activités de consolidation de la paix au Département des affaires politiques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 48 3. Appui fourni aux opérations de paix par le Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244–245 49 Résumé de la principale recommandation concernant le renforcement du Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 49 V. Les opérations de maintien de la paix à l’ère de l’information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246–264 49 A. Les technologies de l’information dans les opérations de paix : questions relatives aux stratégies et aux politiques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247–251 49 Résumé de la recommandation concernant la stratégie et la politique relatives aux technologies de l’information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 50 B. Outils de gestion des connaissances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252–258 50 Résumés des principales recommandations concernant l’usage des outils informatiques dans les opérations de paix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 51 C. Mieux actualiser les informations proposées sur l’Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259–264 52 Résumé de la principale recommandation concernant l’actualisation des informations diffusées sur l’Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 52 VI. Application des recommandations : les défis à relever. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265–280 52 Annexes I. Membres du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 II. Références . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 III. Résumé des recommandations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62viii n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Résumé L’Organisation des Nations Unies a été fondée, selon sa Charte, pour « préservve les générations futures du fléau de la guerre ». Relever ce défi constitue la fonctiio la plus importante de l’Organisation et, dans une large mesure, le critère par rapport auquel elle est jugée par les peuples au service desquels elle se trouve. Au cours des dix dernières années, l’ONU a connu plusieurs échecs face à ce défi, et elle n’est guère en mesure de faire mieux aujourd’hui. À moins d’un engagement renouuvel de la part de ses membres, de changements institutionnels importants et d’un appui financier plus solide, l’ONU n’aura pas les moyens, dans les mois et les années qui viennent, d’exécuter les tâches cruciales de maintien et de consolidation de la paix que les États Membres lui confient. Il est certes beaucoup de tâches que les forces de maintien de la paix de l’ONU ne devraient pas se voir demander d’accomplir, et beaucoup d’endroits où elles ne devraient pas être déployées. Mais une fois que l’ONU envoie ses forces quelque part pour y soutenir la paix, ces forces devraient être en mesure d’affronter sur place les forces rémanentes de la guerre et de la violence avec les moyens et la volonté de les vaincre. Le Secrétaire général a demandé au Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix – dont les membres ont l’expérience de divers aspects de la prévention des conflits et du maintien et de la consolidation de la paix – d’évaluer les insuffisances du systèèm actuel et de lui faire des recommandations franches, précises et réalistes en vue de le modifier. Nos recommandations ne sont pas seulement axées sur les aspects politiques ou stratégiques, mais aussi, et peut-être même plus, sur les déficiences opérationnelles et organisationnelles. Pour que ses actions préventives réussissent à réduire les tensions et à prévenir les conflits, le Secrétaire général doit bénéficier d’un appui politique manifeste, soliid et soutenu de la part des États Membres. Plus encore, si l’on veut que des opérattion complexes de maintien de la paix atteignent leur objectif, les meilleures intenttion du monde ne sauraient remplacer l’élément essentiel à leur succès : la crédibiilit que donne la capacité d’agir. L’ONU en a fait l’amère expérience à plusieurs reprises au cours des dix dernières années. Mais la force à elle seule ne saurait engenndre la paix; elle ne peut qu’ouvrir un espace dans lequel la paix pourra être édifiiée Qui plus est, les changements recommandés par le Groupe n’auront un impact durable que si les États Membres mobilisent la volonté politique d’appuyer l’ONU sur les plans politique, financier et opérationnel afin de lui permettre de devenir une force de paix véritablement crédible. Chacune des recommandations formulées dans le présent rapport vise à corrigee un grave problème d’orientation stratégique, de prise de décisions, de rapidité de déploiement, de planification et de soutien des opérations et d’utilisation des moyens informatiques modernes. On trouvera ci-dessous une synthèse des principalle constatations et recommandations, généralement présentées dans l’ordre où elles apparaissent dans le corps du rapport (les numéros des paragraphes correspondants du rapport sont indiqués entre parenthèses). Un résumé des recommandations est également donné en annexe.n0059471.doc ix A/55/305 S/2000/809 Les leçons du passé (par. 15 à 28) Il n’y a rien d’étonnant à ce que certaines des missions des dix dernières annéée se soient révélées particulièrement difficiles : elles avaient tendance à être déplooyée dans des situations où la guerre n’avait apporté la victoire à aucun des protagonnistes où les hostilités avaient certes cessé soit à cause d’une impasse militaire, soit sous la pression internationale, ou pour ces deux raisons à la fois, mais où au moins quelques-unes des parties n’étaient pas vraiment prêtes à mettre un terme au conflit. Loin donc d’être déployées dans des situations d’après-conflit, les opératiion de l’ONU s’efforçaient de les créer. Dans des opérations complexes de ce genre, les Casques bleus tentent de créer un environnement sûr sur le plan de la sécurrité tandis que leurs collègues civils s’efforcent de faire en sorte que cet environnemmen puisse se maintenir de lui-même. Seul un tel environnement offre en effet aux forces de maintien de la paix la possibilité d’un retrait dans de bonnes conditioons ce qui explique que les personnels militaires et civils chargés respectivement du maintien et de la consolidation de la paix soient des partenaires indissociables. Implications pour l’action préventive et la consolidation de la paix : importance de la stratégie et de l’appui technique (par. 29 à 47) Il est nécessaire et urgent pour l’ONU et pour ses membres de mettre en place des stratégies plus efficaces de prévention des conflits, tant sur le moyen que sur le court terme. Dans ce contexte, le Groupe souscrit aux recommandations sur la prévenntio des conflits formulées par le Secrétaire général dans son Rapport du Millénaair (A/54/2000) et dans l’allocution qu’il a prononcée devant le Conseil de sécuriit lors de la deuxième séance publique que celui-ci a consacrée à l’action préventiiv en juillet 2000. Il encourage également le Secrétaire général à dépêcher plus fréquemment des missions d’établissement des faits dans les zones de tension à titre de mesure immédiate de prévention des crises. En outre, le Conseil de sécurité et le Comité spécial de l’Assemblée générale sur les opérations de maintien de la paix, conscients que l’ONU continuera de se voir demander d’aider des communautés et des nations à gérer leur transition de la guerre à la paix, ont l’un et l’autre reconnu le rôle essentiel de la consolidation de la paix dans les opérations complexes de maintien de la paix. Il faudra en conséquence que les organismes des Nations Unies corrigent ce qui a été jusqu’à maintenant une carence fondamentale dans la façon dont ils concevaient, finançaient et mettaient en oeuvre leurs activités et stratégies de consolidation de la paix. Le Groupe recommaand donc que le Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité soumette au Secrétaire général un plan de renforcement des moyens permanents dont dispose l’ONU pour élaborer des stratégies de consolidation de la paix et gérer des programmes destinés à appuyer ces stratégies. Le Groupe préconise un certain nombre de changements, dont les suivants : la doctrine d’emploi de la police et des autres membres du personnel des opérations de paix chargés de restaurer l’état de droit devrait être modifiée de façon à favoriser le travail d’équipe chaque fois qu’il s’agit de promouvoir l’état de droit et le respect des droits de l’homme et d’aider les communautés à renoncer au conflit en faveur de la réconciliation nationale; les programmes de désarmement, démobilisation et réinserrtio devraient être inclus dans les budgets ordinaires des opérations de paix compleexe dès leur phase initiale; les chefs des opérations de paix de l’ONU devraient se voir donner les moyens de financer des projets à impact rapide qui améliorent véx n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 ritablement la vie des habitants de la zone où est déployée une mission; et l’assistance électorale devrait être mieux intégrée à une stratégie élargie d’appui aux institutions. Implications pour le maintien de la paix : nécessité d’une doctrine robuste et de mandats réalistes (par. 48 à 64) Le Groupe convient que l’accord des parties locales, l’impartialité et la limitatiio de l’emploi de la force aux cas de légitime défense doivent rester les principes fondamentaux du maintien de la paix. L’expérience a montré, cependant, que dans le cas de conflits internes/transnationaux, l’accord peut être manipulé de plusieurs façoons Dans le cadre des opérations de l’ONU, l’impartialité doit par conséquent signiifie l’adhésion aux principes de la Charte : lorsqu’une partie à un accord de paix en viole les clauses de façon claire et irréfragable, le fait pour l’ONU de continuer à accorder le même traitement à toutes les parties risque, au mieux, de compromettre l’efficacité de l’Organisation, et, au pire, de la rendre complice du crime. Rien n’a été plus préjudiciable à la réputation et à la crédibilité de l’ONU en matière de maintien de la paix au fil des années 1990 que sa réticence à distinguer entre la victiim et son agresseur. L’ONU s’est souvent par le passé trouvée incapable de répondre de façon efficaac à ce genre de situation. Le présent rapport pose cependant comme une prémisse fondamentale qu’elle doit être capable de le faire. Une fois sur le terrain, les Casquue bleus doivent être capables d’accomplir leur mission de façon professionnelle et efficace. Cela veut dire que les unités militaires de l’ONU doivent être capables de se défendre elles-mêmes, de défendre les autres composantes de la mission, et de défendre le mandat de celle-ci. Les règles d’engagement doivent être suffisamment fermes pour que les contingents de l’ONU ne soient pas contraints d’abandonner l’initiative à leurs agresseurs. Cela veut dire, corollairement, que le Secrétariat ne doit pas appliquer des hypothhèse de planification favorables à des situations dont les acteurs locaux ont largemmen fait la preuve que leur comportement serait défavorable. Cela veut dire que les mandats devraient préciser qu’une opération donnée est autorisée à employer la force. Cela veut dire des forces plus nombreuses, mieux équipées et plus coûteuses, mais aussi capables d’avoir un effet plus dissuasif. Les forces de l’ONU travaillant dans le cadre d’opérations complexes devraient, en particulier, se voir doter de moyens de renseignement sur le terrain et des ressources voulues pour opposer une défense efficace à des agressions violentes. De plus, les soldats de la paix de l’ONU – militaires ou policiers – qui sont témoins de violences à l’égard de civils devraient jouir d’une autorisation implicite de faire cesser ces violences, dans la mesure de leurs moyens et au nom des princippe fondamentaux de l’ONU. Les opérations dans le mandat desquelles la protection des civils est prévue de façon générale et explicite doivent être dotées des moyens requis pour s’acquitter de cette partie de leur mission. Lorsque le Secrétariat formule des recommandations concernant les effectifs et autres moyens nécessités par une mission nouvelle, il doit dire au Conseil de sécuriit ce que ce dernier doit savoir plutôt que ce qu’il veut entendre, et il doit estimer ces effectifs et autres moyens sur la base de scénarios réalistes qui tiennent compte des obstacles probables à l’accomplissement de la mission. De leur côté, les mandats donnés par le Conseil de sécurité devraient manifester la clarté indispensable à lan0059471.doc xi A/55/305 S/2000/809 cohésion des efforts des opérations de maintien de la paix lorsqu’elles sont déplooyée dans des situations potentiellement dangereuses. Selon la pratique actuelle, le Secrétaire général reçoit du Conseil de sécurité une résolution qui précise, sur le papier, le nombre de militaires requis, mais il ne sait pas si on lui donnera effectivement ces militaires et les autres personnels nécessaiire au bon fonctionnement de la mission, ni s’ils seront correctement équipés. Le Groupe estime qu’il faut d’abord fixer d’un commun accord et de façon réaliste les besoins d’une mission, et que le Conseil devrait différer l’adoption de son projet de résolution jusqu’à ce que le Secrétaire général confirme qu’il a reçu des États Membrre suffisamment de promesses de contribuer des troupes et autres moyens pour satisffair ces besoins. Les États Membres qui s’engagent à fournir à une opération des unités militairre constituées devraient être invités à des consultations avec les membres du Conseil de sécurité pendant la période de formulation du mandat de l’opération; ce genre de consultation pourrait être utilement institutionnalisé en créant des organes subsidiaires spéciaux du Conseil comme prévu à l’Article 29 de la Charte. Les pays qui fournissent des contingents à une opération devraient également être invités à assister aux exposés que le Secrétariat fait au Conseil en cas de crise menaçant la sécurité du personnel des missions ou de changement ou de réinterprétation des termme du mandat gouvernant l’emploi de la force. Création d’une unité de gestion de l’information et d’analyse stratégique au Siège (par. 65 à 75) Le Groupe recommande la création d’une unité de gestion de l’information et d’analyse stratégique chargée de satisfaire les besoins du Secrétaire général et des membres du Conseil exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité en matière d’information et d’analyse. En l’absence d’une unité de ce genre, le Secrétariat restera une institution à la remorque des événements, incapable de les anticiper, et le Comité exécutif ne sera pas en état de remplir le rôle pour lequel il a été créé. Le Groupe propose donc que soit mis sur pied un Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique (SIAS) du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité (CEPS) chargé de créer et de gérer des bases de données intégrées sur les questions relatives à la paix et à la sécurité, d’assurer une diffusion rationnelle de ces données au sein du système des Nations Unies, de produire des analyses axées sur les politiques, de formuler des stratégies à long terme à l’intention du CEPS et de porter les menaces de crises à son attention. Le SIAS pourrait aussi proposer et gérer l’ordre du jour du CEPS, contribuant ainsi à en faire l’organe décisionnel que prévoyaient les réformes initiales du Secrétaire général. Le Groupe propose que le SIAS soit créé en regroupant le Centre de situation du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix et un certain nombre de bureeau de planification des politiques, épars et peu fournis en effectifs, et en leur adjoiggnan une petite équipe d’analystes militaires, de spécialistes des réseaux crimineel internationaux et d’experts en systèmes d’information. Le SIAS devrait réponddr aux besoins de tous les membres du CEPS.xii n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Amélioration de l’orientation et de la direction des missions (par. 92 à 101) Le Groupe estime essentiel de rassembler les dirigeants d’une nouvelle mission au Siège des Nations Unies le plus tôt possible afin de les faire participer à l’élaboration du concept d’opérations, du plan d’appui administratif, du budget et des tableaux d’effectifs de la mission ainsi qu’à la formulation de ses grandes orientations. Pour cela, il recommande que le Secrétaire général compile de façon systématique, et avec le concours des États Membres, un vaste fichier de Représentaant spéciaux, commandants de force, chefs de la police civile et adjoints potentiels, qui comprendrait également les noms de candidats potentiels à la direction des autrre composantes organiques d’une mission, et qui justifierait d’une large représentattio géographique et d’une répartition équitable entre les sexes. Normes de déploiement rapide et personnel spécialisé sous astreinte (par. 86 à 91 et 102 à 169) Les six à 12 semaines qui suivent un cessez-le-feu ou la conclusion d’un accoor de paix sont souvent la période la plus critique pour l’instauration d’une paix stable et la crédibilité d’une nouvelle opération. Les occasions perdues durant cette période se représentent rarement. Le Groupe d’étude recommande que l’Organisation des Nations Unies revoie la définition de la « capacité de déploiement rapide et efficace » de façon à entendre par-là l’aptitude à déployer pleinement des opérations de maintien de la paix de type classique dans un délai de 30 jours à compter de l’adoption de la résolution du Conseil de sécurité créant une telle opération, ou dans un délai de 90 jours dans le cas d’une opération complexe. Le Groupe d’étude recommande d’élargir le Système de forces et moyens en attente pour y inclure plusieurs forces multinationales homogènes de la taille d’une brigade, dotées des éléments précurseurs nécessaires, qui seraient établies par des États Membres en concertation, de façon à pouvoir disposer de forces solides pour le maintien de la paix, comme il l’a préconisé. Il recommande également que le Secréttaria envoie une équipe sur place pour déterminer, préalablement au déploiemeent si les États susceptibles de fournir des contingents sont prêts à répondre aux exigences des opérations de maintien de la paix en matière de formation et d’équipement. Les unités qui ne remplissent pas les conditions requises ne doivent pas être déployées. Pour faciliter un déploiement rapide et efficace, le Groupe d’étude recommaand l’établissement, dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente, d’une liste régulièrement actualisée de personnels sous astreinte – une centaine d’officiers expérimentés et parfaitement qualifiés –, qui serait soigneusement examiiné et approuvée par le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. Des équipes constituées à partir de cette liste, pouvant être mises à disposition dans les sept jours, seraient chargées de traduire dans des plans d’opérations concrets et tactiqques avant le déploiement des contingents, les concepts stratégiques définis dans leurs grandes lignes au Siège pour les missions et viendraient renforcer un élément de base du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix pour faire partie d’une équipe de démarrage. Des listes parallèles de personnels sous astreinte en nombre suffisant seraient établies pour le personnel de police civile, les spécialistes des questions judiciaires àn0059471.doc xiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 l’échelle internationale, les experts en matière pénale et les spécialistes des droits de l’homme pour renforcer selon les besoins, les institutions chargées de faire respecter la loi, également dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente. Des équippe préalablement formées pourraient alors être constituées à partir de cette liste pour précéder l’élément principal de police civile et les spécialistes qui l’accompagnent dans la zone d’établissement d’une nouvelle mission, ce qui faciliteraai le déploiement rapide et efficace de la composante de la mission ayant trait au maintien de l’ordre. Le Groupe d’étude demande également aux États Membres de constituer des réserves nationales renforcées de personnel de police civile et d’experts apparentés désignés à l’avance en vue de leur déploiement pour des opérations de paix des Natiion Unies, pour aider à satisfaire les besoins importants en services de personnel de police civile et en spécialistes dans des domaines apparentés (justice pénaalerespect de la loi) dans le cas des opérations en rapport avec un conflit interne. Le Groupe d’étude exhorte en outre les États Membres à envisager de mettre en place des programmes et partenariats régionaux conjoints pour former les membres de leurs réserves nationales respectives à la doctrine et aux normes des Nations Unies applicables à la police civile. En outre, le Secrétariat devrait prendre d’urgence des dispositions dans les domaines suivants : mise en place d’un mécanisme transparent et décentralisé de recruttemen de personnel civil pour les missions, moyens de retenir au service des Nations Unies les spécialistes civils que requièrent les opérations de paix complexes et mise au point d’arrangements concernant le personnel en attente de sorte qu’il puisse être déployé rapidement. Enfin, le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Secrétariat modifie radicalement les systèmes et pratiques existants concernant les achats afin de faciliter le déploiemeen rapide des missions. Il recommande en particulier que la responsabilité de la budgétisation et des achats pour les opérations de maintien de la paix soit confiée au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix et non plus au Département de la gestion. Il propose que soit élaboré un nouvel ensemble de règles et pratiques simpliffiée dans ce domaine, d’accorder des pouvoirs accrus aux bureaux hors Siège en ce qui concerne les achats et de faire en sorte que les missions puissent gérer leur budget avec plus de souplesse. En outre, il demande instamment au Secrétaire générra d’élaborer, pour la soumettre à l’Assemblée générale aux fins d’approbation, une stratégie mondiale d’appui logistique régissant la constitution des réserves d’équipement et la conclusion de contrats-cadres auprès du secteur privé pour la fourniture de biens et services courants. Entre-temps, il recommande que la Base de soutien logistique de l’Organisation des Nations Unies à Brindisi (Italie) ait à sa disposition un plus grand nombre de lots d’équipement de base pour les phases de démarrage. Le Groupe recommande en outre que le Secrétaire général soit autorisé, avec l’approbation du Comité consultatif pour les questions administratives et budgétairre (CCQAB), à engager des dépenses à concurrence de 50 millions de dollars bien avant l’adoption par le Conseil de sécurité d’une résolution établissant une opération nouvelle lorsqu’il est évident que l’opération sera vraisemblablement créée.xiv n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Renforcement des moyens dont dispose le Siège pour planifier et appuyer les opérations de paix (par. 170 à 197) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que l’appui du Siège aux opérations de maintiie de la paix soit considéré comme une activité de base de l’Organisation des Natiion Unies et, par conséquent que la plus grande partie des ressources requises à cette fin soient inscrites au budget ordinaire de l’Organisation. À présent, le Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix et les autres bureaux qui planifient et appuient ces opérations sont essentiellement financés à l’aide du compte d’appui, qui est reconstitué chaque année et qui ne permet de financer que des postes temporaiires Cette approche du financement et de la dotation en personnel semble refléter une confusion entre le caractère temporaire de telle ou telle opération et le fait évideen que le maintien de la paix et autres activités au titre des opérations de paix ont un caractère permanent et constituent des fonctions de base de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Il est certain que cet état de choses doit cesser. Le montant total des dépenses du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix et des bureaux du Secrétariat fournissant des services d’appui connexes pour ces opérations ne dépasse pas 50 millions de dollars par an, soit à peu près 2 % du coût total des opérations de maintien de la paix. Il faut de toute urgence mettre des ressources supplémentaires à la disposition de ces bureaux pour faire en sorte que les fonds qui seront consacrés au maintien de la paix en 2001, soit plus de 2 milliards de dollars, soient utilisés rationnellement. Le Groupe d’étude recommaand par conséquent que le Secrétaire général soumette à l’Assemblée générale une proposition indiquant l’intégralité des moyens dont l’Organisation a besoin. Le Groupe d’étude estime qu’il faudrait procéder à un examen méthodique de la gestion du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, mais il considère par ailleurs que l’insuffisance des effectifs dans certains domaines est flagrante. Signallons à titre d’exemple, que l’on ne dispose que de 32 officiers pour assurer la planification militaire et donner des orientations aux 27 000 hommes qui se trouvent sur le terrain, de neuf membres de la police civile pour sélectionner, confirmer et orienter plus de 8 600 agents et de 15 spécialistes des affaires politiques pour s’occuper des 14 opérations en cours et de deux nouvelles; de même, il n’est alloué que 1,25 % du coût total des opérations de maintien de la paix aux services d’appui administratif et logistique du Siège. Création d’équipes spéciales intégrées pour la planification des missions et les services d’appui (par. 198 à 245) Le Groupe d’étude recommande de créer des équipes spéciales intégrées, en leur adjoignant du personnel détaché de tout le système des Nations Unies, pour planifier les missions nouvelles et les aider à exécuter intégralement les plans de déploieement ce qui renforcerait considérablement l’appui fourni aux missions. Il n’existe pas actuellement au Secrétariat de cellule intégrée de planification ou d’appui qui permettrait de réunir les responsables de l’analyse des politiques, des opérations militaires, de la police civile, de l’assistance électorale, des droits de l’homme, du développement, de l’assistance humanitaire, des réfugiés et personnes déplacées, de l’information, de la logistique, des finances et du recrutement. Des ajustement structurels sont également requis dans d’autres secteurs du Départtemen des opérations de maintien de la paix, en particulier à la Division du personnne militaire et de la police civile, qui devrait être scindée en deux divisions, et àn0059471.doc xv A/55/305 S/2000/809 la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions, qui devrait elle aussi être scindée en deux. Le Groupe des enseignements tirés de l’expérience des missiion devrait être renforcé et rattaché au Bureau des opérations du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. Il faut aussi renforcer les services de planification et d’appui en matière d’information au Siège, ainsi que certaines unités du Départemeen des affaires politiques, en particulier le Groupe électoral. À l’extérieur du Secrétaariat il faut renforcer les moyens dont dispose le Haut Commissariat des Natiion Unies aux droits de l’homme pour planifier et appuyer les composantes des opérations de paix ayant trait aux droits de l’homme. Il faudrait envisager de créer au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix un troisième poste de sous-secrétaire général, le titulaire de l’un des trois postte ayant le titre de sous-secrétaire général principal et exerçant les fonctions d’adjoint du Secrétaire général adjoint. Adapter les opérations de paix à l’âge de l’information (par. 246 à 264) Le recours à des technologies d’information modernes judicieusement utilisées est l’un des instruments clefs de la réalisation d’un grand nombre des objectifs indiquué plus haut; toutefois, des insuffisances d’ordre stratégique, méthodologique et pratique font obstacle à leur utilisation efficace. En particulier, il n’a pas été établi au Siège de responsabilités centrales quant à la stratégie et la politique applicables pour l’application de ces technologies aux opérations de paix. Il faudrait confier cette fonction, dans le domaine de la paix et de la sécurité, à un haut fonctionnaire qui travaillerait dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente, des homoloogue étant désignés dans les bureaux des représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire général pour chaque opération de paix des Nations Unies. Il faudrait aussi mettre en place, à l’intention du Siège et des missions sur le terrain, un réseau Extranet mondial pour les opérations de paix, qui permettrait aux missions d’avoir accès, entre autres, aux bases de données et analyses du Système de forces et moyens en attente ainsi qu’aux enseignements tirés de l’expérience des missions. Application des recommandations : les défis à relever (par. 265 à 280) Le Groupe estime que ces recommandations entrent parfaitement dans le cadre de ce que l’on peut raisonnablement attendre des États Membres de l’Organisation. L’application de certaines d’entre elles exigera certes que l’Organisation soit dotée de ressources supplémentaires, mais cela ne veut nullement dire que le meilleur moyen de résoudre les problèmes de l’Organisation consiste simplement à y affecter davantage de ressources. En vérité, l’allocation de fonds ou de ressources ne peut en aucun cas se substituer aux modifications importantes qu’il est impératif d’apporter à la culture de l’Organisation. Le Groupe d’étude exhorte le Secrétariat à s’inspirer des initiatives prises par le Secrétaire général pour tendre la main aux institutions de la société civile, en ayant constamment à l’esprit que l’Organisation des Nations Unies qu’ils servent est l’organisation universelle par excellence. Les peuples du monde entier sont parfaitemmen en droit de considérer l’ONU comme leur organisation et donc à porter un jugement sur ses activités et ceux qui les exécutent.xvi n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Par ailleurs, la qualité du personnel est extrêmement variable et les fonctionnaiire eux-mêmes sont les premiers à le reconnaître : les meilleurs d’entre eux sont confrontés à une charge de travail déraisonnable pour compenser les insuffisances de ceux qui sont moins compétents qu’eux. Tant que l’Organisation ne fera pas le nécessaire pour devenir une véritable méritocratie, elle ne pourra stopper l’hémorragie de personnel qualifié, parmi les jeunes en particulier. De plus, les personnne qualifiées ne trouveront aucun attrait à travailler pour elle. Si les responsablle à tous les niveaux, à commencer par le Secrétaire général et ses collaborateurs, ne s’attaquent pas sérieusement à ce problème en toute priorité, pour récompenser le mérite et écarter le personnel incompétent, des ressources supplémentaires seront gaspillées et il sera impossible de mettre en place des réformes durables. Les États Membres conviennent eux aussi qu’ils doivent s’interroger sur leur propre manière de procéder et leurs méthodes de travail. Il incombe aux membres du Conseil de sécurité, par exemple, et aux États Membres dans leur ensemble, de donnne une expression concrète à leurs déclarations et résolutions, comme l’a fait par exemple la délégation du Conseil qui s’est rendue à Jakarta et Dili lorsqu’a éclaté la crise au Timor oriental l’an dernier. On ne saurait trouver de meilleur exemple de ce que peut être le Conseil de sécurité lorsqu’il décide de passer à l’action. Les membres du Groupe d’étude exhortent les dirigeants du monde entier rassemmblé à l’occasion du Sommet du Millénaire pour renouveler leur attachement aux idéaux des Nations Unies, à s’engager en même temps à doter l’Organisation des Nations Unies de moyens renforcés pour qu’elle puisse s’acquitter pleinement de la mission qui est en fait sa véritable raison d’être : aider les populations en butte à des conflits et maintenir ou rétablir la paix. La recherche d’un consensus sur les recommandations à présenter dans ce rappoor a amené les membres du Groupe d’étude à se forger une idée commune de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, tendant une main ferme et secourable pour aider réellement une population, un pays ou une région à éviter que n’éclate un conflit ou à faire cesser la violence, et d’un Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général qui a mené à bonne fin sa mission et donné au peuple d’un pays la possibilité d’accomplir lui-même ce qui auparavant, était hors de sa portée : instaurer et consolider la paix, trouver la voie de la réconciliation, renforcer la démocratie, garantir le respect des droits de l’homme. Ce à quoi nous aspirons, avant tout, c’est à une Organisation des Nations Unies qui ait non seulement la volonté mais aussi les moyens de répondre aux espérances qu’elle a fait naître et de justifier la confiance que place en elle l’immense majorité des hommes.n0059471.doc 1 A/55/305 S/2000/809 I. Impératif du changement 1. L’Organisation des Nations Unies a été fondée, selon sa Charte, pour « préserver les générations futurre du fléau de la guerre ». Relever ce défi constitue la fonction la plus importante de l’Organisation et, dans une large mesure, le critère par rapport auquel elle est jugée par les peuples au service desquels elle se trouve. Au cours des 10 dernières années, l’ONU a connu plusieeur échecs face à ce défi, et elle n’est guère en mesuur de faire mieux aujourd’hui. À moins de changemeent institutionnels importants, d’un appui financier plus solide et d’un engagement renouvelé de la part de ses membres, l’ONU n’aura pas les moyens, dans les mois et les années qui viennent, d’exécuter les tâches cruciales de maintien et de consolidation de la paix que les États Membres lui confient. Il est certes beaucoup de tâches que les forces de maintien de la paix de l’ONU ne devraient pas se voir demander d’accomplir, et beaucoup d’endroits où elles ne devraient pas être déployées. Mais une fois que l’ONU envoie ses forces quelque part pour y soutenir la paix, ces forces devraaien être en mesure d’affronter sur place les forces rémanentes de la guerre et de la violence avec les moyens et la volonté de les vaincre. 2. Le Secrétaire général a demandé au Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix – dont les membres ont l’expérience de divers aspects de la prévention des conflits et du maintien et de la consolidation de la paix – d’évaluer les insuffisances du système actuel et de lui faire des recommandations franches, précises et réalistes en vue de le modifier. Nos recommandations ne sont pas seulement axées sur les aspects politiques ou stratégiques, mais aussi sur les déficiences opérationnnelle et organisationnelles. 3. Pour que ses actions préventives réussissent à réduire les tensions et à prévenir les conflits, le Secrétaair général doit bénéficier d’un appui politique manifesste solide et soutenu de la part des États Membres. Pour qu’une force de maintien de la paix atteigne son objectif, les meilleures intentions du monde ne sauraiien remplacer l’élément essentiel à son succès : la crédibilité que donne la capacité d’action. L’ONU en a fait l’expérience à maintes reprises au cours des 10 dernières années. Mais la force à elle seule ne saurait engendrer la paix; elle ne peut qu’ouvrir un espace dans lequel la paix pourra être édifiée. 4. En d’autres termes, appui politique, déploiement rapide d’une force solide pouvant adopter une attitude de fermeté et stratégie rationnelle de consolidation de la paix sont les conditions essentielles au succès des opérations complexes qui pourront être lancées à l’avenir. Toutes les recommandations figurant dans le présent rapport visent, en quelque sorte, à permettre de réunir ces trois conditions. L’impératif du changement s’est imposé avec d’autant plus de force au vu des derniier événements survenus en Sierra Leone et face à la perspective redoutable d’un élargissement des opératiion des Nations Unies en République démocratique du Congo. 5. Ces changements – essentiels certes – n’auront aucune incidence durable si les États Membres ne prennent au sérieux la responsabilité qui est la leur d’entraîner et d’équiper leurs propres forces et de les doter d’un mandat leur permettant d’agir collectivemeent afin qu’ensemble, elles puissent affronter avec succès les menaces à la paix. Ils doivent faire preuve de la volonté politique nécessaire pour apporter à l’Organisation un appui politique, financier et opératioonne dès lors qu’ils ont décidé d’agir dans le cadre des Nations Unies – si l’on veut assurer la crédibilité de l’Organisation en tant que force de paix. 6. Les recommandations que présente le Groupe d’étude s’efforcent d’allier principes et pragmatisme, tout en respectant l’esprit et la lettre de la Charte des Nations Unies et les rôles respectifs des organes délibéraant de l’Organisation. Elles se fondent sur les prémissse ci-après: a) C’est aux États Membres qu’incombent la responsabilité fondamentale du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationale et le renforcement – qualitatif comme quantitatif – de l’appui fourni au système des Nations Unies pour lui permettre de s’acquitter de ses responsabilités dans ce domaine; b) Il est crucial que le Conseil de sécurité assiggn des mandats clairs et crédibles aux missions et les dote de ressources adéquates; c) Le système des Nations Unies doit centrer son action sur la prévention des conflits et intervenir très rapidement chaque fois que cela est possible; d) Il faut améliorer la collecte et l’analyse des informations au Siège, et notamment renforcer le dispossiti d’alerte rapide qui permet de déceler ou de reconnnaîtr la menace ou le risque de conflit ou de génociide2 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 e) Il est essentiel que le système des Nations Unies, dans tous les aspects des activités concernant la paix et la sécurité, se conforme aux normes et instrumeent internationaux relatifs aux droits de l’homme et au droit international humanitaire, et en favorise l’application; f) Il faut doter l’Organisation de la capacité de contribuer à la consolidation de la paix, aussi bien avant qu’après les conflits, de manière véritablement intégrée; g) Il est essentiel d’améliorer la planification au Siège (y compris la planification pour imprévus) des opérations de paix; h) Il faut admettre que si l’Organisation a acquui des compétences considérables dans le domaine de la planification, de la mise sur pied et de l’exécution des opérations de maintien de la paix classiques, elle ne possède pas encore la capacité nécessaire pour le déploiiemen rapide d’opérations plus complexes, ni les moyens de les appuyer comme il convient; i) Il faut que le Siège nomme des chefs et directteur de missions hautement qualifiés qui, dans le cadre de mandats précis, jouiront d’une plus grande flexibilité et d’une plus large autonomie et devront rendre compte des dépenses engagées et des résultats obtenus; j) Il est impératif de fixer et de respecter des normes élevées de compétence et d’intégrité pour les personnels au Siège et sur le terrain, qui doivent recevooi la formation et l’appui nécessaires pour s’acquitter de leurs tâches et progresser dans leur carrière, en s’inspirant des pratiques modernes de gestion qui récompeensen le mérite et sanctionnent l’incompétence; k) Il est essentiel de tenir les fonctionnaires du Siège et les fonctionnaires sur le terrain responsables, à titre personnel, de l’exécution des tâches qui leur sont confiées, tout en reconnaissant qu’ils doivent être dotés des responsabilités, des pouvoirs et des ressources correspondantes. 7. Dans le présent rapport, le Groupe d’étude a étuddi les nombreux aspects du système des Nations Unies où un changement s’impose impérativement. Ses recommanndation constituent, à son avis, le seuil minimmu nécessaire pour faire du système des Nations Unies une institution du XXIe siècle, efficace, opérationnnelle 8. Les critiques sévères que contient le rapport sont le fruit de l’expérience collective du Groupe d’étude ainsi que des entretiens que ses membres ont eus avec des responsables à tous les échelons du système des Nations Unies. Plus de 200 personnes ont été interviewéée par le Groupe d’étude ou lui ont apporté leur contribution par écrit. Au nombre des sources, il faut citer les missions permanentes des États Membres, y compris les États membres du Conseil de sécurité ; le Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix et le personnel des départements chargés des questions relatives à la paix et à la sécurité du Siège des Nations Unies à New York, de l’Office des Nations Unies à Genève, du siège du Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme et du Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, du siège d’autres fonds et programmes de l’ONU; de la Banque mondiale ainsi que du personnel de toutes les opérations de paix des Nations Unies en cours. II. Doctrine, stratégie et prise de décisions concernant les opérations de paix 9. Le système des Nations Unies – États Membres, Conseil de sécurité, Assemblée générale et Secrétariia – doit s’engager en faveur d’opérations de paix avec prudence, en réfléchissant honnêtement sur le billa des opérations menées au cours de la dernière décennnie Il doit modifier en conséquence la doctrine sur laquelle sont fondées ces opérations, affiner ses mécanissme d’analyse et de prise de décisions pour répondre à la conjoncture actuelle et anticiper les exigences de l’avenir, et mobiliser la créativité, l’imagination et la volonté nécessaires pour trouver d’autres solutions face à des situations dans lesquelles les forces de maintien de la paix ne peuvent intervenir ou ne devraient pas être impliquées. A. Définition des éléments des opérations de paix 10. Les opérations de paix des Nations Unies font appel à trois activités principales : la prévention des conflits et le rétablissement de la paix, le maintien de la paix et la consolidation de la paix. La prévention à long terme des conflits s’intéresse à leurs sources structurelles afin de fonder la paix sur des bases solin0059471.doc 3 A/55/305 S/2000/809 des. Lorsque ces bases s’effritent, l’action préventive s’efforce de les renforcer, généralement sous forme d’initiatives diplomatiques. Une telle action exige par définition l’adoption d’un profil bas; en cas de succès, elle peut même passer inaperçue. 