A_55_305_ER
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A/55/305 A-55-305_e.pdf (English)A/55/305 A-55-305_r.pdf (Russian)
United Nations A/55/305–S/2000/809 General Assembly Security Council Distr.: General 21 August 2000 Original: English 00-59470 (E) 180800 ````````` General Assembly Security Council Fifty-fifth session Fifty-fifth year Item 87 of the provisional agenda* Comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects Identical letters dated 21 August 2000 from the Secretary-General to the President of the General Assembly and the President of the Security Council On 7 March 2000, I convened a high-level Panel to undertake a thorough review of the United Nations peace and security activities, and to present a clear set of specific, concrete and practical recommendations to assist the United Nations in conducting such activities better in the future. I asked Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi, the former Foreign Minister of Algeria, to chair the Panel, which included the following eminent personalities from around the world, with a wide range of experience in the fields of peacekeeping, peace-building, development and humanitarian assistance: Mr. J. Brian Atwood, Ambassador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Mr. Richard Monk, General Klaus Naumann (retd.), Ms. Hisako Shimura, Ambassador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda and Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga. I would be grateful if the Panel’s report, which has been transmitted to me in the enclosed letter dated 17 August 2000 from the Chairman of the Panel, could be brought to the attention of Member States. The Panel’s analysis is frank yet fair; its recommendations are far-reaching yet sensible and practical. The expeditious implementation of the Panel’s recommendations, in my view, is essential to make the United Nations truly credible as a force for peace. Many of the Panel’s recommendations relate to matters fully within the purview of the Secretary-General, while others will need the approval and support of the legislative bodies of the United Nations. I urge all Member States to join me in considering, approving and supporting the implementation of those recommendations. In this connection, I am pleased to inform you that I have designated the Deputy Secretary-General to follow up on the report’s recommendations and to oversee the preparation of a detailed implementation plan, which I shall submit to the General Assembly and the Security Council. * A/55/150.ii A/55/305 S/2000/809 I very much hope that the report of the Panel, in particular its Executive Summary, will be brought to the attention of all the leaders who will be coming to New York in September 2000 to participate in the Millennium Summit. That highleeve and historic meeting presents a unique opportunity for us to commence the process of renewing the United Nations capacity to secure and build peace. I ask for the support of the General Assembly and Security Council in converting into reality the far-reaching agenda laid out in the report. (Signed) Kofi A. Annaniii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Letter dated 17 August 2000 from the Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations to the Secretary-General The Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, which you convened in March 2000, was privileged to have been asked by you to assess the United Nations ability to conduct peace operations effectively, and to offer frank, specific and realistic recommendations for ways in which to enhance that capacity. Mr. Brian Atwood, Ambassador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Mr. Richard Monk, General (ret.) Klaus Naumann, Ms. Hisako Shimura, Ambassador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda, Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga and I accepted this challenge out of deep respect for you and because each of us believes fervently that the United Nations system can do better in the cause of peace. We admired greatly your willingness to undertake past highly critical analyses of United Nations operations in Rwanda and Srebrenica. This degree of self-criticism is rare for any large organization and particularly rare for the United Nations. We also would like to pay tribute to Deputy Secretary-General Louise Fréchette and Chef de Cabinet S. Iqbal Riza, who remained with us throughout our meetings and who answered our many questions with unfailing patience and clarity. They have given us much of their time and we benefited immensely from their intimate knowledge of the United Nations present limitations and future requirements. Producing a review and recommendations for reform of a system with the scope and complexity of United Nations peace operations, in only four months, was a daunting task. It would have been impossible but for the dedication and hard work of Dr. William Durch (with support from staff at the Stimson Center), Mr. Salman Ahmed of the United Nations and the willingness of United Nations officials throughout the system, including serving heads of mission, to share their insights both in interviews and in often comprehensive critiques of their own organizations and experiences. Former heads of peace operations and force commanders, academics and representatives of non-governmental organizations were equally helpful. The Panel engaged in intense discussion and debate. Long hours were devoted to reviewing recommendations and supporting analysis that we knew would be subject to scrutiny and interpretation. Over three separate three-day meetings in New York, Geneva and then New York again, we forged the letter and the spirit of the attached report. Its analysis and recommendations reflect our consensus, which we convey to you with our hope that it serve the cause of systematic reform and renewal of this core function of the United Nations. As we say in the report, we are aware that you are engaged in conducting a comprehensive reform of the Secretariat. We thus hope that our recommendations fit within that wider process, with slight adjustments if necessary. We realize that not all of our recommendations can be implemented overnight, but many of them do require urgent action and the unequivocal support of Member States. Throughout these months, we have read and heard encouraging words from Member States, large and small, from the South and from the North, stressing the necessity for urgent improvement in the ways the United Nations addresses conflictiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 situations. We urge them to act decisively to translate into reality those of our recommendations that require formal action by them. The Panel has full confidence that the official we suggest you designate to oversee the implementation of our recommendations, both inside the Secretariat and with Member States, will have your full support, in line with your conviction to transform the United Nations into the type of twenty-first century institution it needs to be to effectively meet the current and future threats to world peace. Finally, if I may be allowed to add a personal note, I wish to express my deepest gratitude to each of my colleagues on this Panel. Together, they have contributed to the project an impressive sum of knowledge and experience. They have consistently shown the highest degree of commitment to the Organization and a deep understanding of its needs. During our meetings and our contacts from afar, they have all been extremely kind to me, invariably helpful, patient and generous, thus making the otherwise intimidating task as their Chairman relatively easier and truly enjoyable. (Signed) Lakhdar Brahimi Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operationsv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Contents Paragraphs Page Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii I. The need for change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 1 II. Doctrine, strategy and decision-making for peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–83 2 A. Defining the elements of peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 2 B. Experience of the past. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–28 3 C. Implications for preventive action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–34 5 Summary of key recommendations on preventive action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 6 D. Implications for peace-building strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–47 6 Summary of key recommendations on peace-building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 8 E. Implications for peacekeeping doctrine and strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48–55 9 Summary of key recommendation on peacekeeping doctrine and strategy. . . . 55 10 F. Clear, credible and achievable mandates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–64 10 Summary of key recommendations on clear, credible and achievable mandates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 11 G. Information-gathering, analysis and strategic planning capacities . . . . . . . . . . 65–75 12 Summary of key recommendation on information and strategic analysis. . . . . 75 13 H. The challenge of transitional civil administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–83 13 Summary of key recommendation on transitional civil administration. . . . . . . 83 14 III. United Nations capacities to deploy operations rapidly and effectively . . . . . . . . . . 84–169 14 A. Defining what “rapid and effective deployment” entails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–91 15 Summary of key recommendation on determining deployment timelines . . . . . 91 16 B. Effective mission leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–101 16 Summary of key recommendations on mission leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 17 C. Military personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–117 17 Summary of key recommendations on military personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 20 D. Civilian police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–126 20 Summary of key recommendations on civilian police personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 21 E. Civilian specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127–145 21 1. Lack of standby systems to respond to unexpected or high-volume surge demands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128–132 22vi A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. Difficulties in attracting and retaining the best external recruits . . . . . . . 133–135 23 3. Shortages in administrative and support functions at the mid-to-senior levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 23 4. Penalizing field deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–138 23 5. Obsolescence in the Field Service category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139–140 24 6. Lack of a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations. . . . . . . . 141–145 24 Summary of key recommendations on civilian specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 25 F. Public information capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146–150 25 Summary of key recommendation on rapidly deployable capacity for public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 26 G. Logistics support, the procurement process and expenditure management . . . 151–169 26 Summary of key recommendations on logistics support and expenditure management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 28 IV. Headquarters resources and structure for planning and supporting peacekeeping operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170–245 29 A. Staffing-levels and funding for Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172–197 29 Summary of key recommendations on funding Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 34 B. Need and proposal for the establishment of Integrated Mission Task Forces . 198–217 34 Summary of key recommendation on integrated mission planning and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 37 C. Other structural adjustments required in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218–233 37 1. Military and Civilian Police Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219–225 37 2. Field Administration and Logistics Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226–228 38 3. Lessons Learned Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229–230 39 4. Senior management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231–233 39 Summary of key recommendations on other structural adjustments in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 39 D. Structural adjustments needed outside the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234–245 40 1. Operational support for public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235–238 40 Summary of key recommendation on structural adjustments in public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 40vii A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs . . . . . . . . . 239–243 40 Summary of key recommendations for peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 41 3. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244–245 41 Summary of key recommendation on strengthening the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 41 V. Peace operations and the information age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246–264 42 A. Information technology in peace operations: strategy and policy issues . . . . . 247–251 42 Summary of key recommendation on information technology strategy and policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 42 B. Tools for knowledge management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252–258 43 Summary of key recommendations on information technology tools in peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 43 C. Improving the timeliness of Internet-based public information . . . . . . . . . . . . 259–264 44 Summary of key recommendation on the timeliness of Internet-based public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 44 VI. Challenges to implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265–280 44 Annexes I. Members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 II. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 III. Summary of recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54viii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Executive Summary The United Nations was founded, in the words of its Charter, in order “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Meeting this challenge is the most important function of the Organization, and to a very significant degree it is the yardstick with which the Organization is judged by the peoples it exists to serve. Over the last decade, the United Nations has repeatedly failed to meet the challenge, and it can do no better today. Without renewed commitment on the part of Member States, significant institutional change and increased financial support, the United Nations will not be capable of executing the critical peacekeeping and peacebuilldin tasks that the Member States assign to it in coming months and years. There are many tasks which United Nations peacekeeping forces should not be asked to undertake and many places they should not go. But when the United Nations does send its forces to uphold the peace, they must be prepared to confront the lingering forces of war and violence, with the ability and determination to defeat them.The Secretary-General has asked the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, composed of individuals experienced in various aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building, to assess the shortcomings of the existing system and to make frank, specific and realistic recommendations for change. Our recommendations focus not only on politics and strategy but also and perhaps even more so on operational and organizational areas of need. For preventive initiatives to succeed in reducing tension and averting conflict, the Secretary-General needs clear, strong and sustained political support from Member States. Furthermore, as the United Nations has bitterly and repeatedly discovered over the last decade, no amount of good intentions can substitute for the fundamental ability to project credible force if complex peacekeeping, in particular, is to succeed. But force alone cannot create peace; it can only create the space in which peace may be built. Moreover, the changes that the Panel recommends will have no lasting impact unless Member States summon the political will to support the United Nations politically, financially and operationally to enable the United Nations to be truly credible as a force for peace. Each of the recommendations contained in the present report is designed to remedy a serious problem in strategic direction, decision-making, rapid deployment, operational planning and support, and the use of modern information technology. Key assessments and recommendations are highlighted below, largely in the order in which they appear in the body of the text (the numbers of the relevant paragraphs in the main text are provided in parentheses). In addition, a summary of recommendations is contained in annex III. Experience of the past (paras. 15-28) It should have come as no surprise to anyone that some of the missions of the past decade would be particularly hard to accomplish: they tended to deploy where conflict had not resulted in victory for any side, where a military stalemate or international pressure or both had brought fighting to a halt but at least some of the parties to the conflict were not seriously committed to ending the confrontation. United Nations operations thus did not deploy into post-conflict situations but tried to create them. In such complex operations, peacekeepers work to maintain a secure local environment while peacebuilders work to make that environment self-sustaining.ix A/55/305 S/2000/809 Only such an environment offers a ready exit to peacekeeping forces, making peacekeepers and peacebuilders inseparable partners. Implications for preventive action and peace-building: the need for strategy and support (paras. 29-47) The United Nations and its members face a pressing need to establish more effective strategies for conflict prevention, in both the long and short terms. In this context, the Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report (A/54/2000) and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000. It also encourages the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension in support of short-term crisispreveentiv action. Furthermore, the Security Council and the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, conscious that the United Nations will continue to face the prospect of having to assist communities and nations in making the transition from war to peace, have each recognized and acknowledged the key role of peace-building in complex peace operations. This will require that the United Nations system address what has hitherto been a fundamental deficiency in the way it has conceived of, funded and implemented peace-building strategies and activities. Thus, the Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) present to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. Among the changes that the Panel supports are: a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police and related rule of law elements in peace operations that emphasizes a team approach to upholding the rule of law and respect for human rights and helping communities coming out of a conflict to achieve national reconciliation; consolidation of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations in their first phase; flexibility for heads of United Nations peace operations to fund “quick impact projects” that make a real difference in the lives of people in the mission area; and better integration of electoral assistance into a broader strategy for the support of governance institutions. Implications for peacekeeping: the need for robust doctrine and realistic mandates (paras. 