11. Le rétablissement de la paix vise les conflits en cours et s’efforce de les désamorcer par la diplomatie et la médiation. Les médiateurs peuvent être des envooyé de gouvernements, de groupes d’État, d’organisations régionales ou de l’Organisation des Nations Unies : ils peuvent aussi être des groupes gouvernemmentau et non officiels, comme cela a été le cas par exemple, lors des négociations ayant abouti à un accord de paix au Mozambique. Le rétablissement de la paix peut même être l’oeuvre d’une personnalité éminennte agissant à titre individuel. 12. Les opérations de maintien de la paix, lancées il y a 50 ans, ont connu au cours de la dernière décennie une évolution rapide : fondées sur le modèle classique, essentiellement militaire, d’observation du cessez-leffe et de séparation des forces à l’issue de guerres inteerÉtats, elles ont intégré au fil des ans un ensemble complexe d’éléments, civils et militaires, associant leurs efforts pour édifier la paix au lendemain de guerrre civiles qui laissent de dangereuses séquelles. 13. La consolidation de la paix est un terme d’origine plus récente qui, au sens où l’entend le présent rapport, définit l’action menée après les conflits, en vue de reconsttitue des bases propres à affermir la paix et de fournir les moyens d’édifier sur ces bases quelque chose de plus que la simple absence de guerre. Ainsi la consolidation de la paix recouvre, sans se limiter à ellees les activités de réintégration d’anciens combattants dans la société civile, le renforcement de l’état de droit (par exemple par le biais de la formation et de la restructuuratio de la police locale et de la réforme du systèèm judiciaire et pénal); l’amélioration du respect des droits de l’homme par le biais de la surveillance, de l’éducation, de l’ouverture d’enquêtes sur les mauvais traitements passés et présents; la fourniture d’une assisttanc technique pour un développement démocratiqqu (notamment une assistance pour l’organisation d’élections et un appui aux médias libres); et la mise en oeuvre de techniques de règlement des conflits et de réconciliation. 14. Pour être efficace, cette action doit être complétée par des activités d’appui à la lutte contre la corruption, l’exécution de programmes de déminage de caractère humanitaire, la promotion d’activités d’éducation et de lutte contre le virus de l’immunodéficience humaine/syndrome d’immunodéficience acquise (VIH/sida) ainsi que contre d’autres maladies transmissibles. B. Les leçons du passé 15. Les succès discrets enregistrés par la diplomatie préventive à court terme et le rétablissement de la paix par des moyens pacifiques sont souvent, comme on l’a fait observer, invisibles sur le plan politique. Des envooyé et représentants personnels ou des représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire général ont parfois complété les initiatives diplomatiques des États Membres et, parfois, pris des initiatives qu’il était difficile aux États Membrre de prendre. À titre d’exemples d’initiatives de ce type (tirés des activités de rétablissement de la paix aussi bien que de diplomatie préventive), on peut citer la conclusion d’un cessez-le-feu lors de la guerre entre la République islamique d’Iran et l’Iraq en 1988, la libération des derniers otages occidentaux détenus au Liban en 1991, et l’initiative qui a permis d’éviter la guerre entre la République islamique d’Iran et l’Afghanistan en 1998. 16. Ceux qui préconisent une action axée sur les causse sous-jacentes des conflits font valoir que les initiatiive de ce type liées à des situations de crise se révèleen souvent insuffisantes ou trop tardives. Mais, lancéée plus tôt, les initiatives diplomatiques peuvent se heurter au refus d’un gouvernement qui ne voit pas l’imminence du problème ou refuse de l’admettre, ou est peut être lui-même une partie du problème. Il faut donc adopter des stratégies préventives à long terme pour compléter les initiatives à court terme. 17. Jusqu’à la fin de la guerre froide, les opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies ont été pour la plupart des missions classiques de surveillance du cessez-le-feu sans responsabilité directe en matière de consolidation de la paix. La « stratégie d’entrée » ou suite d’événements et décisions aboutissant à un déploiiemen était simple : guerre, cessez-le-feu, invitatiio à en surveiller l’application, et déploiement d’observateurs ou d’unités militaires, tandis que se poursuivaient les efforts pour parvenir à un règlement politique. Les besoins en matière de renseignements étaient aussi assez simples et les dangers que couraient les troupes relativement faibles. Mais les activités de maintien de la paix classiques, qui traitent des symptôôme plutôt que des sources du conflit, n’ont pas de4 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 stratégie intégrée de sortie et le rétablissement de la paix qui y est associé progresse souvent lentement. En conséquence, des forces de maintien de la paix classiques sont en place depuis 10, 20, 30 et même 50 ans (comme à Chypre, au Moyen-Orient et en Inde/Pakistan). Comparées à des opérations plus compleexes elles sont relativement peu onéreuses et sur le plan politique, il est plus facile de les maintenir que de les retirer. Mais elles sont aussi plus difficiles à justifiie à moins d’être assorties d’une action sérieuse et soutenue de consolidation de la paix qui cherche à transformer un accord de cessez-le-feu en accord de paix durable. 18. Depuis la fin de la guerre froide, les opérations de maintien de la paix ont été souvent associées à une mission de consolidation dans le cadre d’opérations de paix complexes déployées dans un contexte de conflit interne. Ce contexte est cependant influencé par des acteurs extérieurs qui, à leur tour, influent sur lui : protecteurs politiques; marchands d’armes; acheteurs de produits d’exportation illicite; puissances régionales qui font entrer leurs propres forces en lice; et États voisiin qui accueillent des réfugiés parfois systématiquemeen contraints de fuir leurs foyers. Lourds de telles conséquences au-delà des frontières du fait de protagonisste nationaux et extérieurs, ces conflits ont souvent un caractère « transnational » marqué. 19. Les dangers et les coûts qu’entraînent des opératiion qui doivent se déployer dans un tel contexte sont bien plus grands que ceux qu’entraînent les opérations de maintien de la paix classiques. De plus, la compleexit des tâches assignées à ces missions et la volatiliit de la situation sur le terrain tendent à augmenter de pair. Depuis la fin de la guerre froide, des missions aussi complexes et aussi dangereuses ont été la règle plutôt que l’exception : les missions des Nations Unies ont eu pour tâche d’escorter des convois de secours dans des endroits où la situation en matière de sécurité était si dangereuse que les opérations humanitaires ne pouvaient se poursuivre sans faire courir de grands risquue au personnel; elles ont reçu mandat de protéger des victimes civiles de conflits en des endroits où les victimes potentielles couraient les plus grands dangers, et de contrôler les armes lourdes possédées par les partiie locales quand ces armes étaient utilisées pour menaace la mission comme la population locale. Dans deux situations extrêmes, elles se sont vu confier le maintien de l’ordre et l’administration du pays lorsque les autorités locales n’existaient pas ou n’étaient pas en mesure d’exercer leurs fonctions. 20. Personne ne pouvait s’attendre que ces missions soient aisées à accomplir. Au départ, les années 90 offraaien des perspectives plus positives : les opérations de mise en oeuvre des accords de paix étaient limitées dans le temps et non d’une durée indéterminée, et l’organisation d’élections nationales dans de bonnes conditions paraissait offrir une stratégie de sortie toute faite. Mais depuis lors, les opérations des Nations Unies ont tendance à intervenir dans des situations où aucune des parties ne peut prétendre à la victoire, soit qu’on se trouve dans une impasse sur le plan militaire, soit que des pressions de la communauté internationale aient mis fin aux hostilités, mais en tout état de cause le conflit subsiste. La mise en place des opérations des Nations Unies se fait donc moins dans des situations d’après conflit qu’elle ne se fait pour créer de telles situations. Autrement dit, les opérations visent à détouurne du domaine militaire le conflit non terminé et les motivations personnelles, politiques ou autres qui le sous-tendaient pour les infléchir vers le domaine politiqque et ce, d’une manière durable. 21. Comme l’Organisation n’a pas été longue à s’en rendre compte, les parties locales signent des accords de paix pour des raisons très diverses, qui ne sont pas toutes propices à la paix. Des « fauteurs de troubles » – des groupes (y compris des signataires) qui renient leurs engagements ou cherchent par d’autres moyens à saper un accord de paix par la violence – se sont oppossé à la mise en oeuvre des accords de paix au Camboddge ont plongé l’Angola, la Somalie et la Sierra Leone à nouveau dans la guerre civile et orchestré le massacre de pas moins de 800 000 personnes au Rwandda L’Organisation doit être prête à affronter avec succcè de tels groupes, dès lors qu’elle entend enregistrer des succès durables en matière de maintien de la paix ou de consolidation de la paix dans des situations de conflit interne ou transnational. 22. Il ressort d’un nombre toujours plus élevé de rappoort concernant de tels conflits que les fauteurs de troubles potentiels sont d’autant plus incités à renier des accords de paix qu’ils peuvent compter sur une source indépendante de revenus qui permette de payer des soldats, d’acheter des armes et d’enrichir des chefs de faction et qui peut même avoir été le motif de la guerre. Comme des événements récents l’attestent, la paix ne peut être durable lorsque pareils revenus pron0059471.doc 5 A/55/305 S/2000/809 viennent du trafic illicite de stupéfiants, de pierres précieeuse ou d’autres marchandises de grande valeur. 23. Les États voisins peuvent encore compliquer davanntag les choses en fermant les yeux sur la contrebaand qui permet de financer la poursuite du conflit, en servant d’intermédiaires ou en fournissant des bases pour les combattants. Pour être en mesure de contrecarrre l’action de tels voisins, une opération de paix doit être assurée d’un solide appui politique, logistique et/ou militaire d’un ou de plusieurs grands pays ou de grandes puissances régionales. L’importance de cet appui devra être à la mesure de la difficulté de l’opération. 24. Au nombre des autres facteurs qui influent sur la difficulté de la mise en oeuvre de la paix, on retiendra en premier lieu les origines du conflit. Elles peuvent se situer dans le domaine économique (par exemple, des questions relatives à la pauvreté, à la répartition des richesses, à la discrimination ou à la corruption), ou dans le domaine politique (la lutte pure et simple pour le pouvoir), ou être liées à des questions de ressources et d’environnement (lutte pour des ressources en eau rares), des questions ethniques ou religieuses, ou encoor à des violations flagrantes des droits de l’homme. Les objectifs de caractère politique ou économique sont susceptibles de mieux se prêter à un compromis que les objectifs se situant dans le domaine du partage des ressourrces de l’ethnicité ou de la religion. En deuxième lieu, la complexité du processus de négociation et de mise en oeuvre de la paix tend à être proportionnelle au nombre de parties locales et au degré de divergence des objectifs poursuivis (par exemple, certains peuvent préconiser l’unité, et d’autres la séparation). En troisiièm lieu, l’importance des pertes en vies humaines, des déplacements de population et des dommages caussé à l’infrastructure aura des incidences sur l’importaanc des doléances suscitées par la guerre et, partant, sur le degré de difficulté de la réconciliation, celle-ci exigeant qu’il soit remédié aux violations des droits de l’homme et qu’une solution soit trouvée pour faire face aux coûts et à la complexité de la reconstruction. 25. Un environnement relativement moins dangereux, où il n’y a que deux parties, également éprises de paix, dont les objectifs sont concurrents mais accordés à la situation, qui ne disposent pas de sources illicites de revenus et dont les voisins et les protecteurs sont attachhé à la paix, constitue un environnement assez propiice Dans des environnements moins propices, plus dangereux, où il y a au moins trois parties, inégalement attachées à la paix, dont les objectifs sont divergents, qui disposent de sources autonomes de revenus et d’armes et dont les voisins sont disposés à acheter, vendre et accepter en transit des marchandises illicites, les missions des Nations Unies risquent de mettre en péril non seulement leur personnel, mais également la paix elle-même, à moins de s’acquitter de leurs tâches avec la compétence et l’efficacité que la situation exige et d’être assurées du ferme soutien d’une grande puissannce 26. Il est capital que les négociateurs, le Conseil de sécurité, les responsables de la planification des missiion au Secrétariat de l’ONU et ceux qui participent à des missions sachent bien auquel de ces environnemeent politiques ou militaires ils vont avoir affaire, comprennent que, sitôt arrivés sur place, l’environnement peut se dérober sous leurs pas et aient une idée claire de ce qu’ils envisagent de faire en pareil cas. Chacun de ces éléments doit être intégré dans une stratégie d’entrée et donc dans la décision elle-même qui interviendra sur le point de savoir si une opération est faisable et devrait même être entreprise. 27. À cet égard, il est tout aussi important de détermiine dans quelle mesure les autorités locales sont aptte et disposées à prendre des décisions difficiles mais nécessaires en matière politique et économique et à participer à la mise en place de processus et mécanismme de règlement des différends internes en sorte d’empêcher la violence ou la reprise du conflit. Il s’agit là de facteurs sur lesquels une mission et l’Organisattio n’ont guère de prise; pourtant, l’existence d’un tel environnement coopératif joue un rôle déterminant dans le succès d’une opération de paix. 28. Lorsqu’une opération de paix complexe est entrepriise il appartient aux membres des forces de maintien de la paix de garantir un environnement local sûr aux fins de la consolidation de la paix, tout comme il apparttien au personnel chargé de consolider la paix d’appuyer les changements politiques, sociaux et économiique garants d’un environnement sûr qui soit autonnome Seul un tel environnement offre aux forces de maintien de la paix la possibilité d’un retrait dans de bonnes conditions, à moins que la communauté internatiional n’accepte la perspective de voir le conflit reprendre après le retrait de ses forces. L’expérience nous enseigne que les personnels militaire et civil chargés respectivement du maintien et de la consolidattio de la paix sont des partenaires indissociables dans le cadre d’opérations complexes, les seconds ne6 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 pouvant s’acquitter de leurs tâches sans le soutien des premiers, et les premiers ne pouvant se retirer sans l’appui des seconds. C. Implications pour l’action préventive 29. Les opérations de paix des Nations Unies n’ont concerné qu’un tiers des situations de conflit apparues dans les années 90. Étant acquis que même des mécanissme beaucoup plus perfectionnés en vue de la mise sur pied et du soutien des opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies ne permettront pas au système des Nations Unies de déployer de telles opérations dans toutes les situations de conflit en tout point du globe, il est urgent que l’ONU et les États Membres mettent en place un système plus efficace de prévention durable des conflits. De toute évidence, la prévention est de loin préférable pour ceux qui autrement devraient enduure les conséquences de la guerre, et pour la communaaut internationale, c’est une option moins coûteuse qu’une intervention militaire, les secours humanitaires d’urgence ou les travaux de reconstruction à l’issue d’une guerre. Comme le Secrétaire général le fait obserrve dans le récent rapport qu’il a établi en vue du Sommet du millénaire (A/54/2000), « chaque étape franchie sur la voie de la réduction de la pauvreté et de la croissance économique marque un progrès dans le sens de la prévention des conflits ». Dans de nombreux cas de conflit interne, « la pauvreté s’accompagne de clivages ethniques ou religieux », dans lesquels les droits de minorités « ne sont pas suffisamment respectté [et] les institutions de l’État ne font pas à ces [groupes] une place suffisante ». Des stratégies préventtive durables doivent, dans de tels cas, contribuer à « promouvoir les droits de l’homme, protéger les droits des minorités et mettre en place des institutions politiquue dans lesquelles tous les groupes sont représentés... [I]l faut que chaque groupe se convainque que l’État appartient à tous. » 30. Le Groupe d’étude tient à féliciter l’Équipe spéciial pour la paix et la sécurité constituée au sein du Secrétariat pour les travaux qu’elle mène dans le domaain de la prévention à long terme, en particulier l’idée que les organismes des Nations Unies qui s’occupent des questions de développement devraient considérer l’action humanitaire et le développement sous l’angle de la prévention des conflits et faire de la prévention à long terme un des axes majeurs de leurs programmes, en adaptant à cet effet des instruments comme les bilans communs de pays et le Plan-cadre des Nations Unies pour l’aide au développement. 31. Pour permettre à l’Organisation de mieux anticippe sur d’éventuelles situations d’urgence complexes et donc d’oeuvrer dans le domaine de la prévention à court terme, il y a environ deux ans, les départements du Siège qui font partie du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité ont créé le Cadre interinstitutionnel/interdépartemental de coordination dont font partie à l’heure actuelle 10 départements, fonds, programmes et organismes. L’élément moteur, qui est l’Équipe du Cadrre se réunit chaque mois au niveau des directeurs pour faire le point sur les zones menacées, planifier les réunions d’examen de pays (ou de situation) et identifiie les mesures préventives à prendre. Le mécanisme du Cadre a amélioré les contacts entre les départemennts mais il n’a pas acquis de savoir systématique et ne fait pas de planification stratégique. Cela pourrait expliquer la difficulté qu’éprouve le Secrétariat à convaincre les États Membres de la nécessité de traduuir concrètement leur attachement déclaré à des mesuure de prévention des conflits à court terme et à long terme par un soutien politique et financier adéquat. Dans l’intervalle, les rapports annuels du Secrétaire général pour 1997 et 1999 (A/52/1 et A/54/1) ont mis l’accent expressément sur la prévention des conflits. La Commission Carnegie sur la prévention des conflits et l’Association des États-Unis pour les Nations Unies, entre autres, ont réalisé aussi des études intéressantes sur la question. Par ailleurs, plus de 400 fonctionnaires de l’ONU ont suivi une formation systématique dans le domaine de l’« alerte avancée » à l’École des cadres des Nations Unies, à Turin. 32. La prévention à court terme est tributaire de l’envoi de missions d’établissement des faits et autres initiatives importantes du Secrétaire général. Toutefois, l’action préventive bute généralement sur deux grands obstacles. En premier lieu, il y a le souci légitime et compréhensible des États Membres, en particulier ceux qui sont petits et vulnérables, de voir respecter leur souveraineté. Les initiatives que peuvent prendre un autre État Membre, surtout un voisin plus puissant, ou une organisation régionale dominée par un de ses membres, sont de nature à aviver ce souci. Un État en proie à des difficultés internes serait plus disposé à accepter des ouvertures du Secrétaire général, compte tenu de l’indépendance reconnue de sa charge et de l’autorité morale que celle-ci lui confère, ainsi que de la lettre et de l’esprit de la Charte, qui fait obligationn0059471.doc 7 A/55/305 S/2000/809 au Secrétaire général de proposer son assistance et aux États Membres de donner à l’Organisation « pleine assisttanc », comme précisé notamment au paragraphe 5 de l’Article 2 de la Charte. Les missions d’établissemeen des faits sont un instrument qui facilite l’offre de bons offices du Secrétaire général. 33. Le second obstacle qui peut entraver l’efficacité de l’action préventive est constitué par l’écart existant entre les prises de position verbales et l’appui financier et politique donné à la prévention. L’Assemblée du millénaire offre à tous les intéressés l’occasion de réévaalue leur engagement dans ce domaine et d’examinne les recommandations en matière de prévention contenues dans le rapport du millénaire et les observatiion formulées récemment par le Secrétaire général à la deuxième séance publique du Conseil de sécurité sur la prévention des conflits. À cette occasion, le Secrétaair général a souligné la nécessité de renforcer la collaboration entre le Conseil de sécurité et les autres organes principaux des Nations Unies sur les questions liées à la prévention des conflits et sur les moyens de collaborer plus étroitement avec des acteurs autres que les États, notamment les entreprises, pour éviter les conflits ou les désamorcer. 34. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant l’action préventive : a) Le Groupe d’étude fait siennes les recommanndation du Secrétaire général ayant trait à la prévention des conflits contenues dans le rapport du millénaire et dans les observations qu’il a formullée à la deuxième séance publique du Conseil de sécurité sur la prévention des conflits en juillet 2000, en particulier l’appel qu’il a lancé à « tous ceux qui s’occupent de prévention des conflits et de développement – l’ONU, les institutions de Bretton Woods, les gouvernements et les organisations de la société civile – [pour qu’ils s’attaquent] à ces problèème de façon plus cohérente »; b) Le Groupe d’étude encourage le Secrétaair général à dépêcher plus fréquemment des missiion d’établissement des faits dans les zones de tensiio et souligne l’obligation qu’ont les États Membrres au titre du paragraphe 5 de l’Article 2 de la Charte, de donner « pleine assistance » à de telles activités de l’Organisation. D. Implications pour la stratégie de consolidation de la paix 35. Le Conseil de sécurité et le Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix de l’Assemblée généraal ont tous deux constaté et reconnu que la consolidattio de la paix était un élément important des opératiion de maintien de la paix et contribuait pour beaucoou à leur succès. Ainsi, dans une déclaration de son Président adoptée le 29 décembre 1998, le Conseil de sécurité a encouragé le Secrétaire général à « envisager la possibilité de mettre en place des structures de consolidation de la paix après les conflits dans le cadre des efforts accomplis par le système des Nations Unies pour parvenir à un règlement pacifique durable des différends... ». Pour sa part, le Comité spécial des opérattion de maintien de la paix, dans le rapport qu’il a présenté plus tôt en 2000, a souligné qu’il importait de définir explicitement et d’identifier clairement les diverrse composantes d’un programme de consolidation de la paix avant de les intégrer dans le mandat d’opérations de paix complexes, afin de permettre ensuuit à l’Assemblée générale d’examiner s’il est opporrtu de continuer à appuyer des éléments clefs du programme de consolidation de la paix lorsqu’une opérattio complexe arrive à son terme. 36. Des bureaux d’appui aux programmes de consolidattio de la paix ou des bureaux politiques de l’ONU peuvent être créés pour faire suite à une opération de paix, comme au Tadjikistan ou en Haïti, ou indépendammmen d’une telle opération, comme au Guatemala ou en Guinée-Bissau. De tels bureaux, qui collaborent à la fois avec les services gouvernementaux et avec des entités non gouvernementales, contribuent à la consolidattio de la paix après les conflits, et conjuguent leurs efforts à ceux des organismes de développement de l’ONU qui sont déjà sur place et qui s’efforcent de rester neutres tout en s’attaquant aux causes du conflit. 37. Pour être efficaces, les programmes de consolidattio de la paix requièrent la participation active des parties locales, qui doit être multidimensionnelle. Premièreement toutes les opérations de paix devraient être dotées de moyens suffisants pour que les conditions de vie des gens dans la zone de la mission s’améliorent sensiblement, et ce, assez tôt après la mise en place de la mission. Une somme représentant un faible pourcenntag des fonds alloués à la mission devrait être mise à la disposition du chef de mission pour financer des « projets à impact rapide » ayant pour objectif8 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 d’apporter de réelles améliorations aux conditions de vie des populations, ce qui contribuerait à rendre la nouvelle mission plus crédible. Le coordonnateur résideentcoordonnateur humanitaire de l’équipe de pays de l’ONU déjà en place, qui ferait office de conseiller principal pour ces projets, devrait s’assurer que les dépennse sont justifiées et que les projets n’entrent pas en concurrence avec d’autres programmes de développemeen ou d’aide humanitaire. 38. Deuxièmement, la tenue d’élections « libres et régulières » devrait être considérée comme faisant partti intégrante du processus général de renforcement des institutions d’un pays. Or, il n’est possible d’engager un processus électoral que si l’on arrive à convaincre les populations qui se relèvent d’une guerre que les élections constituent un mécanisme approprié et crédibbl leur permettant, mieux que la lutte armée, de se faire entendre. Les élections doivent donc s’appuyer sur un processus plus large de démocratisation et d’organisation de la société civile qui comprenne la mise en place d’une administration civile efficace fonddé sur le respect des droits humains fondamentaux, faute de quoi elles ne servent qu’à légitimer le pouvoir tyrannique exercé par la majorité, ou risquent d’être annulées par un coup de force après le départ de la mission de paix. 39. Troisièmement, les observateurs de police civile des Nations Unies ne remplissent pas leur mission de consolidation de la paix s’ils se contentent de constater les abus et autres comportements inacceptables des membres de la police locale ou de chercher à découragge de tels comportements par leur simple présence – ce qui est la conception classique, quelque peu étroite du rôle de la police civile. Aujourd’hui, les membres de la police civile peuvent être chargés de réformer, d’instruire et de réorganiser les forces de police locales pour qu’elles observent les normes internationales en matière d’exercice d’une police démocratique et de respect des droits de l’homme, tout en ayant la capacité d’intervenir efficacement en cas de troubles civils et de se défendre. Il faut aussi que les tribunaux devant lesquuel la police locale défère les criminels présumés et le système pénitentiaire établi par la loi soient politiqueemen impartiaux et ne subissent ni pressions ni menacces Lorsqu’on décide d’inclure des experts internatioonau –pénalistes, criminologues et spécialistes des droits de l’homme – ainsi qu’une composante de police civile dans une mission de consolidation de la paix, il faut prévoir des effectifs suffisants si l’on veut renforcce l’état de droit et les institutions sur lesquelles il se fonde. Quand il y va de la justice, de la réconciliation et de la lutte contre l’impunité, le Conseil de sécurité devrait autoriser de tels experts, ainsi que des enquêteeur et des médecins légistes, à participer aux interpellaation et au jugement des personnes inculpées de crimes de guerre, afin d’aider les tribunaux pénaux internationaux à s’acquitter de leur mandat. 40. Alors qu’une telle démarche semble aller de soi, il est arrivé, au cours des 10 dernières années, que le Conseil de sécurité ait autorisé le déploiement d’une composante de police forte de plusieurs milliers de personnne dans le cadre d’une opération de maintien de la paix, mais ait hésité à doter la même mission ne seraitcc que de 20 ou 30 pénalistes. En outre, le rôle que doit jouer aujourd’hui la police civile doit être mieux comprri et faire l’objet d’une réflexion plus poussée. Il faut que l’Organisation revoie de fond en comble la façon dont elle conçoit ce rôle et dont elle utilise les forces de police civile dans les opérations de paix. Promouvooi l’état de droit et le respect des droits de l’homme exige un travail d’équipe et une approche coordonnée et collégiale, s’appuyant sur une riche palette de compéteence : pénalistes, criminologues et spécialistes des droits de l’homme et de l’exercice de la police. 41. Quatrièmement, la composante droits de l’homme d’une opération de paix est un élément décisif de la consolidation de la paix. Les fonctionnaires de l’ONU spécialistes des droits de l’homme peuvent jouer un rôle de premier plan, en contribuant par exemple à la mise en oeuvre d’un programme général de réconciliatiio nationale. Toutefois, cette composante n’a pas toujours reçu l’appui politique et administratif qui s’imposait, et les autres composantes n’ont pas toujours clairement compris sa fonction. Le Groupe d’étude tient donc à souligner qu’il importe de sensibiliser les personnels militaires, civils et de police aux questions relatives aux droits de l’homme et aux dispositions pertinentes du droit international humanitaire. À cet égard, le Groupe d’étude prend note avec satisfaction de la circulaire du Secrétaire général datée du 6 août 1999 intitulée « Respect du droit international humanittair par les forces des Nations Unies » (ST/SGB/1999/13). 42. Cinquièmement, la composante désarmement, démobilisation et réinsertion des anciens combattants – qui est indispensable si l’on veut rétablir la stabilité et éviter les risques de reprise du conflit – apporte une contribution directe à la sécurité publique et à l’état den0059471.doc 9 A/55/305 S/2000/809 droit. Mais l’objectif fondamental de cette composante ne peut être atteint tant que ses trois volets n’ont pas été réalisés. Les soldats démobilisés (qui ne se laissent presque jamais complètement désarmer) sont généralemeen enclins à recourir à la violence s’ils n’ont pas de moyens de subsistance légitimes, c’est-à-dire s’ils ne peuvent se réinsérer dans l’économie locale. Or, le volle réinsertion est uniquement financé à l’aide de contributions volontaires, dont le montant est souvent très inférieur aux besoins. 43. Au cours des 10 dernières années, les programmme de désarmement, de démobilisation et de réinsertiio ont fait partie intégrante d’au moins 15 opérations de maintien de la paix. Plus de 12 organismes et prograamme des Nations Unies, ainsi que des organisatiion non gouvernementales internationales et locales, financent ces programmes. Il semble donc indispensablle compte tenu notamment du grand nombre d’acteeur qui participent à la planification et à l’exécution de ces programmes, qu’un coordonnateur soit nommé au sein du système des Nations Unies. 44. Pour que les programmes de consolidation de la paix portent leurs fruits, il faut aussi que les activités très diverses qu’ils comportent soient coordonnées. De l’avis du Groupe d’étude, l’ONU devrait être chargée de la coordination des activités de la communauté des donateurs entrant dans le cadre de la consolidation de la paix. Il lui semble aussi qu’il serait très utile de créer une capacité institutionnelle permanente et consolidée au sein du système des Nations Unies, et estime que c’est au Secrétaire général adjoint aux affaires politiquues en sa qualité de Président du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité qu’il faudrait confier la responsaabilit de coordonner toutes les activités de consolidation de la paix. Le Groupe d’étude appuie par ailleurs les efforts actuellement menés conjointement par le Département des affaires politiques et le Prograamm des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD) en vue de renforcer la capacité de l’ONU dans ce domaine. En effet, la consolidation de la paix est une combinaison d’activités politiques et d’activités de développement qui, toutes, s’attaquent aux causes du conflit. 45. Le Département des affaires politiques, le Départtemen des opérations de maintien de la paix, le Bureea de la coordination des affaires humanitaires, le Département des affaires de désarmement, le Bureau des affaires juridiques, le PNUD, le Fonds des Nations Unies pour l’enfance (UNICEF), le Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme, le HCR, le Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour la protection des enfants en période de conflit armé et le Coordonnateur des Natiion Unies pour les mesures de sécurité sont représennté au Comité exécutif – auquel le Groupe de la Banque mondiale a également été invité à participer – et qui constitue de ce fait l’instance idéale pour ce qui est de la formulation de stratégies de consolidation de la paix. 46. Toutefois, la formulation de stratégies doit être distincte de leur mise en oeuvre et il convient de procééde à une division rationnelle des tâches entre les différents membres du Comité exécutif. De l’avis du Groupe d’étude, le PNUD a un potentiel inexploité dans ce domaine, et est le mieux placé pour diriger, en coopération avec les autres organismes, fonds et prograamme des Nations Unies et la Banque mondiale, la mise en oeuvre des activités de consolidation de la paix. Le Groupe d’étude recommande donc que le Comiit exécutif propose au Secrétaire général une série de mesures propres à renforcer la capacité de l’ONU d’élaborer des stratégies de consolidation de la paix et d’exécuter des programmes s’inscrivant dans le cadre de ces stratégies. Le Comité exécutif devrait aussi défiini des critères permettant de déterminer dans quels cas il est utile de nommer un envoyé politique de haut vol ou un représentant du Secrétaire général pour donnne plus de visibilité et de poids politique aux activités de consolidation de la paix dans une région ou un pays qui se relève d’un conflit. 47. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la consolidation de la paix : a) Une somme représentant un faible pourcenntag du budget prévu pour la première année de la mission devrait être mise à la disposition du représeentan du Secrétaire général ou de son représenntan spécial pour financer, en suivant les conseils du coordonnateur résident de l’équipe de pays de l’ONU, des projets à impact rapide dans la zone d’opérations de la mission; b) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que l’Organisation revoie de fond en comble l’utilisation des forces de police civile, des autres éléments d’appui à l’état de droit et des spécialistes des droits de l’homme dans les opérations de paix complexes, afin de mettre davantage l’accent sur le renforcemeen de l’état de droit et le respect des droits de l’homme après les conflits;10 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 c) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que les organes délibérants inscrivent au budget statutaire des opérations de paix complexes des programmes de démobilisation et de réinsertion dès la première phase des opérations, afin de favoriser la dissolution rapide des factions belligérantes et de réduire les risques de reprise du conflit; d) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité examine et propose au Secrétaire général une série de mesurre visant à renforcer la capacité permanente de l’ONU d’élaborer des stratégies de consolidation de la paix et d’exécuter des programmes dans le cadre de ces stratégies. E. Implications pour la doctrine et la stratégie de maintien de la paix 48. Le Groupe d’étude convient que l’accord des parties locales, l’impartialité et la limitation de l’emploi de la force aux cas de légitime défense demeuuren les principes de base du maintien de la paix. Toutefois, l’expérience récente a montré que, dans le cas de conflits internes/transnationaux, l’accord des parties peut faire l’objet de diverses manoeuvres. Ainssi une partie peut accepter une présence de l’ONU uniquement pour gagner du temps et réorganiser ses forces, puis se rétracter lorsque l’opération de maintien de la paix ne sert plus ses intérêts. D’autres peuvent chercher à limiter la liberté de mouvement d’une opérattion violer délibérément les termes d’un accord ou le dénoncer purement et simplement. Par ailleurs, même lorsque les dirigeants d’une faction s’engagent fermemeen à faire la paix, leurs forces ne sont pas toujours aussi disciplinées que les armées classiques avec lesqueelle les membres des opérations traditionnelles de maintien de la paix collaborent; en outre, ces forces peuvent se diviser en plusieurs factions qui n’existaient pas lors de la signature de l’accord de paix en vertu duquel la mission de l’ONU a été créée, et les conséqueence qui en résultent n’avaient pas été envisagées dans l’accord en question. 49. Dans le passé, l’ONU s’est souvent trouvée démuuni face à ce type de problèmes. Toutefois, le préseen rapport part de l’hypothèse qu’elle doit être en mesure de le faire. Une fois qu’une mission a été mise en place, les soldats de la paix des Nations Unies doiveen pouvoir s’acquitter de leurs tâches avec professionnnalism et remplir leur mission, ce qui signifie que les unités militaires de l’ONU doivent être en mesure de se défendre, de défendre d’autres composantes de la mission et d’assurer l’exécution du mandat de celle-ci. Les règles d’engagement devraient non seulement permetttr aux contingents de riposter au coup par coup, mais les autoriser à lancer des contre-attaques assez vigoureuses pour faire taire les tirs meurtriers dirigés contre des soldats des Nations Unies ou les personnes qu’ils sont chargés de protéger et, dans les situations particulièrement dangereuses, à ne pas laisser l’initiative à leurs attaquants. 50. Dans le contexte de telles opérations, on entend par impartialité l’adhésion aux principes consacrés par la Charte et aux objectifs d’un mandat qui repose sur ces principes. Ainsi, être impartial ne signifie pas être neutre et ne revient pas à traiter toutes les parties de la même façon, en toutes circonstances et à tout moment, ce qui relèverait plutôt d’une politique d’apaisement. Si l’on se place d’un point de vue moral, les parties, dans certains cas, ne se situent pas sur un pied d’égalité, l’une étant de toute évidence l’agresseur, l’autre la victiime l’emploi de la force n’est alors pas seulement justifié sur le plan opérationnel, c’est une obligation morale. Si le génocide rwandais a fait tant de victimes, c’est en partie parce que la communauté internationale n’a pas utilisé ou renforcé l’opération alors déployée dans le pays pour combattre un mal évident. Depuis lors, le Conseil de sécurité a établi, dans sa résolution 1296 (2000), que les pratiques consistant à prendre délibérément pour cible des civils et à refuser au personnne humanitaire le libre accès à ces derniers en périiod de conflit armé pouvaient constituer une menace contre la paix et la sécurité internationales et s’est décllar disposé, dans de telles situations, à adopter les mesures appropriées. Si une opération de paix des Natiion Unies se trouve déjà sur place, c’est elle qui sera chargée de mettre en oeuvre ces mesures; elle devrait donc être préparée à une telle éventualité. 51. De son côté, le Secrétariat devrait se garder de fonder ses prévisions sur des hypothèses trop optimistte dans les situations où le comportement passé des acteurs locaux peut laisser présager le pire. Il faudrait donc spécifier, dans le mandat de toute opération, si elle est autorisée à employer la force, auquel cas elle devrait être dotée d’effectifs plus nombreux et mieux équipés. Elle serait certes plus coûteuse mais constitueraai une menace plus crédible, et donc plus dissuasive, que la présence symbolique et non menaçante qui caracttéris les opérations de maintien de la paix classin0059471.doc 11 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ques. Dans le cas des opérations complexes, la taille de la force et sa configuration ne devraient laisser aucun doute dans l’esprit des fauteurs de troubles quant aux intentions de l’Organisation. En outre, ces opérations devraient être dotées de services de renseignements et d’autres moyens qui leur permettraient d’organiser leur défense face à des adversaires violents. 52. Tout État Membre qui consent à fournir des contingents à une opération de ce type doit aussi être prêt à assumer d’éventuelles pertes en vies humaines dans le cadre de l’exécution de son mandat. Or, si les États Membres hésitent souvent à prendre un tel risque, et c’est de plus en plus le cas depuis les difficiles missiion du milieu des années 90, c’est parce qu’ils ne sont pas certains que la défense de leurs intérêts nationaau justifie un tel risque que, d’ailleurs, ils n’arrivent pas toujours à bien cerner. Aussi, lorsqu’il demande aux États Membres de fournir des contingents, le Secréttair général doit être en mesure de démontrer que les pays qui répondent à son appel, voire tous les États Membres, ont tout intérêt à participer à la gestion et au règlement du conflit, ne serait-ce que parce qu’ils appartiiennen à une organisation dont la vocation est de rétablir la paix. Pour ce faire, le Secrétaire général devrrai pouvoir présenter aux fournisseurs potentiels de contingents une évaluation des risques qui indique quels sont les enjeux de la guerre ou de la paix dans le cas considéré, et contienne une analyse des capacités et des objectifs des parties locales, ainsi qu’une estimatiio des ressources financières indépendantes auxquellle celles-ci ont accès et de l’incidence que ces ressouurce peuvent avoir sur le maintien de la paix. Le Conseil de sécurité et le Secrétariat doivent aussi gagnne la confiance des pays fournissant des contingents en les assurant que la stratégie et le concept des opératiion d’une nouvelle mission ont été bien conçus et que leurs contingents militaires ou leurs forces de police pourront compter sur un encadrement compétent et un commandement efficace. 53. Le Groupe d’étude souligne que les Nations Unies ne font pas la guerre. Lorsqu’il a fallu prendre des mesures coercitives, elles ont toujours été confiées à des coalitions d’États volontaires, avec l’autorisation du Conseil de sécurité agissant en vertu du Chapitre VII de la Charte. 54. La Charte encourage expressément la coopération avec les organisations régionales et sous-régionales pour régler les conflits et établir et maintenir la paix et la sécurité. L’Organisation des Nations Unies participe activement, avec de bons résultats, à de nombreux prograamme de coopération dans les domaines de la prévenntio des conflits, du rétablissement de la paix, des élections et de l’assistance électorale, de la surveillance du respect des droits de l’homme et de l’action humanitaaire ainsi qu’à d’autres activités de consolidation de la paix après les conflits dans différentes parties du monde. Toutefois, dans le domaine des opérations de maintien de la paix, la prudence semble être de rigueur dans la mesure où les moyens et capacités militaires sont inégalement répartis dans le monde et où, dans les zones de tension, les troupes sont souvent moins bien préparées aux exigences des opérations de maintien de la paix modernes que dans d’autres régions. Pour permetttr à des soldats de la paix de toutes les régions de participer à une opération des Nations Unies ou mettre sur pied une opération de maintien de la paix régionale sur la base d’une résolution du Conseil de sécurité, il faudrait fournir aux organisations régionales et sousrégioonale des services de formation, du matériel, un appui logistique et d’autres ressources. 55. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la doctrine et la stratégie de maintien de la paix : une fois déployés, les soldats de la paix des Nations Unies doivent pouvoir s’acquitter de leurs tâches avec professionnalisme et efficacité; ils doiveen aussi, grâce à des règles d’engagement fermes, être en mesure de se défendre et de défendre d’autres composantes de la mission et l’exécution du mandat de celle-ci contre ceux qui reviennent sur les engagements qu’ils ont pris en vertu d’un accord de paix ou qui, de toute autre façon, cherchent à y porter atteinte par la violence. F. Des mandats clairs, crédibles et réalistes 56. En tant qu’organe politique, le Conseil de sécurité recherche le consensus, même si ses décisions ne doiveen pas nécessairement être prises à l’unanimité. Mais le consensus exige des compromis qui nuisent parfois à la précision, et l’ambiguïté qui en résulte peut avoir des conséquences sérieuses sur le terrain si le mandat est interprété de façon différente par divers éléments de l’opération ou si on a l’impression, dans la zone de mission, que le Conseil n’est pas vraiment résolu à faire appliquer la paix, ce qui encourage les fauteurs de trouble. L’ambiguïté peut aussi avoir pour effet de gommer des divergences qui refont leur apparition plus12 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 tard, en situation de crise, et entravent alors l’efficacité du Conseil. Tout en reconnaissant que les compromis politiques sont utiles dans bien des cas, le Groupe considère qu’en l’occurrence le Conseil a tout intérêt à être clair, surtout pour des opérations qui comportent de grands risques. Le Groupe d’étude est convaincu que le Conseil ferait mieux de s’abstenir plutôt que d’exposer les personnels des missions au danger en leur donnant des instructions qui manquent de clarté. 57. Souvent, la première ébauche des missions de maintien de la paix est le fait des négociateurs, au momeen où ils s’efforcent de parvenir à un accord de paix et envisagent d’en confier la mise en oeuvre à l’ONU. Bien qu’il s’agisse pour la plupart de négociateurs éminemment qualifiés, il est peu probable qu’ils sachhen avec précision ce dont les soldats, les policiers, le personnel des organisations humanitaires ou les conseillers électoraux travaillant dans une mission des Nations Unies ont besoin. Et les négociateurs qui sont extérieurs à l’ONU en savent encore beaucoup moins. Pourtant, ces dernières années, le Secrétariat a dû exécuute des mandats élaborés ailleurs, auxquels le Conseil n’a apporté que des changements mineurs. 58. Le Secrétariat doit être en mesure de bien faire comprendre au Conseil de sécurité que les demandes adressées à l’Organisation concernant la mise en oeuvvr d’accords de cessez-le-feu ou d’accords de paix doivent répondre à un certain nombre de conditions minimales avant que le Conseil ne charge des forces placées sous le commandement des Nations Unies d’en assurer la mise en oeuvre. Au nombre de ces conditioons on citera : la présence de conseillers/observateurs aux négociations de paix; la conformité des accords aux normes internationales relatives aux droits de l’homme et au droit humanitaire; l’assurance que les tâches imparties aux Nations Unies sont réalisables (l’appui devant être fourni localement est précisé), qu’elles contribuent à l’élimination des causes du conflit ou ménagent le répit nécessaire pour que d’autres puissent le faire. La qualité des conseils fournni aux négociateurs étant fonction de la connaissance de la situation sur le terrain, le Secrétaire général devrrai être autorisé à prélever des ressources sur le Fonds de réserve pour les opérations de maintien de la paix, afin de conduire une enquête préliminaire dans la zone où la mission doit être déployée. 59. Lorsqu’il fournit des conseils sur les besoins des missions, le Secrétariat doit veiller à ne pas arrêter le niveau des forces et d’autres ressources en fonction de ce qu’il considère politiquement acceptable pour le Conseil. En pratiquant ce type d’autocensure, non seulemmen le Secrétariat se place en situation d’échec, mais il s’expose aussi à devenir le bouc émissaire. S’il est vrai que les chances de voir se concrétiser une missiio sont moindres lorsque les estimations de dépenses correspondent à des normes opérationnelles élevées, il ne faudrait pas que les États Membres s’imaginent renddr service à des pays en difficulté lorsqu’ils dotent les missions de moyens insuffisants; il est plus probable, en effet, qu’en agissant de la sorte ils gaspillent ressouurce humaines, temps et argent. 60. De plus, le Groupe d’étude estime que tant que le Secrétaire général n’a pas obtenu des États Membres l’engagement ferme qu’ils fourniront les contingents nécessaires à l’efficacité d’une opération donnée, la mission ne devrait pas être mise en place. En déployant des forces insuffisantes et donc incapables d’affermir une paix fragile, on suscite des espoirs voués à être déçus dans des populations qui viennent de sortir de la guerre ou sont encore aux prises avec un conflit, et on risque de jeter le discrédit sur le système des Nations Unies tout entier. Dans de telles circonstances, le Groupe d’étude est convaincu que le Conseil de sécuriit devrait garder à l’état de projet les résolutions qui prévoient le déploiement d’effectifs assez nombreux dans le cadre d’une opération de maintien de la paix jusqu’à ce que le Secrétaire général ait reçu des États Membres l’assurance qu’ils mettraient les contingents nécessaires à la disposition de l’ONU. 61. Il existe plusieurs moyens de pallier cette difficullté notamment en améliorant, au stade de l’élaboration du mandat, la coordination et la consultatiio entre les États susceptibles de fournir des contingeent et les membres du Conseil de sécurité. On pourraai utilement institutionnaliser la procédure par laqueell le Conseil de sécurité consulte les pays qui fournisssen des contingents, en créant un organe subsidiaire comme prévu à l’Article 29 de la Charte. Les États Membres qui fournissent des unités militaires constituuée à telle ou telle opération devraient être systématiqueemen invités à assister aux séances d’information que le Secrétariat organise à l’intention du Conseil de sécurité sur des situations de crise susceptibles de metttr en danger la sécurité des personnels de la mission ou sur toute modification ou réinterprétation d’un mandda dans le sens du recours à la force. 62. Enfin, il faut se féliciter de l’évolution positive que dénotent le souhait exprimé par le Secrétaire génén0059471.doc 13 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ral d’assurer davantage de protection aux civils en situaatio de conflit armé ainsi que les mesures prises par le Conseil qui tendent à autoriser explicitement les Casques bleus à protéger les civils dans les situations de conflit. On pourrait présumer en effet que les soldats ou les policiers de la paix qui assistent à des exactions contre la population civile devraient être autorisés à y mettre fin, dans la mesure de leurs moyens, au nom des principes fondamentaux de l’ONU et, comme indiqué dans le rapport de la Commission d’enquête indépendaant sur le Rwanda, en tenant compte du fait que « la présence des Nations Unies dans une zone de conflit suscite chez les civils une attente de protection » (S/1999/1257, p. 55). 63. Le Groupe d’étude n’est toutefois pas convaincu qu’il soit possible ou souhaitable d’envisager un mandda général sur ce point. Il y a actuellement dans les zones de mission de l’ONU des centaines de milliers de civils exposés aux risques de violences et les forces déployées ne suffiraient pas à protéger ne serait-ce qu’une petite partie d’entre eux, même si elles en recevaiien l’ordre. En promettant d’assurer une telle protecttion les Nations Unies suscitent de grands espoirs, qui risquent d’être invariablement déçus étant donné le grand décalage qui peut exister entre l’objectif poursuuiv et les ressources disponibles pour l’atteindre. Si une opération a pour mandat de protéger des civils, elle doit nécessairement être dotée des ressources dont elle a besoin pour s’acquitter de cette partie de sa mission. 64. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant les mandats : a) Le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’avant d’accepter de déployer une opération portaan sur la mise en oeuvre d’un accord de cessez-leffe ou d’un accord de paix, le Conseil de sécurité s’assure que l’accord en question réponde à certainne conditions minimales, concernant notamment sa conformité avec les normes internationales relatives aux droits de l’homme, la faisabilité des tâches envisaggée et les délais prévus; b) Le Conseil de sécurité devrait garder à l’état de projet les résolutions prévoyant le déploiiemen d’effectifs assez nombreux jusqu’à ce que le Secrétaire général ait reçu des États Membres l’assurance qu’ils fourniraient les contingents et autres éléments d’appui indispensables, notamment en matière de consolidation de la paix; c) Le Conseil de sécurité devrait, dans ses résolutions, doter des moyens nécessaires les opératiion qui sont déployées dans des situations potentielllemen dangereuses, et prévoir notamment une chaîne de commandement bien définie et présentant un front uni; d) Lorsqu’il s’agit d’élaborer ou de modifier le mandat d’une mission, le Secrétariat doit dire au Conseil de sécurité ce qu’il doit savoir plutôt que ce qu’il veut entendre, et les pays qui se sont engagés à fournir des unités militaires devraient être invités à assister aux séances d’information que le Secrétariia organise à l’intention du Conseil sur des questiion touchant à la sécurité de leur personnel, en particulier lorsque le recours à la force est envisagé. G. Capacités en matière de collecte et d’analyse d’informations et de planification stratégique 65. Pour que l’ONU puisse appliquer une approche stratégique à la prévention des conflits, au maintien de la paix et à la consolidation de la paix, il faut que les départements du Secrétariat qui ont compétence en matière de paix et de sécurité collaborent plus étroitemeent Pour ce faire, et appuyer ainsi le travail du Comiit exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité, instance décisionnnell de haut niveau chargée des questions relatives à la paix et à la sécurité, ils auront besoin d’outils plus performants pour la collecte et l’analyse d’informations. 66. Le Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité est l’un des quatre comités sectoriels établis par le Secrétaair général dans le cadre de la réforme qu’il a entreprris au début de 1997 (voir A/51/829, sect. A). Les autres comités sont compétents, respectivement, pour les affaires économiques et sociales, les activités de développement et les affaires humanitaires. Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme est membre des quatre comités. Ces comités, auxquels sont dévolus des pouvoirs de décision et des fonctions de coordination, ont été constitués de manière à facilitte une gestion plus concertée et plus coordonnée des activités des départements de l’Organisation. Présidé par le Secrétaire général adjoint aux affaires politiques, le Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité a favorisé l’échange d’informations et la coopération entre les départements, mais de l’aveu même de ses membres, il14 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 n’est pas encore devenu l’organe de décision prévu dans le programme de réformes de 1997. 67. Le niveau actuel des effectifs au Secrétariat et le volume de travail dans le secteur de la paix et de la sécurité sont tels qu’une planification des politiques au niveau des départements est pratiquement impossible. Bien que la plupart des départements représentés au Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité aient un serviic de planification ou d’élaboration des politiques, ils tendent à être absorbés par la gestion du quotidien. Pourtant, à moins de disposer d’une capacité réelle de collecte et d’analyse d’informations, le Secrétariat resteer une institution à la remorque des événements, incappabl de les anticiper, et le Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité ne sera pas en mesure de remplir le rôle pour lequel il a été créé. 68. Le Secrétaire général et les membres du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité doivent pouvoir compter, au Secrétariat, sur une capacité spécialisée, qui serait chargée de recueillir un maximum de renseignemment sur les situations de conflit, de diffuser largemmen ces renseignements, de produire des analyses et d’élaborer des stratégies à long terme. Cette capacité n’existe pas actuellement. Le Groupe d’étude propose donc de créer un secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyys stratégique (SIAS), qui dépendrait du Comité exécuuti pour la paix et la sécurité. 69. Le SIAS serait constitué pour l’essentiel d’éléments provenant des différents services départemenntau chargés de l’analyse de l’information et des politiques en matière de paix et de sécurité, notamment le Groupe de l’analyse des politiques et le Centre de situation du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix; le Groupe de la planification des politiques du Département des affaires politiques; le Groupe de l’élaboration des politiques du Bureau de la coordinatiio des affaires humanitaires; et la Section de l’analyse des médias du Département de l’information. 70. Il faudrait recruter des effectifs supplémentaires pour doter le SIAS de compétences qui n’existent pas ailleurs dans le système ou dont les structures existannte ne peuvent pas se passer. Ainsi, il faudrait recruute un responsable (avec rang de directeur), une petiit équipe d’analystes militaires, des spécialistes de la police et des analystes fonctionnels hautement qualifiiés qui seraient responsables de la conception et de la gestion des bases de données du SIAS, lesquelles devraaien être accessibles au Siège, dans les bureaux extériieur et dans les missions. 71. Le SIAS entretiendrait des liens étroits avec le Groupe de la planification stratégique du Cabinet du Secrétaire général; la Division des interventions d’urgence du PNUD; le Groupe de la consolidation de la paix (voir par. 239 à 243); le Groupe de l’analyse de l’information du Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires (qui gère le site Relief Web); les bureaux de liaison à New York du Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme et du Haut Commissariat pour les réfugiés; le Bureau du Coordonnateur des Nations Unies pour les mesures de sécurité et le Service du suivvi de la gestion de la base de données et de l’information du Département des affaires de désarmemment Il faudrait inviter le Groupe de la Banque mondiale à rester en liaison avec le SIAS par l’intermédiaire d’éléments comme ceux de l’Unité de situation postconflictuelle. 72. En tant que service interdépartemental, le SIAS serait utile aux membres du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité tant à court terme qu’à long terme. Il permettrait de renforcer les fonctions du Centre de situattion grâce aux informations à jour qu’il recueillerait sur l’activité des missions ou sur des événements de portée mondiale. Il pourrait attirer l’attention des membres du Comité exécutif sur les signes avantcourreur d’une crise et les informer en utilisant des techniques de présentation modernes. Il pourrait servir de centre d’analyse pour les questions intéressant plusieeur départements et élaborer des rapports sur ces questions à l’intention du Secrétaire général. Enfin, en fonction des missions ou des crises en cours, des intérêêt des organes délibérants ou des apports des membrre du Comité exécutif, le SIAS pourrait gérer l’ordre du jour du Comité exécutif, appuyer ses délibérations et contribuer à en faire l’organe décisionnel envisagé dans le programme de réformes initial du Secrétaire général. 73. Le SIAS devrait pouvoir faire appel aux éléments les plus qualifiés, tant à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur du système des Nations Unies, afin d’affiner les analyses qu’il consacre à une région ou à une situation donnée. Il pourrait rendre compte au Secrétaire général et aux membres du Comité exécutif des efforts déployés par les Nations Unies et d’autres partenaires afin de s’attaquer aux causes et aux symptômes de conflits en cours ou naissants, et devrait être capable d’évaluer l’utilité et les conséquences d’une intervention plusn0059471.doc 15 A/55/305 S/2000/809 poussée de l’ONU. Il devrait établir la documentation de base qui servira aux équipes spéciales intégrées dont le Groupe recommande la création (voir par. 198 à 217) pour planifier et appuyer les opérations de maintien de la paix. Une fois qu’une opération est mise sur pied, il devrait continuer de fournir des analyses et de gérer les échanges d’informations entre la mission et les équipes spéciales intégrées. 74. Le SIAS devrait créer, gérer et utiliser des bases de données communes et intégrées qui, progressivemeent se substitueraient à la masse de messages chiffrrés de rapports de situation quotidiens et des points de presse quotidiens, ainsi qu’aux contacts informels que les responsables de secteur et les décideurs entretienneen actuellement avec des collègues bien informés afin de se tenir au courant des événements qui se produiisen dans leur domaine de compétence. Avec les précautions voulues, ces bases de données pourraient être rendues accessibles aux utilisateurs d’un Intranet consacré aux opérations de paix (voir par. 255 et 256). Ces bases de données, accessibles au Siège comme sur le terrain grâce aux réseaux de communication à large bande dont le prix ne cesse de baisser, révolutionneraiien la manière dont l’Organisation engrange des connaissances et analyse les grandes questions ayant trait à la paix et la sécurité. Le SIAS serait aussi appelé à se substituer au Cadre interdépartemental de coordinattion 75. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la gestion de l’information et l’analyse stratégique : le Secrétaire général devrait créer un organe, dénommé ci-après le Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique (SIAS), pour répondre aux besoins des membres du Comité exécuuti pour la paix et la sécurité en matière d’analyse et d’information; le SIAS serait administré conjointemmen par le Département des affaires politiques et le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, auxquels il rendrait compte. H. Problèmes posés par la mise en place d’une administration civile transitoire 76. Jusqu’à la mi-1999, l’ONU n’avait mené qu’une poignée d’opérations sur le terrain comportant des élémeent d’une administration civile ou de supervision d’une telle administration. En juin 1999 cependant, le Secrétariat a reçu pour instruction de mettre en place une administration civile transitoire au Kosovo et, trois mois plus tard, il a été chargé d’une mission similaire au Timor oriental. Les efforts déployés par l’ONU pour mettre sur pied et mener à bien ce type d’opérations transparaissent dans les sections du présent rapport consacrées au déploiement rapide ainsi qu’aux effectifs et à la structure du Siège. 77. Les problèmes que posent ces opérations et les responsabilités qu’elles impliquent sont tout à fait spécifiique : aucune autre opération ne doit définir et faire respecter la loi, mettre en place des services de douane et un régime douanier, fixer la fiscalité applicable aux entreprises et aux personnes physiques et collecter l’impôt, attirer des investissements étrangers, se prononnce sur des différends en matière de biens mobiliers et accorder des indemnités pour dommages de guerre, reconstruire et assurer le bon fonctionnement de l’ensemble des services destinés aux collectivités, créer un système bancaire, faire fonctionner les écoles et payer les enseignants, et assurer le ramassage des ordurees le tout dans une société ravagée par la guerre, et au moyen de contributions volontaires, étant donné que le budget affecté aux missions, même aux missions « d’administration transitoire », ne prévoit pas le financemmen des administrations locales. De plus, les missiion d’administration civile transitoire doivent égalemeen essayer de reconstruire la société civile et de promouvoir le respect des droits de l’homme alors que les griefs sont nombreux et les rancunes profondément enracinées. 78. Ces divers problèmes s’inscrivent cependant dans une problématique plus générale, à savoir si c’est effectiivemen à l’ONU de jouer un tel rôle et, dans l’affirmative, si ce rôle doit être considéré comme un élément des opérations de paix ou être assumé par une autre structure. Il est certes possible que le Conseil de sécurité ne confie plus de telles missions à l’Organisation, mais il est tout aussi vrai que personne ne s’attendait à ce qu’il le fasse pour le Kosovo et le Timor oriental. Il existe toujours des conflits dans certaain États, et l’instabilité est difficile à prévoir, de sorte qu’en dépit d’une ambivalence manifeste des États Membres et du Secrétariat, il se pourrait fort bien que d’autres missions d’administration civile soient menées à l’avenir, et dans les mêmes conditions d’urgence. Le Secrétariat se trouve donc face à un dileemm : soit partir du principe qu’une administration transitoire, par définition, n’implique qu’une responsabillit transitoire, ne pas se préparer à de futures missiion et, par conséquent, les mener dans de mauvaises16 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 conditions s’il est de nouveau appelé à le faire, soit bien se préparer et, de ce fait, être de plus en plus fréquemmmen appelé à en mener. Une chose est cependant certaine : si le Secrétariat estime qu’à l’avenir de telles missions seront la règle plutôt que l’exception, il est alors indispensable de créer, au sein du système des Nations Unies, une structure à laquelle en confier la responsabilité. Dans l’intervalle, le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix doit continuer à assuume ce rôle. 79. Quoi qu’il en soit, les missions d’administration civile transitoire sont confrontées à un problème auquel il est urgent d’apporter une réponse, à savoir celui du « droit applicable ». Dans les deux régions où l’ONU assume désormais la responsabilité de la justice et de la police, l’infrastructure juridique et judiciaire locale était inexistante, non opérationnelle, ou faisait l’objet d’intimidation de la part d’éléments armés. De plus, dans les deux cas, la législation et le système juridique en vigueur avant le conflit étaient remis en question ou rejetés par des groupes clefs de la population considérré comme les victimes des conflits. 80. Même si le choix du code pénal local paraissait s’imposer, il n’en faudrait pas moins que les juristes attachés à la mission se familiarisent suffisamment avec celui-ci et les procédures associées pour être en mesure de poursuivre et de juger les affaires devant les tribunaux, ce qui, en raison des différences de langue, de culture, de coutume et d’expérience, pourrait facilemmen demander six mois ou plus. Que faire dans l’intervalle? L’ONU n’a pour l’instant pas de réponse à cette question. Par ailleurs, il se peut que de puissantes factions politiques locales profitent de cette période d’apprentissage pour mettre en place leurs propres administtration parallèles, et que les syndicats du crime exploitent sans se priver tout vide juridique ou policier qu’ils peuvent trouver. 81. Ces tâches auraient été beaucoup plus faciles à exécuter si la mission avait pu disposer d’une ensemble type de règles juridiques et judiciaires qui auraient servv à titre intérimaire de code juridique, et auquel le personnne aurait été formé au préalable, en attendant d’apporter une réponse définitive à la question du « droit applicable ». Bien que rien ne soit en cours à ce sujet dans les services du Conseil juridique de l’ONU, les entretiens avec des universitaires ont montré que l’on avait quelque peu progressé en dehors de l’ONU en vue de régler ce problème, compte tenu en particuliie de l’existence des principes, principes juridiques, codes et procédures contenus dans plusieurs dizaines de conventions et de déclarations internationales concernant les droits de l’homme, le droit humanitaire ainsi que les principes directeurs applicables à la poliice à la magistrature et au système pénal. 82. Le but de ces recherches est de parvenir à élaborre un code qui énonce les principes de base du droit et de la procédure afin d’assurer le respect de la légalité, de faire appel à des juristes internationaux et de se fondde sur des normes acceptées au plan international pour des crimes tels que meurtres, viols, incendies volontairees enlèvements et violences graves. Il est probable qu’un tel « code type » ne couvrira pas le droit des biens, mais au moins il permettra aux membres de la mission de l’ONU de poursuivre efficacement ceux qui se seront rendus coupables d’avoir incendié la maison de leurs voisins, en attendant de pouvoir régler la question du point de vue du droit des biens. 83. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant l’administration civile transitoire : Le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Secrétaire génééra invite un groupe de juristes internationaux, y compris d’experts connaissant les opérations de l’ONU dont le mandat prévoit la mise en place d’une administration transitoire, à déterminer dans quelle mesure il serait possible et utile d’élaborer un code pénal, y compris d’éventuelles variantes régionales, destiné à être utilisé de façon temporaire par les opérations de l’ONU en attendant le rétablisssemen de l’état de droit et des capacités locales en matière de police. III. Capacités de l’ONU à mener une opération rapidement et efficacement 84. De nombreux observateurs se sont interrogés sur les raisons pour lesquelles tellement de temps s’écoulait entre le moment où le Conseil de sécurité adoptait une résolution et celui où la mission de l’ONU se déployait pleinement. Ces raisons sont multiples. L’ONU n’a pas d’armée permanente ni de force de poliic permanente conçue pour intervenir sur le terrain. Il n’existe pas non plus de corps de réserve dans lequel puiser pour désigner les principaux responsables d’une mission : représentant spécial du Secrétaire général et chef de mission, commandant de la force, responsable de la police, directeur de l’Administration, etc., den0059471.doc 17 A/55/305 S/2000/809 sorte qu’elle ne commence à les rechercher que en a un besoin urgent. Le système de forces et moyens en attente actuellement en vigueur, qui concerne les effectifs militaires, de police et civils suscepttible d’être fournis par les gouvernements, n’est pas encore une source fiable de personnel. Le stock de matériel essentiel provenant des grandes missions organiisée au milieu des années 90, qui se trouve à la Base de soutien logistique des Nations Unies à Brindisi (Italie), a été largement utilisé pour répondre aux besooin créés par la brusque augmentation récente du nombre de missions, et il n’existe toujours pas de mécannism budgétaire pour le reconstituer rapidement. Le mécanisme de passation des marchés, qui est fondé sur l’efficacité par rapport au coût et la responsabilité financcière n’est peut-être pas adapté aux missions compte tenu de la nécessité absolue d’intervenir rapidemmen et d’être crédible. Le besoin de mécanismes permanents pour le recrutement de personnel civil dans les domaines technique et d’appui est admis depuis longtemps, mais n’a débouché sur rien de concret jusquu’ présent. Enfin, le Secrétaire général n’a pas, pour l’essentiel, le pouvoir d’acquérir le matériel et de recruute le personnel nécessaires et de les prépositionner afin de pouvoir assurer le déploiement rapide d’une opération avant que le Conseil de sécurité n’adopte la résolution créant cette mission, même si celle-ci paraît très probable. 85. En d’autres termes, seules sont remplies un petit nombre des conditions de base indispensables à l’obtention et au déploiement rapide des ressources humaines et matériel nécessaires à l’organisation de toute opération de paix complexe. A. Ce qu’implique un « déploiement rapide et efficace » 86. Les comptes rendus du Conseil de sécurité, les rapports du Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix de même que les responsables des missions, les représentants du Secrétariat et les représentants des États Membres que le Groupe a rencontrés reconnaisseen tous que l’ONU doit renforcer sensiblement sa capacité à exécuter rapidement et efficacement de nouvellle opérations. Pour cela, elle doit d’abord adopter un certain nombre de paramètres de base permettant de définir ce que l’on entend par « rapidité » et par « efficacité ». 87. Les 6 à 12 semaines qui suivent un accord de cesseezle-feu ou de paix constituent souvent la période la plus critique pour l’instauration d’une paix stable et la crédibilité d’une opération de maintien de la paix. Toute perte de crédibilité ou d’élan politique au cours de cette période sera souvent très difficile à rattraper. Le calendrier de déploiement devrait donc être établi en conséquence. Toutefois, il ne suffit pas de déployer rapidement le personnel militaire, de police civile et civil pour contribuer à consolider une paix fragile et à établir la crédibilité d’une opération : il faut en plus que ces personnels aient les moyens d’accomplir leur travail. Pour cela, il leur faut des équipements (matériel et appui logistique), des moyens financiers (liquidités pour l’achat des biens et des services) des informations (formation et réunions d’information), et une stratégie opérationnelle. Dans certains cas, il faut en outre que la mission ait un « centre de gravité » militaire et politiqqu suffisant pour lui permettre d’anticiper et de surmonnte les hésitations que pourraient avoir une ou plusieeur parties en ce qui concerne la poursuite du processsu de paix. 88. Le calendrier fixé pour un déploiement rapide et efficace sera bien entendu fonction des conditions politticomilitaires propres à chaque situation d’après conflit. Néanmoins, la première mesure à prendre pour renforcer la capacité de l’ONU à intervenir rapidement doit être de fixer un délai maximum que l’Organisation doit s’efforcer de ne pas dépasser. Comme il n’existe rien de tel actuellement, le Groupe propose que l’ONU acquière la capacité de déployer pleinement une opératiio « classique » de maintien de la paix dans les 30 jours qui suivent l’adoption de la résolution pertineent par le Conseil de sécurité, et dans les 90 jours pour des missions complexes. Dans ce dernier cas, le quartier général de la mission devrait être installé et fonctionner pleinement dans un délai de 15 jours. 89. Pour être en mesure de respecter ce calendrier, le Secrétariat aura besoin d’au moins un des éléments suivants : a) une réserve permanente de personnel militaaire de police civile et civil, d’équipements et de ressources financières; b) des capacités en attente extrêmmemen fiables, auxquelles il peut être fait appel avec un très bref préavis; ou c) un temps suffisant pour acquérir ces ressources, ce qui implique la capacité à prévoir et planifier de nouvelles missions potentielles et à engager les premières dépenses pour ces missions plusieurs mois à l’avance. Un certain nombre de recommanndation du Groupe d’étude concernent le ren18 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 forcement des capacités d’analyse du Secrétariat et l’adaptation de ces capacités au processus de planificatiio des missions, de façon à ce que l’ONU soit mieux préparée à mener d’éventuelles nouvelles opérations. Toutefois, il n’est pas toujours possible de prévoir longtemps à l’avance le déclenchement d’une guerre ou la conclusion d’une paix. En fait, l’expérience montre que c’est même rarement le cas. Par conséquent, le Secréttaria doit être en mesure de maintenir un certain niveau de préparation, autorisé par la création de nouvellle capacités permanentes et le renforcement des capacités en attente existantes, afin d’être prêt à faire face à des imprévus. 90. De nombreux États Membres se sont prononcés contre la création d’une armée ou d’une force de police permanentes de l’ONU, ont refusé de conclure des accoord pour la constitution de forces et moyens en atteent fiables, ont mis en garde contre les engagements de dépenses nécessaires à la constitution d’une réserve de matériel, ou ont découragé le Secrétariat de planifier d’éventuelles opérations avant qu’une crise ne conduise à autoriser spécifiquement le Secrétaire générra à le faire. Dans ces conditions, l’ONU ne peut déplooye « rapidement et efficacement » une mission dans les délais suggérés. L’analyse ci-dessous cherche à démonntre qu’au moins certaines conditions doivent changer si l’on veut véritablement que l’ONU puisse agir rapidement et efficacement. 91. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la détermination des calendriers de déploiiemen des opérations : L’ONU devrait définir la « capacité de déploiement rapide et efficace » comme la capacité, d’un point de vue opérationnel, à déployer intégralement une opération de maintien de la paix dans un délai de 30 jours après l’adoption d’une résolution par le Conseil de sécurité dans le cas d’une mission classique, et dans un délai de 90 jours dans le cas d’une mission complexe. B. Une équipe dirigeante efficace 92. Des chefs efficaces et dynamiques peuvent faire toute la différence entre une mission solidaire, capable de garder son moral et son efficacité face à des circonsttance difficiles, et une mission qui a du mal à préserrve ces qualités. En d’autres mots, le climat d’une mission tout entière peut être fortement influencé par le caractère et les compétences de ceux qui la dirigent. 93. Vu l’importance cruciale de ce facteur, la façon dont l’ONU sélectionne, recrute, forme et appuie les dirigeants de ses missions pourrait être considérablemeen améliorée. Des listes de candidats potentiels sont certes tenues à jour de manière informelle. Mais la sélecctio des Représentants ou Représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire général, chefs de mission, commandants de Force et chefs de police civile et de leurs adjoints respecctif est parfois différée jusqu’à ce que le Conseil de sécurité soit sur le point d’adopter la résolution créant une nouvelle mission, voire jusqu’à ce qu’il l’ait adoptée. Ces dirigeants et les chefs des autres composannte organiques ou administratives de la mission risquuen fort de ne pas se rencontrer avant d’arriver sur les lieux de la mission, après quelques jours passés au Siège en réunions d’initiation avec des fonctionnaires du Secrétariat. On leur aura bien donné des instructions – les « termes de référence » – énonçant leur rôle et leurs responsabilités en termes généraux, mais c’est bien rarement qu’ils quitteront le Siège munis de directtive politiques ou opérationnelles spécifiquement adaptées à leur mission. Au moins au début, ils devront chercher par eux-mêmes comment mettre en oeuvre le mandat adopté par le Conseil de sécurité et comment surmonter les obstacles éventuels. Enfin, ils seront censsé tout à la fois et en même temps élaborer une stratéggi de mise en oeuvre de ce mandat, trouver le centre de gravité politico-militaire de la mission et protéger un processus de paix souvent fragile. 94. On comprendra mieux le fonctionnement de ce processus de sélection si l’on tient compte de ses contraintes politiques. Une nouvelle mission peut être tellement « sensible » politiquement que le Secrétaire général devra éviter de pressentir des candidats potentiiel avant que la mission ne soit effectivement créée. Au moment de choisir un Représentant spécial, un Représeentan ou un Chef de Mission, il devra tenir compte des vues des membres du Conseil de sécurité, des États de la région concernée et des parties sur place, puisque son Représentant ou Représentant spécial devra pouvooi compter sur leur confiance à tous. Le choix du ou des Représentants spéciaux adjoints peut, quant à lui, être influencé par la nécessité de maintenir un équilibre géographique au sein de la direction de la mission. Quant au Commandant de la Force, au Chef de la poliic et à leurs adjoints respectifs, leur nationalité doit tenir compte de la composition des éléments militaire et de police ainsi que de la sensibilité politique des parties locales.n0059471.doc 19 A/55/305 S/2000/809 95. Même si ces considérations d’ordre politique et géographique sont légitimes, le Groupe d’étude estime que les compétences et l’expérience managériales devraaien être des critères au moins également prioritaires de sélection des dirigeants. En se fondant sur l’expérience personnelle de plusieurs de ses membres, le Groupe souligne la nécessité de faire se rencontrer le plus tôt possible les dirigeants d’une mission, de façon qu’ils puissent participer ensemble à la formulation du concept des opérations, du plan de soutien administratiif du budget et du plan d’effectifs de la mission. 96. Pour faciliter le processus de sélection, le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Secrétaire général compile de façon systématique, et avec le concours des États Membres, un vaste fichier de Représentants spéciaux, Commandants de Force, Chefs de police civile et adjoiint potentiels, qui comprendrait aussi les noms de candidats à la direction des autres composantes organiquue des missions, et qui justifierait d’une large représenttatio géographique et d’une répartition équitable entre les sexes. Ce genre de fichier rendrait plus facile et plus rapide le processus d’identification et de sélectiio de l’équipe dirigeante. 97. Le Secrétariat devrait avoir pour règle de fournir aux dirigeants d’une mission des orientations et plans stratégiques identifiant par avance les obstacles éventuuel à la mise en oeuvre du mandat ainsi que les moyens de les surmonter; chaque fois que possible, le Secrétariat devrait formuler ces orientations et plans de concert avec les dirigeants de la mission. Les dirigeants devraient également mener de larges consultations avec l’équipe résidente des Nations Unies dans le pays concerné ainsi qu’avec les organisations non gouvernemenntale actives dans la région afin de compléter et d’approfondir sa connaissance de la situation locale, connaissance indispensable à la mise en oeuvre d’une stratégie globale de transition de la guerre à la paix. Le Coordinateur résident de l’équipe de pays devrait être intégré plus fréquemment et de façon officielle au processsu de planification des missions. 98. Le Groupe d’étude estime qu’il faudrait que la haute direction d’une mission comprenne toujours au moins un membre ayant l’expérience de l’ONU, acquuis de préférence à la fois sur le terrain et au Siège. Cette personne faciliterait le travail des membres de l’équipe de direction recrutés à l’extérieur du système des Nations Unies, réduirait les délais nécessaires à leur apprentissage des règles, règlements, politiques et méthodes de travail de l’Organisation, et répondrait aux questions qui n’auraient pas été prévues dans la préparation qu’ils ont reçue avant leur déploiement. 99. Le Groupe note le précédent consistant à nommer comme l’un des adjoints du Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général dans une opération de paix compleexe le Coordonnateur résident/Coordonnateur humanittair des institutions spécialisées, fonds et programmme des Nations Unies chargés des activités de développpemen et de l’aide humanitaire dans le pays concerné. Il est d’avis que cette pratique devrait être suivie chaque fois que possible. 100. À l’inverse, il est d’une importance cruciale que les représentants sur place des institutions spécialisées, fonds et programmes des Nations Unies facilitent la tâche d’un Représentant spécial ou d’un Représentant du Secrétaire général dans son rôle de coordonnateur de l’ensemble des activités de l’ONU dans le pays en question. Dans un certain nombre de cas, les efforts des Représentants du Secrétaire général pour remplir ce rôle se sont heurtés à une résistance lourdement bureaucrratiqu à la coordination. Ce genre de résistance ne rend pas justice à la vision d’une « famille » des Nations Unies que le Secrétaire général s’efforce sans relâche de promouvoir. 101. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la direction des missions : a) Le Secrétaire général devrait rationaliser le processus de sélection des dirigeants des missions, en commençant par la compilation, avec le concours des États Membres, d’un vaste fichier de Représentaant spéciaux, commandants de Force, chefs de poliic civile et leurs adjoints potentiels, qui comprendrrai aussi les noms de candidats potentiels à la direcctio des autres composantes organiques et administrrative des missions et qui justifierait à la fois d’une large représentation géographique et d’une répartition équitable entre les sexes; b) L’ensemble des dirigeants d’une mission devrait être sélectionné et rassemblé au Siège le plus tôt possible afin de leur permettre de participer aux principaux volets du processus de planification de la mission, de recevoir des informations sur la situatiio dans la zone de la mission, de faire la connaissaanc de leurs collègues au sein de la direction de la mission et d’établir une relation de travail avec eux; c) Le Secrétariat devrait avoir pour règle de fournir aux dirigeants d’une mission des directives20 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 et plans stratégiques identifiant par avance les obstaccle éventuels à la mise en oeuvre du mandat ainsi que les moyens de les surmonter; chaque fois que possible, le Secrétariat devrait formuler ces directivve et plans de concert avec les dirigeants de la missiion C. Personnel militaire 102. L’ONU a lancé son Système de forces et moyens en attente au milieu des années 90 afin d’améliorer sa capacité de se déployer à bref délai et de répondre à la croissance imprévisible et exponentielle du nombre des opérations de maintien de la paix complexes de la nouveell génération. Ce système consiste en une base de données sur les personnels et matériels militaires, de police et civils dont les gouvernements ont indiqué qu’ils étaient en principe à la disposition de l’ONU pour déploiement dans des opérations de maintien de la paix avec 7, 15, 30, 60 ou 90 jours de préavis. La base de données comprend actuellement quelque 147 900 personnes ressortissantes de 87 États Membres : 85 000 dans des unités militaires de combat; 56 700 dans des éléments d’appui; 1 600 observateurs militaires; 2 150 personnels de police civile; et 2 450 spécialistes civils. Sur ces 87 États, 31 ont conclu avec l’ONU des mémorandums d’accord qui précisent leurs responsabillité du point de vue de la préparation des personnels concernés, mais qui réaffirment aussi la nature conditionnnell de leur engagement. Ces mémorandums confirment que les États se réservent le droit souverain de répondre simplement « non » à toute demande que pourrait leur faire le Secrétaire général de mettre effectiivemen ces moyens à la disposition d’une opératiion 103. L’absence de statistiques détaillées sur les réponsse des États n’empêche pas de constater que nombre d’entre eux répondent bien plus souvent « non » que « oui » aux demandes de déploiement d’unités militairre constituées dans des opérations de maintien de la paix dirigées par l’ONU. Pendant les cinquante premièrre années de l’Organisation, une longue tradition voulait que les pays développés fournissent le gros des troupes des opérations de maintien de la paix de l’ONU; par contraste, au cours des dernières années et jusqu’à la fin du mois de juin 2000, les pays en développpemen ont fourni 77 % des effectifs des unités militaaire constituées. 104. Les cinq membres permanents du Conseil de sécurrit fournissent actuellement un nombre beaucoup moins élevé de troupes aux opérations sous conduite de l’ONU, mais il faut reconnaître que quatre d’entre eux ont fourni des contingents substantiels aux opérations sous conduite de l’OTAN en Bosnie-Herzégovine et au Kosovo qui sécurisent l’environnement dans lequel deux opérations de l’ONU – la Mission des Nations Unies en Bosnie-Herzégovine et la Mission d’administration intérimaire des Nations Unies au Kosoov – sont déployées. Le Royaume-Uni a, en plus, déployé des troupes en Sierra Leone (hors contrôle opérationnel de l’ONU) à un moment crucial de la crise, exerçant ainsi une précieuse influence stabilisatriice mais aucun pays développé ne fournit actuellemeen de troupes aux opérations de l’ONU les plus difficcile du point de vue de la sécurité, à savoir la Missiio des Nations Unies en Sierra Leone (MINUSIL) et la Mission de l’Organisation des Nations Unies en Républliqu démocratique du Congo (MONUC). 105. Le souvenir des soldats de la paix tués à Mogadiish et à Kigali et pris en otage en Sierra Leone expliqqu les difficultés auxquelles se heurtent les États Membres quand il s’agit de convaincre leur assemblée nationale et leur opinion publique qu’elles devraient appuyer le déploiement de contingents nationaux dans des opérations conduites par l’ONU, notamment en Afrique. À cela s’ajoute que les pays développés ont tendance à ne pas considérer que leur intérêt national stratégique soit en jeu. La réduction des effectifs des armées nationales et la multiplication des initiatives de maintien de la paix régionales en Europe contribuent elles aussi à réduire le nombre de contingents solidemeen entraînés et bien équipés que les pays développés peuvent mettre à la disposition des opérations conduitte par l’ONU. 106. Il s’ensuit que l’ONU est confrontée à un grave dilemme. Une mission comme la MINUSIL n’aurait probablement pas été en butte aux difficultés qu’elle a connues au printemps 2000 si elle avait pu compter sur des forces aussi puissantes que celles qui maintiennent actuellement la paix au Kosovo dans le cadre de la KFOR. Les membres du Groupe d’étude sont convainccu que les militaires responsables de la planification à l’OTAN auraient rejeté l’idée de déployer en Sierra Leone un contingent qui ne comptait que 6 000 hommees soit l’effectif autorisé à l’origine. Il n’en reste pas moins que les perspectives de déploiement en Afrique d’une opération du type de la KFOR dans un avenirn0059471.doc 21 A/55/305 S/2000/809 proche sont plutôt limitées si on en juge par les tendancce actuelles. Et même si l’ONU voulait essayer de déployer une force du type KFOR, on peut se demandeer dans les conditions actuelles du système de forces et moyens en attente, où elle se procurerait les troupes et le matériel nécessaires. 107. Il est indéniable qu’un certain nombre de pays en développement, sollicités de fournir des contingents, offrent des troupes qui servent avec distinction et conviction, répondent aux normes professionnelles les plus exigeantes et respectent les nouvelles « règles relattive au matériel appartenant aux contingents » adoptées par l’Assemblée générale, qui prévoient que les contingents nationaux doivent apporter avec eux presque tout le matériel et les approvisionnements nécesssaire à leur subsistance. L’ONU s’engage à compennse les pays fournisseurs pour l’utilisation de ce matériel et à fournir les services d’appui et autres serviice qui ne sont pas couverts par les nouvelles règles. De leur côté, les pays fournissant des troupes s’engagent à honorer les termes du « mémorandum d’accord sur le matériel appartenant aux contingents » qu’ils ont signé. 108. Or le Secrétaire général se trouve dans une positiio intenable. On lui donne une résolution du Conseil de sécurité qui précise, sur le papier, le nombre de militaaire requis, mais il ne sait pas si on lui donnera les militaires à déployer sur le terrain. Et les troupes qui finissent par débarquer sur le théâtre des opérations risquent d’être sous-équipées : il est arrivé que des pays fournissent des troupes sans fusils, ou équipées de fusils mais dépourvues de casques, ou munies de casquue mais sans gilets pare-balles, et sans moyens proprre de transport (c’est-à-dire sans camions ni véhiculle de transport de troupes). Il arrive que les militaires concernés n’aient reçu aucune formation en maintien de la paix et, dans la plupart des cas, les différents contingents d’une opération donnée risquent fort de n’avoir jamais travaillé ensemble ou de ne s’être jamais entraînés ensemble auparavant. Certaines unités ne dispossen d’aucun membre parlant la langue de l’opération. Et même là où la langue ne fait pas problèème les différents contingents risquent d’avoir des modes de fonctionnement différents, des interprétations différentes de certains éléments essentiels du contrôle et du commandement, une perception différente des règles d’engagement de la mission, et des vues différennte sur les conditions régissant l’usage de la force dans le cadre de leur mandat. 109. Cet état de choses doit cesser. Les pays fournisseeur de troupes qui ne peuvent satisfaire aux conditiion de leurs mémorandums d’accord doivent le faire savoir à l’ONU, et leurs contingents ne doivent pas être déployés. Pour cela, il faudrait donner au Secrétaire général les moyens et l’appui nécessaires pour qu’il puisse évaluer, préalablement à leur déploiement, l’état de préparation des contingents nationaux et confirmer que ces contingents satisfont aux conditions prévues par le mémorandum d’accord. 110. On pourrait faire un pas de plus pour corriger la situation en donnant au Secrétaire général la possibilité de réunir, avec un préavis très bref, des militaires spécialliste de la planification, des travaux d’état-major et d’autres disciplines, ayant de préférence une expérieenc préalable des missions de l’ONU, pour faire la liaison avec les spécialistes de la planification des missiion au Siège avant d’être déployés sur le terrain en même temps qu’un élément de base du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix afin d’y mettre sur pied l’état-major militaire d’une mission autorisée par le Conseil de sécurité. Sur la base du système actuue de forces et moyens en attente, on pourrait établir à cette fin, ainsi que pour renforcer des missions existannte en cas de crise, une liste de personnels sous astreeint proposés par les États Membres selon le princiip de la répartition géographique équitable, soigneusemmen examinés et approuvés par le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix de l’ONU. Cette liste de personnels sous astreinte comprendrait une centaine d’officiers allant du grade de commandant à celui de colonel, susceptibles d’être appelés à bref délai et qui, une fois appelés, jouiraient du statut d’observateurs militaires modifié comme il convient. 111. Les personnels sous astreinte de la liste passeraiien à l’avance les examens médicaux et les formalitté administratives nécessaires en vue d’un déploiemeen partout dans le monde; ils recevraient une formatiio préalable et s’engageraient à pouvoir partir dans les sept jours pour une période pouvant aller jusqu’à deux ans. La liste serait actualisée tous les trois mois et augmentée des noms de dix à quinze nouvelles personnne proposées par les États Membres pour recevoir une formation pendant une période initiale de trois mois. Grâce à cette actualisation trimestrielle, la liste de personnnel sous astreinte finirait par représenter de cinq à sept équipes prêtes à être déployées à bref délai. L’instruction initiale des équipes comprendrait une première phase de préqualification et de formation (une22 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 semaine de cours et d’introduction aux modes de fonctionnnemen de l’ONU), suivie d’une phase de perfectionnnemen pratique (par déploiement au sein d’une opération de maintien de la paix de l’ONU en cours, pour une période d’environ dix semaines, en tant qu’équipe d’observateurs militaires). À l’issue de cette période de formation initiale de trois mois, les officiers concernés repartiraient dans leurs pays respectifs où ils auraient le statut de « personnel sous astreinte ». 112. Sur autorisation du Conseil de sécurité, une ou plusieurs de ces équipes pourraient être appelées à entrre immédiatement en fonctions. Elles se rendraient au Siège de l’ONU pour mettre leurs connaissances à jour et s’initier à la nouvelle mission, selon que de besoin, et pour s’entretenir avec les responsables de la planificattio de cette mission au sein de l’équipe spéciale intégrée (voir par. 198 à 217), avant d’être déployées sur le terrain. Elles auraient pour mandat de traduire dans des plans opérationnels et tactiques concrets les concepts généraux et stratégiques élaborés par l’équipe spéciale intégrée et d’exécuter les activités immédiates de coordination et de liaison en attendant le déploiemeen effectif des contingents. Une fois sur le terrain, une équipe avancée resterait opérationnelle jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit remplacée par les contingents déployés (soit pour environ deux ou trois mois, mais plus longteemp si nécessaire, et ce jusqu’à un maximum de six mois). 113. Le financement de l’instruction initiale d’une équipe sous astreinte serait prélevé sur le budget de la mission en cours où l’équipe effectuera son stage initiial tandis que le financement de son déploiement effeccti dans une mission à établir viendrait du budget de cette dernière. L’ONU ne couvrirait pas le coût de ces personnels tant qu’ils sont sous astreinte dans leur pays, puisqu’ils y exerceront leurs fonctions normales dans leurs armées nationales. Le Groupe d’étude recommmand que le Secrétaire général transmette cette proposition et ses modalités de mise en oeuvre aux États Membres en vue de son application immédiate dans le cadre du Système des forces et moyens en attennte 114. Il ne suffirait pas, toutefois, de disposer d’effectifs de planification et de liaison militaires d’urgeenc pour assurer la cohésion des forces. Nous estimoon que pour opérer de façon homogène, les contingeent devraient au moins avoir été entraînés et équipés selon une norme commune et qu’il faudrait parallèlemeen prévoir une planification concertée au niveau de leur commandement. Pour bien faire, ils devraient avoir eu l’occasion de faire des exercices conjoints sur le terrain. 115. Si les planificateurs militaires des Nations Unies jugent que la brigade (5 000 soldats environ) est la formation à même de prévenir ou de maîtriser efficacemmen les manifestations de violence qui menacent l’accomplissement du mandat d’une opération, la compossant militaire de l’opération devrait se déployer en brigade au lieu d’être divisé en bataillons dont chacun ignore la doctrine, le commandement et les pratiques opérationnelles des autres. La brigade devrait être constituée par un groupe de pays ayant collaboré – comme il est proposé plus haut – à l’établissement de normes communes en matière de formation et d’équipement, d’une doctrine unique, et de dispositifs conjoints pour le contrôle opérationnel des forces. En principe, le Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies devrait comprendre plusieurs brigades homogènes de ce type, dotées des éléments précurseurs nécessaires, qui pourraient être déployées complètemmen dans un délai de 30 jours pour une opération de type classique ou de 90 jours pour une mission compleexe 116. À cette fin, l’ONU devrait établir des normes miniimu en matière de formation, d’équipement et autres éléments requis des forces qui prennent part aux opérattion de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies. Les États Membres qui en ont les moyens devraient constittue des partenariats, dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies, afin d’aider, notamment sous forme de ressources financièrees d’équipements et de moyens de formation, les pays moins avancés fournisseurs de contingents à atteindre et à maintenir ces normes minimales : ainsi, chacune des brigades créées pourrait offrir une qualité de prestattio comparable et compter sur un soutien opérationnne efficace. C’est une formation de ce type que vise le groupe d’États composant la Brigade multinationale d’intervention rapide des forces en attente des Nations Unies, qui a également mis en place au niveau du commandement une cellule de planification travaillant systématiquement en concertation. Toutefois, le mécaniism en projet n’entend pas exonérer certains États de la responsabilité qui leur incombe de participer activemeen aux opérations de maintien de la paix ni empêchhe les petits États de prendre part à ces opérations.n0059471.doc 23 A/55/305 S/2000/809 117. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le personnel militaire : a) Les États Membres devraient être incités, le cas échéant, à constituer des partenariats dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies afin de créer plusieurs forces homogèène de la taille de la brigade, dotées des éléments précurseurs nécessaires, qui pourraient être effectivemmen déployées dans un délai de 30 jours suivant l’adoption d’une résolution du Conseil de sécurité portant création d’une opération de maintien de la paix de type classique, ou de 90 jours s’il s’agit d’une mission complexe; b) Lorsque les événements laissent présager la signature d’un accord de cessez-le-feu dont l’application prévoit l’intervention des Nations Unies, le Secrétaire général devrait être autorisé à consulter officiellement les États Membres participaan au Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies pour leur demander s’ils sont dispossé à fournir des contingents pour le cas où une opération serait mise en place; c) Le Secrétariat devrait systématiquement charger une équipe de déterminer sur place si chaccu des fournisseurs de contingents potentiels est à même de satisfaire aux conditions du Mémorandum d’accord pour ce qui est de la formation et de l’équipement, et ce avant le déploiement. Les élémeent qui ne remplissent pas ces conditions ne doiveen pas être déployés; d) Le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’une liste régulièrement actualisée de personnels sous astreinte comportant les noms d’une centaine d’officiers soit établie dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies; ces officiers pourraient être mis à disposition dans les sept jours pour renforcer les unités centrales de planification du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix en leur adjoignant des équipes ayant reçu la formation nécessaire pour mettre en place l’état-major d’une nouvelle opération de maintien de la paix. D. Police civile 118. La police civile ne le cède qu’au personnel militaair pour ce qui est des effectifs de personnel internatioona prenant part aux opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies. En règle générale, le déploiemeen de membres de la police civile tend à occuper une place prioritaire parmi les besoins à satisfaire en vue du bon déroulement d’opérations répondant à des conflits internes, lorsqu’on veut aider une société ravagée par la guerre à rétablir des conditions favorables à la stabiliit sociale, économique et politique. La neutralité et l’impartialité des forces locales de police, que la police civile encadre et entraîne, contribuent pour beaucoup au maintien de la sécurité collective, et il est indispensaabl que celles-ci se montrent opérantes dans les cas où les actes d’intimidation et les agissements de réseeau criminels continuent d’entraver le progrès dans les domaines politique et économique. 119. Le Groupe d’étude a donc préconisé (voir par. 39, 40 et 47 b) ci-dessus) un changement de doctrine quant au rôle dévolu à la police civile dans les opérations de paix des Nations Unies de sorte que, outre les activités traditionnelles de consultation, de formation et de contrôle, celle-ci s’attache principalement à réformer et à restructurer les forces de police locales. Ce nouveau rôle exigera des États Membres qu’ils fournissent à l’ONU des experts de police encore mieux entraînés et plus spécialisés, alors même qu’ils ont du mal à réponddr aux besoins présents. Au 1er août 2000, 25 % des 8 641 postes autorisés dans ce domaine pour les opératiion des Nations Unies demeuraient vacants. 120. Si les États Membres peuvent s’exposer à des difficultés politiques internes lorsqu’il s’agit d’envoyer des unités militaires pour les opérations de paix des Nations Unies, les gouvernements tendent à avoir une plus grande liberté de manoeuvre lorsqu’il s’agit de fournir les services de membres de leur police civile. Cependant, les États Membres ont toujours du mal à le faire, car les effectifs et la configuration de leurs forces de police tendent à être adaptés à leurs seuls besoins internes. 121. Dans ces conditions, il faut souvent beaucoup de temps pour trouver des agents de police civile et autres experts apparentés dans le domaine judiciaire susceptiblle de participer à la mission, obtenir leur détachemeen et leur prodiguer une formation, ce qui empêche l’ONU de déployer l’élément de police civile d’une mission avec la rapidité et l’efficacité voulues. En outrre l’élément de police d’une mission peut se composer d’agents originaires d’une quarantaine de pays, qui ne se sont jamais rencontrés, n’ont aucune expérience de l’ONU ou très peu, sont à peine formés à la mission qui les attend et mal informés de ses particularités, et dont24 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 la conception théorique et pratique du travail policier peut considérablement varier. En outre, les membres de la police civile se relaient en général à un rythme semesttrie ou annuel. Pour toutes ces raisons, les commisssaire de police civile des missions ont beaucoup de mal à faire de ces groupes d’agents disparates une force homogène et efficace. 122. Le Groupe d’étude demande donc aux États Membres de constituer des réserves nationales de personnne de police en exercice (auquel pourront s’ajouter, si nécessaire, des agents en retraite satisfaisant aux conditions professionnelles et physiques nécessaires) répondant aux conditions administratives et médicales requises en vue de leur déploiement auprès d’opérattion de paix dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies. Les effectifs des réserves ainsi constituées peuvent naturellement varier en fonction de la taille et des moyens du pays. Le Groupe de la police civile du Département des opératiion de maintien de la paix devrait aider les États Membres à fixer les critères de sélection et les besoins en formation en répertoriant les spécialisations et les compétences requises et en publiant des directives communes sur les normes de prestation à satisfaire. Une fois déployés dans le cadre d’une mission des Natiion Unies, les membres de la police civile devraient rester au moins un an en poste pour assurer un minimmu de continuité. 123. Le Groupe d’étude, estimant que l’homogénéité des éléments de police serait encore renforcée si les pays fournisseurs mettaient au point des exercices d’entraînement conjoints, recommande aux États Membres de constituer, le cas échéant, de nouveaux partenariats régionaux à cet effet, en étoffant ceux qui existent déjà. Il invite aussi les États Membres qui sont en mesure de le faire à offrir une assistance (par exemppl sous la forme de services de formation et d’équipement) aux petits États qui fournissent du personnne de police afin d’assurer le niveau de préparation voulu, et ce dans le respect des directives, des instructiion permanentes et des normes de prestation promulguuée par l’ONU. 124. Le Groupe d’étude recommande aussi que les États Membres désignent un seul agent de liaison au sein de leurs structures gouvernementales, qui serait chargé de la coordination et de la gestion de la fournituur de personnel de police aux opérations de paix des Nations Unies. 125. Le Groupe d’étude estime que le Secrétaire générra devrait être en mesure de rassembler, dans les délais les plus brefs, des planificateurs et des experts techniquue de haut rang de la police civile, possédant de préférrenc une expérience préalable des missions des Natiion Unies, dont la tâche serait d’assurer la liaison avec les planificateurs de la mission au Siège et de se rendre ensuite sur le terrain pour aider à établir le quartier général de la police civile de la mission, avec l’autorisation du Conseil de sécurité, dans le cadre d’un système s’inspirant du principe et des modalités de fonctionnement de la liste de personnels sous astreinte de l’état-major militaire. Une fois appelés, les agents figurant sur la liste jouiraient du même statut contractuue et juridique que les autres membres de police civiil des opérations des Nations Unies. Les dispositifs de formation et de déploiement des membres inscrits sur la liste pourraient être alignés sur ceux qui ont été prévus pour l’élément militaire. En outre, un prograamm de formation et de planification commun pour les personnels des deux listes (personnels militaires et police civile) permettrait de renforcer encore l’homogénéité de la mission et la coopération entre les divers éléments pendant la phase de démarrage d’une nouvelle opération. 126. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le personnel de police civile : a) Les États Membres sont encouragés à constituer des réserves nationales de personnel de police civile prêt à être déployé auprès d’opérations de paix des Nations Unies dans des délais très brefs, dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies; b) Les États Membres sont encouragés à constituer des partenariats régionaux pour la formattio du personnel de police civile de leurs réservve nationales, afin d’assurer à tous le même niveau de préparation dans le respect des directives, des instructions permanentes et des normes de prestatiio que promulguera l’ONU; c) Les États Membres sont encouragés à désigner un seul agent de liaison au sein de leurs structures gouvernementales pour la fourniture de personnel de police civile aux opérations de paix des Nations Unies; d) Le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’une liste régulièrement actualisée d’agents de police et d’experts apparentés sous astreinte, comportant unen0059471.doc 25 A/55/305 S/2000/809 centaine de noms, soit établie dans le cadre du Systèèm de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies; ces agents pourraient être mis à disposition dans les sept jours, pour constituer des équipes ayant reçu la formation nécessaire pour mettre en place l’élément de police civile d’une nouvelle opérattio de maintien de la paix, assurer l’entraînemmen du personnel à son arrivée et donner plus d’homogénéité à cet élément le plus rapidement possible; e) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que des mesures analogues à celles énoncées dans les recommanndation a), b) et c) ci-dessus soient prises en ce qui concerne les spécialistes des questions judiciaiires des questions pénales, des droits de l’homme et autres disciplines pertinentes qui, avec les experts de la police civile, constitueront des équipes collégiaale au service de l’état de droit. E. Spécialistes civils 127. À ce jour, le Secrétariat n’a pas été en mesure de recruter et de déployer dans les temps voulus suffisammmen de personnel civil assez qualifié pour s’acquitter de fonctions opérationnelles et d’appui. Actuellement, 50 % environ des postes à caractère opératiionne et près de 40 % des postes dans les services administratifs et logistiques sont vacants dans les missiion qui ont été créées il y six mois à un an et ont donc un cruel besoin de spécialistes. Certaines des personnne affectées à ces missions occupent des postes qui ne correspondent pas à leur expérience, ce qui est notammmen le cas dans la composante administration civiil de l’Administration transitoire des Nations Unies au Timor oriental (ATNUTO) et de la Mission des Natiion Unies au Kosovo (MINUK). De plus, les départs, motivés par les conditions de travail, y compris l’insuffisance des effectifs, sont presque aussi nombrreu que les recrutements. Les taux élevés de vacance de postes et de renouvellement des effectifs augurent mal de la mise sur pied et du maintien de la prochaine opération de maintien de la paix complexe et entravent le déploiement complet des missions en cours. Ces problèmes sont aggravés par plusieurs facteurs. 1. Absence d’arrangements relatifs aux forces en attente qui permettent de répondre à des demandes inattendues ou importantes 128. Chacune des nouvelles tâches complexes assignnée à la nouvelle génération d’opérations de maintien de la paix crée des demandes auxquelles le système des Nations Unies n’est pas en mesure de répondre à bref délai. C’est ce dont on s’est aperçu pour la première fois au début des années 90, lors de la création d’opérations visant à faire appliquer des accords de paix au Cambodge [Autorité provisoire des Nations Unies au Cambodge (APRONUC)], en El Salvador [Mission d’observation des Nations Unies en El Salvaddo (ONUSAL)], en Angola [Mission de vérification des Nations Unies en Angola (UNAVEM)] et au Mozambbiqu [Opération des Nations Unies au Mozambiqqu (ONUMOZ)]. Le système des Nations Unies s’est alors efforcé de recruter rapidement des experts dans les domaines de l’assistance électorale, de la reconstrucctio et du redressement économiques, de la surveilllanc des droits de l’homme, de la radio et de la télévision, des affaires judiciaires et du renforcement des institutions. À mi-parcours de la décennie, il s’était doté d’un personnel qui avait acquis des compétences dans ces domaines en cours d’emploi mais nombreux sont ceux qui ont quitté le système depuis pour les raisoon exposées plus loin. 129. Le Secrétariat a été à nouveau pris de court en 1999 lorsqu’il lui a fallu doter en effectifs les missions d’administration au Timor oriental et au Kosovo. Peu de fonctionnaires du Secrétariat ou des organismes, fonds ou programmes des Nations Unies possèdent les compétences et l’expérience techniques voulues pour gérer une municipalité ou un ministère. Les États Membres ne pouvaient pas non plus répondre à la demaand au pied levé, parce qu’ils n’avaient pas fait la planification nécessaire pour recenser ceux de leurs fonctionnaires qui avaient les qualifications requises et étaient disponibles. De plus, les missions d’administraatio intérimaire elles-mêmes, qui manquaient de personnnel ont mis un certain temps avant de faire part avec précision de leurs besoins. Finalement, quelques États Membres ont proposé des candidats (parfois à titre gracieux) pour satisfaire une part importante de la demande. Le Secrétariat n’a donné que partiellement suite à ces candidatures, en partie pour éviter un déséquillibr dans la répartition géographique des effectifs. L’idée tendant à confier à certains États Membres le26 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 soin de s’occuper de la totalité de certains secteurs administtratif (responsabilité sectorielle) a été lancée mais apparemment trop tard pour que l’on puisse en régler tous les détails. Il serait bon d’y revenir, ne seraaitce que pour constituer des petites équipes d’administrateurs civils ayant des compétences spécialissées 130. Pour que le Secrétariat puisse réagir rapidement, assurer un contrôle de la qualité et répondre ne seraitcc qu’aux demandes prévisibles, il faudrait qu’il établiiss et mette à jour une liste de candidats civils. Cette liste, qui serait distincte de celle du système des forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies, comprendrait les noms de personnes compétentes dans toutes sortes de domaines que l’ONU aurait activement recherchées (individuellement ou dans le cadre de partenariats avec des organismes des Nations Unies et des organisations gouvernementales, intergouvernementales et non gouvernemmentale et/ou avec leur assistance), sur lesquellle elle se serait renseignée de manière approfondie, notamment dans le cadre d’entretiens et qui auraient fait l’objet d’une présélection, passé une visite médicaale reçu le matériel d’orientation de base concernant les affectations hors Siège en général et fait savoir qu’elles étaient disponibles à bref délai. 131. Il n’existe pas de telle liste actuellement, ce qui oblige à contacter d’urgence par téléphone les États Membres, les départements du Secrétariat de l’ONU et les organismes des Nations Unies – ainsi d’ailleurs que les missions hors Siège elles-mêmes – pour trouver des candidats en dernière minute, dont il ne reste plus ensuuit qu’à espérer qu’ils peuvent se rendre disponibles du jour au lendemain. Au cours de l’année écoulée, le Secrétariat a réussi, à l’aide de cette méthode, à recrutte et à déployer au moins 1 500 personnes, non comprri les membres du personnel des Nations Unies réaffecctés mais au détriment du contrôle de la qualité. 132. Il faudrait établir et afficher sur le réseau Intranet un fichier central de candidats conforme aux propositiion ci-dessus, que les membres concernés du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité pourraient consulter et mettre à jour et qui inclurait les noms de ceux de leurs fonctionnaires qu’ils acceptent d’envoyer en missiion Des ressources supplémentaires devraient être dégagées pour mettre la liste à jour mais on pourrait rappeler automatiquement aux candidats extérieurs reteenu qu’ils doivent actualiser leur offre de travail via Internet, en particulier en ce qui concerne leur disponibillité et on devrait aussi prendre les dispositions vouluue pour qu’ils puissent accéder au matériel d’information et de formation en ligne via Internet. Les missions hors Siège devraient pouvoir accéder au fichhie et être autorisées à recruter les candidats qui y figurent, conformément aux directives que le Secrétariia promulguerait en vue d’assurer une répartition géographique et selon les sexes qui soit équitable. 2. Difficultés rencontrées pour ce qui est d’attirer et de retenir les meilleurs éléments externes 133. Bien qu’elle ait recruté au gré des circonstances, l’ONU est parvenue à embaucher des candidats très qualifiés et très dévoués pour pourvoir des postes hors Siège au cours des années 90 – ceux-là mêmes qui ont organisé des élections au Cambodge, échappé aux ballle en Somalie, évacué le Libéria in extremis et fini par accepter les tirs d’artillerie dans l’ex-Yougoslavie comme une fatalité de leur vie quotidienne – mais le système des Nations Unies n’a toujours pas mis au point de mécanisme contractuel qui permette de reconnaîîtr et de récompenser leur travail en leur offrant une certaine sécurité de l’emploi. Il est vrai que les nouvellle recrues des missions sont expressément informéée qu’elles ne doivent pas se faire d’illusions au sujje de la durée de leur emploi parce que les recrutemeent extérieurs sont destinés à répondre à une demaand « temporaire » mais de telles conditions de travaai ne sont pas faites pour attirer les meilleurs et les retenir longtemps. De manière générale, il faudrait cessse de considérer le maintien de la paix comme résultat de circonstances aberrantes et non une fonction de base de l’Organisation. 134. Il faudrait donc offrir de meilleures perspectives de carrière à un certain pourcentage au moins des meilleurs éléments recrutés à l’extérieur en leur accordaan des contrats dont la durée excède celle des contrats à durée limitée actuellement offerts. Il faudrait aussi s’attacher activement à recruter certains d’entre eux pour pourvoir des postes dans les services du Secréttaria qui s’occupent des situations d’urgence compleexe de manière à étoffer le nombre des fonctionnairre du Siège ayant une expérience de terrain. Un petit nombre de personnes recrutées pour une mission ont réussi à obtenir des postes au Siège mais, semble-t-il, ponctuellement et à titre individuel plutôt que dans le cadre d’une stratégie concertée et transparente. 135. Des propositions visant à améliorer la situation sont en cours de formulation. Elles tendent à permettre aux personnes recrutées aux fins d’une mission qui ontn0059471.doc 27 A/55/305 S/2000/809 servi quatre ans hors Siège de bénéficier chaque fois que possible de « contrats prolongés ». À la différence de celle des contrats actuels, la durée de ces contrats ne serait pas limitée à la durée du mandat de la mission concernée. Ces propositions, si elles étaient adoptées, contribueraient à améliorer la situation de ceux qui ont intégré une mission hors Siège à mi-parcours de la décennni et font toujours partie du personnel des Nations Unies. Elles ne seraient cependant pas suffisantes pour attirer de nouveaux candidats, qui devraient généralemeen accepter des contrats de six mois à un an sans savoir nécessairement s’ils pourraient rester en poste une fois leur contrat achevé. La perspective de devoir vivre dans l’incertitude pendant quatre ans peut faire reculer les meilleurs candidats – qui ont de nombreuses possibilités d’emploi, souvent plus intéressantes pour ce qui est des conditions de travail –, en particulier ceux qui sont chargés de famille. Il faudrait donc envisaage d’offrir des contrats prolongés aux membres du personnel recrutés à l’extérieur qui ont servi avec distincctio pendant au moins deux ans dans une opération de maintien de la paix. 3. Pénuries de personnel dans les services administratifs et d’appui (postes de rang intermédiaire ou supérieur) 136. Les graves pénuries de personnel dont souffrent les services administratifs essentiels (achats, finances, budget, personnel) et les services d’appui logistique (marchés, ingénierie, informatique et planification logisttique ont pesé de tout leur poids sur les opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies au cours des années 90. Le caractère spécifique des règles, règlemeent et procédures internes de l’Organisation font que les nouvelles recrues ne peuvent prendre en charge ces fonctions administratives et logistiques dans les conditiion dynamiques d’un début de mission sans avoir reçu une importante formation. Des programmes de formation spéciaux ont bien été mis en place à leur intenntio en 1995 mais ils ne sont pas encore institutionnaliisés les personnes les plus expérimentées et donc les plus à même de dispenser une formation ne pouvant être soustraites aux fonctions qu’elles exercent à plein temps. En règle générale, la formation et la production de documents d’orientation faciles à utiliser sont les premières tâches que l’on interrompt lorsque de nouvellle missions doivent être dotées d’urgence en effectiifs C’est pourquoi la version actualisée du manuel d’administration des opérations hors Siège de 1992 en est toujours à l’état de projet. 4. Une pénalisation de fait du personnel des missions 137. Les fonctionnaires du Siège qui connaissent bien le règlement et les procédures n’acceptent pas aisément d’être détachés à une mission. Les fonctionnaires des services d’administration comme ceux des services organiques doivent se porter volontaires pour une affecttatio sur le terrain, et leur supérieur doit accepter de les libérer à cet effet. Les chefs de département s’efforcent souvent de dissuader leurs meilleurs élémeent d’accepter une affectation sur le terrain, ou refuseen même de les détacher, car ils manquent euxmêême de collaborateurs compétents et craignent qu’un remplaçant temporaire ne puisse faire l’affaire. Les volontaires potentiels sont également découragés de se porter candidats, car ils ont connaissance de collègues qui ont été oubliés, lors d’une promotion, car ils étaient « loin des yeux, loin du coeur ». La plupart des opératiion sur le terrain sont des affectations où le fonctionnaair n’est pas normalement accompagné de sa famille, pour des raisons de sécurité, ce qui réduit encore le nombre de volontaires. Plusieurs organismes, fonds et programmes des Nations Unies actifs sur le terrain (comme le HCR, le Programme alimentaire mondial (PAM), l’UNICEF, le Fonds des Nations Unies pour la population (FNUAP) et le PNUD) ont bien un certain nombre de candidats qui seraient qualifiés pour une affectation dans une opération de maintien de la paix, mais ces organismes ont eux-mêmes leurs propres contraintes de ressources, et leurs propres besoins, pour leurs opérations sur le terrain, ont généralement la prioriité 138. Le Bureau de la gestion des ressources humaines, soutenu en cela par plusieurs groupes de travail interdéparttements a proposé une série de réformes qui aideraiien à résoudre certains de ces problèmes. Ces réformme prescrivent une mobilité accrue des fonctionnaires du Secrétariat et cherchent à encourager la rotation du personnel entre le Siège et le terrain en récompensant, notamment au moment des promotions, les fonctionnairre qui ont accepté une mission. Ces réformes cherchhen également à réduire les délais de recrutement et à donner aux chefs de département toute latitude dans les opérations de recrutement. Le Groupe d’étude estime qu’il est essentiel que ces initiatives soient rapidement approuvées.28 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 5. Obsolescence de la catégorie Service mobile 139. Le Service mobile est la seule catégorie de personnne des Nations Unies expressément recruté pour le service dans des opérations de maintien de la paix. Les conditions d’emploi et les contrats sont conçus à cet effet, les traitements et prestations sont versés intégralemmen par prélèvement dans les budgets des missions. Mais la notion a perdu de son intérêt, car l’Organisation n’a pas consacré assez de ressources au développement des carrières des administrateurs du Service mobile. Cette catégorie avait été conçue dans les années 50 pour créer un cadre très mobile de spécialliste techniques, capables de seconder notamment les contingents militaires des opérations de maintien de la paix. Mais comme la nature de ces opérations a changé, les fonctions des administrateurs du Service mobile ont également changé. Certains avaient finalemeen gravi des échelons, à la fin des années 80 et au début des années 90, et assumé des fonctions d’administration dans les composantes administratives et logistiques des opérations de maintien de la paix. 140. Les plus expérimentés des membres de ce groupe, qui sont désormais peu nombreux, sont déployés dans les missions actuellement en cours et beaucoup sont près de la retraite s’ils ne l’ont pas déjà atteinte. Rares sont ceux qui ont acquis les compétences administrattive ou reçu la formation voulues pour diriger efficaceemen les principales unités administratives d’opérations de paix complexes. Les connaissances techniques de certains autres sont dépassées. Ainsi, la composition du Service mobile ne correspond plus à l’ensemble, ou à un grand nombre, des tâches administrattive et logistiques, dans les dernières opérations de maintien de la paix. Le Groupe d’étude préconise donc une révision urgente de la composition du Service mobiile une réflexion sur sa raison d’être, de façon à mieux pourvoir aux besoins actuels et futurs de ses opérations, en particulier s’agissant de l’encadrement moyen et supérieur dans les services administratifs et logistiques essentiels. Le perfectionnement professionnne continu de cette catégorie de personnel devrait également être assuré en priorité et les conditions d’emploi devraient être révisées pour attirer et conservve les meilleurs candidats. 6. Absence de stratégie d’ensemble pour le recrutement du personnel des opérations de paix 141. Il n’y a pas de stratégie d’ensemble pour le recruttemen du personnel des opérations de paix, capable d’assurer le bon dosage du personnel civil dans une opération donnée. Il y a bien des spécialistes, dans le système des Nations Unies, auxquels il faut faire appel, mais les lacunes doivent être comblées par un recrutemeen extérieur; entre ces deux catégories, on peut égalemmen choisir d’utiliser des Volontaires des Nations Unies, du personnel des sous-traitants, des services commerciaux, et du personnel recruté sur le plan nationaal Pendant toute la décennie écoulée, l’ONU s’est bien tournée vers ces différentes sources de personnel, mais au cas par cas, sans réfléchir à une stratégie globaale Une telle stratégie est pourtant nécessaire si l’on veut un bon rapport coût-efficacité, et si l’on veut en outre assurer la cohésion de la mission et veiller au moral du personnel. 