48-64) The Panel concurs that consent of the local parties, impartiality and the use of force only in self-defence should remain the bedrock principles of peacekeeping. Experience shows, however, that in the context of intra-State/transnational conflicts, consent may be manipulated in many ways. Impartiality for United Nations operations must therefore mean adherence to the principles of the Charter: where one party to a peace agreement clearly and incontrovertibly is violating its terms, continued equal treatment of all parties by the United Nations can in the best case result in ineffectiveness and in the worst may amount to complicity with evil. No failure did more to damage the standing and credibility of United Nations peacekeeping in the 1990s than its reluctance to distinguish victim from aggressor.xA/55/305 S/2000/809 In the past, the United Nations has often found itself unable to respond effectively to such challenges. It is a fundamental premise of the present report, however, that it must be able to do so. Once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandate professionally and successfully. This means that United Nations military units must be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate. Rules of engagement should be sufficiently robust and not force United Nations contingents to cede the initiative to their attackers. This means, in turn, that the Secretariat must not apply best-case planning assumptions to situations where the local actors have historically exhibited worstcaas behaviour. It means that mandates should specify an operation’s authority to use force. It means bigger forces, better equipped and more costly but able to be a credible deterrent. In particular, United Nations forces for complex operations should be afforded the field intelligence and other capabilities needed to mount an effective defence against violent challengers. Moreover, United Nations peacekeepers — troops or police — who witness violence against civilians should be presumed to be authorized to stop it, within their means, in support of basic United Nations principles. However, operations given a broad and explicit mandate for civilian protection must be given the specific resources needed to carry out that mandate. The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when recommending force and other resource levels for a new mission, and it must set those levels according to realistic scenarios that take into account likely challenges to implementation. Security Council mandates, in turn, should reflect the clarity that peacekeeping operations require for unity of effort when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations. The current practice is for the Secretary-General to be given a Security Council resolution specifying troop levels on paper, not knowing whether he will be given the troops and other personnel that the mission needs to function effectively, or whether they will be properly equipped. The Panel is of the view that, once realistic mission requirements have been set and agreed to, the Council should leave its authorizing resolution in draft form until the Secretary-General confirms that he has received troop and other commitments from Member States sufficient to meet those requirements. Member States that do commit formed military units to an operation should be invited to consult with the members of the Security Council during mandate formulation; such advice might usefully be institutionalized via the establishment of ad hoc subsidiary organs of the Council, as provided for in Article 29 of the Charter. Troop contributors should also be invited to attend Secretariat briefings of the Security Council pertaining to crises that affect the safety and security of mission personnel or to a change or reinterpretation of the mandate regarding the use of force. New headquarters capacity for information management and strategic analysis (paras. 65-75) The Panel recommends that a new information-gathering and analysis entity be created to support the informational and analytical needs of the Secretary-Generalxi A/55/305 S/2000/809 and the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS). Without such capacity, the Secretariat will remain a reactive institution, unable to get ahead of daily events, and the ECPS will not be able to fulfil the role for which it was created. The Panel’s proposed ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS) would create and maintain integrated databases on peace and security issues, distribute that knowledge efficiently within the United Nations system, generate policy analyses, formulate long-term strategies for ECPS and bring budding crises to the attention of the ECPS leadership. It could also propose and manage the agenda of ECPS itself, helping to transform it into the decision-making body anticipated in the Secretary-General’s initial reforms. The Panel proposes that EISAS be created by consolidating the existing Situation Centre of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) with a number of small, scattered policy planning offices, and adding a small team of military analysts, experts in international criminal networks and information systems specialists. EISAS should serve the needs of all members of ECPS. Improved mission guidance and leadership (paras. 92-101) The Panel believes it is essential to assemble the leadership of a new mission as early as possible at United Nations Headquarters, to participate in shaping a mission’s concept of operations, support plan, budget, staffing and Headquarters mission guidance. To that end, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General compile, in a systematic fashion and with input from Member States, a comprehensive list of potential special representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs), force commanders, civilian police commissioners, their potential deputies and potential heads of other components of a mission, representing a broad geographic and equitable gender distribution. Rapid deployment standards and “on-call” expertise (paras. 86-91 and 102-169) The first 6 to 12 weeks following a ceasefire or peace accord are often the most critical ones for establishing both a stable peace and the credibility of a new operation. Opportunities lost during that period are hard to regain. The Panel recommends that the United Nations define “rapid and effective deployment capacity” as the ability to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing such an operation, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. The Panel recommends that the United Nations standby arrangements system (UNSAS) be developed further to include several coherent, multinational, brigadesiiz forces and the necessary enabling forces, created by Member States working in partnership, in order to better meet the need for the robust peacekeeping forces that the Panel has advocated. The Panel also recommends that the Secretariat send a team to confirm the readiness of each potential troop contributor to meet the requisite United Nations training and equipment requirements for peacekeeping operations, prior to deployment. Units that do not meet the requirements must not be deployed.xii A/55/305 S/2000/809 To support such rapid and effective deployment, the Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 experienced, well qualified military officers, carefully vetted and accepted by DPKO, be created within UNSAS. Teams drawn from this list and available for duty on seven days’ notice would translate broad, strategic-level mission concepts developed at Headquarters into concrete operational and tactical plans in advance of the deployment of troop contingents, and would augment a core element from DPKO to serve as part of a mission start-up team. Parallel on-call lists of civilian police, international judicial experts, penal experts and human rights specialists must be available in sufficient numbers to strengthen rule of law institutions, as needed, and should also be part of UNSAS. Pre-trained teams could then be drawn from this list to precede the main body of civilian police and related specialists into a new mission area, facilitating the rapid and effective deployment of the law and order component into the mission. The Panel also calls upon Member States to establish enhanced national “pools” of police officers and related experts, earmarked for deployment to United Nations peace operations, to help meet the high demand for civilian police and related criminal justice/rule of law expertise in peace operations dealing with intra-State conflict. The Panel also urges Member States to consider forming joint regional partnerships and programmes for the purpose of training members of the respective national pools to United Nations civilian police doctrine and standards. The Secretariat should also address, on an urgent basis, the needs: to put in place a transparent and decentralized recruitment mechanism for civilian field personnel; to improve the retention of the civilian specialists that are needed in every complex peace operation; and to create standby arrangements for their rapid deployment. Finally, the Panel recommends that the Secretariat radically alter the systems and procedures in place for peacekeeping procurement in order to facilitate rapid deployment. It recommends that responsibilities for peacekeeping budgeting and procurement be moved out of the Department of Management and placed in DPKO. The Panel proposes the creation of a new and distinct body of streamlined field procurement policies and procedures; increased delegation of procurement authority to the field; and greater flexibility for field missions in the management of their budgets. The Panel also urges that the Secretary-General formulate and submit to the General Assembly, for its approval, a global logistics support strategy governing the stockpiling of equipment reserves and standing contracts with the private sector for common goods and services. In the interim, the Panel recommends that additional “start-up kits” of essential equipment be maintained at the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) in Brindisi, Italy. The Panel also recommends that the Secretary-General be given authority, with the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) to commit up to $50 million well in advance of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a new operation once it becomes clear that an operation is likely to be established.xiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Enhance Headquarters capacity to plan and support peace operations (paras. 170-197) The Panel recommends that Headquarters support for peacekeeping be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements should be funded through the regular budget of the Organization. DPKO and other offices that plan and support peacekeeping are currently primarily funded by the Support Account, which is renewed each year and funds only temporary posts. That approach to funding and staff seems to confuse the temporary nature of specific operations with the evident permanence of peacekeeping and other peace operations activities as core functions of the United Nations, which is obviously an untenable state of affairs. The total cost of DPKO and related Headquarters support offices for peacekeeping does not exceed $50 million per annum, or roughly 2 per cent of total peacekeeping costs. Additional resources for those offices are urgently needed to ensure that more than $2 billion spent on peacekeeping in 2001 are well spent. The Panel therefore recommends that the Secretary-General submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining the Organization’s requirements in full. The Panel believes that a methodical management review of DPKO should be conducted but also believes that staff shortages in certain areas are plainly obvious. For example, it is clearly not enough to have 32 officers providing military planning and guidance to 27,000 troops in the field, nine civilian police staff to identify, vet and provide guidance for up to 8,600 police, and 15 political desk officers for 14 current operations and two new ones, or to allocate just 1.25 per cent of the total costs of peacekeeping to Headquarters administrative and logistics support. Establish Integrated Mission Task Forces for mission planning and support (paras. 198-245) The Panel recommends that Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs) be created, with staff from throughout the United Nations system seconded to them, to plan new missions and help them reach full deployment, significantly enhancing the support that Headquarters provides to the field. There is currently no integrated planning or support cell in the Secretariat that brings together those responsible for political analysis, military operations, civilian police, electoral assistance, human rights, development, humanitarian assistance, refugees and displaced persons, public information, logistics, finance and recruitment. Structural adjustments are also required in other elements of DPKO, in particular to the Military and Civilian Police Division, which should be reorganized into two separate divisions, and the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD), which should be split into two divisions. The Lessons Learned Unit should be strengthened and moved into the DPKO Office of Operations. Public information planning and support at Headquarters also needs strengthening, as do elements in the Department of Political Affairs (DPA), particularly the electoral unit. Outside the Secretariat, the ability of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to plan and support the human rights components of peace operations needs to be reinforced.xiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Consideration should be given to allocating a third Assistant Secretary-General to DPKO and designating one of them as “Principal Assistant Secretary-General”, functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. Adapting peace operations to the information age (paras. 246-264) Modern, well utilized information technology (IT) is a key enabler of many of the above-mentioned objectives, but gaps in strategy, policy and practice impede its effective use. In particular, Headquarters lacks a sufficiently strong responsibility centre for user-level IT strategy and policy in peace operations. A senior official with such responsibility in the peace and security arena should be appointed and located within EISAS, with counterparts in the offices of the SRSG in every United Nations peace operation. Headquarters and the field missions alike also need a substantive, global, Peace Operations Extranet (POE), through which missions would have access to, among other things, EISAS databases and analyses and lessons learned. Challenges to implementation (paras. 265-280) The Panel believes that the above recommendations fall well within the bounds of what can be reasonably demanded of the Organization’s Member States. Implementing some of them will require additional resources for the Organization, but we do not mean to suggest that the best way to solve the problems of the United Nations is merely to throw additional resources at them. Indeed, no amount of money or resources can substitute for the significant changes that are urgently needed in the culture of the Organization. The Panel calls on the Secretariat to heed the Secretary-General’s initiatives to reach out to the institutions of civil society; to constantly keep in mind that the United Nations they serve is the universal organization. People everywhere are fully entitled to consider that it is their organization, and as such to pass judgement on its activities and the people who serve in it. Furthermore, wide disparities in staff quality exist and those in the system are the first to acknowledge it; better performers are given unreasonable workloads to compensate for those who are less capable. Unless the United Nations takes steps to become a true meritocracy, it will not be able to reverse the alarming trend of qualified personnel, the young among them in particular, leaving the Organization. Moreover, qualified people will have no incentive to join it. Unless managers at all levels, beginning with the Secretary-General and his senior staff, seriously address this problem on a priority basis, reward excellence and remove incompetence, additional resources will be wasted and lasting reform will become impossible. Member States also acknowledge that they need to reflect on their working culture and methods. It is incumbent upon Security Council members, for example, and the membership at large to breathe life into the words that they produce, as did, for instance, the Security Council delegation that flew to Jakarta and Dili in the wake of the East Timor crisis in 1999, an example of effective Council action at its best: res, non verba. We — the members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations — call on the leaders of the world assembled at the Millennium Summit, as they renew their commitment to the ideals of the United Nations, to commit as well toxv A/55/305 S/2000/809 strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to fully accomplish the mission which is, indeed, its very raison d’être: to help communities engulfed in strife and to maintain or restore peace. While building consensus for the recommendations in the present report, we have also come to a shared vision of a United Nations, extending a strong helping hand to a community, country or region to avert conflict or to end violence. We see an SRSG ending a mission well accomplished, having given the people of a country the opportunity to do for themselves what they could not do before: to build and hold onto peace, to find reconciliation, to strengthen democracy, to secure human rights. We see, above all, a United Nations that has not only the will but also the ability to fulfil its great promise, and to justify the confidence and trust placed in it by the overwhelming majority of humankind.1 A/55/305 S/2000/809 I. The need for change 1. The United Nations was founded, in the words of its Charter, in order “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Meeting this challenge is the most important function of the Organization, and, to a very significant degree, the yardstick by which it is judged by the peoples it exists to serve. Over the last decade, the United Nations has repeatedly failed to meet the challenge; and it can do no better today. Without significant institutional change, increased financial support, and renewed commitment on the part of Member States, the United Nations will not be capable of executing the critical peacekeeping and peace-building tasks that the Member States assign it in coming months and years. There are many tasks which the United Nations peacekeeping forces should not be asked to undertake, and many places they should not go. But when the United Nations does send its forces to uphold the peace, they must be prepared to confront the lingering forces of war and violence with the ability and determination to defeat them. 2. The Secretary-General has asked the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, composed of individuals experienced in various aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building (Panel members are listed in annex I), to assess the shortcomings of the existing system and to make frank, specific and realistic recommendations for change. Our recommendations focus not only on politics and strategy but also on operational and organizational areas of need. 3. For preventive initiatives to reduce tension and avert conflict, the Secretary-General needs clear, strong and sustained political support from Member States. For peacekeeping to accomplish its mission, as the United Nations has discovered repeatedly over the last decade, no amount of good intentions can substitute for the fundamental ability to project credible force. However, force alone cannot create peace; it can only create a space in which peace can be built. 4. In other words, the key conditions for the success of future complex operations are political support, rapid deployment with a robust force posture and a sound peace-building strategy. Every recommendation in the present report is meant, in one way or another, to help ensure that these three conditions are met. The need for change has been rendered even more urgent by recent events in Sierra Leone and by the daunting prospect of expanded United Nations operations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 5. These changes — while essential — will have no lasting impact unless the Member States of the Organization take seriously their responsibility to train and equip their own forces and to mandate and enable their collective instrument, so that together they may succeed in meeting threats to peace. They must summon the political will to support the United Nations politically, financially and operationally — once they have decided to act as the United Nations — if the Organization is to be credible as a force for peace. 