142. Cette stratégie devrait en priorité s’appuyer sur le recours aux Volontaires des Nations Unies pour les opérations de paix. Depuis 1992, plus de 4 000 Volontaiire des Nations Unies ont servi dans 19 opérations de maintien de la paix. Rien qu’au cours des 18 derniers mois, environ 1 500 Volontaires ont été affectés aux nouvelles missions organisées au Timor oriental, au Kosovo et en Sierra Leone, dans l’administrratio civile, les affaires électorales, la défense des droits de l’homme ou l’appui administratif et logistiquue Les Volontaires ont montré traditionnellement combien ils étaient dévoués et compétents. Les organes délibérants ont encouragé un recours plus large aux Volontaires des Nations Unies dans les opérations de maintien de la paix, en raison de leur performance passsé exemplaire, mais leur utilisation comme maind’oeeuvr peu coûteuse risque de compromettre le prograamm et de porter atteinte au moral du personnel d’une mission. Il arrive souvent en effet que les Volonttaire des Nations Unies travaillent aux côtés de collègues qui, pour des fonctions similaires, gagnent trois ou quatre fois plus qu’eux. Le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix examine actuellement avec les responsables du programme des Volontaires des Nations Unies les termes d’un mémorandum d’accord qui porterait sur les conditions d’emploi des Volontaires dans les opérations de paix. Il est essentiel que ce mémorandum d’accord fasse partie d’une stran0059471.doc 29 A/55/305 S/2000/809 tégie plus complète et plus large de recrutement de personnne pour les opérations de paix. 143. Cette stratégie devrait inclure aussi des propositiion détaillées pour la création d’un « système de moyens civils en attente » qui contiendrait une liste de fonctionnaires des Nations Unies qui pourraient être sélectionnés d’avance et, après avoir passé avec succès un examen médical, pourraient être affectés par leur service d’origine, avec un préavis de 72 heures, à une équipe de démarrage d’une mission. Les organes des Nations Unies seraient dûment habilités, pour les grouppe professionnels relevant de leur domaine de compéteence à constituer au moyen de mémorandums d’accord avec des organisations intergouvernementales et non gouvernementales, des partenariats qui porteraiien sur la fourniture de personnel destiné à complétte des équipes de démarrage d’une mission, dont les membres seraient empruntés aux différents organismes du système. 144. Le fait que la responsabilité d’élaborer une stratéégi globale de recrutement de personnel et de définir des dispositions pour un système de moyens civils en attente ait incombé uniquement à la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions, agissaan de sa propre initiative quand elle avait un peu de temps libre, montre assez que le Secrétariat n’a pas consacré à la question, pourtant essentielle, l’attention qu’elle méritait. Pourtant, le personnel d’une mission, depuis le sommet jusqu’à la base, est peut-être l’un des éléments les plus importants de son succès. La question doit donc être examinée en priorité absolue au niveau le plus élevé du Secrétariat. 145. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant les spécialistes civils : a) Le Secrétariat devrait constituer sur Interrne ou Intranet un fichier central de spécialistes civils présélectionnés qui pourraient être immédiatemmen déployés dans des opérations de paix. Les missions devraient avoir accès à ce fichier, et pouvooi recruter du personnel en choisissant des candidaat y figurant, conformément aux directives que le Secrétariat devrait publier sur la répartition géograpphiqu et sur la répartition par sexe; b) La catégorie Service mobile devrait être réformée pour mieux refléter les besoins courants de toutes les opérations de paix, en particulier les besoins de personnel d’encadrement moyen et supériieu dans les domaines de l’administration et de la logistique; c) Les conditions d’emploi du personnel civil recruté à l’extérieur devraient être révisées pour permettre aux Nations Unies d’attirer les candiddat les plus qualifiés et d’offrir à ceux qui se seraiien distingués des perspectives de carrière plus attrayantes; d) Le Département des opérations de maintiie de la paix devrait formuler pour les opérations de paix une stratégie complète de recrutement exposaan notamment les possibilités de recours aux Volonttaire des Nations Unies, prévoyant des moyens en attente pour fournir, avec un préavis de 72 heures, du personnel civil capable de faciliter le démarrage d’une mission, et précisant la répartition des attributions entre les membres du Comité exécuuti pour la paix et la sécurité, en vue de l’application de cette stratégie. F. Capacité d’information 146. Pour presque toutes les opérations de paix des Nations Unies, il est indispensable de mettre en place une capacité effective de communication et d’information. Il est indispensable en effet de couper court aux rumeurs, de contrecarrer la désinformation et de s’assurer la coopération de la population locale. Une capacité d’information peut être un moyen utile de réaggi aux menées des dirigeants de groupes hostiles, mais aussi d’améliorer la sécurité du personnel des Nations Unies et d’amplifier l’effet d’une force. Il est donc essentiel que chaque opération de paix formule une stratégie d’information, en particulier pour faire connaître les aspects essentiels du mandat d’une missiion et chaque mission doit veiller à ce que cette stratéégi et le personnel nécessaire pour l’appliquer figureen bien dans les tout premiers éléments déployés pour lancer une mission nouvelle. 147. Les missions ont besoin aussi d’un porte-parole compétent, faisant partie de l’équipe dirigeante et qui soit à même de faire connaître au monde ce que fait chaque jour la mission. Ce porte-parole doit avoir l’expérience et l’instinct d’un journaliste, et bien connaître le fonctionnement aussi bien de la mission que du Siège de l’ONU. Il (ou elle) doit avoir la confiance du Représentant spécial du Secrétaire générra et nouer de bonnes relations avec les autres mem30 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 bres de la direction de la mission. Le Secrétariat doit donc faire plus pour constituer un réservoir de spécialisste de ce calibre et les conserver. 148. Les missions de paix des Nations Unies doivent également pouvoir parler à leurs propres hommes, les tenir informés des principes de la mission et de son évolution, et veiller à la qualité des relations entre ses différentes composantes et au bon fonctionnement de la chaîne de commandement. L’informatique, par ses instrumment nouveaux, devrait faciliter cette communicatiion et le matériel informatique devrait figurer en bonne place dans l’équipement de départ d’une mission et dans les réserves de matériel à la Base de soutien logistique des Nations Unies à Brindisi. 149. Les ressources consacrées à l’information et au personnel voulu de même qu’au matériel informatique nécessaire pour faire passer le message propre à une opération de paix et pour assurer le bon fonctionnemeen des communications internes, qui actuellement ne dépassent que rarement 1 % du budget de fonctionnemeen d’une mission, devraient être accrues pour réponddr au mandat, à la taille et aux besoins de chaque missiion 150. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant la création d’une capacité d’information rapidement déployable : des ressources supplémentaiire devraient être allouées dans le budget des missions, à l’information et au personnel et au matérrie informatique associés nécessaires pour bien faire connaître une mission et pour assurer des communications internes efficaces. G. Soutien logistique, passation des marchés et gestion des dépenses 151. L’épuisement des stocks de matériel de l’ONU, les longs délais de livraison, même dans le cas de contrats-cadres, la lourdeur des procédures d’achat et les retards dans l’allocation aux missions des fonds nécessaires pour effectuer des achats sur le marché locca sont autant d’obstacles au déploiement rapide des missions et au bon fonctionnement de celles qui parviennnen à porter leurs effectifs aux niveaux autorisés. Or, sans un soutien logistique efficace, il leur est imposssibl de fonctionner correctement. 152. Les délais requis pour fournir aux missions le matériel et les services dont elles ont besoin pour démarrre puis pour fonctionner à plein régime sont dus aux particularités du processus de passation des marchhé à l’ONU, lequel est régi par le Règlement financiie promulgué par l’Assemblée générale, les règles de gestion financière qui en découlent et, selon les termes en usage à l’ONU, les « politiques et procédures » résulltan de l’interprétation du Règlement et des règles par le Secrétariat. Concrètement, ce dispositif impose au Siège une procédure comportant en gros huit étapes au cours desquelles il faut : 1. Déterminer les besoins et émettre une demaand de fourniture de biens ou de servicees 2. Certifier que les fonds nécessaires sont disponiibles 3. Publier un avis d’appel d’offres ou une demaand de proposition; 4. Évaluer les soumissions; 5. Soumettre le dossier au Comité des marchés du Siège; 6. Attribuer le marché et passer commande; 7. Attendre que la commande soit prête; 8. Faire livrer à la mission. 153. Si la plupart des organismes publics et des entrepriise privées suivent une procédure analogue, les délaai ne sont pas toujours aussi longs qu’à l’ONU, où ils peuvent atteindre 20 semaines pour du mobilier de bureeau 17 à 21 semaines pour des groupes électrogènes, 23 à 27 semaines pour des bâtiments préfabriqués, 27 semaines pour des véhicules lourds et 17 à 21 semaines pour du matériel de transmissions. Avec de tels délais, il est évident qu’une mission ne pourra pas être complètement déployée dans les délais propossé si la procédure d’achat ne peut être engagée qu’après le lancement de l’opération. 154. L’ONU a partiellement résolu le problème en adoptant la formule des « lots d’équipements de dépaar » au milieu des années 90, époque où ses activités de maintien de la paix ont connu une ampleur sans précéddent Chaque lot est constitué du matériel indispensaabl pour établir un quartier général de mission doté d’un effectif de 100 personnes, et assurer son fonctionnemmen pendant les 100 premiers jours de son déploiemeent les différents articles sont stockés – préemballlé – à Brindisi d’où ils peuvent être expédiés très rapidemment Les contributions mises en recouvrement pourn0059471.doc 31 A/55/305 S/2000/809 financer la mission ayant reçu un lot servent à reconstittue le stock et, à la liquidation de la mission, le matériie durable est réexpédié à Brindisi où il est gardé en réserve, à côté des équipements de départ. 155. Toutefois, compte tenu de l’usure que peuvent subir les véhicules légers et autres matériels dans une zone sortant tout juste d’un conflit, il peut être moins avantageux de les réexpédier et de les remettre en état que de les vendre ou de les dépecer pour en utiliser les pièces et d’acheter du matériel neuf. C’est pourquoi de plus en plus souvent, ce type de matériel est vendu aux enchères sur place, bien que le Secrétariat ne puisse pas affecter à l’achat de matériel le produit de la cession, qu’il est tenu de restituer aux États Membres. Il faudrrai envisager d’autoriser le Secrétariat à affecter le produit de ces ventes à l’achat de matériels neufs qui seraient stockés à Brindisi. Il faudrait également envisaage d’habiliter les missions à donner, en consultation avec le coordonnateur résident des Nations Unies, au moins une fraction de ces équipements à des organisatiion non gouvernementales locales considérées comme sérieuses, afin de favoriser le développement de la sociiét civile. 156. Il n’en reste pas moins que l’existence de stocks d’équipements de départ et de matériel autre a sensibleemen accéléré la mise en place des opérations de moindre envergure lancées entre le milieu et la fin des années 90. Mais, comme à l’heure actuelle le nombre de missions créées ou élargies est supérieur à celui des missions que l’on ferme, la Base de soutien logistique des Nations Unies à Brindisi n’a quasiment plus en stock le type d’articles exigeant de longs délais de livraaiso qui sont indispensables au déploiement complet d’une mission. Sauf si l’une des grandes opérations en cours prenait fin immédiatement et expédiait tout son matériel, en bon état, à la Base de Brindisi, l’ONU seraai incapable, dans un proche avenir, de fournir le matériel nécessaire au démarrage et au déploiement rapide d’une mission importante. 157. Bien entendu, il y a des limites à la quantité d’articles que l’ONU peut et doit garder en réserve à Brindisi ou ailleurs. Ainsi, même stockés, les équipemeent mécaniques exigent un entretien qui peut être coûteux mais doit néanmoins être assuré, faute de quoi les missions risquent de recevoir, au terme d’une longgu attente, du matériel qui ne fonctionne pas. On constate par ailleurs que les entreprises privées et les administrations nationales privilégient de plus en plus la formule du stockage ou de la livraison « juste à temps », en raison du coût d’option élevé que représeent l’immobilisation de fonds dans des stocks dont on n’aura peut-être pas besoin avant un certain temps. Enfin, dans le cas du matériel de transmission et du matériel informatique, les progrès technologiques sont si rapides que les articles peuvent être périmés en quelquue mois, à plus forte raison en quelques années. 158. L’ONU s’est orientée dans la même direction ces derniers temps et a conclu avec des entreprises une vingtaine de contrats-cadres pour la fourniture de matériie couramment utilisé par les opérations de maintien de la paix, en particulier des articles nécessaires au stade du lancement ou de l’élargissement d’une missiion Cette formule a permis de réduire sensiblement les délais de livraison dans la mesure où les fournisseuurs sélectionnés à l’avance, se tiennent prêts à produuir les quantités nécessaires sur demande. Toutefois, même dans ces conditions, il faut encore 14 semaines pour produire des véhicules légers, auxquelles s’ajoutent quatre semaines de délais de livraison. 159. L’Assemblée générale a pris plusieurs mesures pour réduire les délais. Elle a créé le Fonds de réserve pour les opérations de maintien de la paix qui, lorsqu’il est pleinement abondé, représente une réserve de 150 millions de dollars utilisable à bref délai. Pour facillite le lancement d’une mission ou l’élargissement imprévu d’une mission en cours, le Secrétaire général peut demander au Comité consultatif pour les questions administratives et budgétaires de l’autoriser à prélever 50 millions de dollars sur le Fonds. Celui-ci est reconsstitu par prélèvement sur les crédits alloués à la mission concernée, une fois le budget de celle-ci approouv ou révisé. Si le montant nécessaire est supérieur à 50 millions de dollars, l’autorisation de l’Assemblée générale est nécessaire. 160. Dans des cas exceptionnels, l’Assemblée générale a décidé, sur la recommandation du Comité consultatif, d’autoriser le Secrétaire général à engager des dépensse jusqu’à concurrence de 200 millions de dollars pour faciliter la mise en place de missions importantes (ATNUTO, MINUK et MONUC), en attendant qu’il puisse présenter des propositions budgétaires détailléées dont l’établissement prend parfois plusieurs mois. Il faut se féliciter de ces initiatives, qui montrent que les États Membres sont prêts à aider l’Organisation à améliorer sa capacité de déploiement rapide. 161. Cela étant, toutes ces mesures ne peuvent être prises qu’après l’adoption par le Conseil de sécurité32 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 d’une résolution autorisant la mise en place d’une missiio ou de ses éléments précurseurs. Or, à moins qu’une partie d’entre elles ne puissent être appliquées bien avant la date de déploiement prévue, ou qu’elles ne soient modifiées pour autoriser la constitution et le renouvellement d’un stock minimum dans le cas des articles longs à obtenir, il sera impossible de tenir les délais proposés pour la définition d’un déploiement efficace et rapide. 162. En conséquence, le Secrétariat devrait élaborer une stratégie générale de soutien logistique qui lui permette de déployer rapidement et efficacement une mission dans les délais proposés. À partir d’une analyys coûts-avantages, il devrait déterminer le niveau optimal des stocks d’articles longs à obtenir et des commandes de biens se prêtant mieux à la formule des contrats-cadres, en tenant compte des frais de livraison d’urgence que la stratégie retenue l’obligera éventuellemmen à engager. Il faudrait que les unités compétentes des départements s’occupant du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité communiquent aux responsables de la planification logistique une estimation du nombre et de la nature des opérations dont la mise en place pourrait s’imposer à un horizon de 12 à 18 mois. Le Secrétaire général devrait présenter périodiquement à l’Assemblée générale, pour examen et approbation, des propositions détaillées concernant les modalités de mise en oeuvre de sa stratégie, qui pourraient avoir des incidences financières importantes. 163. Dans l’intervalle, l’Assemblée générale devrait autoriser le Secrétaire général à engager une dépense ponctuelle pour la constitution de trois nouveaux lots d’équipements de départ à Brindisi (afin de porter le total à cinq), étant entendu que le stock serait ensuite automatiquement reconstitué par prélèvement des fonds nécessaires sur le budget des missions ayant reçu des lots. 164. Afin de faciliter le déploiement rapide et efficace des nouvelles missions dans les délais proposés, le Secréttair général devrait être autorisé à prélever un montant maximum de 50 millions de dollars sur le Fonds de réserve pour les opérations de maintien de la paix, avant que le Conseil de sécurité n’adopte la résoluutio portant création d’une mission, mais avec l’accord préalable du Comité consultatif pour les questiion administratives et budgétaires. Le Fonds serait automatiquement reconstitué à l’aide des contributions mises en recouvrement pour financer la mission ayant bénéficié du tirage. Dans l’hypothèse où le Secrétaire général constaterait que du fait de la création de plusieeur missions à intervalles rapprochés le Fonds est épuisé, il devrait inviter l’Assemblée générale à envisaage d’en relever le montant. 165. Les missions opérationnelles doivent parfois attenndr plusieurs mois après leur lancement pour obtenir les équipements nécessaires, en particulier lorsque les prévisions initiales se sont révélées erronées ou que l’évolution de la situation a entraîné une modification des besoins. À supposer que les articles requis soient disponibles sur le marché local, elles se heurtent encore à plusieurs contraintes. Premièrement, elles n’ont qu’une marge de manoeuvre et des pouvoirs restreints et peuvent difficilement, par exemple, faire face à des besoins imprévus en virant rapidement à un poste budgéttair les économies réalisées sur un autre. Deuxièmemment la procuration générale dont elles disposent est limitée à 200 000 dollars par commande. Au-delà de ce montant, les demandes d’achat doivent être transmises au Siège, et le processus de décision en huit étapes est engagé (voir par. 152 ci-dessus). 166. Le Groupe d’étude est favorable à l’adoption de dispositions qui réduisent les interventions du Siège dans la gestion au jour le jour des missions opérationnellle et donnent à celles-ci les pouvoirs et la marge de manoeuvre dont elles ont besoin pour être crédibles et efficaces, tout en engageant leur responsabilité. Le Siège devrait toutefois rester responsable des achats lorsqu’il apporte une réelle valeur ajoutée, comme dans le cas des contrats-cadres. 167. Selon les statistiques de la Division des achats, sur les 184 commandes de biens ou de services, d’une valeur allant de 200 000 dollars à 500 000 dollars, passéée par le Siège en 1999 pour des opérations de maintiie de la paix, 93 % portaient sur des achats de servicce de transport aérien ou maritime, de véhicules ou d’ordinateurs, qui ont fait l’objet d’un appel d’offres international ou étaient couverts par l’un des contratscaddre en vigueur. Si ceux-ci peuvent être activés rapidemmen et permettent d’obtenir les biens ou services requis dans les délais voulus, il paraît judicieux de faire appel au Siège. En principe, il est possible avec les contrats-cadres et les appels d’offres internationaux de se procurer des biens et des services à des prix inférieeur à ceux que l’on obtiendrait localement, à supposse que l’on puisse se procurer les biens et services en question dans la zone de la mission, ce qui souvent n’est pas le cas.n0059471.doc 33 A/55/305 S/2000/809 168. En revanche, on ne voit pas bien quel intérêt préseent l’intervention du Siège dans le processus d’achat de biens ou de services qui ne font pas l’objet de contrats-cadres et peuvent être obtenus plus facilement et à meilleur prix sur le marché local. Il serait préférabbl en pareil cas d’habiliter les services de la mission à procéder eux-mêmes aux achats, à charge pour les auditteur de contrôler le processus et ses aspects financieers Pour cela, le Secrétariat devrait s’attacher en priorité à renforcer la capacité de ces services (par exemple, en recrutant pour eux du personnel qualifié, en le formant et en mettant à sa disposition des guides faciles d’emploi), afin qu’ils puissent assumer dès que possible la responsabilité des achats de tous les biens et services disponibles sur le marché local et ne faisant pas l’objet de contrats-cadres ou de commandes permaneente (jusqu’à concurrence de 1 million de dollars des États-Unis, selon la taille et les besoins de la missioon) 169. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le soutien logistique et la gestion des dépenses : a) Le Secrétariat devrait élaborer une stratéégi générale de soutien logistique, qui permette de déployer rapidement et efficacement une mission dans les délais proposés et qui tienne compte des hypothèses retenues par les services compétents du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix chargés de la planification; b) L’Assemblée générale devrait autoriser le Secrétaire général à engager une dépense non renouveelabl afin de constituer à Brindisi un stock d’au moins cinq lots d’équipement de départ, compreenan du matériel de transmission pouvant être déployé rapidement. Ce stock devrait être systématiquuemen reconstitué, à l’aide des contributions mises en recouvrement pour financer les missions qu’il aurait servi à équiper; c) Le Secrétaire général devrait être habilité à effectuer un tirage d’un montant maximum de 50 millions de dollars des États-Unis sur le Fonds de réserve pour les opérations de maintien de la paix dès lors que l’établissement d’une nouvelle opératiio est quasiment assuré, après avoir obtenu l’accord du Comité consultatif pour les questions administratives et budgétaires, mais avant l’adoption d’une résolution par le Conseil de sécuritté d) Le Secrétariat devrait réexaminer toutes les politiques et procédures concernant les achats (en faisant des propositions à l’Assemblée générale sur les amendements à apporter, le cas échéant, au Règlement financier et aux règles de gestion financièère) afin notamment de faciliter le déploiement rapide et complet d’une opération dans les délais proposés; e) Le Secrétariat devrait réexaminer les politiique et procédures de gestion financière des missiion opérationnelles, en vue de donner à celles-ci une plus grande latitude dans la gestion de leur budget; f) Le Secrétariat devrait relever le montant de la procuration donnée aux missions opérationnellle en matière d’achats (le plafond actuel de 200 000 dollars pouvant être porté jusqu’à 1 million de dollars, selon la taille et les besoins de la missioon) pour tous les biens et services disponibles sur le marché local et ne faisant pas l’objet d’un contrat-cadre ou d’une commande permanente. IV. Planification des opérations de maintien de la paix et services d’appui : moyens et structure disponibles au Siège 170. Si l’on veut mettre en place, au Siège, un bon dispositif d’appui aux opérations de paix, cela suppose qu’on s’attaque aux problèmes de quantité, de structure et de qualité, c’est-à-dire à la question de l’effectif nécesssair pour faire ce qui est à faire; à celle des structurre organisationnelles et des règles de fonctionnement grâce auxquelles l’appui aura plus de chances d’être efficace; et à celle de la qualité des individus et des méthodes de travail qui font vivre ces structures. Dans la présente section le Groupe d’étude fait porter l’essentiel de son analyse et de ses recommandations sur les deux premières questions; il traite de la qualité des fonctionnaires et de la culture d’organisation à la section VI. 171. Il apparaît nettement au Groupe d’étude qu’il faudrait accroître les moyens consacrés à l’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix. Il est particulièremeen nécessaire d’augmenter les ressources du Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix, sur lequel repose l’essentiel de la responsabilité des activités de34 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 planification et d’appui à l’intention des opérations hors Siège les plus complexes et les plus médiatisées de l’ONU. A. Niveau des effectifs et financement des services d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix situés au Siège 172. Les dépenses de personnel au Siège et les dépensse connexes consacrées à la planification et à l’appui de l’ensemble des opérations de maintien de la paix peuvent être considérées comme le coût direct, hors services d’appui sur le terrain, de ces opérations. Sur les cinq dernières années, ces dépenses n’ont pas dépaass 6 % du coût total des opérations de maintien de la paix (voir tableau 4.1). Elles se situent actuellement plus près de 3 %, et elles tomberont au-dessous de 2 % pour l’exercice budgétaire en cours, compte tenu de ce qui est prévu actuellement (renforcement de certaines missions telles que la MONUC en République démocrattiqu du Congo, achèvement du déploiement de la MINUSIL en Sierra Leone et création d’une nouvelle opération en Érythrée et en Éthiopie, etc.). Il est probabbl qu’un spécialiste de la gestion qui connaît bien les besoins opérationnels des gros organismes publics ou privés qui gèrent d’importants éléments déployés sur le terrain estimerait qu’une organisation qui essaie de mener des activités sur le terrain en ne consacrant que 2 % de son budget aux services d’appui centraux assure un appui insuffisant pour son personnel hors Siège et risque fort, ce faisant, d’aboutir à l’épuisement de ses structures d’appui. 173. Le tableau 4.1 donne les montants totaux des budgets des opérations de maintien de la paix de mi-1996 à mi-2001 (l’exercice budgétaire de ces opératiion court de juillet à juin, c’est-à-dire qu’il est décalé de six mois par rapport au cycle du budget ordinaire de l’ONU). Ce tableau donne aussi les montants totaux des dépenses consacrées, au Siège, à l’appui des opérattion de maintien de la paix, tant au sein du Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix que dans d’autres départements, et que ces dépenses soient finanncée au moyen du budget ordinaire ou du Compte d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix (le budgge ordinaire porte sur une période de deux ans, et les dépenses en sont réparties entre les États Membres en appliquant le barème de leurs quotes-parts au budget ordinaire; le Compte d’appui, lui, porte sur une période d’un an – l’idée étant que les effectifs, au Secrétariat, doivent être renforcés ou réduits en fonction de l’intensité des activités sur le terrain – et les dépenses en sont réparties entre les États Membres en appliquant le barème de leurs quotes-parts au budget des opératiion de maintien de la paix). Tableau 4.1 Pourcentage du montant total des dépenses d’appui du Siège par rapport au montant total des budgets des opérations de maintien de la paix, de 1996 à 2001 (En millions de dollars des États-Unis) Juill. 96-juin 97 Juill. 97-juin 98 Juill. 98-juin 99 Juil. 99-juin 2000 Juill. 2000-juin 2001a Budgets de maintien de la paix 1 260 911,7 812,9 1 417 2 582b Dépenses d’appui du Siègec 49,2 52,8 41,0 41,7 50,2 Pourcentage Siège/terrain 3,90 5,79 5,05 2,95 1,94 a D’après les rapports du Secrétaire général sur l’exécution des budgets, non compris les missions terminées avant le 1er juillet 2000 mais y compris une estimation approximative du coût du déploiement complet de la Mission de l’Organisation des Nations Unies en République démocratique du Congo (MONUC), dont le budget n’a pas encore été établi. b Estimation. c Chiffres communiqués par le Contrôleur de l’ONU, portant sur tous les postes du Secrétariat (principalement au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix) financés au moyen du budget ordinaire ou du Compte d’appui; on a aussi compté les dépenses qui auraient correspondu aux contributions en nature (personnel fourni à titre gracieux) s’il avait fallu les financer entièrement. 174. Le budget du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix est financé à 85 % au moyen du Compte d’appui, ce qui représente une quarantaine de millions de dollars par an. À cela s’ajoutent 6 millions de dollars affectés au Département dans le budget ordinaiire Ce total de 46 millions de dollars finance en gros les traitements et les dépenses connexes relatifs aux 231 fonctionnaires de la classe des administrateurs (civiils militaires et policiers) et 173 agents des services généraux du Département (mais non le Service de l’action antimines, qui est financé au moyen de contributtion volontaires). Sont également financés au moyen du Compte d’appui des postes situés ailleurs dans le Secrétariat, dont les titulaires participent auxn0059471.doc 35 A/55/305 S/2000/809 activités d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix : Division du financement des opérations de maintien de la paix et certains éléments de la Division des achats (Département de la gestion), du Bureau des affaires juridiques et du Département de l’information, par exemple. 175. Jusqu’au milieu de la décennie, le Compte d’appui était fixé à 8,5 % du montant total des dépensse de personnel civil des opérations de maintien de la paix, mais cela ne tenait pas compte des dépenses d’appui relatives à la police civile et aux Volontaires des Nations Unies, ni du coût des services d’appui à l’intention des entreprises privées et des contingents. La formule du pourcentage forfaitaire a été remplacée par une méthode de calcul selon laquelle le financemeen au moyen du Compte d’appui est justifié poste par poste, chaque année. Néanmoins, les effectifs du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix ont peu augmenté depuis l’adoption de ce nouveau systèème en partie parce que le Secrétariat semble avoir adapté ses projets de budget à l’idée qu’il se faisait des montants que les politiques seraient disposés à voter. 176. Certes, le Département des opérations de maintiie de la paix et les autres bureaux du Secrétariat qui assurent des services d’appui à l’intention des opératiion de maintien de la paix doivent, dans une certaine mesure, grossir ou rétrécir en fonction du niveau d’activité sur le terrain; mais imposer chaque année au Département de justifier à nouveau l’existence de sept sur huit de ses postes revient à le traiter comme une entité provisoire et à considérer le maintien de la paix comme une responsabilité temporaire de l’Organisation. Ce n’est pas ce que montrent 52 ans d’expérience, et le passé récent donne des raisons supplémenntaire de penser que l’Organisation doit absolumeen se tenir prête à agir, même pendant les périodes d’accalmie, car les événements ne sont pratiquement pas prévisibles et, comme le Département l’a appris à ses dépens ces deux dernières années, une fois qu’il s’est privé des compétences et de l’expérience de fonctionnnaire il faut beaucoup de temps pour les remplaceer 177. Du fait que la quasi-totalité du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix est financée année par année au moyen du Compte d’appui, ce départemeen et les autres bureaux qui dépendent de la même source de financement ne disposent d’aucun niveau de référence, en termes de moyens financiers et de nombre de postes, en fonction duquel recruter et conserver leur personnel. Les fonctionnaires mutés du terrain à des postes financés au moyen du Compte d’appui ne savent pas s’ils pourront encore compter sur ces postes un an plus tard. Vu les conditions de travail actuelles et la précarité des carrières qu’entraîne le financement par le Compte d’appui, on ne peut que féliciter le Départemeen d’avoir réussi à éviter de se désintégrer. 178. Les États Membres et le Secrétariat sont conscieent depuis longtemps de la nécessité de définir un niveau de référence pour les effectifs et le financement, et de disposer par ailleurs d’un mécanisme qui permeett de faire grossir ou rétrécir le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix en fonction de l’évolution des besoins. Cependant, faute d’une étude des besoins en effectifs du Département qui serait fonddé sur des critères objectifs en matière de gestion et de productivité, il est difficile de fixer un niveau de référence valable. Ce n’est pas au Groupe d’étude de procéder à une telle analyse méthodique de la gestion du Département, mais il estime qu’il faudrait le faire. En attendant, il trouve que certaines situations de souseffeecti sont flagrantes et méritent d’être soulignées. 179. La Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile (Département des opérations de maintien de la paix), que dirige le Conseiller militaire de l’ONU, dispoos d’un effectif autorisé de 32 militaires et neuf membres de la police civile. Le Groupe de la police civile est chargé d’assurer l’appui des opérations internatioonale de police sous tous leurs aspects, depuis leur conception sur le papier jusqu’à la sélection et au déploiiemen des hommes sur le terrain. Il ne peut actuellemmen guère faire plus que trouver des candidats, essaaye de les trier en dépêchant des équipes d’aide à la sélection du personnel de police civile (activité qui occupe à peu près la moitié de son effectif) puis faire en sorte qu’ils parviennent sur le terrain. En outre, il n’existe ni au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix ni nulle part ailleurs dans le système des Natiion Unies une unité administrative qui soit chargée d’assurer l’organisation et l’appui des composantes de maintien de l’ordre et qui par la suite assure l’appui des activités de police elles-mêmes, que ce soit à titre consultatif ou hiérarchique. 180. Onze officiers du bureau du Conseiller militaire aident à trouver les unités militaires pour toutes les opérations de maintien de la paix et à en assurer la relèève et conseillent les spécialistes des questions politiquue du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix sur le plan militaire. Les officiers du Département36 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 sont aussi censés trouver le temps de former des formatteur au niveau des États Membres, d’établir des directives, des manuels et des documents d’information et de collaborer avec la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions au recensement des besoiins sur les plans logistique et opérationnel, des composaante militaires et de police des missions hors Siège. Or, les effectifs étant ce qu’ils sont actuellemeent le Groupe de la formation compte en tout et pour tout cinq officiers. Au Service de la planification militaiire 10 officiers constituent l’essentiel de la capacité du Département en matière de planification des missiion militaires au niveau opérationnel; six autres postte ont été autorisés, mais n’ont pas encore été pourvus. Ces 16 planificateurs constituent la totalité de l’effectif de militaires disponibles pour déterminer de quels effecctif les missions ont besoin au moment de leur lancemmen ou de leur renforcement, participer aux études techniques et apprécier l’état de préparation des pays susceptibles de fournir des contingents. Sur les 10 planificateurs initialement autorisés, l’un a été chargg d’établir les règles d’engagement et les directives à l’intention des commandants des forces, pour toutes les opérations. Un seul officier est disponible, à temps partiel, pour gérer la base de données du Système des forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies. 181. Le tableau 4.2 oppose les effectifs déployés des contingents et des forces de police à ceux de leurs serviice d’appui respectifs au Siège. Aucun gouvernement n’enverrait 27 000 hommes sur le terrain en n’ayant dans son propre pays que 32 officiers pour leur donner des instructions techniques et opérationnelles sur le plan militaire. Aucune force de police ne déploierait 8 000 hommes en n’ayant que neuf personnes à son quartier général pour assurer leur appui technique et opérationnel. Tableau 4.2 Pourcentage des effectifs militaires et de police civile au Siège par rapport aux effectifs militaires et de police civile déployés sur le terraina Personnel militaire Police civile Opérations de maintien de la paix 27 365 8 641 Siège 32 9 Pourcentage Siège/terrain 0,1 % 0,1 % a Effectifs autorisés au 15 juin 2000 pour le personnel militaire et au 1er août 2000 pour la police civile. 182. Le Bureau des opérations du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, où se trouvent les officiers de secteur qui centralisent les échanges concernant telle ou telle opération de maintien de la paix, paraît lui aussi être doté d’un effectif très insuffisaant Il dispose actuellement de 15 administrateurs qui s’occupent de 14 opérations en cours et de deux nouvellle opérations qui pourraient voir le jour, soit en moyenne moins d’un fonctionnaire par mission. S’il est vrai qu’une personne peut être capable de faire face aux besoins d’une ou même deux petites missions, cela paraît impossible dans le cas des missions plus importannte telles que l’ATNUTO au Timor oriental, la MINUK au Kosovo, la MINUSIL en Sierra Leone et la MONUC en République démocratique du Congo. On peut dire la même chose des spécialistes de la logistiqqu et de la gestion du personnel de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions (Départtemen des opérations de maintien de la paix), ainsi que du personnel d’appui qui s’occupe des opérations de maintien de la paix au Département de la gestion, au Bureau des affaires juridiques, au Département de l’information et dans les autres bureaux concernés. Le tableau 4.3 donne les effectifs totaux, au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix et dans d’autres services du Secrétariat, qui sont occupés à plein temps à assurer l’appui des grosses missions, ainsi que les budgets annuels et les effectifs autorisés de ces missioons 183. Le manque généralisé de personnel fait que dans bien des cas des fonctionnaires qui remplissent une fonction essentielle n’ont personne pour les remplacer, aucune autre solution, pour que leur service soit assuré plus de huit heures par jour lorsqu’une crise éclate à six ou 12 fuseaux horaires, que de l’assurer eux-mêmes pendant 16 heures, et aucune possibilité de prendre des congés, de tomber malade ou de se rendre sur les lieux de la mission sans mettre leurs activités d’appui en veilleuse. Dans les conditions actuelles, on ne peut éviter de faire des choix entre des impératifs antagoniques, ce qui risque d’avoir des effets néfastes sur l’appui dont bénéficie le terrain. À New York, les tâches qui concernent le Siège – établissement de rapports à l’intention des organes délibérants, par exemple – passent généralement en priorité en raison de la pression exercée, souvent en personne, par les représentants des États Membres. À l’opposé, ce qu’on voit du terrain à New York se limite à des messages électroniques, des câbles et des notes gribouillées au cours de conversations téléphoniques. Ainsi, dans lan0059471.doc 37 A/55/305 S/2000/809 lutte pour partager le temps d’un officier de secteur, les opérations sur le terrain sont souvent les vaincues et doivent se contenter de régler leurs problèmes toutes seules. Pourtant, ce sont elles qui devraient être prioritaires. Le personnel sur le terrain se trouve face à des situations difficiles et sa vie est parfois en danger. Il mérite mieux, de même que ceux qui, au Siège, voudraient lui apporter un appui efficace. Tableau 4.3 Nombre total d’administrateurs affectés à plein temps à l’appui des opérations complexes de maintien de la paix créées en 1999 MINUK (Kosovo) MINUSIL (Sierra Leone) ATNUTO (Timor oriental) MONUC (République démocrattiqu du Congo) Budget estimatif juillet 2000-juin 2001 410 millions de dollars 465 millions de dollars 540 millions de dollars 535 millions de dollars Effectif actuellement autorisé des principales composantes 4 718 policiers Plus de 1 000 civils recruuté sur le plan internatiiona 13 000 militaires 8 950 militaires 1 640 policiers 1 185 civils recrutés sur le plan internatioona 5 537 militaires 500 observateurs militaiire Nombre d’administrateurs au Siège affectés à plein temps à l’appui de l’opération 1 spécialiste des questions politiques 2 membres de la police civile 1 coordonnateur de la logistique 1 spécialiste civil du recrutement 1 spécialiste des finances 1 spécialiste des questions politiques 2 militaires 1 coordonnateur de la logistique 1 spécialiste des finances 1 spécialiste des questions politiques 2 militaires 1 membre de la police civile 1 coordonnateur de la logistique 1 spécialiste civil du recrutement 1 spécialiste des finances 1 spécialiste des questions politiques 3 militaires 1 membre de la police civile 1 coordonnateur de la logistique 1 spécialiste civil du recrutement 1 spécialiste des finances Effectif total du personnel d’appui au Siège 6 5 7 8 184. Il pourrait sembler y avoir quelques chevauchemeent entre les fonctions exercées par les officiers de secteur du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix et leurs homologues des divisions régionales du Département des affaires politiques, mais en y regardaan de plus près on constate qu’il n’en est rien. Par exemple, l’homologue de l’officier de secteur de la MINUK au Département des affaires politiques suit l’actualité dans tout le sud-est de l’Europe, et son homollogu du Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanittaire s’occupe de toute la région des Balkans, plus certaines parties de la Communauté d’États indépenddants Il faut absolument que les fonctionnaires de ces deux services aient la possibilité d’apporter l’aide dont ils sont capables, mais leur apport total équivaut au travail de moins d’un fonctionnaire supplémentaire à plein temps pour ce qui est de l’appui fourni à la MINUK. 185. Les trois directeurs régionaux du Bureau des opérattion devraient se rendre régulièrement auprès des missions et entretenir un dialogue permanent avec les représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire général et les chefs des composantes à propos des obstacles que le Siège pourrait les aider à surmonter. Au lieu de cela, ils sont accaparés par les activités de leurs officiers de secteur, qui ne peuvent se passer de leur renfort. 186. Le Secrétaire général adjoint et le Sous-Secrétaire général sont encore plus soumis à des impératifs antinomiiques Ils donnent des avis au Secrétaire général, se38 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 tiennent en rapport avec les délégations et les capitales des États Membres, et l’un ou l’autre d’entre eux relit chacun des rapports sur les opérations de maintien de la paix (on en a compté 40 au cours du premier semesttr 2000) soumis au Secrétaire général pour qu’il les approuve et les signe avant de les présenter aux organne délibérants. Depuis janvier 2000, à eux deux ils ont présenté personnellement des comptes rendus au Conseil de sécurité plus de 50 fois, au cours de séances qui ont duré parfois trois heures et qui ont nécessité des heures de préparation sur le terrain et au Siège. Les réunions de coordination prennent aussi du temps, qui pourrait être passé à étudier les problèmes opérationneel avec les missions, à leur rendre visite sur le terraain à réfléchir aux moyens d’améliorer la façon dont l’ONU conduit ses opérations de maintien de la paix ou à gérer de plus près le Département. 187. Les problèmes de sous-effectifs qui accablent les services d’appui administratif et logistique, particulièremmen la Division de l’administration et de la logistiqqu des missions, sont peut-être encore plus graves que ceux dont souffrent les services organiques du Départemment À l’heure actuelle, la Division assure l’appui non seulement des opérations de maintien de la paix mais aussi d’autres bureaux extérieurs tels que le Bureea du Coordonnateur spécial des Nations Unies dans les territoires occupés, à Gaza, la Mission de vérificatiio des Nations Unies au Guatemala (MINUGUA) ou une douzaine d’autres petits bureaux, sans parler du travail que représente sa participation aux opérations de liquidation des missions terminées. Au total, elle représente un surcoût d’environ 1,25 % pour les opératiion de maintien de la paix et les autres opérations hors Siège. Si l’ONU sous-traitait les activités d’appui administratif et logistique assurées par la Division, le Groupe d’étude est persuadé qu’elle aurait du mal à trouver une entreprise privée pour accomplir le même travail pour le même prix. 188. Les exemples suivants donneront une idée du grave manque de personnel dont souffre la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions. La Section de la dotation en effectifs du Service de la gestiio du personnel de la Division, qui s’occupe du recruttemen et des voyages du personnel civil, ainsi que des voyages des membres de la police civile et des observaateur militaires, ne compte que 10 administrateurs responsables du recrutement, dont quatre sont chargés d’examiner les 150 candidatures spontanées reçues chaque jour, ainsi que d’y répondre. Les six autres administtrateur s’occupent de la procédure de sélection proprement dite : un à temps plein et un à mi-temps pour le Kosovo, un à temps plein et un à mi-temps pour le Timor oriental et trois à temps plein pour toutes les autres missions. Trois responsables du recrutement s’occupent à eux seuls de trouver des candidats qualifiié pour deux missions d’administration civile qui ont besoin de centaines d’administrateurs expérimentés dans une multitude de domaines et de disciplines. De neuf à 12 mois après leur mise en train, ni la MINUK ni l’ATNUTO ne sont intégralement déployées. 189. Les États Membres doivent donner au Secrétaire général une certaine latitude, ainsi que des ressources financières suffisantes, afin qu’il puisse recruter assez de personnel pour éviter que l’Organisation, incapable de réagir avec professionnalisme face à des situations d’urgence, ne voie sa réputation ternie. Le Secrétaire général doit disposer des ressources nécessaires pour faire du Secrétariat un organisme mieux à même de réagir immédiatement à des circonstances imprévues. 190. C’est principalement le Service de la logistique et des communications de la Division qui est chargé de fournir à ceux qui se trouvent sur le terrain les biens et services dont ils ont besoin pour s’acquitter de leurs tâches. La description d’emploi d’un des 14 coordonnatteur des opérations logistiques donnera une bonne idée de la charge de travail que supporte l’ensemble du Service. Ce fonctionnaire est le principal responsable de la planification des opérations logistiques pour l’expansion de la Mission de l’Organisation des Natiion Unies en République démocratique du Congo (MONUC) et de la Force intérimaire des Nations Unies au Liban (FINUL). Ce même fonctionnaire est chargé d’élaborer les politiques et procédures pour la très importtant Base de soutien logistique des Nations Unies à Brindisi, ainsi que de coordonner l’établissement des projets de budget annuel de l’ensemble du Service. 191. Rien que sur la base de cet examen superficiel, et compte tenu du fait que les dépenses d’appui du Départtemen des opérations de maintien de la paix et des autres entités du Siège qui appuient les opérations de maintien de la paix ne dépassent pas les 50 millions de dollars par an, le Groupe d’étude est convaincu qu’en fournissant des ressources supplémentaires au Départemmen et à ces entités, les États Membres réaliseraient un investissement fondamental qui garantirait l’utilisation rationnelle des 2 milliards de dollars et plus qu’ils consacreront aux opérations de maintien de la paix en 2001. Le Groupe d’étude recommande doncn0059471.doc 39 A/55/305 S/2000/809 une augmentation sensible des ressources et exhorte le Secrétaire général à soumettre à l’Assemblée générale une proposition indiquant tous les besoins de l’Organisation. 192. Le Groupe d’étude estime par ailleurs qu’il faut cesser de considérer le maintien de la paix comme une fonction temporaire et le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix comme une structure temporaire. Le Département doit pouvoir compter systématiquemeen sur une enveloppe budgétaire prévisible s’il est appelé à faire plus que de maintenir à flot les missions existantes. Il doit disposer de ressources pour se préparre aux situations d’urgence qui pourraient survenir dans les six à 12 mois, pour mettre au point des outils de gestion susceptibles d’améliorer le fonctionnement des futures missions, pour étudier l’incidence que les technologies modernes pourraient avoir sur divers aspeect du maintien de la paix, pour mettre en pratique les enseignements tirés des missions précédentes et pour appliquer les recommandations figurant dans les rapports d’évaluation établis par le Bureau des services de contrôle interne ces cinq dernières années. Son personnne doit avoir la possibilité de concevoir et de menne des programmes de formation à l’intention des nouvelles recrues, tant au Siège que sur le terrain. Il doit pouvoir terminer l’élaboration des directives et des manuels qui pourraient aider les nouveaux membres des missions à s’acquitter de leurs tâches avec plus de professionnalisme et conformément aux règles, règlemeent et procédures des Nations Unies, mais qui sont pour l’instant abandonnés, à moitié achevés, dans une douzaine de bureaux du Département, parce que leurs auteurs sont trop occupés à répondre à d’autres besoiins 193. Le Groupe d’étude recommande donc que l’appui fourni par le Siège aux opérations de maintien de la paix soit considéré comme une activité essentielle de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, et que la plus grande partie des ressources nécessaires soient, par conséqueent inscrites au budget-programme biennal ordinaiire En attendant l’élaboration du prochain budget, il recommande que le Secrétaire général demande le plus tôt possible à l’Assemblée générale d’augmenter d’urgence les ressources prévues dans le dernier projet de budget pour le compte d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix. 194. La répartition précise des ressources devrait être déterminée sur la base d’un examen professionnel et objectif des besoins, mais l’enveloppe globale devrait refléter l’expérience passée du maintien de la paix. Une possibilité serait de calculer le montant de base à inscrrir au budget ordinaire pour l’appui du Siège aux opérations de maintien de la paix en fonction du coût moyen des opérations au cours des cinq années précédenntes Le montant ainsi calculé refléterait le niveau d’activité auquel le Secrétariat devrait être prêt à faire face. Selon les chiffres fournis par le Contrôleur (voir tableau 4.1), la moyenne pour les cinq dernières années (y compris l’exercice budgétaire en cours) est de 1,4 milliard de dollars. Si l’on fixait l’enveloppe budgéttair de base pour les activités d’appui à 5 % de la moyenne, on obtiendrait un montant de 70 millions de dollars, soit environ 20 millions de plus que le budget actuel du Siège pour l’appui aux opérations de maintiie de la paix. 195. Pour financer des niveaux d’activités supérieurs à la moyenne, en période de pointe, on pourrait envisager de majorer d’un certain pourcentage les budgets des missions auxquelles est imputable le dépassement de l’enveloppe de base. Ainsi, le coût estimatif des opératiion de maintien de la paix pour l’exercice en cours, soit 2,6 milliards de dollars, dépasse de 1,2 milliard l’enveloppe de base hypothétique, soit 1,4 milliards de dollars. Une majoration de 1 % calculée sur la base de ce montant de 1,2 milliard de dollars donnerait 12 millions de dollars dont le Siège disposerait pour faire face à la charge de travail accrue. Une majoration de 2 % produirait 24 millions de dollars. 196. Ce moyen direct de financer les capacités nécessaiire en période de pointe devrait remplacer le systèèm actuel, qui exige que chaque poste soit justifié chaque année dans les projets de budget pour le compte d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix. Le Secréttair général devrait avoir la latitude de décider de la meilleure façon d’utiliser les fonds pour faire face à un niveau exceptionnel d’activité, et des mesures d’urgence devraient être prises pour que les postes temporaires destinés à couvrir les besoins accrus puisseen être pourvus immédiatement. 197. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant le financement de l’appui aux opératiion de maintien de la paix fourni par le Siège : a) Le Groupe d’étude recommande une augmentation sensible des ressources servant à finannce l’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix fourni par le Siège et exhorte le Secrétaire génééra à soumettre à l’Assemblée générale une pro40 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 position indiquant l’intégralité des moyens qu’il juge nécessaires; b) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que l’appui fourni par le Siège aux opérations de maintiie de la paix soit considéré comme une activité essentielle de l’Organisation des Nations Unies et que la plus grande partie des ressources nécessaires soient donc inscrites au budget ordinaire; c) En attendant l’élaboration du prochain projet de budget, le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Secrétaire général demande à l’Assemblée générale d’augmenter d’urgence les ressources du compte d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix pour que du personnel supplémentaire puisse être recruté immédiatement, en particulier au sein du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. B. Création d’équipes spéciales intégrées : justification et proposition 198. Il n’existe pas actuellement, au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, de cellule intégrée de planification ou d’appui au sein de laquelle seraient représentés, entre autres, les responsables de l’analyse des politiques, des opérations militaires, de la police civile, de l’assistance électorale, des droits de l’homme, du développement, de l’assistance humanitaiire des réfugiés et des déplacés, de l’information, de la logistique, des finances et du recrutement. Comme on l’a vu plus haut, le Département ne compte qu’une poignée d’administrateurs affectés à temps plein à la planification et aux activités d’appui, y compris pour les opérations complexes de grande envergure comme la Mission des Nations Unies en Sierra Leone (MINUSIL), la Mission d’administration intérimaire des Nations Unies au Kosovo (MINUK) et l’Administrratio transitoire des Nations Unies au Timor oriental (ATNUTO). Dans le cas des missions de paix à caractère politique ou des bureaux de consolidation de la paix, ces fonctions sont prises en charge par le Départtemen des affaires politiques, avec un personnel tout aussi réduit. 199. Le Bureau des opérations du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix est chargé d’élaborer le concept général d’opérations des nouvelles missions de maintien de la paix. Il porte une lourde responsabiliit puisqu’il se charge à la fois de l’analyse politique et de la coordination interne avec les autres services du Département qui sont chargés des questions miliaires, de la police civile, de la logistique, des finances et du personnel. Ces services ont chacun une structure hiérarcchiqu distincte et beaucoup d’entre eux se trouvent même dans des bâtiments différents. En outre, le Départtemen des affaires politiques, le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement, le Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires, le Haut Commisssaria pour les réfugiés, le Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme, le Département de l’information et bien d’autres départements, organismes, fonds et prograamme ont un rôle de plus en plus important à jouer dans la planification des opérations, en particulier les opérations complexes, et doivent être officiellement associés au processus de planification. 200. Il arrive que les divisions, départements et organissme collaborent entre eux, mais cette collaboration dépend trop de contacts personnels et d’un appui ponctuel. Des équipes spéciales composées de représenttant des diverses parties du système sont mises en place pour la planification des grandes opérations, mais elles font plutôt office de groupe de discussion que d’organe de décision. En outre, elles tendent à se réunir peu souvent, voire à se dissoudre, dès que le déploiemeen de l’opération commence, et bien avant qu’il soit achevé. 201. D’autre part, lorsqu’une opération est déployée, les représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire général coordonnnen l’ensemble des activités des Nations Unies dans leur zone de mission, mais n’ont pas au Siège, au niveau opérationnel, d’interlocuteur unique capable de donner suite rapidement à leurs demandes. Ainsi, les officiers de secteur et les directeurs des divisions régionnale du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix répondent aux questions de nature politique, mais ne peuvent, en général, répondre directement aux questions relatives aux opérations militaires, à la poliice à l’assistance humanitaire, aux droits de l’homme, aux élections, aux affaires juridiques ou à d’autres aspeect des opérations, et ils ne savent pas toujours à qui s’adresser pour trouver la réponse. Lorsqu’elles ne peuvent attendre, les missions finissent par trouver elleesmêmes des interlocuteurs compétents et, à la longuue établissent leurs propres contacts avec les différennte entités du Secrétariat et du système. 202. Les missions ne devraient pas être amenées à établli leurs propres réseaux. Elles devraient savoir exactemmen à qui s’adresser pour obtenir les réponses etn0059471.doc 41 A/55/305 S/2000/809 l’appui dont elles ont besoin, surtout au cours des premiier mois, qui sont particulièrement critiques car le déploiement est en cours et des crises surgissent chaqqu jour. En outre, elles devraient pouvoir obtenir ces réponses d’une entité unique qui rassemble tout le personnne d’appui et tous les experts nécessaires, détachés de divers services du Siège correspondant à toutes les fonctions des missions. Une telle entité pourrait s’appeler une équipe spéciale intégrée. 203. Cette notion, quoique beaucoup plus large, s’appuie sur les mesures de coopération prévues dans les directives pour l’application du principe du « département chef de file » adoptées par le Départemeen des opérations de maintien de la paix et le Départtemen des affaires politiques lors d’une réunion qu’ils ont tenue en juin 2000 sous la présidence du Secréttair général. Le Groupe d’étude recommande, par exemple, que ces deux départements choisissent ensemmbl le chef de chaque nouvelle équipe spéciale, mais sans se limiter nécessairement à leur propre personnnel Il peut arriver que les directeurs des divisions régionales ou les spécialistes des questions politiques des deux départements soient trop occupés pour assumme ce rôle à temps plein. Il peut aussi arriver qu’une personne venant du terrain fasse mieux l’affaire. Cette souplesse de fonctionnement, y compris la latitude de confier la tâche au candidat le plus qualifié, suppose l’adoption de mécanismes de financement permettant de répondre à des besoins exceptionnels en période de pointe, conformément à la recommandation formulée plus haut. 204. Le Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité ou un sous-groupe de ce comité désigné à cette fin devrait s’entendre sur la composition générale De l’équipe spéciale intégrée que le groupe d’étude envisage de former au tout début du processus de prévention des conflits, de rétablissement de la paix, de maintien éventuel de la paix ou de déploiement éventuel d’un bureau de soutien à la consolidation de la paix. Cette formule faisant appel à un dispositif central de soutien intégré aux activités en faveur de la paix et de la sécuriit menées par les Nations Unies sur le terrain devrait s’étendre à toutes les opérations de paix, la taille, la composition, le lieu de réunion et la direction de l’équipe spéciale dépendant des besoins de chaque opérattion 205. La question de la direction et du département chef de file s’est posée par le passé lorsque la nature de la présence des Nations Unies sur le terrain a changé – privilégiant davantage l’aspect maintien de la paix ou vilégiant davantage l’aspect maintien de la paix ou polittiqu selon le cas –, ce qui a nécessité une révision non seulement du principal interlocuteur des différentte opérations au siège mais aussi de l’ensemble des intervenants au siège. D’après la conception que le Groupe d’étude se fait du fonctionnement de ces équippe spéciales, ces intervenants demeureraient en gros les mêmes pendant et après ces transitions, sous réseerv des remaniements rendus nécessaires par l’évolution de la nature de l’opération mais sans changemmen du personnel de base de chaque équipe spéciale chargé des fonctions à assurer tout au long de la transitiion La direction de ces équipes spéciales serait assurré à tour de rôle par chacun de leurs membres (elle passerait par exemple d’un directeur régional ou d’un spécialiste des questions politiques du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix à son homologue au sein du Département des affaires politiques). 206. La taille et la composition de ces équipes spécialle seraient fonction de la nature de l’activité sur le terrain recevant un appui et de la phase où elle se trouve. L’action préventive menée en cas de crise exigerrai un soutien politique éclairé qui permettrait à l’envoyé des Nations Unies de se tenir informé de l’évolution de la situation politique dans la région et d’autres facteurs déterminants pour le succès de sa mission. Les responsables du rétablissement de la paix chargés de mettre fin à un conflit devraient être plus au fait des options existant pour assurer le maintien et la consolidation de la paix de façon que les possibilités qu’elles offrent aussi bien que leurs limites soient prisse en compte dans tout accord de paix dont l’application ferait intervenir les Nations Unies. Les conseillers-observateurs du Secrétariat collaborant avec ces responsables auraient des liens avec l’équipe spéciial intégrée qui apporte son soutien aux négociations et la tiendraient informée des progrès accomplis. Le chef de l’équipe spéciale servirait de son côté d’intermédiaire entre le responsable du rétablissement de la paix et le Siège, en se servant de ses contacts avec les hautes instances du Secrétariat pour obtenir des réponses aux questions politiques délicates. 207. Les équipes spéciales décrites plus haut pourraiien être des organes « virtuels » dont les membres se réuniraient régulièrement mais ne partageraient pas les mêmes locaux et s’acquitteraient de leurs fonctions à partir de leurs bureaux habituels en communiquant enttr eux grâce aux techniques modernes d’information. Pour contribuer au travail de ces équipes, chacun de42 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 leurs membres devrait fournir des données et analyses, qui seraient affichées sur le réseau Intranet de l’ONU par le secrétariat de l’information et de l’analyse stratéggiqu du Comité exécutif dont la création est propossé plus haut aux paragraphes 65 à 75 et avoir accès à ces mêmes données et analyses. 208. Les équipes spéciales intégrées créées pour planifiie d’éventuelles opérations de paix pourraient elles aussi être au départ des organes virtuels. Lorsque les préparatifs de l’opération se concrétiseraient, elles se constitueraient réellement et tous leurs membres partageraaien les mêmes locaux pour pouvoir travailler en équipe aussi longtemps que l’exigerait le déploiement complet de la nouvelle mission, soit jusqu’à six mois, à condition que les réformes proposées plus haut aux paragraphes 84 à 169, pour accélérer le déploiement soient appliquées. 209. Leurs membres seraient officiellement détachés pour toute la durée de l’opération par leur division, département, agence, fonds ou programme d’origine. Ils auraient ainsi entre eux des liens beaucoup plus étroits que ceux qui existent actuellement entre les membres des comités de coordination et équipes existaan au Siège. Ils constitueraient de ce fait une cellule temporaire mais réunie autour d’un même objectif, dont la taille et la composition pourraient être modifiiée en fonction des besoins de la mission. 210. Chaque membre de chaque équipe spéciale serait non seulement autorisé à servir d’intermédiaire entre l’équipe spéciale et son département d’origine, mais serait aussi chargé de prendre toutes les décisions pratiqque importantes concernant la mission pour ce départeement Le chef de l’équipe spéciale – qui ferait rapport au Sous-Secrétaire général chargé des opératiion du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix dans le cas des opérations de maintien de la paix, ou au Sous-Secrétaire général du Département des affaiire politiques, dans le cas des activités de rétablissemmen de la paix, des bureaux de soutien à la consolidattio de la paix et les missions politiques spéciales – devrait lui-même avoir autorité sur les autres membres de l’équipe spéciale pendant toute la durée de leur détacheement et devrait être la première personne à contacter par les opérations de paix pour toutes les questions ayant trait à leurs activités. Les questions relatives aux politiques et stratégies à long terme devraiient elles, être réglées au niveau des Secrétaire génééra adjoint et Sous-Secrétaire général au sein du Comiit exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité avec l’appui du secrétariat de l’information et de l’analyse stratégique de ce comité. 211. Pour que le système des Nations Unies puisse prêter du personnel aux équipes spéciales, il faudra établir des centres de responsabilité pour chaque grande composante des opérations de paix. Les départemment et les organismes doivent s’entendre à l’avance sur les procédures en matière de détachement et sur l’appui qu’ils sont prêts à apporter au mécanisme des équipes spéciales intégrées en signifiant au besoin leur accord par écrit. 212. Le Groupe d’étude n’a pas de propositions à faire concernant le choix des bureaux « chefs de file » pour chaque composante éventuelle des opérations de paix mais il pense que tous les membres du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité devraient se pencher sur cette question et choisir parmi eux un responsable de la planificcatio pour chacune de ces composantes autres que celles ayant trait au domaine militaire, à la police et au pouvoir judiciaire, ainsi qu’à la logistique et à l’administration, qui devraient toutes continuer de relevve de la responsabilité du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. L’organisme choisi comme chef de file devrait avoir pour tâche de mettre au point les principaux éléments des concepts d’opérations, des définitions d’emploi, des besoins en personnel et en équipement, des échéanciers et calendriers de déploiemeent des données de base harmonisées, des arrangemeent concernant le personnel civil en attente et des fichiers d’autres candidats potentiels pour la composaant dont il est chargé, ainsi que de participer aux travaau correspondants de l’équipe spéciale intégrée. 213. La formule des équipes spéciales intégrées appoort un élément de souplesse qui doit permettre de faire face à des besoins en ressources importants dans des délais très serrés mais portant en définitive sur une courte période pour faciliter les activités de planificatiion de démarrage et de soutien logistique initial. Elle s’inspire très largement de la notion de « direction par décentralisation fonctionnelle », que l’on retrouve très souvent dans les grandes organisations qui ont besoin de pouvoir mobiliser les compétences spécialisées nécesssaire à des projets précis sans avoir à chaque fois à revoir toute leur organisation. Adoptée par des institutiion aussi diverses que la RAND Corporation et la Banque mondiale, cette conception repose sur l’affectation des employés à un service ou département d’origine permanent dont ils peuvent et doivent même être détachés au besoin pour apporter un soutien à desn0059471.doc 43 A/55/305 S/2000/809 projets. Appliquée à la planification centrale et au soutiie aux opérations de paix, cette formule permettra aux départements, institutions, fonds et programmes organisés sur le plan interne en fonction de leurs besooin d’ensemble, d’affecter des membres de leur personnne à des équipes spéciales intégrées au niveau interdéparrtementalinterorganisations chargées de ce soutien. 214. La formule des équipes spéciales intégrées pourraai aussi avoir des répercussions importantes sur la structure actuelle du Bureau des opérations du Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix car elle remplacerait en fait celle des divisions régionales. Ainssi par exemple, pour chacune des opérations de plus grande envergure, telles que celles menées en Sierra Leone, au Timor oriental ou au Kosovo, il faudrait créer une équipe spéciale intégrée individuelle dirigée par un administrateur ayant rang de directeur. Les autrre missions, telles que les opérations de maintien de la paix « classiques » existant depuis longtemps en Asie et au Moyen-Orient, pourraient être regroupées au sein d’une seule équipe spéciale intégrée. Le nombre des équipes susceptibles d’être créées dépendrait beaucoou du volume des ressources complémentaires allouuée au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, au Département des affaires politiques et aux départeements institutions, fonds et programmes qui en dépendent. À mesure que le nombre des équipes augmenteerait la structure organisationnelle du Bureau des opérations s’élargirait. Il en serait de même pour les fonctions des sous-secrétaires généraux du Départemeen des affaires politiques, auxquels les chefs des équipes spéciales intégrées seraient tenus de faire rappoor au cours de la phase de rétablissement de la paix ou lors du lancement d’une opération importante de soutien à la consolidation de la paix, soit à la suite d’une opération de maintien de la paix, soit en tant qu’initiative distincte. 215. Certes, les directeurs régionaux du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix (et du Départemeen des affaires politiques lorsqu’ils auraient été nommés à la tête d’équipes spéciales intégrées) seraiien responsables d’un moins grand nombre de missiion qu’actuellement, mais ils seraient en fait chargés d’un personnel plus important, notamment celui des bureaux des conseillers du personnel militaire et de la police civile, de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions (ou des divisions qui la remplacerront et des autres départements, institutions, fonds et programmes, qui serait détaché à temps complet auprès d’eux, en fonction des besoins. La taille des équipes spéciales intégrées dépendra aussi du montant des ressouurce complémentaires qui pourront être mobilisées, ressources sans lesquelles les services participants ne seront pas en mesure de détacher leur personnel à temps complet. 216. Il convient aussi de noter que, pour que la formuul des équipes spéciales intégrées fonctionne correctement, les membres de ces équipes doivent partaage les mêmes locaux au cours des phases de planificattio et de déploiement initiales, ce qui n’est pas possiibl dans les conditions actuelles, sauf si l’on procède à des remaniements importants des dispositions prises en matière de locaux à usage de bureaux au sein du Secrétariat. 217. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant une planification et un soutien intégrés dans le cadre des missions : la formule des équipes spéciales intégrées, dont les membres seraient détachhé par tous les organismes des Nations Unies en fonction des besoins, serait celle qui serait retenue pour assurer la planification et le soutien aux différennte missions et le personnel détaché auprès d’elles, conformément aux accords conclus entre le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, le Département des affaires politiques et les autres départements, programmes, fonds et organismes participants, serait temporairement sous les ordres de leurs chefs. C. Autres ajustements structurels à apporter au sein du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix 218. La formule des équipes spéciales intégrées renforccerai la capacité du Bureau des opérations du Départtemen des opérations de maintien de la paix de coordonner réellement tous les aspects de chaque opérattio de maintien de la paix. Elle exigera toutefois des ajustements structurels supplémentaires au niveau d’autres éléments du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, en particulier de la Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile, de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions et du Groupe des enseignements tirés des mission.44 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 1. Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile 219. Tous les responsables de la police civile consultés au Siège aussi bien que sur le terrain jugent frustrant que les fonctions de police dépendant du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix relèvent de la chaîne de commandement militaire. Le Groupe d’étude concède qu’un tel arrangement est peu judicieux aussi bien du point de vue administratif que sur le fond. 220. Les responsables du personnel militaire et de la police civile du Département des opérations de maintiie de la paix n’exercent leurs fonctions que pour trois ans, car les Nations Unies exigent qu’ils soient en serviic actif. S’ils veulent rester en poste plus longtemps, et sont même prêts pour ce faire à quitter l’armée ou la police de leur pays, la politique des Nations Unies en matière de personnel interdit qu’ils soient recrutés pour exercer les fonctions qu’ils remplissaient avant leur départ. C’est ce qui explique que le taux de rotation du personnel militaire et de la police civile soit si élevé au sein du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. Étant donné que les enseignements tirés de la pratique suivie par les services du Siège ne sont pas régulièrement retenus, qu’il n’existe pas de programmme de formation approfondie à l’intention des nouveeau arrivants et que l’élaboration de manuels faciles à utiliser et de directives opérationnelles de base n’est qu’à moitié terminée, il en résulte une perte régulière de mémoire institutionnelle qu’il faut des mois de travaai pour reconstituer. Le manque de personnel actuel oblige en outre les responsables du personnel militaire et de la police civile à exercer des fonctions pour lesqueelle ils n’ont pas nécessairement été formés. Ceux qui sont spécialisés dans les opérations (J3) ou dans la planification (J5) peuvent être appelés à jouer un rôle quasi diplomatique ou à assumer des fonctions de responssable du personnel et de l’administration (J1) devaan faire face à la rotation incessante du personnel et des unités sur le terrain, ce qui les empêche de s’occuper des activités opérationnelles sur le terrain. 221. Le manque de continuité dont souffre le Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix dans ces domaines est aussi la raison pour laquelle depuis plus de 50 ans qu’il déploie des observateurs militaires pour faire rapport sur les violations des accords de cessezllefeu, le Département n’a toujours pas de base centrale rassemblant les données concernant de telles violations et les statistiques générales recueillies par ces observateeurs Actuellement, si l’on veut savoir combien de violations se sont produites pendant six mois dans un pays donné, il faut dépouiller tous les rapports de situaatio journaliers pour cette période et repérer individuelllemen toutes les violations qui y sont signalées. Lorsque des bases de données de ce type existent, elles ont été créées par les missions elles-mêmes au coup par coup. Il en est de même pour toutes les statistiques relattive à la criminalité et autres informations dont ont besoin la plupart des missions de police civile. Les progrès technologiques ont aussi révolutionné les méthoode de vérification des violations des accords de cessez-le-feu et de contrôle des déplacements à l’intérieur des zones démilitarisées, ainsi que des sortiie d’armes provenant d’arsenaux. Or, personne n’est actuellement chargé de ces questions au sein de la Divissio du personnel militaire et de la police civile du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. 222. Le Groupe d’étude recommande que la Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile soit scindée en deux unités distinctes, l’une chargée du personnel militaire, l’autre de la police civile. Le Bureau du Conseiller militaire du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix devrait être élargi et sa structure s’inspirer davantage de celle des quartiers généraux des opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unie, de façon à apporter un soutien plus efficace aux opératiion sur le terrain et à mieux conseiller les hauts responssable du Secrétariat pour les questions militaires. Il faudrait aussi affecter des ressources supplémentaires plus importantes au Groupe de la police civile et envisaage de reclasser le poste de conseiller de la police civile. 223. Afin d’assurer un minimum de continuité au sein du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix pour ce qui est de la capacité du personnel militaire et de la police civile, le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’un certain pourcentage des postes créés au sein de ces deux groupes soit réservé à des membres du personnne militaire et de la police civile ayant déjà travaiill pour les Nations Unies et venant de quitter leur service national, qui feraient partie du personnel des Nations Unies. Cette pratique coïnciderait avec celle suivie par le Service de la logistique et des communicattion de la Division de l’administration et de la logisttiqu des missions, qui compte plusieurs anciens militaires. 224. La police civile sur le terrain participe de plus en plus à la restructuration et à la réforme des forces de police locales, et le Groupe d’étude a recommandén0059471.doc 45 A/55/305 S/2000/809 qu’elle assure en priorité ces fonctions dans le cadre des opérations de paix à venir [voir plus haut, par. 39, 40 et 47 b)]. À ce jour, cependant, le Groupe de la poliic civile est chargé de préparer les plans et d’évaluer les besoins des composantes police des opérations de paix sans disposer des compétences juridiques nécessaiire concernant les structures judiciaires locales et les législations, codes et procédures pénales en vigueur dans les pays de déploiement. Ce type de compétence revêt une importance vitale pour les planificateurs de police civile et pourtant, aucune ressources du Compte d’appui n’a été affectée au titre de cette fonction, que ce soit au Bureau du Conseiller juridique, au Départemeen des opérations de maintien de la paix ou autre département du Secrétariat. 225. Le Groupe d’étude recommande donc qu’il soit créé au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix une nouvelle unité administrative dotée de personnne spécialisé chargé de donner des conseils au Bureea du Conseiller de la police civile sur des questions de droit pénal d’une importance cruciale pour l’utilisation efficace des services de police civile dans le cadre des opérations de paix. Ce groupe devrait aussi travailler en étroite collaboration avec le Haut Commisssaria des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, à Genève, le Bureau des Nations Unies pour le contrôle des drogues et la prévention du crime à Vienne et les autres organismes des Nations Unies qui s’intéressent à la réforme des institutions chargées de promouvoir l’état de droit et d’assurer le respect des droits de l’homme. 2. Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions 226. La Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions n’est pas habilitée à établir la version finaal ni à présenter les projets de budget des opérations qu’elle prévoit de réaliser, ni, en fait, à acquérir les biens et services nécessaires à leur exécution. Cette responsabilité incombe à la Division du financement du maintien de la paix et à la Division des achats du Départtemen de la gestion. Toutes les demandes reçues au Siège concernant les achats sont traitées par les 16 fonctionnaires de la Division des achats, dont les servicce sont financés à l’aide du compte d’appui : ils établisssen les contrats importants (environ 300 en 1999) à présenter au Comité des marchés du Siège, négocient et concluent des marchés pour l’achat des biens et servicce qui ne sont pas acquis sur place par les missions et élaborent les règles et pratiques de l’Organisation des Nations Unies applicables aux achats effectués pour les missions au niveau mondial et sur le marché local. L’insuffisance de personnel, conjuguée au nombre supplémeentair d’opérations qu’entraîne cette manière de procéder, semble jouer un rôle dans les retards signalés par les missions en ce qui concerne les achats. 227. Pour accroître l’efficacité, il faudrait déléguer au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, pendant une période d’essai de deux ans, les fonctions d’établissement et de présentation du budget des opérattion de maintien de la paix, et d’allocation des crédiit et lui confier la responsabilité des achats, en lui transférant les postes et le personnel correspondants. Compte tenu de l’obligation de rendre compte et pour assurer la transparence, le Département de la gestion devrait conserver ses responsabilités en ce qui concerne la comptabilité, les contributions des États Membres et la trésorerie. Il devrait aussi conserver son rôle touchant l’élaboration des grandes orientations et le suivi, comme dans le cas du recrutement et de l’administration du personnel hors-Siège, dont la responsaabilit a déjà été déléguée au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. 228. De plus, pour éviter toutes allégations concernant des irrégularités éventuelles du fait que les responsablle de la budgétisation et des achats travailleraient dans la même division que ceux qui sont chargés de déterminer les besoins, le Groupe d’étude recommande que la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions soit dédoublée, une division (Division des services administratifs), regroupant les fonctions ayant trait au personnel, au budget et aux finances ainsi qu’aux achats et l’autre (Division des services d’appui intégrés) étant chargée de la logistique des transports, des communications, etc. 3. Groupe des enseignements tirés des missions 229. Si l’on s’accorde à reconnaître la nécessité d’exploiter l’expérience accumulée sur le terrain, les efforts entrepris pour permettre au système de mieux tirer parti de cette expérience ou de faire en sorte qu’il en soit tenu compte lors de l’élaboration de la doctrine opérationnelle ainsi que des plans, méthodes ou mandaat ont laissé à désirer. Les travaux actuels du Groupe des enseignements tirés des missions au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix ne semblent pas avoir eu beaucoup d’effet en pratique, au niveau des opérations et dans la plupart des cas la compilation des46 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 enseignements tirés semble n’être faite qu’une fois la mission terminée, ce qui est regrettable car le système de maintien de la paix est une source inépuisable d’expérience dont on peut quotidiennement tirer de nouveaux enseignements. Ces données d’expérience doivent être réunies et conservées au bénéfice des opérattion présentes et futures et de ceux qui les mènent à bien. Les enseignements tirés doivent être considérés comme un aspect de l’information nécessaire à une bonne gestion, qui contribue en permanence à améliorre les opérations, les rapports a posteriori ne représenttant en tel cas, que l’un des éléments d’un processsu plus vaste d’acquisition de savoir : ils en constituuen en fait la récapitulation et non le principal objectiif 230. Le Groupe d’étude considère qu’il faut renforcer d’urgence cette fonction et recommande de l’implanter dans un environnement qui permette aux responsables de suivre de près les opérations en cours et d’y apporter une contribution utile, ainsi qu’à la planification des activités et à l’élaboration de la doctrine et des directivve applicables aux missions. Le Groupe d’étude pense que le cadre le plus approprié serait sans doute le Bureea des opérations, qui supervisera les activités des équipes spéciales intégrées que le Groupe d’étude propoos de créer pour intégrer la planification des opératiion de paix au Siège et l’appui dont elles ont besoin (voir par. 198 à 217 ci-dessus). Ainsi situé dans un secteur du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix où seront régulièrement présents des représentaant de nombreux départements et organismes, ce serviic pourrait assurer l’apprentissage permanent du personnne de toutes ces entités en ce qui concerne les opérattion de paix, en gérant et en actualisant la mémoire institutionnelle dont les missions tout comme les équippe spéciales pourraient tirer parti pour mieux résoudre les problèmes et savoir quelles méthodes ont donné les meilleurs résultats et quelles sont celles qu’il faudrait éviter d’employer. 