6. The recommendations that the Panel presents balance principle and pragmatism, while honouring the spirit and letter of the Charter of the United Nations and the respective roles of the Organization’s legislative bodies. They are based on the following premises: (a) The essential responsibility of Member States for the maintenance of international peace and security, and the need to strengthen both the quality and quantity of support provided to the United Nations system to carry out that responsibility; (b) The pivotal importance of clear, credible and adequately resourced Security Council mandates; (c) A focus by the United Nations system on conflict prevention and its early engagement, wherever possible; (d) The need to have more effective collection and assessment of information at United Nations Headquarters, including an enhanced conflict early warning system that can detect and recognize the threat or risk of conflict or genocide; (e) The essential importance of the United Nations system adhering to and promoting international human rights instruments and standards and international humanitarian law in all aspects of its peace and security activities; (f) The need to build the United Nations capacity to contribute to peace-building, both preventive and post-conflict, in a genuinely integrated manner; (g) The critical need to improve Headquarters planning (including contingency planning) for peace operations;2A/55/305 S/2000/809 (h) The recognition that while the United Nations has acquired considerable expertise in planning, mounting and executing traditional peacekeeping operations, it has yet to acquire the capacity needed to deploy more complex operations rapidly and to sustain them effectively; (i) The necessity to provide field missions with high-quality leaders and managers who are granted greater flexibility and autonomy by Headquarters, within clear mandate parameters and with clear standards of accountability for both spending and results; (j) The imperative to set and adhere to a high standard of competence and integrity for both Headquarters and field personnel, who must be provided the training and support necessary to do their jobs and to progress in their careers, guided by modern management practices that reward meritorious performance and weed out incompetence; (k) The importance of holding individual officials at Headquarters and in the field accountable for their performance, recognizing that they need to be given commensurate responsibility, authority and resources to fulfil their assigned tasks. 7. In the present report, the Panel has addressed itself to many compelling needs for change within the United Nations system. The Panel views its recommendations as the minimum threshold of change needed to give the United Nations system the opportunity to be an effective, operational, twenty-first century institution. (Key recommendations are summarized in bold type throughout the text; they are also combined in a single summary in annex III.) 8. The blunt criticisms contained in the present report reflect the Panel’s collective experience as well as interviews conducted at every level of the system. More than 200 people were either interviewed or provided written input to the Panel. Sources included the Permanent Missions of Member States, including the Security Council members; the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations; and personnel in peace and security-related departments at United Nations Headquarters in New York, in the United Nations Office at Geneva, at the headquarters of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), at the headquarters of other United Nations funds and programmes; at the World Bank and in every current United Nations peace operation. (A list of references is contained in annex II.) II. Doctrine, strategy and decisionmakkin for peace operations 9. The United Nations system — namely the Member States, Security Council, General Assembly and Secretariat — must commit to peace operations carefully, reflecting honestly on the record of its performance over the past decade. It must adjust accordingly the doctrine upon which peace operations are established; fine-tune its analytical and decisionmakkin capacities to respond to existing realities and anticipate future requirements; and summon the creativity, imagination and will required to implement new and alternative solutions to those situations into which peacekeepers cannot or should not go. A. Defining the elements of peace operations 10. United Nations peace operations entail three principal activities: conflict prevention and peacemaking; peacekeeping; and peace-building. Longteer conflict prevention addresses the structural sources of conflict in order to build a solid foundation for peace. Where those foundations are crumbling, conflict prevention attempts to reinforce them, usually in the form of a diplomatic initiative. Such preventive action is, by definition, a low-profile activity; when successful, it may even go unnoticed altogether. 11. Peacemaking addresses conflicts in progress, attempting to bring them to a halt, using the tools of diplomacy and mediation. Peacemakers may be envoys of Governments, groups of States, regional organizations or the United Nations, or they may be unofficial and non-governmental groups, as was the case, for example, in the negotiations leading up to a peace accord for Mozambique. Peacemaking may even be the work of a prominent personality, working independently. 12. Peacekeeping is a 50-year-old enterprise that has evolved rapidly in the past decade from a traditional, primarily military model of observing ceasefires and force separations after inter-State wars, to incorporate a complex model of many elements, military and3 A/55/305 S/2000/809 civilian, working together to build peace in the dangerous aftermath of civil wars. 13. Peace-building is a term of more recent origin that, as used in the present report, defines activities undertaken on the far side of conflict to reassemble the foundations of peace and provide the tools for building on those foundations something that is more than just the absence of war. Thus, peace-building includes but is not limited to reintegrating former combatants into civilian society, strengthening the rule of law (for example, through training and restructuring of local police, and judicial and penal reform); improving respect for human rights through the monitoring, education and investigation of past and existing abuses; providing technical assistance for democratic development (including electoral assistance and support for free media); and promoting conflict resolution and reconciliation techniques. 14. Essential complements to effective peacebuilldin include support for the fight against corruption, the implementation of humanitarian demining programmes, emphasis on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education and control, and action against other infectious diseases. B. Experience of the past 15. The quiet successes of short-term conflict prevention and peacemaking are often, as noted, politically invisible. Personal envoys and representatives of the Secretary-General (RSGs) or special representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs) have at times complemented the diplomatic initiatives of Member States and, at other times, have taken initiatives that Member States could not readily duplicate. Examples of the latter initiatives (drawn from peacemaking as well as preventive diplomacy) include the achievement of a ceasefire in the Islamic Republic of Iran-Iraq war in 1988, the freeing of the last Western hostages in Lebanon in 1991, and avoidance of war between the Islamic Republic of Iran and Afghanistan in 1998. 16. Those who favour focusing on the underlying causes of conflicts argue that such crisis-related efforts often prove either too little or too late. Attempted earlier, however, diplomatic initiatives may be rebuffed by a government that does not see or will not acknowledge a looming problem, or that may itself be part of the problem. Thus, long-term preventive strategies are a necessary complement to short-term initiatives. 17. Until the end of the cold war, United Nations peacekeeping operations mostly had traditional ceasefire-monitoring mandates and no direct peacebuilldin responsibilities. The “entry strategy” or sequence of events and decisions leading to United Nations deployment was straightforward: war, ceasefire, invitation to monitor ceasefire compliance and deployment of military observers or units to do so, while efforts continued for a political settlement. Intelligence requirements were also fairly straightforward and risks to troops were relatively low. But traditional peacekeeping, which treats the symptoms rather than sources of conflict, has no builtii exit strategy and associated peacemaking was often slow to make progress. As a result, traditional peacekeepers have remained in place for 10, 20, 30 or even 50 years (as in Cyprus, the Middle East and India/Pakistan). By the standards of more complex operations, they are relatively low cost and politically easier to maintain than to remove. However, they are also difficult to justify unless accompanied by serious and sustained peacemaking efforts that seek to transform a ceasefire accord into a durable and lasting peace settlement. 18. Since the end of the cold war, United Nations peacekeeping has often combined with peace-building in complex peace operations deployed into settings of intra-State conflict. Those conflict settings, however, both affect and are affected by outside actors: political patrons; arms vendors; buyers of illicit commodity exports; regional powers that send their own forces into the fray; and neighbouring States that host refugees who are sometimes systematically forced to flee their homes. With such significant cross-border effects by state and non-state actors alike, these conflicts are often decidedly “transnational” in character. 19. Risks and costs for operations that must function in such circumstances are much greater than for traditional peacekeeping. Moreover, the complexity of the tasks assigned to these missions and the volatility of the situation on the ground tend to increase together. Since the end of the cold war, such complex and risky mandates have been the rule rather than the exception: United Nations operations have been given reliefesccor duties where the security situation was so4A/55/305 S/2000/809 dangerous that humanitarian operations could not continue without high risk for humanitarian personnel; they have been given mandates to protect civilian victims of conflict where potential victims were at greatest risk, and mandates to control heavy weapons in possession of local parties when those weapons were being used to threaten the mission and the local population alike. In two extreme situations, United Nations operations were given executive law enforcement and administrative authority where local authority did not exist or was not able to function. 20. It should have come as no surprise to anyone that these missions would be hard to accomplish. Initially, the 1990s offered more positive prospects: operations implementing peace accords were time-limited, rather than of indefinite duration, and successful conduct of national elections seemed to offer a ready exit strategy. However, United Nations operations since then have tended to deploy where conflict has not resulted in victory for any side: it may be that the conflict is stalemated militarily or that international pressure has brought fighting to a halt, but in any event the conflict is unfinished. United Nations operations thus do not deploy into post-conflict situations so much as they deploy to create such situations. That is, they work to divert the unfinished conflict, and the personal, political or other agendas that drove it, from the military to the political arena, and to make that diversion permanent. 21. As the United Nations soon discovered, local parties sign peace accords for a variety of reasons, not all of them favourable to peace. “Spoilers” — groups (including signatories) who renege on their commitments or otherwise seek to undermine a peace accord by violence — challenged peace implementation in Cambodia, threw Angola, Somalia and Sierra Leone back into civil war, and orchestrated the murder of no fewer than 800,000 people in Rwanda. The United Nations must be prepared to deal effectively with spoilers if it expects to achieve a consistent record of success in peacekeeping or peacebuilldin in situations of intrastate/transnational conflict. 22. A growing number of reports on such conflicts have highlighted the fact that would-be spoilers have the greatest incentive to defect from peace accords when they have an independent source of income that pays soldiers, buys guns, enriches faction leaders and may even have been the motive for war. Recent history indicates that, where such income streams from the export of illicit narcotics, gemstones or other highvaalu commodities cannot be pinched off, peace is unsustainable. 23. Neighbouring States can contribute to the problem by allowing passage of conflict-supporting contraband, serving as middlemen for it or providing base areas for fighters. To counter such conflictsuppoortin neighbours, a peace operation will require the active political, logistical and/or military support of one or more great powers, or of major regional powers. The tougher the operation, the more important such backing becomes. 24. Other variables that affect the difficulty of peace implementation include, first, the sources of the conflict. These can range from economics (e.g., issues of poverty, distribution, discrimination or corruption), politics (an unalloyed contest for power) and resource and other environmental issues (such as competition for scarce water) to issues of ethnicity, religion or gross violations of human rights. Political and economic objectives may be more fluid and open to compromise than objectives related to resource needs, ethnicity or religion. Second, the complexity of negotiating and implementing peace will tend to rise with the number of local parties and the divergence of their goals (e.g., some may seek unity, others separation). Third, the level of casualties, population displacement and infrastructure damage will affect the level of wargeneerate grievance, and thus the difficulty of reconciliation, which requires that past human rights violations be addressed, as well as the cost and complexity of reconstruction. 25. A relatively less dangerous environment — just two parties, committed to peace, with competitive but congruent aims, lacking illicit sources of income, with neighbours and patrons committed to peace — is a fairly forgiving one. In less forgiving, more dangerous environments — three or more parties, of varying commitment to peace, with divergent aims, with independent sources of income and arms, and with neighbours who are willing to buy, sell and transit illicit goods — United Nations missions put not only their own people but peace itself at risk unless they perform their tasks with the competence and efficiency that the situation requires and have serious great power backing.5 A/55/305 S/2000/809 26. It is vitally important that negotiators, the Security Council, Secretariat mission planners, and mission participants alike understand which of these political-military environments they are entering, how the environment may change under their feet once they arrive, and what they realistically plan to do if and when it does change. Each of these must be factored into an operation’s entry strategy and, indeed, into the basic decision about whether an operation is feasible and should even be attempted. 27. It is equally important, in this context, to judge the extent to which local authorities are willing and able to take difficult but necessary political and economic decisions and to participate in the establishment of processes and mechanisms to manage internal disputes and pre-empt violence or the reemerrgenc of conflict. These are factors over which a field mission and the United Nations have little control, yet such a cooperative environment is critical in determining the successful outcome of a peace operation. 28. When complex peace operations do go into the field, it is the task of the operation’s peacekeepers to maintain a secure local environment for peacebuillding and the peacebuilders’ task to support the political, social and economic changes that create a secure environment that is self-sustaining. Only such an environment offers a ready exit to peacekeeping forces, unless the international community is willing to tolerate recurrence of conflict when such forces depart. History has taught that peacekeepers and peacebuilders are inseparable partners in complex operations: while the peacebuilders may not be able to function without the peacekeepers’ support, the peacekeepers have no exit without the peacebuilders’ work. C. Implications for preventive action 29. United Nations peace operations addressed no more than one third of the conflict situations of the 1990s. Because even much-improved mechanisms for creation and support of United Nations peacekeeping operations will not enable the United Nations system to respond with such operations in the case of all conflict everywhere, there is a pressing need for the United Nations and its Member States to establish a more effective system for long-term conflict prevention. Prevention is clearly far more preferable for those who would otherwise suffer the consequences of war, and is a less costly option for the international community than military action, emergency humanitarian relief or reconstruction after a war has run its course. As the Secretary-General noted in his recent Millennium Report (A/54/2000), “every step taken towards reducing poverty and achieving broad-based economic growth is a step toward conflict prevention”. In many cases of internal conflict, “poverty is coupled with sharp ethnic or religious cleavages”, in which minority rights “are insufficiently respected [and] the institutions of government are insufficiently inclusive”. Long-term preventive strategies in such instances must therefore work “to promote human rights, to protect minority rights and to institute political arrangements in which all groups are represented. ... Every group needs to become convinced that the state belongs to all people”. 30. The Panel wishes to commend the United Nations ongoing internal Task Force on Peace and Security for its work in the area of long-term prevention, in particular the notion that development entities in the United Nations system should view humanitarian and development work through a “conflict prevention lens” and make long-term prevention a key focus of their work, adapting current tools, such as the common country assessment and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF), to that end. 31. To improve early United Nations focus on potential new complex emergencies and thus shortteer conflict prevention, about two years ago the Headquarters Departments that sit on the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) created the Inter-Agency/Interdepartmental Framework for Coordination, in which 10 departments, funds, programmes and agencies now participate. The active element, the Framework Team, meets at the Director level monthly to decide on areas at risk, schedule country (or situation) review meetings and identify preventive measures. The Framework mechanism has improved interdepartmental contacts but has not accumulated knowledge in a structured way, and does no strategic planning. This may have contributed to the Secretariat’s difficulty in persuading Member States of the advantages of backing their professed commitment to both long-and short-term conflict prevention measures with the requisite political and financial support. In the interim, the Secretary-General’s annual reports of 1997 and 1999 (A/52/1 and A/54/1) focused6A/55/305 S/2000/809 specifically on conflict prevention. The Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict and the United Nations Association of the United States of America, among others, also have contributed valuable studies on the subject. And more than 400 staff in the United Nations have undergone systematic training in “early warning” at the United Nations Staff College in Turin. 32. At the heart of the question of short-term prevention lies the use of fact-finding missions and other key initiatives by the Secretary-General. These have, however, usually met with two key impediments. First, there is the understandable and legitimate concern of Member States, especially the small and weak among them, about sovereignty. Such concerns are all the greater in the face of initiatives taken by another Member State, especially a stronger neighbour, or by a regional organization that is dominated by one of its members. A state facing internal difficulties would more readily accept overtures by the Secretary-General because of the recognized independence and moral high ground of his position and in view of the letter and spirit of the Charter, which requires that the Secretary-General offer his assistance and expects the Member States to give the United Nations “every assistance” as indicated, in particular, in Article 2 (5) of the Charter. Fact-finding missions are one tool by which the Secretary-General can facilitate the provision of his good offices. 33. The second impediment to effective crisispreveentiv action is the gap between verbal postures and financial and political support for prevention. The Millennium Assembly offers all concerned the opportunity to reassess their commitment to this area and consider the prevention-related recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s Millennium Report and in his recent remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention. There, the Secretary-General emphasized the need for closer collaboration between the Security Council and other principal organs of the United Nations on conflict prevention issues, and ways to interact more closely with non-state actors, including the corporate sector, in helping to defuse or avoid conflicts. 34. Summary of key recommendations on preventive action: (a) The Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000, in particular his appeal to “all who are engaged in conflict prevention and development — the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, Governments and civil society organizations — [to] address these challenges in a more integrated fashion”; (b) The Panel supports the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension, and stresses Member States’ obligations, under Article 2 (5) of the Charter, to give “every assistance” to such activities of the United Nations. D. Implications for peace-building strategy 35. The Security Council and the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peace-keeping Operations have each recognized and acknowledged the importance of peace-building as integral to the success of peacekeeping operations. In this regard, on 29 December 1998 the Security Council adopted a presidential statement that encouraged the Secretary-General to “explore the possibility of establishing postconfflic peace-building structures as part of efforts by the United Nations system to achieve a lasting peaceful solution to conflicts ...”. The Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, in its own report earlier in 2000, stressed the importance of defining and identifying elements of peace-building before they are incorporated into the mandates of complex peace operations, so as to facilitate later consideration by the General Assembly of continuing support for key elements of peace-building after a complex operation draws to a close. 36. Peace-building support offices or United Nations political offices may be established as follow-ons to other peace operations, as in Tajikistan or Haiti, or as independent initiatives, as in Guatemala or Guinea-Bissau. They help to support the consolidation of peace in post-conflict countries, working with both Governments and non-governmental parties and complementing what may be ongoing United Nations development activities, which strive to remain apart from politics while nonetheless targeting assistance at the sources of conflict.7 A/55/305 S/2000/809 37. Effective peace-building requires active engagement with the local parties, and that engagement should be multidimensional in nature. First, all peace operations should be given the capacity to make a demonstrable difference in the lives of the people in their mission area, relatively early in the life of the mission. The head of mission should have authority to apply a small percentage of mission funds to “quick impact projects” aimed at real improvements in quality of life, to help establish the credibility of a new mission. The resident coordinator/humanitarian coordinator of the pre-existing United Nations country team should serve as chief adviser for such projects in order to ensure efficient spending and to avoid conflict with other development or humanitarian assistance programmes. 38. Second, “free and fair” elections should be viewed as part of broader efforts to strengthen governance institutions. Elections will be successfully held only in an environment in which a population recovering from war comes to accept the ballot over the bullet as an appropriate and credible mechanism through which their views on government are represented. Elections need the support of a broader process of democratization and civil society building that includes effective civilian governance and a culture of respect for basic human rights, lest elections merely ratify a tyranny of the majority or be overturned by force after a peace operation leaves. 39. Third, United Nations civilian police monitors are not peacebuilders if they simply document or attempt to discourage by their presence abusive or other unacceptable behaviour of local police officers — a traditional and somewhat narrow perspective of civilian police capabilities. Today, missions may require civilian police to be tasked to reform, train and restructure local police forces according to international standards for democratic policing and human rights, as well as having the capacity to respond effectively to civil disorder and for self-defence. The courts, too, into which local police officers bring alleged criminals and the penal system to which the law commits prisoners also must be politically impartial and free from intimidation or duress. Where peace-building missions require it, international judicial experts, penal experts and human rights specialists, as well as civilian police, must be available in sufficient numbers to strengthen rule of law institutions. Where justice, reconciliation and the fight against impunity require it, the Security Council should authorize such experts, as well as relevant criminal investigators and forensic specialists, to further the work of apprehension and prosecution of persons indicted for war crimes in support of United Nations international criminal tribunals. 40. While this team approach may seem self-evident, the United Nations has faced situations in the past decade where the Security Council has authorized the deployment of several thousand police in a peacekeeping operation but has resisted the notion of providing the same operations with even 20 or 30 criminal justice experts. Further, the modern role of civilian police needs to be better understood and developed. In short, a doctrinal shift is required in how the Organization conceives of and utilizes civilian police in peace operations, as well as the need for an adequately resourced team approach to upholding the rule of law and respect for human rights, through judicial, penal, human rights and policing experts working together in a coordinated and collegial manner. 41. Fourth, the human rights component of a peace operation is indeed critical to effective peace-building. United Nations human rights personnel can play a leading role, for example, in helping to implement a comprehensive programme for national reconciliation. The human rights components within peace operations have not always received the political and administrative support that they require, however, nor are their functions always clearly understood by other components. Thus, the Panel stresses the importance of training military, police and other civilian personnel on human rights issues and on the relevant provisions of international humanitarian law. In this respect, the Panel commends the Secretary-General’s bulletin of 6 August 1999 entitled “Observance by United Nations forces of international humanitarian law” (ST/SGB/1999/13). 42. Fifth, the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants — key to immediate post-conflict stability and reduced likelihood of conflict recurrence — is an area in which peace-building makes a direct contribution to public security and law and order. But the basic objective of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is not met unless all three elements of the programme are implemented. Demobilized fighters (who almost never fully disarm) will tend to return to a life of violence if8A/55/305 S/2000/809 they find no legitimate livelihood, that is, if they are not “reintegrated” into the local economy. The reintegration element of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is voluntarily funded, however, and that funding has sometimes badly lagged behind requirements. 43. Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration has been a feature of at least 15 peacekeeping operations in the past 10 years. More than a dozen United Nations agencies and programmes as well as international and local NGOs, fund these programmes. Partly because so many actors are involved in planning or supporting disarmament, demobilization and reintegration, it lacks a designated focal point within the United Nations system. 44. Effective peace-building also requires a focal point to coordinate the many different activities that building peace entails. In the view of the Panel, the United Nations should be considered the focal point for peace-building activities by the donor community. To that end, there is great merit in creating a consolidated and permanent institutional capacity within the United Nations system. The Panel therefore believes that the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, in his/her capacity as Convener of ECPS, should serve as the focal point for peace-building. The Panel also supports efforts under way by the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to jointly strengthen United Nations capacity in this area, because effective peace-building is, in effect, a hybrid of political and development activities targeted at the sources of conflict. 45. DPA, the Department of Political Affairs, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Department of Disarmament Affairs (DDA), the Office of Legal Affairs (OLA), UNDP, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), OHCHR, UNHCR, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, and the United Nations Security Coordinator are represented in ECPS; the World Bank Group has been invited to participate as well. ECPS thus provides the ideal forum for the formulation of peace-building strategies. 46. Nonetheless, a distinction should be made between strategy formulation and the implementation of such strategies, based upon a rational division of labour among ECPS members. In the Panel's view, UNDP has untapped potential in this area, and UNDP, in cooperation with other United Nations agencies, funds and programmes and the World Bank, are best placed to take the lead in implementing peace-building activities. The Panel therefore recommends that ECPS propose to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to develop peacebuilldin strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. That plan should also indicate the criteria for determining when the appointment of a senior political envoy or representative of the Secretary-General may be warranted to raise the profile and sharpen the political focus of peace-building activities in a particular region or country recovering from conflict. 47. Summary of key recommendations on peacebuillding (a) A small percentage of a mission’s firstyeea budget should be made available to the representative or special representative of the Secretary-General leading the mission to fund quick impact projects in its area of operations, with the advice of the United Nations country team’s resident coordinator; (b) The Panel recommends a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police, other rule of law elements and human rights experts in complex peace operations to reflect an increased focus on strengthening rule of law institutions and improving respect for human rights in post-conflict environments; (c) The Panel recommends that the legislative bodies consider bringing demobilization and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations for the first phase of an operation in order to facilitate the rapid disassembly of fighting factions and reduce the likelihood of resumed conflict; (d) The Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security discuss and recommend to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies.9 A/55/305 S/2000/809 E. Implications for peacekeeping doctrine and strategy 48. The Panel concurs that consent of the local parties, impartiality and use of force only in selfdeffenc should remain the bedrock principles of peacekeeping. Experience shows, however, that in the context of modern peace operations dealing with intra-State/transnational conflicts, consent may be manipulated in many ways by the local parties. A party may give its consent to United Nations presence merely to gain time to retool its fighting forces and withdraw consent when the peacekeeping operation no longer serves its interests. A party may seek to limit an operation’s freedom of movement, adopt a policy of persistent non-compliance with the provisions of an agreement or withdraw its consent altogether. Moreover, regardless of faction leaders’ commitment to the peace, fighting forces may simply be under much looser control than the conventional armies with which traditional peacekeepers work, and such forces may split into factions whose existence and implications were not contemplated in the peace agreement under the colour of which the United Nations mission operates. 49. In the past, the United Nations has often found itself unable to respond effectively to such challenges. It is a fundamental premise of the present report, however, that it must be able to do so. Once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandate professionally and successfully. This means that United Nations military units must be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate. Rules of engagement should not limit contingents to stroke-forstrrok responses but should allow ripostes sufficient to silence a source of deadly fire that is directed at United Nations troops or at the people they are charged to protect and, in particularly dangerous situations, should not force United Nations contingents to cede the initiative to their attackers. 50. Impartiality for such operations must therefore mean adherence to the principles of the Charter and to the objectives of a mandate that is rooted in those Charter principles. Such impartiality is not the same as neutrality or equal treatment of all parties in all cases for all time, which can amount to a policy of appeasement. In some cases, local parties consist not of moral equals but of obvious aggressors and victims, and peacekeepers may not only be operationally justified in using force but morally compelled to do so. Genocide in Rwanda went as far as it did in part because the international community failed to use or to reinforce the operation then on the ground in that country to oppose obvious evil. The Security Council has since established, in its resolution 1296 (2000), that the targeting of civilians in armed conflict and the denial of humanitarian access to civilian populations afflicted by war may themselves constitute threats to international peace and security and thus be triggers for Security Council action. If a United Nations peace operation is already on the ground, carrying out those actions may become its responsibility, and it should be prepared. 51. This means, in turn, that the Secretariat must not apply best-case planning assumptions to situations where the local actors have historically exhibited worst-case behaviour. It means that mandates should specify an operation’s authority to use force. It means bigger forces, better equipped and more costly, but able to pose a credible deterrent threat, in contrast to the symbolic and non-threatening presence that characterizes traditional peacekeeping. United Nations forces for complex operations should be sized and configured so as to leave no doubt in the minds of would-be spoilers as to which of the two approaches the Organization has adopted. Such forces should be afforded the field intelligence and other capabilities needed to mount a defence against violent challengers. 52. Willingness of Member States to contribute troops to a credible operation of this sort also implies a willingness to accept the risk of casualties on behalf of the mandate. Reluctance to accept that risk has grown since the difficult missions of the mid-1990s, partly because Member States are not clear about how to define their national interests in taking such risks, and partly because they may be unclear about the risks themselves. In seeking contributions of forces, therefore, the Secretary-General must be able to make the case that troop contributors and indeed all Member States have a stake in the management and resolution of the conflict, if only as part of the larger enterprise of establishing peace that the United Nations represents. In so doing, the Secretary-General should be able to give would-be troop contributors an assessment of risk that describes what the conflict and the peace are about, evaluates the capabilities and objectives of the local parties, and assesses the independent financial10 A/55/305 S/2000/809 resources at their disposal and the implications of those resources for the maintenance of peace. The Security Council and the Secretariat also must be able to win the confidence of troop contributors that the strategy and concept of operations for a new mission are sound and that they will be sending troops or police to serve under a competent mission with effective leadership. 53. The Panel recognizes that the United Nations does not wage war. Where enforcement action is required, it has consistently been entrusted to coalitions of willing States, with the authorization of the Security Council, acting under Chapter VII of the Charter. 54. The Charter clearly encourages cooperation with regional and subregional organizations to resolve conflict and establish and maintain peace and security. The United Nations is actively and successfully engaged in many such cooperation programmes in the field of conflict prevention, peacemaking, elections and electoral assistance, human rights monitoring and humanitarian work and other peace-building activities in various parts of the world. Where peacekeeping operations are concerned, however, caution seems appropriate, because military resources and capability are unevenly distributed around the world, and troops in the most crisis-prone areas are often less prepared for the demands of modern peacekeeping than is the case elsewhere. Providing training, equipment, logistical support and other resources to regional and subregional organizations could enable peacekeepers from all regions to participate in a United Nations peacekeeping operation or to set up regional peacekeeping operations on the basis of a Security Council resolution. 55. Summary of key recommendation on peacekeeping doctrine and strategy: once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandates professionally and successfully and be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate, with robust rules of engagement, against those who renege on their commitments to a peace accord or otherwise seek to undermine it by violence. F. Clear, credible and achievable mandates 56. As a political body, the Security Council focuses on consensus-building, even though it can take decisions with less than unanimity. But the compromises required to build consensus can be made at the expense of specificity, and the resulting ambiguity can have serious consequences in the field if the mandate is then subject to varying interpretation by different elements of a peace operation, or if local actors perceive a less than complete Council commitment to peace implementation that offers encouragement to spoilers. Ambiguity may also paper over differences that emerge later, under pressure of a crisis, to prevent urgent Council action. While it acknowledges the utility of political compromise in many cases, the Panel comes down in this case on the side of clarity, especially for operations that will deploy into dangerous circumstances. Rather than send an operation into danger with unclear instructions, the Panel urges that the Council refrain from mandating such a mission. 57. The outlines of a possible United Nations peace operation often first appear when negotiators working toward a peace agreement contemplate United Nations implementation of that agreement. Although peace negotiators (peacemakers) may be skilled professionals in their craft, they are much less likely to know in detail the operational requirements of soldiers, police, relief providers or electoral advisers in United Nations field missions. Non-United Nations peacemakers may have even less knowledge of those requirements. Yet the Secretariat has, in recent years, found itself required to execute mandates that were developed elsewhere and delivered to it via the Security Council with but minor changes. 