4. Personnel de direction 231. Il existe actuellement deux sous-secrétaires généraau au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix : l’un dirige le Bureau des opérations et l’autre le Bureau de la logistique, de la gestion et de l’action antimmine (Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions et Service de l’action antimines). Le Conseiller militaire, qui dirige en outre la Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile, relève actuellemmen du Secrétaire général adjoint aux opérations de maintien de la paix, et fait rapport à celui-ci soit directemment soit par l’intermédiaire de l’un des deux soussecréétaire généraux, selon le cas. 232. Étant donné les nombreux postes nouveaux et ajustements structurels proposés plus haut, le Groupe d’étude pense qu’il y aurait tout lieu de mettre à la disposiitio du Département un troisième poste de soussecréétair général. Il estime en outre que l’un des trois sous-secrétaires généraux devrait avoir le titre de « sous-secrétaire général principal » et exercer les fonctions d’adjoint du Secrétaire général adjoint. 233. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant les autres ajustements structurels propoosé pour le Département des opérations de maintiie de la paix : a) Il faudrait revoir la structure de l’actuelle Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile, de sorte que le Groupe de la police civiil ne relève plus de la chaîne de commandement militaire. Il faudrait envisager de reclasser le poste de Conseiller de la police civile et la classe de son poste;b) Il faudrait modifier la structure du Bureea du conseiller militaire au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix pour qu’elle mieux à celle des quartiers généraux des opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies; c) Il faudrait créer au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix une nouvelle unité administrative dotée de personnel spécialisé chargé de donner des conseils sur des questions de droit pénal d’une importance cruciale pour l’utilisation efficace des services de police civile dans le cadre des opérations paix des Nations Unies; d) Le Secrétaire général adjoint à la gestion devrait déléguer au Secrétaire général adjoint aux opérations de maintien de la paix, pour une période d’essai de deux ans, la responsabilité de la budgétisattio et des achats pour les opérations de maintien de la paix; e) Le Groupe des enseignements tirés des missions devrait être sensiblement renforcé et rattacch au Bureau des opérations du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, qui doit lui-même être réorganisé;n0059471.doc 47 A/55/305 S/2000/809 f) Il faudrait envisager d’accroître le nombbr des postes de sous-secrétaire général au Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix, pour le porter de deux à trois; l’un d’entre eux aurait pour titulaire un « sous-secrétaire général princippa » qui exercerait les fonctions d’adjoint du Secrétaair général adjoint. D. Ajustements structurels requis hors du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix 234. Il faudrait renforcer la planification et les services d’appui en matière d’information au Siège, ainsi que les éléments du Département des affaires politiques qui appuient et coordonnent des activités de consolidation de la paix et fournissent un appui en matière électorale. Hors du Secrétariat, il faudrait renforcer les moyens dont dispose le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme pour planifier et appuyer les composantes « droits de l’homme » des opérations de paix. 1. Appui opérationnel en matière d’information 235. Contrairement à d’autres éléments des missions – personnel militaire, police civile, action antimines, logistique, télécommunications, etc. – aucun service du Siège n’est expressément responsable de la composante « information » des opérations de paix. Le rôle le plus important pour ce qui est de l’information au sujet des missions revient au Bureau du porte-parole du Secrétaair général et aux porte-parole et bureaux d’information des missions elles-mêmes. Au Siège, quatre administrateurs de la Section de la paix et de la sécurité, rattachés au Service de la promotion et de la planification de la Division des relations publiques du Département de l’information sont chargés de produire des publications, de mettre au point et d’actualiser les textes du site Web concernant les opérations de paix et de s’occuper d’autres questions allant du désarmement à l’assistance humanitaire. La Section produit et gère l’information ayant trait au maintien de la paix, mais elle ne dispose pas de moyens suffisants pour définir une doctrine ou une stratégie ou élaborer des modalités d’exécution standard en ce qui concerne les fonctions d’information sur le terrain, si ce n’est de façon sporadiiqu et circonstancielle. 236. La Section de la paix et de la sécurité du Départemmen de l’information est actuellement renforcée dans une certaine mesure grâce à la réaffectation inteern de fonctionnaires du Département, mais il faudrrai ou bien l’élargir sensiblement et la rendre opérationnnell ou bien transférer cette fonction d’appui au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, avec, éventuellement, un certain nombre de fonctionnaiire détachés du Département de l’information. 237. Quelle que soit l’option retenue, la tâche à accommpli consistera à prévoir les besoins en information, y compris les moyens techniques et les effectifs nécessaiire pour y faire face, à établir les priorités et les modallité opérationnelles standard pour les missions, à fournir un appui pour la phase de démarrage des missiion nouvelles et à dispenser des services d’appui et des conseils de façon continue en participant aux travaau des équipes spéciales intégrées. 238. Résumé de la principale recommandation concernant les ajustements structurels requis en matière d’information : un service de planification opérationnelle et d’appui à l’information pour les opérations de paix devrait être créé, soit au Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix, soit au sein d’un nouveau service d’information sur la paix et la sécurité au Département de l’information, qui relèverait directement du Secrétaire général adjoint à la communication et à l’information. 2. Département des affaires politiques : appui aux activités de consolidation de la paix 239. Le Département des affaires politiques a été chargg de coordonner les efforts de consolidation de la paix des Nations Unies et est actuellement responsable de la mise en place de bureaux de consolidation de la paix et de missions politiques spéciales dans une douzaine de pays, auxquels il fournit un appui ou des conseils, ainsi que des activités de cinq envoyés ou représentants du Secrétaire général affectés à des missions de rétablissemmen de la paix ou de prévention de conflits. On prévooi que les fonds prévus au budget ordinaire pour finannce ces activités pendant la prochaine année civile seront inférieurs de 31 millions de dollars (soit 25 %) aux besoins. En fait, l’inscription de crédits au budget ordinaire est relativement rare pour les activités de consolidation de la paix, qui sont pour la plupart financéée à l’aide de contributions volontaires.48 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 240. Le Groupe d’appui à la consolidation de la paix qui se constitue actuellement au Département des affairre politiques représente l’une de ces activités. En sa qualité de responsable de la convocation du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité et de la coordination des stratégies de consolidation de la paix, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux affaires politiques doit pouvoir coordonner la formulation des stratégies dans ce domaain avec les membres du Comité exécutif et d’autres éléments du système des Nations Unies, en particulier ceux qui exercent leurs activités dans les domaines du développement et de l’aide humanitaire, vu le caractère intersectoriel de la notion même de consolidation de la paix. À cette fin, le Secrétariat recueille des contributiion volontaires versées par un certain nombre de donatteur pour financer un projet pilote d’une durée de trois ans destiné à faciliter les travaux du Groupe. Le Groupe d’étude demande instamment que, à mesure que les plans concernant ce groupe pilote se préciseroont le Département des affaires politiques consulte toutes les parties intéressées du système des Nations Unies qui seraient susceptibles de contribuer au succès des activités envisagées, en particulier le PNUD, qui attache actuellement une importance renouvelée à la démocratie et à la gouvernance ainsi qu’à d’autres domaiine liés à la phase de transition. 241. Le Service administratif du Département appuie certaines des activités opérationnelles dont le Départemeen a la responsabilité, mais ni sa conception ni les moyens dont il dispose ne lui permettent de jouer le rôle de bureau d’appui pour les missions. La Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions fournit pour sa part un appui à certaines des missions administrées par le Département des affaires politiques mais, ni le budget de ces missions ni celui du Départemeen des affaires politiques ne prévoient de ressources supplémentaires à cette fin pour la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions. Cette dernière s’efforce de répondre aux besoins des petites opérations de consolidation de la paix, mais constate que les opérations plus importantes imposent une lourde charge aux effectifs dont elle dispose, vu l’ampleur des besoins à satisfaire et leur caractère hautement prioritaire. De ce fait, les besoins des missiion plus modestes tendent à rester en souffrance. Le Département des affaires politiques s’est déclaré satisfaai de l’appui que lui a fourni le Bureau des services d’appui aux projets de l’ONU. Ce dernier, qui existe depuis cinq ans et relevait précédemment du PNUD, gère des programmes et des fonds pour de nombreux clients du système des Nations Unies en ayant recours à des techniques modernes de gestion et en finançant intégralement son budget de base en prélevant des frais de gestion, qui représentent au maximum 13 % du budgge des projets. Le Bureau des services d’appui aux projets peut fournir assez rapidement des services d’appui aux missions de faible ampleur dans les secteeur de la logistique, de la gestion et du recrutement. 242. La Division de l’assistance électorale du Départemmen des affaires politiques a également recours à des contributions volontaires pour financer les besoins croissants en conseils techniques, missions d’évaluation des besoins et autres activités qui n’ont pas de rapport direct avec l’observation des élections. En juin 2000, 41 demandes d’assistance d’États Membrre étaient en attente, mais le fonds d’affectation spéciial qui sert à financer ces activités, auxquelles aucun crédit n’a été affecté, ne disposait que de 8 % des fonds requis pour répondre aux demandes en cours d’ici à la fin de l’année 2001. Alors qu’augmente considérablemeen la demande pour cet élément clef du renforcement des institutions démocratiques auquel l’Assemblée générral a donné son aval dans sa résolution 46/137, la Division de l’assistance électorale doit, pour pouvoir s’acquitter de sa tâche, assurer en premier lieu le financemmen des programmes. 243. Résumé des principales recommandations concernant l’appui aux activités de consolidation de la paix au Département des affaires politiques : a) Le Groupe d’étude appuie les efforts faits par le Secrétariat pour créer un groupe pilote de la consolidation de la paix au Département des affaires politiques, en coopération avec d’autres éléments constitués de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, et propose que les Membres réexaminent la question de l’inscription de crédits au budget ordinaire pour ce groupe si le programme pilote fonctionne de façço satisfaisante. Ce programme devrait être évalué dans le cadre des indications données par le Groupe d’étude au paragraphe 46 et, si l’on juge qu’il constiitu l’option la meilleure pour renforcer la capacité de consolidation de la paix de l’Organisation, il conviendrait de le présenter au Secrétaire général conformément à la résolution formulée à l’alinéa d) du paragraphe 47; b) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que les ressources prévues au budget ordinaire au titre des programmes de la Division de l’assistance électoralen0059471.doc 49 A/55/305 S/2000/809 soient sensiblement accrues en raison de l’accroissement rapide de la demande de services, au lieu de prévoir le financement de ces programmme à l’aide de contributions volontaires; c) Pour alléger la tâche de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions ainss que du Service administratif du Département des affaires politiques et pour améliorer la fourniture de services d’appui aux petits bureaux hors Siège qui s’occupent de questions politiques et de consolidattio de la paix, le Groupe d’étude recommande que les services d’achat, de logistique, de recrutemeen et autres services d’appui à toutes ces missions non militaires de faible ampleur soient fournis par le Bureau des services d’appui aux projets. 3. Appui fourni aux opérations de paix par le Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme 244. Le Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme devrait être plus étroitement associé à la planification et à l’exécution des volets des opérations de paix qui ont trait aux droits de l’homme, notamment dans les opérations complexes. Actuellement, le Haut Commissarria ne dispose pas des ressources nécessaires pour ce faire ou pour envoyer des effectifs sur le terrain. Pour rendre plus efficace la composante « droits de l’homme » des Nations Unies, le Haut Commissaire devrait être en mesure de : coordonner et institutionnaliise les interventions sur le terrain dans le domaine des droits de l’homme; détacher des effectifs auprès des équipes spéciales intégrées à New York; recruter le personnel chargé des droits de l’homme sur le terrain; organiser la formation aux droits de l’homme pour tout le personnel engagé dans les opérations de paix, y compris les composantes « maintien de l’ordre »; et créer des bases de données types sur les activités hors Siège dans le domaine des droits de l’homme. 245. Résumé de la principale recommandation concernant le renforcement du Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme : le Groupe d’étude recommaand de renforcer très sensiblement la capacité du Haut Commissariat aux droits de l’homme de planifiie et de préparer des missions, les fonds nécessairre à cette fin devant provenir du budget ordinaire et des budgets des opérations de paix. V. Les opérations de maintien de la paix à l’ère de l’information 246. À de nombreuses reprises, le présent rapport évoqqu la nécessité de mieux relier les différents éléments du système de maintien de la paix et de la sécurité, de faciliter les communications et le partage de données, de donner aux fonctionnaires les outils dont ils ont besooi pour s’acquitter de leurs tâches, et, enfin, de renforrce l’efficacité de l’Organisation des Nations Unies en matière de prévention des conflits et d’aide destinée à accompagner le relèvement des sociétés après les conflits. Des technologies de l’information modernes et utilisées à bon escient peuvent permettre d’atteindre nombre de ces objectifs. Dans la présente section, on relève les insuffisances qui, dans les domaines des stratégies, des politiques et des pratiques, empêchent l’Organisation d’utiliser efficacement ces technologies et on formule des recommandations sur les moyens de les surmonter. A. Les technologies de l’information dans les opérations de paix : questions relatives aux stratégies et aux politiques 247. La question des stratégies et des politiques relativve aux technologies de l’information dépasse le cadre des opérations de paix et s’étend à l’ensemble du systèèm des Nations Unies. De ce point de vue, elle ne relève pas du mandat du Groupe d’étude, mais cela ne devrait pas empêcher d’adopter des normes communes d’utilisation des technologies de l’information dans les opérations de paix et dans les services du Siège qui les appuient. Le Service des communications de la Divisiio de l’administration et de la logistique des missions peut assurer les liaisons par satellite et la connectivité locale susceptibles de permettre aux missions de constittue des réseaux et des bases de données informatiquue efficaces, mais il conviendrait aussi d’élaborer une meilleure stratégie et une meilleure politique pour permettre à l’ensemble des usagers de tirer parti des bases technologiques que l’on met actuellement en place. 248. Lorsque l’ONU déploie une mission sur le terrain, il est essentiel que les différents éléments de la mission puissent échanger facilement des données. Les opératiion de paix complexes font toujours intervenir une grande diversité de protagonistes : les institutions,50 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 fonds et programmes du système des Nations Unies, ainsi que les départements du Secrétariat; les personnes recrutées pour la mission et qui ne connaissent pas le système des Nations Unies; parfois des organisations régionales; souvent des organismes d’aide bilatérale; et toujours des dizaines, voire des centaines d’organisattion non gouvernementales oeuvrant dans les domainne des questions humanitaires et du développement. Il faut mettre en place un mécanisme qui favorise les échanges d’informations et d’idées entre tous ces intervenaants d’autant plus que chacun d’eux n’est que la pointe visible d’une immense structure bureaucratique qui possède sa culture, ses méthodes de travail et ses objectifs propres. 249. Des technologies de l’information mal préparées et mal intégrées peuvent constituer un obstacle à une telle coopération. En l’absence de normes convenues pour la structure et l’échange des données au niveau des applications, il faut procéder à un recodage manuel laborieux qui va à l’encontre des objectifs poursuivis par l’instauration d’un environnement de travail fortemeen informatisé et connecté. Les conséquences peuveen dépasser la simple déperdition d’énergies, et vont alors de la mauvaise communication des politiques à l’incapacité d’appréhender des dangers ou d’autres changements importants touchant l’environnement opératioonnel 250. L’ironie des systèmes d’information répartis et décentralisés est que, pour bien fonctionner, ils doivent appliquer des normes communes. Élaborer des solutiion communes aux mêmes problèmes que posent les technologies de l’information n’est pas chose facile à des échelons plus élevés – entre les principales composannte d’une opération, entre les services fonctionnels du Siège, ou entre le Siège et le reste du système des Nations Unies – notamment parce que la formulation de la politique relative aux systèmes d’information est le fait d’entités très diverses. Le Siège ne dispose pas d’une fonction centrale suffisamment puissante d’élaboraatio des stratégies et politiques d’utilisation des technologies de l’information, dans les opérations de paix en particulier. Dans les administrations ou les entreprrises cette fonction est confiée à un « directeur des services informatiques ». Le Groupe d’étude estime que l’ONU devrait désigner un fonctionnaire au Siège, de préférence au Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique, qui assumerait ce rôle et superviserrai la formulation et la mise en oeuvre de la stratégie et des normes d’utilisation relatives aux technologies de l’information. Ce fonctionnaire devrait également élaborer et superviser des programmes de formation en informatique qui s’appuient à la fois sur des manuels de service et sur la formation pratique, dont l’importance ne saurait être sous-estimée. Des corresponddant au sein du Bureau du Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général auprès de chaque mission sur le terraai devraient superviser la mise en oeuvre de la stratéggi informatique commune ainsi que la formation sur le terrain et prolonger, en la complétant, l’action de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions et de la Division de l’informatique du Départemmen de la gestion concernant la mise en place de structures et de services informatiques de base. 251. Résumé de la recommandation concernant la stratégie et la politique relatives aux technologies de l’information : les départements responsables des opérations de maintien de la paix et de la sécurité du Siège devraient disposer, au sein du Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique, d’un « centre de responsabilité » chargé d’élaborer et de faire appliquer la stratégie et la formation en matiièr de technologies de l’information pour les opérattion de paix. Des correspondants de ce centre devraient être désignés auprès des missions pour assurer, dans les bureaux des représentants spéciiau du Secrétaire général auprès des opérations de paix complexes, la supervision de la mise en oeuvvr de cette stratégie. B. Outils de gestion des connaissances 252. Les technologies de l’information peuvent aider à saisir et à diffuser les informations et les données d’expérience. Mieux exploitées, elles pourraient aider un large éventail d’intervenants dans la zone d’opérations d’une mission des Nations Unies à acquérri et à partager des données de manière rationnelle et solidaire. Par exemple, des groupes de secours humanittair et d’aide au développement des Nations Unies interviennent dans la plupart des régions où l’ONU mène des opérations de paix. Ces équipes de pays des Nations Unies, ainsi que les organisations non gouvernemenntale qui complètent leur action au niveau local précèdent sur le terrain l’arrivée d’une opération de paix complexe et y demeurent après la fin de l’opération. Ensemble, ces groupes accumulent un stock important de connaissances et d’expériences relattive à la région, qui peuvent se révéler utiles pour lan0059471.doc 51 A/55/305 S/2000/809 planification et la mise en oeuvre des opérations de paix. Un centre informatisé d’échange des données, géré par le Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique, pourrait aider à la planification et à l’exécution des missions, ainsi qu’à la prévention et à l’analyse des conflits. Bien regrouper ces données et celles recueillies par les différentes composantes d’une opération de paix après leur déploiement et les exploitte en association avec des systèmes d’information géographique pourraient fournir des outils précieux pour le recensement des besoins et des problèmes dans une zone de mission et pour le suivi de l’impact des plans d’action. On devrait assigner à chaque équipe de mission des spécialistes des systèmes d’information géographique ainsi que des moyens de formation à l’utilisation de ces systèmes. 253. On trouvera des exemples d’application des systèème d’information géographique dans le travail humaniitair et de reconstruction mené au Kosovo depuis 1998. Le Centre d’information des organisations humanittaire a réuni des données produites par des sourcce telles que le Centre satellitaire de l’Union de l’Europe occidentale, le Centre international de déminaag humanitaire de Genève, la Force de paix au Kosoov (KFOR), l’Institut yougoslave de statistique et le Groupe de gestion international. Ces données ont été regroupées pour créer un atlas qui peut être consulté sur le site Web du Centre et est également disponible, sur CD-ROM pour ceux qui ont des difficultés d’accès à l’Internet ou qui n’ont pas accès à cet outil, et sur support papier. 254. Des simulations informatiques peuvent constituer des outils précieux d’apprentissage pour le personnel des missions et pour les intervenants locaux. On peut, en principe, créer des simulations pour n’importe quelle composante d’une opération. Ces simulations peuvent faciliter la résolution effective des problèmes et révéler aux intervenants locaux les conséquences parfois imprévues de leurs choix. Avec des liaisons Internet à débit suffisamment élevé, les simulations peuvent s’intégrer à des programmes d’apprentissage à distance conçus pour une mission nouvelle et utilisés pour assurer la formation préalable des nouvelles recrrue pour la mission. 255. Améliorer la section consacrée à la paix et à la sécurité sur l’Intranet de l’ONU (le réseau d’informations de l’Organisation accessible à un groupe donné d’utilisateurs) serait une contribution fort utile à la planification, à l’analyse et à l’exécution des opérations de paix. Ce sous-ensemble du réseau serait essentiellement consacré au rassemblement des questiion et des informations intéressant directement la paix et la sécurité, y compris les analyses du Secrétariia à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique, les rappoort de situation, les cartes élaborées grâce aux systèmme d’information géographique et les liens avec les enseignements tirés de l’expérience des missions. Des niveaux d’accès spécifiques permettraient de faciliter le partage d’informations confidentielles au sein de grouppe restreints. 256. Les données disponibles sur l’Intranet devraient être reliées à un réseau Extranet des opérations de paix qui utiliserait les réseaux actuels ou de futurs réseaux étendus pour relier les bases de données du Siège situuée au Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratéggiqu et dans d’autres services fonctionnels et celles des missions sur le terrain, ainsi que les missions entre elles. L’Extranet pourrait contenir des informations relatives aux aspects administratifs et juridiques des opérations ainsi qu’à leurs procédures, fournir un point d’accès unique aux informations émanant de nombreusse sources, donner aux planificateurs la possibilité d’élaborer plus rapidement des rapports exhaustifs et améliorer les délais de réaction face aux situations d’urgence. 257. Certaines composantes, telles que la police civile et les services de justice pénale qui y sont associés, ainsi que les enquêteurs sur les droits de l’homme, exigeen un surcroît de sécurité du réseau et aussi le matériie et les logiciels qui permettent de satisfaire les besooin en matière de stockage, de transmission et d’analyse des données. Deux technologies essentielles pour la police civile sont le système d’information géographique et le logiciel de cartographie de la criminallité qui sont utilisés pour convertir des données brutes en représentations géographiques qui aident à comprendre les tendances de la criminalité et d’autres informations essentielles, facilitent la reconnaissance des tendances et des événements ou mettent en lumière certaines difficultés particulières, et améliorent ainsi la capacité de la police civile de lutter contre la criminaliit ou d’appuyer ses homologues locaux. 258. Résumés des principales recommandations concernant l’usage des outils informatiques dans les opérations de paix : a) En coopération avec la Division de l’informatique, le Secrétariat à l’information et à52 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 l’analyse stratégique devrait créer, sur l’Intranet de l’ONU, une section consacrée aux opérations de paix et la relier aux missions par l’intermédiaire d’un Extranet des opérations de paix; b) Les opérations de paix gagneraient beaucoou à utiliser davantage la technologie des systèmme d’information géographique, qui intègrent rapideemen des informations opérationnelles et des cartes électroniques des zones de mission, et ce pour des applications aussi diverses que la démobilisatiion la police civile, l’inscription des électeurs, l’observation des droits de l’homme et la reconstrucction c) Il faudrait prévoir et satisfaire plus méthodiqquement dans la planification et l’exécution des missions, les besoins particuliers en matière de technologies de l’information de certaines composannte des missions, telles que la police civile et les droits de l’homme. C. Mieux actualiser les informations proposées sur l’Internet 259. Ainsi que le Groupe l’a noté plus haut, dans la section III, il est essentiel d’informer efficacement le public des opérations de paix de l’ONU, afin de mobiliise et de conserver le soutien nécessaire aux missions actuelles et futures. Il apparaît essentiel non seulement de créer, dès le départ, une image constructive qui aide à promouvoir un environnement de travail favorable, mais aussi d’entretenir une bonne campagne d’information susceptible de mobiliser et de conserver le soutien de la communauté internationale. 260. Comme indiqué plus haut à la section IV, le serviic actuellement chargé de diffuser des informations sur les opérations de paix de l’ONU est la Section de la paix et de la sécurité du Département de l’information du Siège. Une personne au sein du Département est chargée d’afficher sur le site Web les informations relattive à la paix et à la sécurité ainsi que toutes les contributions des missions à ce site, et de veiller à ce que les informations affichées soient conformes aux normes qui régissent le site Web du Siège. 261. Le Groupe approuve l’application de normes, mais la normalisation ne doit pas forcément être synonyym de centralisation. Le système actuel de productiio des informations et d’affichage des données sur le site Web de l’ONU ralentit le rythme des mises à jour, alors qu’une actualisation quotidienne peut s’avérer essentielle pour une mission où la situation évolue rapideement Ce système limite également le volume des informations que l’on peut diffuser sur chaque mission. 262. Le Département de l’information et le personnel de terrain ont envisagé la possibilité d’éliminer ce goulet d’étranglement par une « cogestion du site Web ». Cette formule paraît au Groupe une solution judicieuse. 263. Résumé de la principale recommandation concernant l’actualisation des informations diffuséée sur l’Internet : le Groupe encourage la mise au point d’un système de cogestion d’un site Web entre le Siège et les missions sur le terrain, le premier assumman un rôle de supervision et les secondes étant habilitées à produire et à afficher des contenus conformes aux principes et normes de base en matiièr de présentation de l’information. * * * 264. Dans le présent rapport, le Groupe a insisté sur le fait qu’il fallait revoir la structure de l’Organisation et changer ses pratiques afin qu’elle puisse s’acquitter plus efficacement des responsabilités qui lui incombent dans les domaines de la paix et de la sécurité internationnale et du respect des droits de l’homme. Certains de ces changements ne pourraient se faire sans les nouveeau moyens qu’offrent les réseaux informatiques. On n’aurait d’ailleurs pas pu produire le présent rapport sans les technologies qui sont déjà en place au Siège de l’ONU et que les membres du Groupe ont pu exploiter à partir de n’importe quelle région du monde. Un outil efficace est toujours utilisé et des technologies de l’information efficaces permettraient de mieux servir la cause de la paix. VI. Application des recommandations : les défis à relever 265. Les recommandations formulées dans le présent rapport intéressent à la fois les États Membres et le Secrétariat. La réforme ne prendra corps que si les États Membres font preuve d’une authentique volonté de changement. Quant au Secrétaire général, il devra soutenir activement les changements préconisés par le Groupe d’étude en ce qui concerne le Secrétariat, tanddi que les hauts fonctionnaires de l’Organisation devrron les appliquer diligemment.n0059471.doc 53 A/55/305 S/2000/809 266. Les États Membres doivent prendre conscience du fait que l’Organisation des Nations Unies forme un tout et que c’est d’eux que dépend au premier chef la réforme. Les échecs de l’ONU ne peuvent être attribués au seul Secrétariat, pas plus qu’aux responsables militaiire ni qu’aux dirigeants des missions sur le terrain. La plupart des échecs ont eu lieu parce que, après avoir élaboré des mandats ambigus, incohérents et insuffisammmen financés, le Conseil de sécurité et les États Membres ont laissé faire, assistant à l’échec des missiion qu’ils avaient soutenues et allant même parfois jusqu’à formuler publiquement des critiques alors que la crédibilité de l’ONU était mise à rude épreuve. 267. Les problèmes de commandement et de contrôle qui se sont récemment posés en Sierra Leone sont l’illustration la plus récente de situations qui ne peuveen plus être tolérées. Les pays qui fournissent des contingents doivent s’assurer que leurs troupes comprennnen bien toute l’importance de la chaîne de commanddemen intégrée, le contrôle opérationnel exercé par le Secrétaire général, les instructions permanentes de la mission et les règles d’engagement. Il est essentiiel dans une opération, que la chaîne de commandemeen soit comprise et respectée, ce qui signifie que les capitales doivent s’abstenir de donner des instructions aux commandants de leurs contingents au sujet des opérations. 268. Nous savons que le Secrétaire général met actuelllemen en place un programme général de réformes et sommes bien conscients du fait que nos recommandattion pourraient avoir besoin d’être ajustées pour mieux s’insérer dans ce programme général. En outre, les réformes que nous avons recommandées en ce qui concerne aussi bien le Secrétariat que l’ensemble du système des Nations Unies ne se réaliseront pas du jour au lendemain, même si certaines doivent être entreprisse d’urgence. Nous n’ignorons pas non plus que la résistance au changement est inhérente à toute bureaucraati mais notons cependant avec satisfaction que certains des changements préconisés dans nos recommandaation trouvent leur origine au sein même du systèème Nous jugeons également encourageant le fait que le Secrétaire général soit décidé à faire évoluer le Secrétaariat même si cela signifie que des procédures et des modes d’organisation instaurés de longue date devrron être bouleversés et que certains aspects des prioriité et de la culture du Secrétariat devront être remis en cause et changés. À cet égard, nous invitons instammmen le Secrétaire général à désigner un fonctionnaair de haut rang pour superviser l’application des recommandations formulées dans le présent rapport. 269. Le Secrétaire général insiste constamment sur le fait que l’ONU doit tendre la main vers la société civile et renforcer ses liens avec les organisations non gouvernemeentales les établissements universitaires et les organes d’information, qui peuvent être des partenaires utiles dans la promotion de la paix et de la sécurité pour tous. Nous enjoignons le Secrétariat de suivre le Secrétaire général dans cette voie et de s’imprégner de cette approche dans la conduite de ses travaux dans le domaine de la paix et de la sécurité. Les fonctionnaires du Secrétariat ne doivent pas perdre de vue qu’ils sont au service de l’organisation universelle par excellence. Tout un chacun, partout dans le monde, est parfaitemeen en droit de considérer l’ONU comme son organisattio et, à ce titre, d’émettre des jugements sur ses activités et sur ceux qui la servent. 270. La qualité du personnel affecté aux fonctions ayant trait à la paix et à la sécurité, au sein du Départemmen des opérations de maintien de la paix, du Départtemen des affaires politiques et d’autres départemeent du Secrétariat de l’ONU, est extrêmement variablle Cette remarque vaut aussi bien pour les civils recruuté par le Secrétariat que pour le personnel militaire et les membres de la police civile proposés par les États Membres. Ces disparités sont largement reconnues au sein même du système. Les meilleurs se voient attribuue une charge de travail excessive pour compenser les insuffisances du personnel moins compétent. Il est bien évident que cette situation peut nuire au moral du personnel et susciter de l’amertume, en particulier chez ceux qui font observer avec justesse que depuis des années l’ONU néglige les questions de l’organisation des carrières, de la formation, et du suivi et de l’encadreemen du personnel et ne fait pas assez d’efforts pour instaurer des pratiques de gestion modernes. En d’autres termes, l’ONU aujourd’hui est loin d’être une méritocratie et, à moins de se reprendre, elle ne parvieendr pas à stopper l’hémorragie de personnel qualifiié en particulier parmi les jeunes. Si le recrutement, les promotions et la délégation de responsabilités dépennden en grande partie de l’ancienneté ou des relatiion personnelles ou politiques, les personnes qualifiiée ne seront guère incitées à entrer au service de l’Organisation ni à rester. Tant que les dirigeants à tous les niveaux, à commencer par le Secrétaire général et les hauts responsables, ne s’attaqueront pas sérieusemeen à ce problème à titre prioritaire, en récompensant54 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 l’excellence et en écartant le personnel incompétent, il sera inutile d’apporter Des ressources supplémentaires et il deviendra en outre impossible de mettre en place des réformes durables. 271. La même attention devrait être portée aux membrre du personnel de l’ONU sur le terrain. La majorité d’entre eux, n’hésitant pas à se rendre dans des pays déchirés par la guerre et à affronter des situations dangereeuse pour tenter d’améliorer le sort des groupes les plus vulnérables, incarnent l’esprit de la fonction publiiqu internationale. Ils le font au prix de grands sacrifiice personnels et parfois au risque de leur intégrité physique et de leur santé mentale. Ils méritent de la reconnaissance et des éloges. Au fil des ans, nombre d’entre eux ont donné leur vie pour la paix. Nous saluuon leur mémoire. 272. Sur le terrain, les fonctionnaires de l’ONU sont tenus, plus que quiconque, de respecter les coutumes et la culture locales. Ils doivent faire un effort particulier pour signaler dès l’abord leur respect en se familiarisaan avec le milieu qui les accueille et en s’initiant dans toute la mesure possible à la culture et à la langue localles Leur comportement doit être inspiré par l’idée qu’ils sont des hôtes sur la terre d’autrui, aussi désolée soit-elle, en particulier lorsque l’ONU est chargée de son administration transitoire. Les fonctionnaires de l’ONU doivent en outre se comporter avec respect et dignité les uns envers les autres, en se montrant sensiblle aux différences culturelles et en se gardant de tout comportement sexiste. 273. En résumé, nous pensons que la sélection du personnne au Siège et sur le terrain doit se faire sur la base de critères rigoureux et qu’il doit en aller de même du jugement porté sur sa conduite. Lorsque des fonctionnaiire de l’ONU ne répondent pas aux critères fixés, ils doivent en assumer les conséquences. Par le passé, le Secrétariat a eu du mal à mettre en cause la responsabillit des hauts responsables sur le terrain car pour expliquer que la mission n’avait pas rempli son mandaat ils pouvaient faire valoir qu’ils disposaient de ressouurce insuffisantes, qu’ils n’avaient pas reçu d’instructions claires ou que les dispositions en matière de commandement et de contrôle étaient mal adaptées. Ces lacunes doivent certes être dénoncées mais elles ne doivent pas servir d’excuse à l’incompétence. L’avenir de nations, la vie de ceux qui reçoivent aide et protectiio de l’ONU, le succès d’une mission et la crédibilité de l’Organisation ne tiennent parfois qu’à ce que font ou ne font pas quelques individus. Quiconque s’avère ne pas être en mesure d’accomplir la tâche dont il a accepté de se charger doit être démis de ses fonctions auprès d’une mission, aussi haut ou aussi bas soit-il placé sur l’échelle hiérarchique. 274. Les États Membres reconnaissent eux aussi qu’ils doivent s’interroger sur leur manière de procéder au moins en ce qui concerne la conduite des activités de l’ONU dans le domaine de la paix et de la sécurité. Le cérémonial des déclarations suivi de la laborieuse recheerch d’un consensus fait passer le processus diplomattiqu avant le produit opérationnel. Si l’une des principales vertuS de l’ONU est d’être un forum où 189 États Membres se rencontrent pour échanger leurs vues sur les problèmes mondiaux les plus pressants, le dialogue ne suffit pas toujours, face aux énormes difficullté qui peuvent se présenter pour assurer le succès d’opérations de maintien de la paix ou d’actions de prévention des conflits ou de rétablissement de la paix d’importance vitale dont le coût se chiffre en milliards de dollars. Les manifestions de soutien sous forme de déclarations et de résolutions doivent être suivies d’actes concrets. 275. En outre, il arrive que les États Membres émettent des messages contradictoires, leurs représentants expriiman l’appui politique de leur pays dans un organe et refusant un appui financier dans un autre. De telles contradictions sont déjà apparues entre les positions prises d’une part à la Cinquième Commission, chargée des questions administratives et budgétaires, et de l’autre, au Conseil de sécurité ou au Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix. 276. Sur le plan politique, il n’est pas rare que les partiie auxquelles le personnel de maintien ou de rétablissemmen de la paix a affaire au quotidien ne respectent ni ne craignent les condamnations verbales du Conseil de sécurité. Il convient donc que les membres du Conseil et l’ensemble des États Membres des Nations Unies traduisent leurs paroles en actes, comme l’a fait la délégaatio du Conseil de sécurité qui s’est rendue l’an dernier à Jakarta et à Dili lorsque a éclaté la crise au Timor oriental, donnant l’exemple de ce que peut être le Conseil de sécurité lorsqu’il se décide à agir efficacemment 277. Il n’en reste pas moins que les contraintes financièère qui pèsent sur l’Organisation continuent d’entamer considérablement sa crédibilité et son professionnnalism dans la conduite des opérations de paix. Nous invitons donc instamment les États Membres àn0059471.doc 55 A/55/305 S/2000/809 respecter leurs obligations découlant de traités et à versse leurs contributions ponctuellement, en totalité et sans condition. 