58. The Panel believes that the Secretariat must be able to make a strong case to the Security Council that requests for United Nations implementation of ceasefires or peace agreements need to meet certain minimum conditions before the Council commits United Nations-led forces to implement such accords, including the opportunity to have adviser-observers present at the peace negotiations; that any agreement be consistent with prevailing international human rights standards and humanitarian law; and that tasks to be undertaken by the United Nations are operationally achievable — with local responsibility for supporting11 A/55/305 S/2000/809 them specified — and either contribute to addressing the sources of conflict or provide the space required for others to do so. Since competent advice to negotiators may depend on detailed knowledge of the situation on the ground, the Secretary-General should be preauthoorize to commit funds from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund sufficient to conduct a preliminary site survey in the prospective mission area. 59. In advising the Council on mission requirements, the Secretariat must not set mission force and other resource levels according to what it presumes to be acceptable to the Council politically. By self-censoring in that manner, the Secretariat sets up itself and the mission not just to fail but to be the scapegoats for failure. Although presenting and justifying planning estimates according to high operational standards might reduce the likelihood of an operation going forward, Member States must not be led to believe that they are doing something useful for countries in trouble when — by under-resourcing missions — they are more likely agreeing to a waste of human resources, time and money. 60. Moreover, the Panel believes that until the Secretary-General is able to obtain solid commitments from Member States for the forces that he or she does believe necessary to carry out an operation, it should not go forward at all. To deploy a partial force incapable of solidifying a fragile peace would first raise and then dash the hopes of a population engulfed in conflict or recovering from war, and damage the credibility of the United Nations as a whole. In such circumstances, the Panel believes that the Security Council should leave in draft form a resolution that contemplated sizeable force levels for a new peacekeeping operation until such time as the Secretary-General could confirm that the necessary troop commitments had been received from Member States. 61. There are several ways to diminish the likelihood of such commitment gaps, including better coordination and consultation between potential troop contributors and the members of the Security Council during the mandate formulation process. Troop contributor advice to the Security Council might usefully be institutionalized via the establishment of ad hoc subsidiary organs of the Council, as provided for in Article 29 of the Charter. Member States contributing formed military units to an operation should as a matter of course be invited to attend Secretariat briefings of the Security Council pertaining to crises that affect the safety and security of the mission’s personnel or to a change or reinterpretation of a mission’s mandate with respect to the use of force. 62. Finally, the desire on the part of the Secretary-General to extend additional protection to civilians in armed conflicts and the actions of the Security Council to give United Nations peacekeepers explicit authority to protect civilians in conflict situations are positive developments. Indeed, peacekeepers — troops or police — who witness violence against civilians should be presumed to be authorized to stop it, within their means, in support of basic United Nations principles and, as stated in the report of the Independent Inquiry on Rwanda, consistent with “the perception and the expectation of protection created by [an operation’s] very presence” (see S/1999/1257, p. 51). 63. However, the Panel is concerned about the credibility and achievability of a blanket mandate in this area. There are hundreds of thousands of civilians in current United Nations mission areas who are exposed to potential risk of violence, and United Nations forces currently deployed could not protect more than a small fraction of them even if directed to do so. Promising to extend such protection establishes a very high threshold of expectation. The potentially large mismatch between desired objective and resources available to meet it raises the prospect of continuing disappointment with United Nations followthrroug in this area. If an operation is given a mandate to protect civilians, therefore, it also must be given the specific resources needed to carry out that mandate. 64. Summary of key recommendations on clear, credible and achievable mandates: (a) The Panel recommends that, before the Security Council agrees to implement a ceasefire or peace agreement with a United Nations-led peacekeeping operation, the Council assure itself that the agreement meets threshold conditions, such as consistency with international human rights standards and practicability of specified tasks and timelines; (b) The Security Council should leave in draft form resolutions authorizing missions with sizeable troop levels until such time as the Secretary-General has firm commitments of troops and other critical mission support elements,12 A/55/305 S/2000/809 including peace-building elements, from Member States; (c) Security Council resolutions should meet the requirements of peacekeeping operations when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations, especially the need for a clear chain of command and unity of effort; (d) The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when formulating or changing mission mandates, and countries that have committed military units to an operation should have access to Secretariat briefings to the Council on matters affecting the safety and security of their personnel, especially those meetings with implications for a mission’s use of force. G. Information-gathering, analysis, and strategic planning capacities 65. A strategic approach by the United Nations to conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building will require that the Secretariat’s key implementing departments in peace and security work more closely together. To do so, they will need sharper tools to gather and analyse relevant information and to support ECPS, the nominal high-level decision-making forum for peace and security issues. 66. ECPS is one of four “sectoral” executive committees established in the Secretary-General’s initial reform package of early 1997 (see A/51/829, sect. A). The Committees for Economic and Social Affairs, Development Operations, and Humanitarian Affairs were also established. OHCHR is a member of all four. These committees were designed to “facilitate more concerted and coordinated management” across participating departments and were given “executive decision-making as well as coordinating powers.” Chaired by the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, ECPS has promoted greater exchange of information across and cooperation between departments, but it has not yet become the decisionmakkin body that the 1997 reforms envisioned, which its participants acknowledge. 67. Current Secretariat staffing levels and job demands in the peace and security sector more or less preclude departmental policy planning. Although most ECPS members have policy or planning units, they tend to be drawn into day-to-day issues. Yet without significant knowledge generating and analytic capacity, the Secretariat will remain a reactive institution unable to get ahead of daily events, and ECPS will not be able to fulfil the role for which it was created. 68. The Secretary-General and the members of ECPS need a professional system in the Secretariat for accumulating knowledge about conflict situations, distributing that knowledge efficiently to a wide user base, generating policy analyses and formulating longteer strategies. That system does not exist at present. The Panel proposes that it be created as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat, or EISAS. 69. The bulk of EISAS should be formed by consolidation of the various departmental units that are assigned policy and information analysis roles related to peace and security, including the Policy Analysis Unit and the Situation Centre of DPKO; the Policy Planning Unit of DPA; the Policy Development Unit (or elements thereof) of OCHA; and the Media Monitoring and Analysis Section of the Department of Public Information (DPI). 70. Additional staff would be required to give EISAS expertise that does not exist elsewhere in the system or that cannot be taken from existing structures. These additions would include a head of the staff (at Director level), a small team of military analysts, police experts and highly qualified information systems analysts who would be responsible for managing the design and maintenance of EISAS databases and their accessibility to both Headquarters and field offices and missions. 71. Close affiliates of EISAS should include the Strategic Planning Unit of the Office of the Secretary-General; the Emergency Response Division of UNDP; the Peace-building Unit (see paras. 239-243 below); the Information Analysis Unit of OCHA (which supports Relief Web); the New York liaison offices of OHCHR and UNHCR; the Office of the United Nations Security Coordinator; and the Monitoring, Database and Information Branch of DDA. The World Bank Group should be invited to maintain liaison, using appropriate elements, such as the Bank’s Post-Conflict Unit. 72. As a common service, EISAS would be of both short-term and long-term value to ECPS members. It would strengthen the daily reporting function of the DPKO Situation Centre, generating all-source updates13 A/55/305 S/2000/809 on mission activity and relevant global events. It could bring a budding crisis to the attention of ECPS leadership and brief them on that crisis using modern presentation techniques. It could serve as a focal point for timely analysis of cross-cutting thematic issues and preparation of reports for the Secretary-General on such issues. Finally, based on the prevailing mix of missions, crises, interests of the legislative bodies and inputs from ECPS members, EISAS could propose and manage the agenda of ECPS itself, support its deliberations and help to transform it into the decisionmakkin body anticipated in the Secretary-General’s initial reforms. 73. EISAS should be able to draw upon the best available expertise — inside and outside the United Nations system — to fine-tune its analyses with regard to particular places and circumstances. It should provide the Secretary-General and ECPS members with consolidated assessments of United Nations and other efforts to address the sources and symptoms of ongoing and looming conflicts, and should be able to assess the potential utility — and implications — of further United Nations involvement. It should provide the basic background information for the initial work of the Integrated Mission Task Forces (ITMFs) that the Panel recommends below (see paras. 198-217), be established to plan and support the set up of peace operations, and continue to provide analyses and manage the information flow between mission and Task Force once the mission has been established. 74. EISAS should create, maintain and draw upon shared, integrated, databases that would eventually replace the proliferated copies of code cables, daily situation reports, daily news feeds and informal connections with knowledgeable colleagues that desk officers and decision makers alike currently use to keep informed of events in their areas of responsibility. With appropriate safeguards, such databases could be made available to users of a peace operations Intranet (see paras. 255 and 256 below). Such databases, potentially available to Headquarters and field alike via increasingly cheap commercial broadband communications services, would help to revolutionize the manner in which the United Nations accumulates knowledge and analyses key peace and security issues. EISAS should also eventually supersede the Framework for Coordination mechanism. 75. Summary of key recommendation on information and strategic analysis: the Secretary-General should establish an entity, referred to here as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS), that would support the information and analysis needs of all members of ECPS; for management purposes, it should be administered by and report jointly to the heads of DPA and DPKO. H. The challenge of transitional civil administration 76. Until mid-1999, the United Nations had conducted just a small handful of field operations with elements of civil administration conduct or oversight. In June 1999, however, the Secretariat found itself directed to develop a transitional civil administration for Kosovo, and three months later for East Timor. The struggles of the United Nations to set up and manage those operations are part of the backdrop to the narratives on rapid deployment and on Headquarters staffing and structure in the present report. 77. These operations face challenges and responsibilities that are unique among United Nations field operations. No other operations must set and enforce the law, establish customs services and regulations, set and collect business and personal taxes, attract foreign investment, adjudicate property disputes and liabilities for war damage, reconstruct and operate all public utilities, create a banking system, run schools and pay teachers and collect the garbage — in a wardammage society, using voluntary contributions, because the assessed mission budget, even for such “transitional administration” missions, does not fund local administration itself. In addition to such tasks, these missions must also try to rebuild civil society and promote respect for human rights, in places where grievance is widespread and grudges run deep. 78. Beyond such challenges lies the larger question of whether the United Nations should be in this business at all, and if so whether it should be considered an element of peace operations or should be managed by some other structure. Although the Security Council may not again direct the United Nations to do transitional civil administration, no one expected it to do so with respect to Kosovo or East Timor either. Intra-State conflicts continue and future instability is hard to predict, so that despite evident ambivalence about civil administration among United Nations Member States and within the Secretariat, other such14 A/55/305 S/2000/809 missions may indeed be established in the future and on an equally urgent basis. Thus, the Secretariat faces an unpleasant dilemma: to assume that transitional administration is a transitory responsibility, not prepare for additional missions and do badly if it is once again flung into the breach, or to prepare well and be asked to undertake them more often because it is well prepared. Certainly, if the Secretariat anticipates future transitional administrations as the rule rather than the exception, then a dedicated and distinct responsibility centre for those tasks must be created somewhere within the United Nations system. In the interim, DPKO has to continue to support this function. 79. Meanwhile, there is a pressing issue in transitional civil administration that must be addressed, and that is the issue of “applicable law.” In the two locales where United Nations operations now have law enforcement responsibility, local judicial and legal capacity was found to be non-existent, out of practice or subject to intimidation by armed elements. Moreover, in both places, the law and legal systems prevailing prior to the conflict were questioned or rejected by key groups considered to be the victims of the conflicts. 80. Even if the choice of local legal code were clear, however, a mission’s justice team would face the prospect of learning that code and its associated procedures well enough to prosecute and adjudicate cases in court. Differences in language, culture, custom and experience mean that the learning process could easily take six months or longer. The United Nations currently has no answer to the question of what such an operation should do while its law and order team inches up such a learning curve. Powerful local political factions can and have taken advantage of the learning period to set up their own parallel administrations, and crime syndicates gladly exploit whatever legal or enforcement vacuums they can find. 81. These missions’ tasks would have been much easier if a common United Nations justice package had allowed them to apply an interim legal code to which mission personnel could have been pre-trained while the final answer to the “applicable law” question was being worked out. Although no work is currently under way within Secretariat legal offices on this issue, interviews with researchers indicate that some headway toward dealing with the problem has been made outside the United Nations system, emphasizing the principles, guidelines, codes and procedures contained in several dozen international conventions and declarations relating to human rights, humanitarian law, and guidelines for police, prosecutors and penal systems. 82. Such research aims at a code that contains the basics of both law and procedure to enable an operation to apply due process using international jurists and internationally agreed standards in the case of such crimes as murder, rape, arson, kidnapping and aggravated assault. Property law would probably remain beyond reach of such a “model code”, but at least an operation would be able to prosecute effectively those who burned their neighbours’ homes while the property law issue was being addressed. 83. Summary of key recommendation on transitional civil administration: the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General invite a panel of international legal experts, including individuals with experience in United Nations operations that have transitional administration mandates, to evaluate the feasibility and utility of developing an interim criminal code, including any regional adaptations potentially required, for use by such operations pending the re-establishment of local rule of law and local law enforcement capacity. III. United Nations capacities to deploy operations rapidly and effectively 84. Many observers have questioned why it takes so long for the United Nations to fully deploy operations following the adoption of a Security Council resolution. The reasons are several. The United Nations does not have a standing army, and it does not have a standing police force designed for field operations. There is no reserve corps of mission leadership: special representatives of the Secretary-General and heads of mission, force commanders, police commissioners, directors of administration and other leadership components are not sought until urgently needed. The Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS) currently in place for potential government-provided military, police and civilian expertise has yet to become a dependable supply of resources. The stockpile of essential equipment recycled from the large missions of the mid-1990s to the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) at Brindisi, Italy, has been depleted by the current surge in missions and there is as yet no budgetary vehicle for rebuilding it quickly. The15 A/55/305 S/2000/809 peacekeeping procurement process may not adequately balance its responsibilities for cost-effectiveness and financial responsibility against overriding operational needs for timely response and mission credibility. The need for standby arrangements for the recruitment of civilian personnel in substantive and support areas has long been recognized but not yet implemented. And finally, the Secretary-General lacks most of the authority to acquire, hire and preposition the goods and people needed to deploy an operation rapidly before the Security Council adopts the resolution to establish it, however likely such an operation may seem. 85. In short, few of the basic building blocks are in place for the United Nations to rapidly acquire and deploy the human and material resources required to mount any complex peace operation in the future. A. Defining what “rapid and effective deployment” entails 86. The proceedings of the Security Council, the reports of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and input provided to the Panel by the field missions, the Secretariat and the Member States all agree on the need for the United Nations to significantly strengthen capacity to deploy new field operations rapidly and effectively. In order to strengthen these capacities, the United Nations must first agree on basic parameters for defining what “rapidity” and “effectiveness” entail. 87. The first six to 12 weeks following a ceasefire or peace accord is often the most critical period for establishing both a stable peace and the credibility of the peacekeepers. Credibility and political momentum lost during this period can often be difficult to regain. Deployment timelines should thus be tailored accordingly. However, the speedy deployment of military, civilian police and civilian expertise will not help to solidify a fragile peace and establish the credibility of an operation if these personnel are not equipped to do their job. To be effective, the missions’ personnel need materiel (equipment and logistics support), finance (cash in hand to procure goods and services) information assets (training and briefing), an operational strategy and, for operations deploying into uncertain circumstances, a military and political “centre of gravity” sufficient to enable it to anticipate and overcome one or more of the parties’ second thoughts about taking a peace process forward. 88. Timelines for rapid and effective deployment will naturally vary in accordance with the politico-military situations that are unique to each post-conflict environment. Nevertheless, the first step in enhancing the United Nations capacity for rapid deployment must begin with agreeing upon a standard towards which the Organization should strive. No such standard yet exists. The Panel thus proposes that the United Nations develop the operational capabilities to fully deploy “traditional” peacekeeping operations within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and complex peacekeeping operations within 90 days. In the case of the latter, the mission headquarters should be fully installed and functioning within 15 days. 89. In order to meet these timelines, the Secretariat would need one or a combination of the following: (a) standing reserves of military, civilian police and civilian expertise, materiel and financing; (b) extremely reliable standby capacities to be called upon on short notice; or (c) sufficient lead-time to acquire these resources, which would require the ability to foresee, plan for and initiate spending for potential new missions several months ahead of time. A number of the Panel’s recommendations are directed at strengthening the Secretariat’s analytical capacities and aligning them with the mission planning process in order to help the United Nations be better prepared for potential new operations. However, neither the outbreak of war nor the conclusion of peace can always be predicted well in advance. In fact, experience has shown that this is often not the case. Thus, the Secretariat must be able to maintain a certain generic level of preparedness, through the establishment of new standing capacities and enhancement of existing standby capacities, so as to be prepared for unforeseen demands. 90. Many Member States have argued against the establishment of a standing United Nations army or police force, resisted entering into reliable standby arrangements, cautioned against the incursion of financial expenses for building a reserve of equipment or discouraged the Secretariat from undertaking planning for potential operations prior to the Secretary-General having been granted specific, crisis-driven legislative authority to do so. Under these circumstances, the United Nations cannot deploy operations “rapidly and effectively” within the timelines suggested. The analysis that follows argues16 A/55/305 S/2000/809 that at least some of these circumstances must change to make rapid and effective deployment possible. 91. Summary of key recommendation on determining deployment timelines: the United Nations should define “rapid and effective deployment capacities” as the ability, from an operational perspective, to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days after the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. B. Effective mission leadership 92. Effective, dynamic leadership can make the difference between a cohesive mission with high morale and effectiveness despite adverse circumstances, and one that struggles to maintain any of those attributes. That is, the tenor of an entire mission can be heavily influenced by the character and ability of those who lead it. 93. Given this critical role, the current United Nations approach to recruiting, selecting, training and supporting its mission leaders leaves major room for improvement. Lists of potential candidates are informally maintained. RSGs and SRSGs, heads of mission, force commanders, civilian police commissioners and their respective deputies may not be selected until close to or even after adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a new mission. They and other heads of substantive and administrative components may not meet one another until they reach the mission area, following a few days of introductory meetings with Headquarters officials. They will be given generic terms of reference that spell out their overall roles and responsibilities, but rarely will they leave Headquarters with mission-specific policy or operational guidance in hand. Initially, at least, they will determine on their own how to implement the Security Council’s mandate and how to deal with potential challenges to implementation. They must develop a strategy for implementing the mandate while trying to establish the mission’s political/military centre of gravity and sustain a potentially fragile peace process. 94. Factoring in the politics of selection makes the process somewhat more understandable. Political sensitivities about a new mission may preclude the Secretary-General’s canvassing potential candidates much before a mission has been established. In selecting SRSGs, RSGs or other heads of mission, the Secretary-General must consider the views of Security Council members, the States within the region and the local parties, the confidence of each of whom an RSG/SRSG needs in order to be effective. The choice of one or more deputy SRSGs may be influenced by the need to achieve geographic distribution within the mission’s leadership. The nationality of the force commander, the police commissioner and their deputies will need to reflect the composition of the military and police components, and will also need to consider the political sensitivities of the local parties. 95. Although political and geographic considerations are legitimate, in the Panel’s view managerial talent and experience must be accorded at least equal priority in choosing mission leadership. Based on the personal experiences of several of its members in leading field operations, the Panel endorses the need to assemble the leadership of a mission as early as possible, so that they can jointly help to shape a mission’s concept of operations, its support plan, its budget and its staffing arrangements. 96. To facilitate early selection, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General compile, in a systematic fashion, and with input from Member States, a comprehensive list of potential SRSGs, force commanders, police commissioners and potential deputies, as well as candidates to head other substantive components of a mission, representing a broad geographic and equitable gender distribution. Such a database would facilitate early identification and selection of the leadership group. 97. The Secretariat should, as a matter of standard practice, provide mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation and, whenever possible, formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. The leadership should also consult widely with the United Nations resident country team and with NGOs working in the mission area to broaden and deepen its local knowledge, which is critical to implementing a comprehensive strategy for transition from war to peace. The country team’s resident coordinator should be included more frequently in the formal mission planning process.17 A/55/305 S/2000/809 98. The Panel believes that there should always be at least one member of the senior management team of a mission with relevant United Nations experience, preferably both in a field mission and at Headquarters. Such an individual would facilitate the work of those members of the management team from outside the United Nations system, shortening the time they would otherwise need to become familiar with the Organization’s rules, regulations, policies and working methods, answering the sorts of questions that predeplooymen training cannot anticipate. 99. The Panel notes the precedent of appointing the resident coordinator/humanitarian coordinator of the team of United Nations agencies, funds and programmes engaged in development work and humanitarian assistance in a particular country as one of the deputies to the SRSG of a complex peace operation. In our view, this practice should be emulated wherever possible. 100. Conversely, it is critical that field representatives of United Nations agencies, funds and programmes facilitate the work of an SRSG or RSG in his or her role as the coordinator of all United Nations activities in the country concerned. On a number of occasions, attempts to perform this role have been hampered by overly bureaucratic resistance to coordination. Such tendencies do not do justice to the concept of the United Nations family that the Secretary-General has tried hard to encourage. 101. Summary of key recommendations on mission leadership: (a) The Secretary-General should systematize the method of selecting mission leaders, beginning with the compilation of a comprehensive list of potential representatives or special representatives of the Secretary-General, force commanders, civilian police commissioners and their deputies and other heads of substantive and administrative components, within a fair geographic and gender distribution and with input from Member States; (b) The entire leadership of a mission should be selected and assembled at Headquarters as early as possible in order to enable their participation in key aspects of the mission planning process, for briefings on the situation in the mission area and to meet and work with their colleagues in mission leadership; (c) The Secretariat should routinely provide the mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation and, whenever possible, should formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. C. Military personnel 102. The United Nations launched UNSAS in the mid-1990s in order to enhance its rapid deployment capabilities and to enable it to respond to the unpredictable and exponential growth in the establishment of the new generation of complex peacekeeping operations. UNSAS is a database of military, civilian police and civilian assets and expertise indicated by Governments to be available, in theory, for deployment to United Nations peacekeeping operations at seven, 15, 30, 60 or 90 days’ notice. The database currently includes 147,900 personnel from 87 Member States: 85,000 in military combat units; 56,700 in military support elements; 1,600 military observers; 2,150 civilian police; and 2,450 other civilian specialists. Of the 87 participating States, 31 have concluded memoranda of understanding with the United Nations enumerating their responsibilities for preparedness of the personnel concerned, but the same memoranda also codify the conditional nature of their commitment. In essence, the memorandum of understanding confirms that States maintain their sovereign right to “just say no” to a request from the Secretary-General to contribute those assets to an operation. 103. The absence of detailed statistics on responses notwithstanding, many Member States are saying “no” to deploying formed military units to United Nationslle peacekeeping operations, far more often than they are saying “yes”. In contrast to the long tradition of developed countries providing the bulk of the troops for United Nations peacekeeping operations during the Organization’s first 50 years, in the last few years 77 per cent of the troops in formed military units deployed in United Nations peacekeeping operations, as of end-June 2000, were contributed by developing countries. 104. The five Permanent Members of the Security Council are currently contributing far fewer troops to United Nations-led operations, but four of the five have contributed sizeable forces to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led operations in Bosnia and18 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Herzegovina and Kosovo that provide a secure environment in which the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH) and the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) can function. The United Kingdom also deployed troops to Sierra Leone at a critical point in the crisis (outside United Nations operational control), providing a valuable stabilizing influence, but no developed country currently contributes troops to the most difficult United Nations-led peacekeeping operations from a security perspective, namely the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) and the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC). 105. Memories of peacekeepers murdered in Mogadishu and Kigali and taken hostage in Sierra Leone help to explain the difficulties Member States are having in convincing their national legislatures and public that they should support the deployment of their troops to United Nations-led operations, particularly in Africa. Moreover, developed States tend not to see strategic national interests at stake. The downsizing of national military forces and the growth in European regional peacekeeping initiatives further depletes the pool of well-trained and well-equipped military contingents from developed countries to serve in United Nations-led operations. 106. Thus, the United Nations is facing a very serious dilemma. A mission such as UNAMSIL would probably not have faced the difficulties that it did in spring 2000 had it been provided with forces as strong as those currently keeping the peace as part of KFOR in Kosovo. The Panel is convinced that NATO military planners would not have agreed to deploy to Sierra Leone with only the 6,000 troops initially authorized. Yet, the likelihood of a KFOR-type operation being deployed in Africa in the near future seems remote given current trends. Even if the United Nations were to attempt to deploy a KFOR-type force, it is not clear, given current standby arrangements, where the troops and equipment would come from. 107. A number of developing countries do respond to requests for peacekeeping forces with troops who serve with distinction and dedication according to very high professional standards, and in accord with new contingent-owned equipment (COE) procedures (“wet lease” agreements) adopted by the General Assembly, which provide that national troop contingents are to bring with them almost all the equipment and supplies required to sustain their troops. The United Nations commits to reimburse troop contributors for use of their equipment and to provide those services and support not covered under the new COE procedures. In return, the troop contributing nations undertake to honour the memoranda of understanding on COE procedures that they sign. 108. Yet, the Secretary-General finds himself in an untenable position. He is given a Security Council resolution specifying troop levels on paper, but without knowing whether he will be given the troops to put on the ground. The troops that eventually arrive in theatre may still be underequipped: Some countries have provided soldiers without rifles, or with rifles but no helmets, or with helmets but no flak jackets, or with no organic transport capability (trucks or troops carriers). Troops may be untrained in peacekeeping operations, and in any case the various contingents in an operation are unlikely to have trained or worked together before. Some units may have no personnel who can speak the mission language. Even if language is not a problem, they may lack common operating procedures and have differing interpretations of key elements of command and control and of the mission’s rules of engagement, and may have differing expectations about mission requirements for the use of force. 109. This must stop. Troop-contributing countries that cannot meet the terms of their memoranda of understanding should so indicate to the United Nations, and must not deploy. To that end, the Secretary-General should be given the resources and support needed to assess potential troop contributors’ preparedness prior to deployment, and to confirm that the provisions of the memoranda will be met. 110. A further step towards improving the current situation would be to give the Secretary-General a capability for assembling, on short notice, military planners, staff officers and other military technical experts, preferably with prior United Nations mission experience, to liaise with mission planners at Headquarters and to then deploy to the field with a core element from DPKO to help establish a mission’s military headquarters, as authorized by the Security Council. Using the current Standby Arrangements System, an “on-call list” of such personnel, nominated by Member States within a fair geographic distribution and carefully vetted and accepted by DPKO, could be formed for this purpose and for strengthening ongoing missions in times of crisis. Personnel assigned to this19 A/55/305 S/2000/809 on-call list of about 100 officers would be at the rank of Major to Colonel and would be treated, upon their short-notice call-up, as United Nations military observers, with appropriate modifications. 111. Personnel selected for inclusion in the on-call list would be pre-qualified medically and administratively for deployment worldwide, would participate in advance training and would incur a commitment of up to two years for immediate deployment within 7-days notification. Every three months, the on-call list would be updated with some 10 to 15 new personnel, as nominated by Member States, to be trained during an initial three-month period. With continuous updating every three months, the on-call list would contain about five to seven teams ready for short-notice deployment. Initial team training would include at the outset a pre-qualification and education phase (brief one-week classroom and apprentice instruction in United Nations systems), followed by a hands-on professional development phase (deployment to an ongoing United Nations peacekeeping operation as a military observer team for about 10 weeks). After this initial three-month team training period, individual officers would then return to their countries and assume an on-call status. 112. Upon Security Council authorization, one or more of these teams could be called up for immediate duty. They would travel to United Nations Headquarters for refresher orientation and specific mission guidance, as necessary, and interaction with the planners of the Integrated Mission Task Force (see paras. 198-217 below) for that operation, before deploying to the field. The teams’ mission would be to translate the broad strategic-level concepts of the mission developed by IMTF into concrete operational and tactical plans, and to undertake immediate coordination and liaison tasks in advance of the deployment of troop contingents. Once deployed, an advance team would remain operational until replaced by deploying contingents (usually about 2 to 3 months, but longer if necessary, up to a six-month term). 113. Funding for a team's initial training would come from the budget of the ongoing mission in which the team is deployed for initial training, and funding for an on-call deployment would come from the prospective peacekeeping mission budget. The United Nations would incur no costs for such personnel while they were on on-call status in their home country as they would be performing normal duties in their national armed forces. The Panel recommends that the Secretary-General outline this proposal with implementing details to the Member States for immediate implementation within the parameters of the existing Standby Arrangements System. 114. Such an emergency military field planning and liaison staff capacity would not be enough, however, to ensure force coherence. In our view, in order to function as a coherent force the troop contingents themselves should at least have been trained and equipped according to a common standard, supplemented by joint planning at the contingents’ command level. Ideally, they will have had the opportunity to conduct joint training field exercises. 