278. L’action de l’ONU dans le domaine de la paix et de la sécurité rencontre encore d’autres obstacles, direect ou indirects. Deux, notamment, découlent de questions en suspens qui ne relèvent pas du mandat du Groupe mais qui revêtent une importance cruciale pour les opérations de paix et que seuls les États Membres peuvent régler. Il s’agit, d’une part, des désaccords au sujet de la répartition entre les États Membres des dépennse afférentes aux opérations de maintien de la paix et, d’autre part, de la représentation équitable au sein du Conseil de sécurité. Nous ne pouvons qu’espérer que les États Membres parviendront à surmonter leurs désaccords sur ces questions, afin d’assumer leurs responsabbilité internationales collectives conformément à la Charte. 279. Nous en appelons aux dirigeants mondiaux qui seront rassemblés à l’occasion du Sommet du millénaair pour qu’ils s’engagent aussi, lorsqu’ils réaffirmeroon leur attachement aux idéaux des Nations Unies, à doter l’ONU de moyens renforcés afin qu’elle puisse s’acquitter pleinement de la mission qui est sa véritable raison d’être, à savoir aider les groupes humains en butte à des conflits et maintenir ou rétablir la paix. 280. La recherche d’un consensus sur les recommandattion énoncées dans le présent rapport a amené peu à peu les membres du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies à se forger une idée commuun d’une Organisation des Nations Unies qui tendrrai une main ferme et secourable aux communautés, aux pays ou aux régions pour mettre fin aux violences ou éviter que n’éclatent des conflits; une organisation qui verrait un représentant spécial du Secrétaire général se retirer ayant mené à bien une mission et donné au peuple d’un pays la possibilité d’accomplir par luimêêm ce qui auparavant était hors de sa portée, à savooi bâtir une paix solide, trouver la voie de la réconcilliation renforcer la démocratie et garantir le respeec des droits de l’homme. Ce à quoi nous aspirons, avant tout, c’est à une Organisation des Nations Unies qui ait non seulement la volonté mais aussi les moyens de justifier la confiance que place en elle l’immense majorité des hommes et de répondre aux espérances qu’elle a fait naître.56 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annexe I Membres du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies M. J. Brian Atwood (États-Unis), Président de Citizens International; ancien Présidden du National Democratic Institute; ancien Administrateur de US/AID. M. Lakhdar Brahimi (Algérie), ancien Ministre des affaires étrangères; Président du Groupe d’étude. L’Ambassadeur Colin Granderson (Trinité-et-Tobago), Directeur exécutif de la Mission civile internationale en Haïti de l’Organisation des États américains (OEA) et de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, 1993-2000; chef des missions d’observation des élections de l’OEA en Haïti (1995 et 1997) et au Suriname (2000). Dame Ann Hercus (Nouvelle-Zélande), ancienne Ministre et Représentante permannent de la Nouvelle-Zélande auprès de l’Organisation des Nations Unies; chef de mission de la Force des Nations Unies chargée du maintien de la paix à Chypre, 1998-1999. M. Richard Monk (Royaume-Uni), ancien membre de l’Inspection générale de la police de Sa Majesté et conseiller gouvernemental sur les questions de police internatioonale Commissaire du Groupe international de police de l’ONU en Bosnie-Herzégovine, 1998-1999. Le général (à la retraite) Klaus Naumann (Allemagne), chef de la défense, de 1991 à 1996; Président du Comité militaire de l’Organisation du Traité de l’Atlantique Nord (OTAN) de 1996 à 1999; a participé à la supervision des opératiion de la Force de mise en oeuvre et de la Force de stabilisation de l’OTAN en Bosnie-Herzégovine ainsi que de la campagne aérienne de l’OTAN au Kosovo. Mme Hisako Shimura (Japon), Présidente du Collège Tsuda (Tokyo); a passé 24 ans au service du Secrétariat de l’Organisation des Nations Unies jusqu’en 1995, année où elle a pris sa retraite alors qu’elle était Directrice de la Division de l’Europe et de l’Amérique latine du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. L’Ambassadeur Vladimir Shustov (Fédération de Russie), Ambassadeur extraordinaaire a eu des liens à un titre ou à un autre pendant 30 ans avec l’Organisation des Nations Unies; ancien Représentant permanent adjoint auprès de l’Organisation des Nations Unies à New York; ancien représentant de la Fédération de Russie auprès de l’Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe. Le général Philip Sibanda (Zimbabwe), chef d’état-major, et responsable des opérattion et de l’instruction au quartier général de l’armée du Zimbabwe à Harare; anciie commandant de la force de la Mission de vérification des Nations Unies en Angool (UNAVEM III) et de la Mission d’observation des Nations Unies en Angola (MONUA), 1995-1998. M. Cornelio Sommaruga (Suisse), Président de la Fondation pour le réarmement moral (Caux) et du Centre international de Genève pour le déminage humanitaire; ancien Président du Comité international de la Croix-Rouge, 1987-1999. * * *n0059471.doc 57 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Cabinet du Président du Groupe d’étude sur les opérations de paix des Nations Unies M. William Durch, associé principal, Centre Henry L. Stimson; directeur de projet M. Salman Ahmed, spécialiste des affaires politiques, Secrétariat de l’ONU Mme Clare Kane, assistante personnelle, Secrétariat de l’ONU Mme Caroline Earle, associée de recherche, Centre Stimson M. J. Edward Palmisano, titulaire de la bourse Herbert Scoville Jr. pour la paix, Centre Stimson58 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annexe II Références Documents des Nations Unies Annan, Kofi A. Éviter la guerre, prévenir les catastrophhe : le monde mis au défi. Rapport annuel sur l’activité de l’Organisation, 1999. (A/54/1) ________ Pour un véritable partenariat mondial. Rappoor annuel sur l’activité de l’Organisation, 1998. (A/53/1) ________ Relever le défi humanitaire : vers une culture de prévention. (ST/DPI/2070) ________ Nous, les peuples : le rôle des Nations Unies au XXIe siècle. Rapport du millénaire. (A/54/2000) Conseil économique et social. Note du Secrétaire générra transmettant le rapport du Bureau des services de contrôle interne intitulé « Rapport final sur l’évaluation approfondie des opérations de maintiie de la paix : phase de démarrage ». (E/AC.51/1995/2 et Corr.1) ________ Note du Secrétaire général transmettant le rapport du Bureau des services de contrôle inteern intitulé « Évaluation approfondie des opérattion de maintien de la paix : phase finale ». (E/AC.51/1996/3 et Corr.1) ________ Note du Secrétaire général transmettant le rapport du Bureau des services de contrôle inteern intitulé « Examen triennal de l’application des recommandations formulées par le Comité du programme et de la coordination à sa trentecinqquièm session concernant l’évaluation des opérations de maintien de la paix : phase de démarrrag ». (E/AC.51/1998/4 et Corr.1) ________ Note du Secrétaire général transmettant le rapport du Bureau des services de contrôle inteern intitulé « Examen triennal de l’application des recommandations formulées par le Comité du programme et de la coordination à sa trentesixxièm session concernant l’évaluation des opérattion de maintien de la paix : phase de liquidatiio ». (E/AC.51/1999/5) Assemblée générale. Note du Secrétaire général transmetttan le rapport du Bureau des services de contrôle interne sur l’étude de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. (A/49/959) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général intitulé « Rénover l’Organisation des Nations Unies : un programme de réformes ». (A/51/950) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général sur les causes des conflits et la promotion d’une paix et d’un développement durables en Afrique. (A/52/871) ________ Rapport du Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix. (A/54/87) ________ Note du Secrétaire général transmettant le rapport du Bureau des services de contrôle inteern sur l’audit de la gestion des marchés de fourniture de services et de rations dans les missiion de maintien de la paix. (A/54/335) ________ Note du Secrétaire général transmettant le rapport annuel du Bureau des services de contrôle interne portant sur la période du 1er juillet 1998 au 30 juin 1999. (A/54/393) ________ Note du Secrétaire général transmettant le rapport du Représentant spécial du Secrétaire génééra pour les enfants et les conflits armés, intituul « Protection des enfants touchés par les conflits armés ». (A/54/430) ________ Rapport présenté par le Secrétaire général en application de la résolution 53/55 de l’Assemblée générale, intitulé « La chute de Srebreenic ». (A/54/549) ________ Rapport du Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix. (A/54/839) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général sur l’application des recommandations du Comité spécial des opérations de maintien de la paix. (A/54/670) Assemblée générale et Conseil de sécurité. Rapport présenté par le Secrétaire général en application de la déclaration adoptée par la Réunion au sommme du Conseil de sécurité le 31 janvier 1992, intittul « Agenda pour la paix : diplomatie préventiive rétablissement de la paix, maintien de la paix ». (A/47/277-S/24111)n0059471.doc 59 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ________ Rapport de situation présenté par le Secrétaair général à l’occasion du cinquantenaire de l’Organisation des Nations Unies intitulé « Supplément à l’Agenda pour la paix ». (A/50/60-S/1995/1) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général sur les enfaant et les conflits armés. (A/55/163-S/2000/712) Conseil de sécurité. Rapport du Secrétaire général sur la protection des activités d’assistance humanitaair aux réfugiés et autres personnes touchées par un conflit. (S/1998/883) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général sur le renforcemmen de la capacité de l’Afrique en matière de maintien de la paix. (S/1999/171) ________ Rapport intérimaire du Secrétaire général sur les arrangements relatifs aux forces en attente pour le maintien de la paix. (S/1999/361) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général sur la protectiio des civils en période de conflit armé. (S/1999/957) ________ Lettre datée du 15 décembre 1999, adressée au Président du Conseil de sécurité par le Secrétaair général, contenant le texte du rapport de la Commission indépendante d’enquête sur les actiion de l’Organisation des Nations Unies lors du génocide de 1994 au Rwanda. (S/1999/1257) ________ Rapport du Secrétaire général sur le rôle des opérations de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies dans le désarmement, la démobilisation et la réinsertion. (S/2000/101) Lettre datée du 10 mars 2000, adressée au Président du Conseil de sécurité par le Président du Comité du Conseil de sécurité créé par la résolution 864 (1993) concernant la situation en Angola, contenant le rapport du Groupe d’experts chargé d’étudier les violations des sanctions imposées par le Conseil de sécurité à l’UNITA. (S/2000/203) Communiqué de presse : Déclaration faite par le Secréttair général à l’Université de Georgetown. (SG/SM/6901) Circulaire du Secrétaire général. Respect du droit internaationa humanitaire par les forces des Nations Unies. (ST/SGB/1999/13) Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement. Governance foundations for post-conflict situatioons UNDP’s experience. Document de synthèse établi par la Division du renforcement de la gestiio et de la bonne gouvernance du PNUD, janviie 2000. Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme. Appel annuel 2000 : aperçu général des activités et des besoins financiers. Genève. Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiiés Catalogue of emergency response tools. Docummen établi par la Section de la préparation et de la réponse aux situations d’urgence. Genève 2000. Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recheerch (UNITAR), Institut d’études politiques de Singapour et Institut national pour la promotion de la recherche du Japon. Report of the 1997 Singappor Conference: Humanitarian action and peacekeeping operations, New York, 1997. UNITAR, Institut d’études politiques de Singapour et Institut japonais des affaires internationales. The nexus between peacekeeping and peacebuilding: debriefing and lessons. Draft report of the 1999 Singapore Conference. New York, 2000 Goulding, Marrack. Practical measures to enhance United Nations’ effectiveness in the field of peace and security. Rapport présenté au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. New York, 30 juin 1997. Autres sources Berdal, Mats et David M. Malone, éd., Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000. Berman, Eric G. et Katie E. Sams. Peacekeeping in Africa: capabilities and culpabilities. (UNIDIR/2000/3) Bigombe, Betty, Paul Collier et Nicholas Sambanis. Policies for building post-conflict peace. Documeen présenté lors de la réunion d’un groupe spéciia d’experts sur l’économie des conflits civils en Afrique, organisée les 7 et 8 avril 2000 par la Commission économique pour l’Afrique. Blechman, Barry M., William J. Durch, Wendy Eaton et Julie Werbel. Effective transitions from peace60 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 operations to sustainable peace: final report. DFI International, Washington, DC, septembre 1997. Childers, Erskine et Brian Urquhart. Towards a More Effective United Nations: Two Studies. Uppsala, Fondation Dag Hammarskjöld, 1992. Collier, Paul. Economic causes of civil conflict and their implications for policy. In Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson et Pamela Aall, Managing Global Chaos. Washington, DC, United States Institute of Peace (à paraître). Cousens, Elizabeth M., Donald Rothchild et Stephen John Stedman. Ending Civil Wars, vol. II, Evaluattin Peace Implementation. New York, Centre pour la sécurité et la coopération internationales de l’Université de Stamford et Académie mondiial pour la paix (à paraître). De Soto, Alvaro et Graciana del Castillo. Implementatiio of comprehensive peace agreements: staying in the course in El Salvador. Global Governance, vol. 1, No 2 (mai-juin 1995). Doyle, Michael W. et Nicholas Sambanis. International Peacebuilding: a theoretical and quantitative analysis. Document présenté à une conférence du Center of International Studies et de la Banque mondiale, Université de Princeton, 17 et 18 mars 2000. Programme de coopération internationale et de règlemeen des conflits du Fafo. Command from the saddle: managing United Nations peacebuilding missions. Recommandations. Rapport d’une réunnio de représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire génééra sur le thème « Définir le rôle de l’Organisation des Nations Unies en matière de mise en oeuvre de la paix », Oslo, Peace Implementtatio Network, 1999. Fainberg, Anthony, Alan Shaw, Dean Cheng, Xavier Maruyama et Donald Gallagher. Technology for international peace operations. Washington, DC, Institute for Technology Assessment, mars 1998. Forman, Shepard, Stewart Patrick et Dirk Salomons. Recovering from conflict: strategy for an internatioona response. Université de New York, Centre de coopération internationale, février 2000. Gouvernement canadien. Towards a Rapid Reaction Capability for the United Nations. Ottawa, Minisstèr des affaires étrangères et du commerce international et Ministère de la défense nationale, 1995. Griffin, Michèle et Bruce Jones. Building peace through transitional authority: new directions, major challenges. International Peacekeeping, vol. 7, No 3 (été 2000). Henkin, Alice H., éd. Honouring Human Rights and Keeping the Peace: Lessons from El Salvador, Cambodia and Haiti. Washington, DC, Aspen Institute, 1995. ________ Honouring Human Rights from Peace to Justice: Recommendations to the International Community. Édition abrégée de Henkin, op. cit., Washington, DC, Aspen Institute, 1999. Holm, Tor Tanke et Espen Barth Eide, éd. Peacebuildiin and Police Reform. International Peacekeepinng vol. 6, No 4 (numéro spécial, hiver 1999). Centre d’information des organismes humanitaires, Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfuggié et Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires du Secrétariat de l’ONU, Atlas du Kosovo, Pristina, février 2000. Jett, Dennis C. Why Peacekeeping Fails. New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2000. Latter, Richard. Monitoring and verifying peace agreements. Rapport établi à l’issue d’une conféreenc 597 de Wilton Park sur le suivi et la vérificattio des accords de paix, tenue du 24 au 26 mars 2000, avril 2000. Lehman, Ingrid A. Peacekeeping and Public Informatiion Caught in the Crossfire. Londres, Frank Cass, 1999. Lord, Christopher. Advisory note for Stimson CenteerUnited Nations Panel on Peace Operations. Prague, projet de Prague sur les principes de la justice pénale d’urgence, Institut de relations internatiionales 27 juin 2000. Moore, Jonathan. Hard Choices. Lanham, Maryland, Rowman et Littlefield pour le Comité internationna de la Croix-Rouge, Genève, 1998. Plunkett, Mark. Justice re-establisment in United Natiion peacekeeping: methods and techniques for the re-establishment of the rule of law in United Nations peace operations, 18 avril 2000.n0059471.doc 61 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Salerno, Reynolds M., Michael G. Vannoni, David S. Barber, Randall R. Parish et Rebecca L. Frerichs. Enhanced peacekeeping with monitoring technoloogies Sandia report. Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratories, 2000. Smillie, Ian, Lansana Gberie et Ralph Hazleton. The heart of the matter: Sierra Leone, diamonds and human security. Ottawa, Partnership Africa Canadda janvier 2000. Stedman, Stephen John. Spoiler problems in peace processses International Security, vol. 22, No 2 (automne 1997). Stewart, Frances et A. Berry. The real causes of inequallity Challenge, vol. 43, No 1 (2000). Stewart, Frances, Frank P. Humphreys et Nick Lee. Civil conflict in developing countries over the last quarter of a century: an empirical overview of economic and social consequences. Oxford Journna of Development Studies, vol. 25, No 1 (février 1997). Thant, Myint-U et Elizabeth Sellwood. Knowledge and Multilateral Interventions: The United Nations’ Experiences in Cambodia and Bosnia and Herzegovvina Document de synthèse du Royal Institute of International Affairs, No 83. Londres, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2000. Wallensteen, Peter et Margareta Sollenberg. Armed conflict and regional conflict complexes, 1989-1997. Journal of Peace Research, vol. 35, No 5 (1998). World Bank Institute et Interworks. The Transition from War to Peace: An Overview. Washington, DC, 1999.62 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annexe III Résumé des recommandations 1. Action préventive : a) Le Groupe d’étude fait siennes les recommandaation du Secrétaire général ayant trait à la prévenntio des conflits contenues dans le rapport du millénnair et dans les observations qu’il a formulées à la 2e séance publique du Conseil de sécurité sur la prévenntio des conflits en juillet 2000, en particulier l’appel qu’il a lancé à « tous ceux qui s’occupent de prévention de conflits et de développement – l’ONU, les institutions de Bretton Woods, les gouvernements et les organisations de la société civile – [pour qu’ils s’attaquent] à ces problèmes de façon plus cohérente »; b) Le Groupe d’étude encourage le Secrétaire général à dépêcher plus fréquemment des missions d’établissement des faits dans les zones de tension et souligne l’obligation qu’ont les États Membres, au titre du paragraphe 5 de l’Article 2 de la Charte, de donner « pleine assistance » à de telles activités de l’Organisattion 2. Stratégie de consolidation de la paix : a) Une somme représentant un faible pourcenntag du budget prévu pour la première année de la mission devrait être mise à la disposition du Représentaan du Secrétaire général ou de son Représentant spéciia pour financer, en suivant les conseils du coordonnatteu résident de l’équipe de pays de l’ONU, des projeet à impact rapide dans la zone d’opérations de la mission; b) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que l’Organisation revoie de fond en comble l’utilisation des forces de police civile, des autres éléments d’appui à l’état de droit et des spécialistes des droits de l’homme dans les opérations de paix complexes, afin de mettre davantage l’accent sur le renforcement de l’état de droit et le respect des droits de l’homme après les conflits; c) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que les organes délibérants inscrivent au budget statutaire des opérations de paix complexes des programmes de démobiliisatio et de réinsertion dès la première phase des opérations, afin de favoriser la dissolution rapide des factions belligérantes et de réduire les risques de reprris du conflit; d) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Comiit exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité examine et propoos au Secrétaire général une série de mesures visant à renforcer la capacité permanente de l’ONU d’élaborer des stratégies de consolidation de la paix et d’exécuter des programmes dans le cadre de ces stratégiies 3. Doctrine et stratégie de maintien de la paix : Une fois déployés, les soldats de la paix des Nations Unies doivent pouvoir s’acquitter de leurs tâches avec professionalisme et efficacité; ils doivent aussi, grâce à des règles d’engagement fermes, être en mesure de se défendre et de défendre d’autres composantes de la mission et l’exécution du mandat de celle-ci contre ceux qui reviennent sur les engagements qu’ils ont pris en vertu d’un accord de paix ou qui, de toute autre façoon cherchent à y porter atteinte par la violence. 4. Des mandats clairs, crédibles et réalistes : a) Le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’avant d’accepter de déployer une opération portant sur la mise en oeuvre d’un accord de cessez-le-feu ou d’un accord de paix, le Conseil de sécurité s’assure que l’accord en question répond à certaines conditions minimaales concernant notamment sa conformité avec les normes internationales relatives aux droits de l’homme, la faisabilité des tâches envisagées et les délais prévus; b) Le Conseil de sécurité devrait garder à l’état de projet les résolutions prévoyant le déploiement d’effectifs assez nombreux jusqu’à ce que le Secrétaire général ait reçu des États Membres l’assurance qu’ils fourniraient les contingents et autres éléments d’appui indispensables, notamment en matière de consolidatiio de la paix; c) Le Conseil de sécurité devrait, dans ses résoluution doter des moyens nécessaires les opérations qui sont déployées dans des situations potentiellement dangereuses, et prévoir notamment une chaîne de commandement bien définie et présentant un front uni; d) Lorsqu’il s’agit d’élaborer ou de modifier le mandat d’une mission, le Secrétariat doit dire au Conseil de sécurité ce qu’il doit savoir plutôt que ce qu’il veut entendre, et les pays qui se sont engagés à fournir des unités militaires devraient être invités à assister aux séances d’information que le Secrétariatn0059471.doc 63 A/55/305 S/2000/809 organise à l’intention du Conseil sur des questions touchhan à la sécurité de leur personnel, en particulier lorsque le recours à la force est envisagé. 5. Information et analyse stratégique : Le Secrétaair général devrait créer un organe, dénommé ci-après le Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique (SIAS), pour répondre aux besoins des membres du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité en matière d’analyse et d’information; le SIAS serait administré conjointement par le Département des affaires politiquue et le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, auxquels il rendrait compte. 6. Administration civile et transitoire : Le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Secrétaire général invite un groupe de juristes internationaux, y compris d’experts connaissant les opérations de l’ONU dont le mandat prévoit la mise en place d’une administration transitoiire à déterminer dans quelle mesure il serait possible et utile d’élaborer un code pénal, y compris d’éventuelles variantes régionales, destiné à être utilisé de façon temporaire par les opérations de l’ONU en attendant le rétablissement de l’état de droit et des capaccité locales en matière de police. 7. Calendriers de déploiement des opérations : L’ONU devrait définir la « capacité de déploiement rapide et efficace » comme la capacité, d’un point de vue opérationnel, à déployer intégralement une opératiio de maintien de la paix dans un délai de 30 jours après l’adoption d’une résolution par le Conseil de sécurrit dans le cas d’une mission classique, et dans un délai de 90 jours dans le cas d’une mission complexe. 8. Direction des missions : a) Le Secrétaire général devrait rationaliser le processus de sélection des dirigeants des missions, en commençant par la compilation, avec le concours des États Membres, d’un vaste fichier de représentants spéciaaux commandants de force, chefs de police civile et leurs adjoints potentiels, qui comprendrait aussi les noms de candidats potentiels à la direction des autres composantes organiques et administratives des missiion et qui justifierait à la fois d’une large représenttatio géographique et d’une répartition équitable entre les sexes; b) L’ensemble des dirigeants d’une mission devrait être sélectionné et rassemblé au Siège le plus tôt possible afin de leur permettre de participer aux principaux volets du processus de planification de la mission, de recevoir des informations sur la situation dans la zone de la mission, de faire la connaissance de leurs collègues au sein de la direction de la mission et d’établir une relation de travail avec eux; c) Le Secrétariat devrait avoir pour règle de fournir aux dirigeants d’une mission des directives et plans stratégiques identifiant par avance les obstacles éventuels à la mise en oeuvre du mandat ainsi que les moyens de les surmonter; chaque fois que possible, le Secrétariat devrait formuler ces directives et plans de concert avec les dirigeants de la mission. 9. Personnel militaire : a) Les États Membres devraient être incités, le cas échéant, à constituer des partenariats dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies afin de créer plusieurs forces homogènes de la taille de la brigade, dotées des éléments précurseurs nécessaires, qui pourraient être effectivement déplooyée dans un délai de 30 jours suivant l’adoption d’une résolution du Conseil de sécurité portant création d’une opération de maintien de la paix de type classiquue ou de 90 jours s’il s’agit d’une mission complexe; b) Lorsque les événements laissent présager la signature d’un accord de cessez-le-feu dont l’application prévoit l’intervention des Nations Unies, le Secrétaire général devrait être autorisé à consulter officiellement les États Membres participant au Systèèm de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies pour leur demander s’ils sont disposés à fournir des contingents pour le cas où une opération serait mise en place;c) Le Secrétariat devrait systématiquement charger une équipe de déterminer sur place si chacun des fournisseurs de contingents potentiels est à même de satisfaire aux conditions du Mémorandum d’accord pour ce qui est de la formation et de l’équipement, et ce avant le déploiement. Les éléments qui ne remplissent pas ces conditions ne doivent pas être déployés; d) Le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’une liste régulièrement actualisée de personnels sous astreinte comportant les noms d’une centaine d’officiers soit établie dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies; ces officiers pourraient être mis à disposition dans les sept jours pour renforcer les unités centrales de planification du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix en leur adjoignnan des équipes ayant reçu la formation nécessaire64 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 pour mettre en place l’état-major d’une nouvelle opérattio de maintien de la paix. 10. Personnel de police civile : a) Les États Membres sont encouragés à constittue des réserves nationales de personnel de police civile prêt à être déployé auprès d’opérations de paix des Nations Unies dans des délais très brefs, dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies; b) Les États Membres sont encouragés à constittue des partenariats régionaux pour la formation du personnel de police civile de leurs réserves nationales, afin d’assurer à tous le même niveau de préparation dans le respect des directives, des instructions permanennte et des normes de prestation que promulguera l’ONU; c) Les États Membres sont encouragés à désignne un seul agent de liaison au sein de leurs structures gouvernementales pour la fourniture de personnel de police civile aux opérations de paix des Nations Unies; d) Le Groupe d’étude recommande qu’une liste régulièrement actualisée d’agents de police et d’experts apparentés sous astreinte, comportant une centaine de noms, soit établie dans le cadre du Système de forces et moyens en attente des Nations Unies; ces agents pourraiien être mis à disposition dans les sept jours pour constituer des équipes ayant reçu la formation nécessaair pour mettre en place l’élément de police civile d’une nouvelle opération de maintien de la paix, assurre l’entraînement du personnel à son arrivée et donner plus d’homogénéité à cet élément le plus rapidement possible; e) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que des mesures analogues à celles énoncées dans les recommandaation a), b) et c) ci-dessus soient prises en ce qui concerne les spécialistes des questions judiciaires, des questions pénales, des droits de l’homme et autres disciplline pertinentes qui, avec les experts de la police civile, constitueront des équipes collégiales au service de l’état de droit. 11. Spécialistes civils : a) Le Secrétariat devrait constituer sur Internet ou Intranet, un fichier central de spécialistes civils présélecttionné qui pourraient être immédiatement déplooyé dans des opérations de paix. Les missions devraaien avoir accès à ce fichier, et pouvoir recruter du personnel en choisissant des candidats y figurant, conformément aux directives que le Secrétariat devrait publier sur la répartition géographique et sur la répartitiio par sexe; b) La catégorie « Service mobile » devrait être réformée pour mieux refléter les besoins courants de toutes les opérations de paix, en particulier les besoins de personnel d’encadrement moyen et supérieur dans les domaines de l’administration et de la logistique; c) Les conditions d’emploi du personnel civil recruté à l’extérieur devraient être révisées pour permetttr aux Nations Unies d’attirer les candidats les plus qualifiés et d’offrir à ceux qui se seraient distinguué des perspectives de carrière plus attrayantes; d) Le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix devrait formuler pour les opérations de paix une stratégie complète de recrutement exposant notammmen les possibilités de recours aux Volontaires des Nations Unies prévoyant des moyens en attente pour fournir, avec un préavis de 72 heures, du personnel civil capable de faciliter le démarrage d’une mission et précisant la répartition des attributions entre les membrre du Comité exécutif pour la paix et la sécurité, en vue de l’application de cette stratégie. 12. Capacité d’information rapidement déployabbl : des ressources supplémentaires devraient être allouuées dans le budget des missions, à l’information et au personnel et au matériel informatique associés nécesssaire pour bien faire connaître une mission et pour assurer des communications internes efficaces. 13. Soutien logistique et gestion des dépenses : a) Le Secrétariat devrait élaborer une stratégie générale de soutien logistique, qui permette de déplooye rapidement et efficacement une mission dans les délais proposés et qui tienne compte des hypothèses retenues par les services compétents du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix chargés de la planificcation b) L’Assemblée générale devrait autoriser le Secrétaire général à engager une dépense non renouvellabl afin de constituer à Brindisi un stock d’au moins cinq lots d’équipement de départ, comprenant du matériel de transmission pouvant être déployé rapidemeent Ce stock devrait être systématiquement reconstittué à l’aide des contributions mises en recouvrement pour financer les missions qu’il aurait servi à équiper;n0059471.doc 65 A/55/305 S/2000/809 c) Le Secrétaire général devrait être habilité à effectuer un tirage d’un montant maximum de 50 millions de dollars des États-Unis sur le Fonds de réserve pour les opérations de maintien de la paix dès lors que l’établissement d’une nouvelle opération est quasiment assuré, après avoir obtenu l’accord du Comiit consultatif pour les questions administratives et budgétaires, mais avant l’adoption d’une résolution par le Conseil de sécurité; d) Le Secrétariat devrait réexaminer toutes les politiques et procédures concernant les achats (en faisaan des propositions à l’Assemblée générale sur les amendements à apporter, le cas échéant, au Règlement financier et aux règles de gestion financière), afin notammmen de faciliter le déploiement rapide et complet d’une opération dans les délais proposés; e) Le Secrétariat devrait réexaminer les politiquue et procédures de gestion financière des missions opérationnelles, en vue de donner à celles-ci une plus grande latitude dans la gestion de leur budget; f) Le Secrétariat devrait relever le montant de la procuration donnée aux missions opérationnelles en matière d’achats (le plafond actuel de 200 000 dollars pouvant être porté jusqu’à 1 million de dollars, selon la taille et les besoins de la mission), pour tous les biens et services disponibles sur le marché local et ne faisant pas l’objet d’un contrat-cadre ou d’une commande permanente. 14. Financement de l’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix fourni par le Siège : a) Le Groupe d’étude recommande une augmenttatio sensible des ressources servant à financer l’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix fourni par le Siège et exhorte le Secrétaire général à soumettre à l'Assemblée générale une proposition indiquant l’intégralité des moyens qu’il juge nécessaires; b) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que l’appui fourni par le Siège aux opérations de maintien de la paix soit considéré comme une activité essentielle de l’Organisation des Nations Unies et que la plus grande partie des ressources nécessaires soient donc inscrites au budget ordinaire; c) En attendant l’élaboration du prochain projje de budget, le Groupe d’étude recommande que le Secrétaire général demande à l'Assemblée générale d’augmenter d’urgence les ressources du compte d’appui aux opérations de maintien de la paix pour que le personnel supplémentaire puisse être recruté immédiateement en particulier au sein du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix. 15. Planification et soutien intégré dans le cadre des missions : la formule des équipes spéciales intégrrée dont les membres seraient détachés par tous les organismes des Nations Unies en fonction des besoins, serait celle qui serait retenue pour assurer la planificatiio et le soutien aux différentes missions. Ces équipes spéciales serviraient de premier interlocuteur pour toutes les activités de soutien et le personnel détaché auprès d’elles, conformément aux accords conclus enttr le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, le Département des affaires politiques et les autrre départements, programmes, fonds et organismes participants, serait temporairement sous les ordres de leurs chefs. 16. Autres ajustements structurels proposés pour le Département des opérations de maintien de la paix :a) Il faudrait revoir la structure de l’actuelle Division du personnel militaire et de la police civile, de sorte que le Groupe de la police civile ne relève plus de la chaîne de commande militaire. Il faudrait envisager de reclasser le poste de conseiller de la police civile; b) Il faudrait modifier la structure du Bureau du conseiller militaire au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix pour qu’elle corresponde mieux à celle des quartiers généraux des opérations de maintiie de la paix des Nations Unies; c) Il faudrait créer au Département des opératiion de maintien de la paix une nouvelle unité administrrativ dotée de personnel spécialisé chargé de donnne des conseils sur des questions de droit pénal d’une importance cruciale pour l’utilisation efficace des serviice de police civile dans le cadre des opérations de paix; d) Le Secrétaire général adjoint à la gestion devrait déléguer au Secrétaire général adjoint aux opérattion de maintien de la paix, pour une période d’essai de deux ans, la responsabilité de la budgétisation et des achats pour les opérations de maintien de la paix; e) Le Groupe des enseignements tirés des missiion devrait être sensiblement renforcé et rattaché au Bureau des opérations du Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, qui doit lui-même être réorganissé66 n0059471.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 f) Il faudrait envisager d’accroître le nombre des postes de sous-secrétaire général au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, pour le porter de deux à trois; l’un d’entre eux aurait pour titulaire un « sous-secrétaire général principal » qui exercerait les fonctions d’adjoint du Secrétaire général adjoint. 17. Appui opérationnel en matière d’information : Un service de planification opérationnelle et d’appui à l’information pour les opérations de paix devrait être créé, soit au Département des opérations de maintien de la paix, soit au sein d’un nouveau service d’information sur la paix et la sécurité au Département de l’information, qui relèverait directement du Secrétaair général adjoint à la communication et à l’information. 18. Appui aux activités de consolidation de la paix au Département des affaires politiques : a) Le Groupe d’étude appuie les efforts faits par le Secrétariat pour créer un groupe pilote de la consolidation de la paix au Département des affaires politiques en coopération avec d’autres éléments constittué de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, et propose que les Membres réexaminent la question de l’inscription de crédits au budget ordinaire pour ce groupe si le programme pilote fonctionne de façon satisfaiisante Ce programme devrait être évalué dans le cadre des indications données par le Groupe d’étude au paragraphe 46 et, si l’on juge qu’il constitue l’option la meilleure pour renforcer la capacité de consolidation de la paix de l’Organisation, il conviendrait de le présennte au Secrétaire général conformément à la résolutiio formulée à l’alinéa d) du paragraphe 47; b) Le Groupe d’étude recommande que les ressources prévues au budget ordinaire au titre des prograamme de la Division de l’assistance électorale soient sensiblement accrues en raison de l’accroissement rapide de la demande de services, au lieu de prévoir le financement de ces programmes à l’aide de contributions volontaires; c) Pour alléger la tâche de la Division de l’administration et de la logistique des missions ainsi que du Service administratif du Département des affairre politiques et pour améliorer la fourniture de servicce d’appui aux petits bureaux hors Siège qui s’occupent de questions politiques et de consolidation de la paix, le Groupe d’étude recommande que les serviice d’achat, de logistique, de recrutement et autres services d’appui à toutes ces missions non militaires de faible ampleur soient fournis par le Bureau des services d’appui aux projets. 19. Appui fourni aux opérations de paix par le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme : Le Groupe d’étude recommande de renforcce très sensiblement la capacité du Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme de planifier et de préparer des missions, les fonds nécessaires à cette fin devant provenir du budget ordinaire et des budgets des opérations de paix. 20. Les opérations de maintien de la paix à l’ère de l’information : a) Les départements responsables des opératiion de maintien de la paix et de la sécurité du Siège devraient disposer, au sein du Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique, d’un « centre de responsabilité » chargé d’élaborer et de faire appliquue la stratégie et la formation en matière de technologgie de l’information pour les opérations de paix. Des correspondants de ce centre devraient être désignés auprès des missions pour assurer, dans les bureaux des représentants spéciaux du Secrétaire général auprès des opérations de paix complexes, la supervision de la mise en oeuvre de cette stratégie; b) En coopération avec la Division de l’informatique, le Secrétariat à l’information et à l’analyse stratégique devrait créer, sur l’Intranet de l’ONU, une section consacrée aux opérations de paix et la relier aux missions par l’intermédiaire d’un Extranet des opérations de paix; c) Les opérations de paix gagneraient beaucoou à utiliser davantage la technologie des systèmes d’information géographique, qui intègrent rapidement des informations opérationnelles et des cartes électroniqque des zones de mission, et ce pour des applicatiion aussi diverses que la démobilisation, la police civile, l’inscription des électeurs, l’observation des droits de l’homme et la reconstruction; d) Il faudrait prévoir et satisfaire plus méthodiqueement dans la planification et l’exécution des missioons les besoins particuliers en matière de technologiie de l’information de certaines composantes des missions, telles que la police civile et les droits de l’homme; e) Le Groupe encourage la mise au point d’un système de cogestion d’un site Web entre le Siège et les missions sur le terrain, le premier assumant un rôlen0059471.doc 67 A/55/305 S/2000/809 de supervision et les secondes étant habilitées à produuir et à afficher des contenus conformes aux principe et normes de base en matière de présentation de l’information.