115. If United Nations military planners assess that a brigade (approximately 5,000 troops) is what is required to effectively deter or deal with violent challenges to the implementation of an operation’s mandate, then the military component of that United Nations operation ought to deploy as a brigade formation, not as a collection of battalions that are unfamiliar with one another’s doctrine, leadership and operational practices. That brigade would have to come from a group of countries that have been working together as suggested above to develop common training and equipment standards, common doctrine, and common arrangements for the operational control of the force. Ideally, UNSAS should contain several coherent such brigade-size forces, with the necessary enabling forces, available for full deployment to an operation within 30 days in the case of traditional peacekeeping operations and within 90 days in the case of complex operations. 116. To that end, the United Nations should establish the minimum training, equipment and other standards required for forces to participate in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Member States with the means to do so could form partnerships, within the context of UNSAS, to provide financial, equipment, training and other assistance to troop contributors from less developed countries to enable them to reach and maintain that minimum standard, with the goal that each of the brigades so established should be of comparably high quality and be able to call upon effective levels of operational support. Such a formation has been the objective of the Standing High-Readiness Brigade (SHIRBRIG) group of States, who have also established a command-level planning element that works together routinely. However, the20 A/55/305 S/2000/809 proposed arrangement is not intended as a mechanism for relieving some States from their responsibilities to participate actively in United Nations peacekeeping operations or for precluding the participation of smaller States in such operations. 117. Summary of key recommendations on military personnel: (a) Member States should be encouraged, where appropriate, to enter into partnerships with one another, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS), to form several coherent brigade-size forces, with necessary enabling forces, ready for effective deployment within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a traditional peacekeeping operation and within 90 days for complex peacekeeping operations; (b) The Secretary-General should be given the authority to formally canvass Member States participating in UNSAS regarding their willingness to contribute troops to a potential operation once it appeared likely that a ceasefire accord or agreement envisaging an implementing role for the United Nations might be reached; (c) The Secretariat should, as a standard practice, send a team to confirm the preparedness of each potential troop contributor to meet the provisions of the memoranda of understanding on the requisite training and equipment requirements, prior to deployment; those that do not meet the requirements must not deploy; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 military officers be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice to augment nuclei of DPKO planners with teams trained to create a mission headquarters for a new peacekeeping operation. D. Civilian police 118. Civilian police are second only to military forces in numbers of international personnel involved in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Demand for civilian police operations dealing with intra-State conflict is likely to remain high on any list of requirements for helping a war-torn society restore conditions for social, economic and political stability. The fairness and impartiality of the local police force, which civilian police monitor and train, is crucial to maintaining a safe and secure environment, and its effectiveness is vital where intimidation and criminal networks continue to obstruct progress on the political and economic fronts. 119. The Panel has accordingly argued (see paras. 39, 40 and 47 (b) above) for a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police in United Nations peace operations, to focus primarily on the reform and restructuring of local police forces in addition to traditional advisory, training and monitoring tasks. This shift will require Member States to provide the United Nations with even more well-trained and specialized police experts, at a time when they face difficulties meeting current requirements. As of 1 August 2000, 25 per cent of the 8,641 police positions authorized for United Nations operations remained vacant. 120. Whereas Member States may face domestic political difficulties in sending military units to United Nations peace operations, Governments tend to face fewer political constraints in contributing their civilian police to peace operations. However, Member States still have practical difficulties doing so, because the size and configuration of their police forces tend to be tailored to domestic needs alone. 121. Under the circumstances, the process of identifying, securing the release of and training police and related justice experts for mission service is often time-consuming, and prevents the United Nations from deploying a mission’s civilian police component rapidly and effectively. Moreover, the police component of a mission may comprise officers drawn from up to 40 countries who have never met one another before, have little or no United Nations experience, and have received little relevant training or mission-specific briefings, and whose policing practices and doctrines may vary widely. Moreover, civilian police generally rotate out of operations after six months to one year. All of those factors make it extremely difficult for missions’ civilian police commissioners to transform a disparate group of officers into a cohesive and effective force. 122. The Panel therefore calls upon Member States to establish national pools of serving police officers (augmented, if necessary, by recently retired police officers who meet the professional and physical requirements) who are administratively and medically21 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System. The size of the pool will naturally vary with each country’s size and capacity. The Civilian Police Unit of DPKO should assist Member States in determining the selection criteria and training requirements for police officers within these pools, by identifying the specialities and expertise required and issuing common guidelines on the professional standards to be met. Once deployed in a United Nations mission, civilian police officers should serve for at least one year to ensure a minimum level of continuity. 123. The Panel believes that the cohesion of police components would be further enhanced if policecontriibutin States were to develop joint training exercises, and therefore recommends that Member States, where appropriate, enter into new regional training partnerships and strengthen existing ones. The Panel also calls upon Member States in a position to do so to offer assistance (e.g., training and equipment) to smaller police-contributing States to maintain the requisite level of preparedness, according to guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards promulgated by the United Nations. 124. The Panel also recommends that Member States designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures to be responsible for coordinating and managing the provision of police personnel to United Nations peace operations. 125. The Panel believes that the Secretary-General should be given a capability for assembling, on short notice, senior civilian police planners and technical experts, preferably with prior United Nations mission experience, to liaise with mission planners at Headquarters and to then deploy to the field to help establish a mission’s civilian police headquarters, as authorized by the Security Council, in a standby arrangement that parallels the military headquarters oncaal list and its procedures. Upon call-up, members of the on-call list would have the same contractual and legal status as other civilian police in United Nations operations. The training and deployment arrangements for members of the on-call list also could be the same as those of its military counterpart. Furthermore, joint training and planning between the military and civilian police officers on the respective lists would further enhance mission cohesion and cooperation across components at the start-up of a new operation. 126. Summary of key recommendations on civilian police personnel: (a) Member States are encouraged to each establish a national pool of civilian police officers that would be ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations on short notice, within the context of the United Nations standby arrangements system; (b) Member States are encouraged to enter into regional training partnerships for civilian police in the respective national pools in order to promote a common level of preparedness in accordance with guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards to be promulgated by the United Nations; (c) Members States are encouraged to designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures for the provision of civilian police to United Nations peace operations; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving on-call list of about 100 police officers and related experts be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice with teams trained to create the civilian police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train incoming personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date; (e) The Panel recommends that parallel arrangements to recommendations (a), (b) and (c) above be established for judicial, penal, human rights and other relevant specialists, who with specialist civilian police will make up collegial “rule of law” teams. E. Civilian specialists 127. To date, the Secretariat has been unable to identify, recruit and deploy suitably qualified civilian personnel in substantive and support functions either at the right time or in the numbers required. Currently, about 50 per cent of field positions in substantive areas and up to 40 per cent of the positions in administrative and logistics areas are vacant, in missions that were established six months to one year ago and remain in desperate need of the requisite specialists. Some of those who have been deployed have found themselves in positions that do not match their previous experience, such as in the civil administration22 A/55/305 S/2000/809 components of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and UNMIK. Furthermore, the rate of recruitment is nearly matched by the rate of departure by mission personnel fed up with the working conditions that they face, including the short-staffing itself. High vacancy and turnover rates foreshadow a disturbing scenario for the start-up and maintenance of the next complex peacekeeping operation, and hamper the full deployment of current missions. Those problems are compounded by several factors. 1. Lack of standby systems to respond to unexpected or high-volume surge demands 128. Each new complex task assigned to the new generation of peacekeeping operations creates demands that the United Nations system is not able to meet on short notice. This phenomenon first emerged in the early 1990s, with the establishment of the following operations to implement peace accords: the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC), the United Nations Observer Mission in El Salvador (ONUSAL), the United Nations Angola Verification Mission (UNAVEM) and the United Nations Operation in Mozambique (ONUMOZ). The system struggled to recruit experts on short notice in electoral assistance, economic reconstruction and rehabilitation, human rights monitoring, radio and television production, judicial affairs and institution-building. By middeccade the system had created a cadre of individuals, which had acquired on-the-job expertise in these areas, hitherto not present in the system. However, for reasons explained below, many of those individuals have since left the system. 129. The Secretariat was again taken by surprise in 1999, when it had to staff missions with responsibilities for governance in East Timor and Kosovo. Few staff within the Secretariat, or within United Nations agencies, funds or programmes possess the technical expertise and experience required to run a municipality or national ministry. Neither could Member States themselves fill the gap immediately, because they, too, had done no advance planning to identify qualified and available candidates within their national structures. Moreover, the understaffed transitional administration missions themselves took some time to even specify precisely what they required. Eventually, a few Member States offered to provide candidates (some at no cost to the United Nations) to satisfy substantial elements of the demand. However, the Secretariat did not fully avail itself of those offers, partly to avoid the resulting lopsided geographic distribution in the missions’ staffing. The idea of individual Member States taking over entire sectors of administration (sectoral responsibility) was also floated, apparently too late in the process to iron out the details. This idea is worth revisiting, at least for the provision of small teams of civil administrators with specialized expertise. 130. In order to respond quickly, ensure quality control and satisfy the volume of even foreseeable demands, the Secretariat would require the existence and maintenance of a roster of civilian candidates. The roster (which would be distinct from UNSAS) should include the names of individuals in a variety of fields, who have been actively sought out (on an individual basis or through partnerships with and/or the assistance of the members of the United Nations family, governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernnmenta organizations), pre-vetted, interviewed, pre-selected, medically cleared and provided with the basic orientation material applicable to field mission service in general, and who have indicated their availability on short notice. 131. No such roster currently exists. As a result, urgent phone calls have to be made to Member States, United Nations departments and agencies and the field missions themselves to identify suitable candidates at the last minute, and to then expect those candidates to be in a position to drop everything overnight. Through this method, the Secretariat has managed to recruit and deploy at least 1,500 new staff over the last year, not including the managed reassignments of existing staff within the United Nations system, but quality control has suffered. 132. A central Intranet-based roster should be created, along the lines proposed above, that is accessible to and maintained by the relevant members of ECPS. The roster should include the names of their own staff whom ECPS members would agree to release for mission service. Some additional resources would be required to maintain these rosters, but accepted external candidates could be reminded automatically to update their own records via the Internet, particularly as regards availability, and they should be able to access on-line briefing and training materials via the Internet, as well. Field missions should be granted access and delegated the authority to recruit candidates23 A/55/305 S/2000/809 from the roster, in accordance with guidelines to be promulgated by the Secretariat for ensuring fair geographic and gender distribution. 2. Difficulties in attracting and retaining the best external recruits 133. As ad hoc as the recruitment system has been, the United Nations has managed to recruit some very qualified and dedicated individuals for field assignments throughout the 1990s. They have managed ballots in Cambodia, dodged bullets in Somalia, evacuated just in time from Liberia and came to accept artillery fire in former Yugoslavia as a feature of their daily life. Yet, the United Nations system has not yet found a contractual mechanism to appropriately recognize and reward their service by offering them some job security. While it is true that mission recruits are explicitly told not to harbour false expectations about future employment because external recruits are brought in to fill a “temporary” demand, such conditions of service do not attract and retain the best performers for long. In general, there is a need to rethink the historically prevailing view of peacekeeping as a temporary aberration rather than a core function of the United Nations. 134. Thus, at least a percentage of the best external recruits should be offered longer-term career prospects beyond the limited-duration contracts that they are currently offered, and some of them should be actively recruited for positions in the Secretariat’s complex emergency departments in order to increase the number of Headquarters staff with field experience. A limited number of mission recruits have managed to secure positions at Headquarters, but apparently on an ad hoc and individual basis rather than according to a concerted and transparent strategy. 135. Proposals are currently being formulated to address this situation by enabling mission recruits who have served for four years in the field to be offered “continuing appointments”, whenever possible; unlike current contracts, these would not be restricted to the duration of a specific mission mandate. Such initiatives, if adopted, would help to address the problem for those who joined the field in mid-decade and remain in the system. They might not, however, go far enough to attract new recruits, who would generally have to take up six-month to one-year assignments at a time, without necessarily knowing if there would be a position for them once the assignment had been completed. The thought of having to live in limbo for four years might be inhibiting for some of the best candidates, particularly for those with families, who have ample alternative employment opportunities (often with more competitive conditions of service). Consideration should therefore be given to offering continuing appointments to those external recruits who have served with particular distinction for at least two years in a peace operation. 3. Shortages in administrative and support functions at the mid-to senior-levels 136. Critical shortfalls in key administrative areas (procurement, finance, budget, personnel) and in logistics support areas (contracts managers, engineers, information systems analysts, logistics planners) plagued United Nations peace operations throughout the 1990s. The unique and specific nature of the Organization’s administrative rules, regulations and internal procedures preclude new recruits from taking on these administrative and logistics functions in the dynamic conditions of mission start-up, without a substantial amount of training. While ad hoc training programmes for such personnel were initiated in 1995, they have yet to be institutionalized because the most experienced individuals, the would-be trainers, could not be spared from their full-time line responsibilities. In general, training and the production of user-friendly guidance documents are the first projects to be set aside when new missions have to be staffed on an urgent basis. Accordingly, the updated version of the 1992 field administration handbook still remains in draft form. 4. Penalizing field deployment 137. Headquarters staff who are familiar with the rules, regulations and procedures do not readily deploy to the field. Staff in both administrative and substantive areas must volunteer for field duty and their managers must agree to release them. Heads of departments often discourage, dissuade and/or refuse to release their best performers for field assignments because of shortages of competent staff in their own offices, which they fear temporary replacements cannot resolve. Potential volunteers are further discouraged because they know colleagues who were passed over for promotion because they were “out of sight, out of mind.” Most field operations are “non-family assignments” given security considerations, another factor which reduces24 A/55/305 S/2000/809 the numbers of volunteers. A number of the fieldorieente United Nations agencies, funds and programmes (UNHCR, the World Food Programme (WFP), UNICEF, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UNDP) do have a number of potentially well qualified candidates for peacekeeping service, but also face resource constraints, and the staffing needs of their own field operations generally take first priority. 138. The Office of Human Resources Management, supported by a number of interdepartmental task forces, has proposed a series of progressive reforms that address some of these problems. They require mobility within the Secretariat, and aim to encourage rotation between Headquarters and the field by rewarding mission service during promotion considerations. They seek to reduce recruitment delays and grant full recruitment authority to heads of departments. The Panel feels it is essential that these initiatives be approved expeditiously. 5. Obsolescence in the Field Service category 139. The Field Service is the only category of staff within the United Nations designed specifically for service in peacekeeping operations (and whose conditions of service and contracts are designed accordingly and whose salaries and benefits are paid for entirely from mission budgets). It has lost much of its value, however, because the Organization has not dedicated enough resources to career development for the Field Service Officers. This category was developed in the 1950s to provide a highly mobile cadre of technical specialists to support in particular the military contingents of peacekeeping operations. As the nature of the operations changed, so too did the functions the Field Service Officers were asked to perform. Eventually, some ascended through the ranks by the late 1980s and early 1990s to assume managerial functions in the administrative and logistics components of peacekeeping operations. 140. The most experienced and seasoned of the group are now in limited supply, deployed in current missions, and many are at or near retirement. Many of those who remain lack the managerial skills or training required to effectively run the key administrative components of complex peace operations. Others’ technical knowledge is dated. Thus, the Field Service’s composition no longer matches all or many of the administrative and logistics support needs of the newer generation of peacekeeping operations. The Panel therefore encourages the urgent revision of the Field Service’s composition and raison d’être, to better match the present and future demands of field operations, with particular emphasis on mid-to seniorleeve managers in key administrative and logistics areas. Staff development and training for this category of personnel, on a continual basis, should also be treated as a high priority, and the conditions of service should be revised to attract and retain the best candidates. 6. Lack of a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations 141. There is no comprehensive staffing strategy to ensure the right mix of civilian personnel in any operation. There are talents within the United Nations system that must be tapped, gaps to be filled through external recruitment and a range of other options that fall in between, such as the use of United Nations Volunteers, subcontracted personnel, commercial services, and nationally-recruited staff. The United Nations has turned to all of these sources of personnel throughout the past decade, but on a case-by-case basis rather than according to a global strategy. Such a strategy is required to ensure cost-effectiveness and efficiency, as well as to promote mission cohesion and staff morale. 142. This staffing strategy should address the use of United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations, on a priority basis. Since 1992, more than 4,000 United Nations Volunteers have served in 19 different peacekeeping operations. Approximately 1,500 United Nations Volunteers have been assigned to new missions in East Timor, Kosovo and Sierra Leone in the last 18 months alone, in civil administration, electoral affairs, human rights, administrative and logistics support roles. United Nations Volunteers have historically proven to be dedicated and competent in their fields of work. The legislative bodies have encouraged greater use of United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations based on their exemplary past performance, but using United Nations Volunteers as a form of cheap labour risks corrupting the programme and can be damaging to mission morale. Many United Nations Volunteers work alongside colleagues who are making three or four times their salary for similar functions. DPKO is currently in discussion with the United Nations Volunteers Programme on the conclusion of a global memorandum of understanding for the use of25 A/55/305 S/2000/809 United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations. It is essential that such a memorandum be part of a broader comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations. 143. This strategy should also include, in particular, detailed proposals for the establishment of a Civilian Standby Arrangements System (CSAS). CSAS should contain a list of personnel within the United Nations system who have been pre-selected, medically cleared and committed by their parent offices to join a mission start-up team on 72 hours’ notice. The relevant members of the United Nations family should be delegated authority and responsibility, for occupational groups within their respective expertise, to initiate partnerships and memoranda of understanding with intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, for the provision of personnel to supplement mission start-up teams drawn from within the United Nations system. 144. The fact that responsibility for developing a global staffing strategy and civilian standby arrangements has rested solely within the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD), acting on its own initiative whenever there are a few moments to spare, is itself an indication that the Secretariat has not dedicated enough attention to this critical issue. The staffing of a mission, from the top down, is perhaps one of the most important building blocks for successful mission execution. This subject should therefore be accorded the highest priority by the Secretariat’s senior management. 145. Summary of key recommendations on civilian specialists: (a) The Secretariat should establish a central Internet/Intranet-based roster of pre-selected civilian candidates available to deploy to peace operations on short notice. The field missions should be granted access to and delegated authority to recruit candidates from it, in accordance with guidelines on fair geographic and gender distribution to be promulgated by the Secretariat; (b) The Field Service category of personnel should be reformed to mirror the recurrent demands faced by all peace operations, especially at the mid-to senior-levels in the administrative and logistics areas; (c) Conditions of service for externally recruited civilian staff should be revised to enable the United Nations to attract the most highly qualified candidates, and to then offer those who have served with distinction greater career prospects; (d) DPKO should formulate a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations, outlining, among other issues, the use of United Nations Volunteers, standby arrangements for the provision of civilian personnel on 72 hours’ notice to facilitate mission start-up, and the divisions of responsibility among the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security for implementing that strategy. F. Public information capacity 146. An effective public information and communications capacity in mission areas is an operational necessity for virtually all United Nations peace operations. Effective communication helps to dispel rumour, to counter disinformation and to secure the cooperation of local populations. It can provide leverage in dealing with leaders of rival groups, enhance security of United Nations personnel and serve as a force multiplier. It is thus essential that every peace operation formulate public information campaign strategies, particularly for key aspects of a mission’s mandate, and that such strategies and the personnel required to implement them be included in the very first elements deployed to help start up a new mission. 147. Field missions need competent spokespeople who are integrated into the senior management team and project its daily face to the world. To be effective, the spokesperson must have journalistic experience and instincts, and knowledge of how both the mission and United Nations Headquarters work. He or she must also enjoy the confidence of the SRSG and establish good relationship with other members of the mission leadership. The Secretariat must therefore increase its efforts to develop and retain a pool of such personnel. 148. United Nations field operations also need to be able to speak effectively to their own people, to keep staff informed of mission policy and developments and to build links between components and both up and down the chain of command. New information technology provides effective tools for such communications, and should be included in the start-up kits and equipment reserves at UNLB in Brindisi.26 A/55/305 S/2000/809 149. Resources devoted to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links, which now infrequently exceed one per cent of a mission’s operating budget, should be increased in accordance with a mission’s mandate, size and needs. 150. Summary of key recommendation on rapidly deployable capacity for public information: additional resources should be devoted in mission budgets to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links. G. Logistics support, the procurement process and expenditure management 151. The depletion of the United Nations reserve of equipment, long lead-times even for systems contracts, bottlenecks in the procurement process and delays in obtaining cash in hand to conduct procurement in the field further constrain the rapid deployment and effective functioning of missions that do actually manage to reach authorized staffing levels. Without effective logistics support, missions cannot function effectively. 152. The lead-times required for the United Nations to provide field missions with basic equipment and commercial services required for mission start-up and full deployment are dictated by the United Nations procurement process. That process is governed by the Financial Regulations and Rules promulgated by the General Assembly and the Secretariat’s interpretations of those regulations and rules (known as “policies and procedures” in United Nations parlance). The regulations, rules, policies and procedures have been translated into a roughly eight-step process that Headquarters must follow to provide field missions with the equipment and services it requires, as follows: 1. Identify the requirements and raise a requisition. 2. Certify that finances are available to procure the item. 3. Initiate an invitation to bid (ITB) or request for proposal (RFP). 4. Evaluate tenders. 5. Present cases to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts (HCC). 6. Award a contract and place an order for production. 7. Await production of the item. 8. Deliver the item to the mission. 153. Most governmental organizations and commercial companies follow similar processes, though not all of them take as long as that of the United Nations. For example, this entire process in the United Nations can take 20 weeks in the case of office furniture, 17 to 21 weeks for generators, 23 to 27 weeks for prefabricated buildings, 27 weeks for heavy vehicles and 17 to 21 weeks for communications equipment. Naturally, none of these lead-times enable full mission deployment within the timelines suggested if the majority of the processes are commencing only after an operation has been established. 154. The United Nations launched the “start-up kit” concept during the boom in peacekeeping operations in the mid-1990s to partially address this problem. The start-up kits contain the basic equipment required to establish and sustain a 100-person mission headquarters for the first 100 days of deployment, prepurchhased packaged and waiting and ready to deploy at a moment’s notice at Brindisi. Assessed contributions from the mission to which the kits are deployed are then used to reconstitute new start-up kits, and once liquidated a mission’s non-disposable and durable equipment is returned to Brindisi and held in reserve, in addition to the start-up kits. 155. However, the wear and tear on light vehicles and other items in post-war environments may sometimes render the shipping and servicing costs more expensive than selling off the item or cannibalizing it for parts and then purchasing a new item altogether. Thus, the United Nations has moved towards auctioning such items in situ more frequently, although the Secretariat is not authorized to use the funds acquired through this process to purchase new equipment but must return it to Member States. Consideration should be given to enabling the Secretariat to use the funds acquired through these means to purchase new equipment to be held in reserve at Brindisi. Furthermore, consideration should also be given to a general authorization for field missions to donate, in consultation with the United Nations resident coordinator, at least a percentage of27 A/55/305 S/2000/809 such equipment to reputable local non-governmental organizations as a means of assisting the development of nascent civil society. 156. Nonetheless, the existence of these start-up kits and reserves of equipment appears to have greatly facilitated the rapid deployment of the smaller operations mounted in the mid-to-late 1990s. However, the establishment and expansion of new missions has now outpaced the closure of existing operations, so that UNLB has been virtually depleted of the long lead-time items required for full mission deployment. Unless one of the large operations currently in place closes down today and its equipment is all shipped to UNLB in good condition, the United Nations will not have in hand the equipment required to support the start-up and rapid full deployment of a large mission in the near future. 157. There are, of course, limits to how much equipment the United Nations can and should keep in reserve at UNLB or elsewhere. Mechanical equipment in storage needs to be maintained, which can be an expensive proposition, and if not addressed properly can result in missions receiving long awaited items that are inoperable. Furthermore, the commercial and public sectors at the national level have moved increasingly towards “just-in-time” inventory and/or “just-in-time delivery” because of the high opportunity costs of keeping funds tied up in equipment that may not be deployed for some time. Furthermore, the current pace of technological advancements renders certain items, such as communications equipment and information systems hardware, obsolete within a matter of months, let alone years. 158. The United Nations has accordingly also moved in that direction over the past few years, and has concluded some 20 standing commercial systems contracts for the provision of common equipment for peace operations, particularly those required for mission start-up and expansion. Under the systems contracts, the United Nations has been able to cut down lead-times considerably by selecting the vendors ahead of time, and keeping them on standby for production requests. Nevertheless, the production of light vehicles under the current systems contract takes 14 weeks and requires an additional four weeks for delivery. 159. The General Assembly has taken a number of steps to address this lead-time issue. The establishment of the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, which when fully capitalized amounts to $150 million, provided a standing pool of money from which to draw quickly. The Secretary-General can seek the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) to draw up to $50 million from the Fund to facilitate the start-up of a new mission or for unforeseen expansion of an existing one. The Fund is then replenished from the mission budgets once it has been approved or increased. For commitment requests in excess of $50 million, the General Assembly’s approval is required. 160. In exceptional cases, the General Assembly, on the advice of ACABQ, has granted the Secretary-General authority to commit up to $200 million in spending to facilitate the start-up of larger missions (UNTAET, UNMIK and MONUC), pending submission of the necessary detailed budget proposals, which can take months of preparation. These are all welcome developments and are indicative of the Member States’ support for enhancing the Organization’s rapid deployment capacities. 161. At the same time, all of these developments are only applicable after a Security Council resolution has been adopted authorizing the establishment of a mission or its advance elements. Unless some of these measures are applied well in advance of the desired date of mission deployment or are modified to help and maintain a minimum reserve of equipment requiring long lead-times to procure, the suggested targets for rapid and effective deployment cannot be met. 162. The Secretariat should thus formulate a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the deployment timelines proposed. That strategy should be formulated based on a cost-benefit analysis of the appropriate level of long lead-time items that should be kept in reserve and those best acquired through standing contracts, factoring in the cost of compressed delivery times, as required, to support such a strategy. The substantive elements of the peace and security departments would need to give logistics planners an estimate of the number and types of operations that might need to be established over 12 to 18 months. The Secretary-General should submit periodically to the General Assembly, for its review and approval, a detailed proposal for implementing that strategy, which could entail considerable financial implications.28 A/55/305 S/2000/809 163. In the interim, the General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure for the creation of three new start-up kits at Brindisi (for a total of five), which would then automatically be replenished from the budgets of the missions that drew upon the kits. 164. The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to $50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution authorizing a mission’s establishment but with the approval of ACABQ, to facilitate the rapid and effective deployment of operations within the proposed timelines. The Fund should be automatically replenished from assessed contributions to the missions that used it. The Secretary-General should request that the General Assembly consider augmenting the size of the Fund, should he determine that it had been depleted due to the establishment of a number of missions in rapid succession. 165. Well beyond mission start-up, the field missions often wait for months to receive items that they need, particularly when initial planning assumptions prove to be inaccurate or mission requirements change in response to new developments. Even if such items are available locally, there are several constraints on local procurement. First, field missions have limited flexibility and authority, for example, to quickly transfer savings from one line item in a budget to another to meet unforeseen demands. Second, missions are generally delegated procurement authority for no more than $200,000 per purchase order. Purchases above that amount must be referred to Headquarters and its eight-step decision process (see para. 152 above). 166. The Panel supports measures that reduce Headquarters micro-management of the field missions and provide them with the authority and flexibility required to maintain mission credibility and effectiveness, while at the same time holding them accountable. Where Headquarters’ involvement adds real value, however, as with respect to standing contracts, Headquarters should retain procurement responsibility. 167. Statistics from the Procurement Division indicate that of the 184 purchase orders raised by Headquarters in 1999 in support of peacekeeping operations, for values of goods and services between US$ 200,000 and US$ 500,000, 93 per cent related to aircraft and shipping services, motor vehicles and computers, which were either handled through international tenders or are currently covered under systems contracts. Provided that systems contracts are activated quickly and result in the timely provision of goods and services, it appears that the Headquarters’ involvement in those instances makes good sense. The systems contracts and international tenders presumably enable bulk purchases of items and services more cheaply than would be possible locally, and in many instances involve goods and services not available in the mission areas at all. 168. However, it is not entirely clear what real value Headquarters involvement adds to the procurement process for those goods and services that are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts and are more readily available locally at cheaper prices. In such instances, it would make sense to delegate the authority to the field to procure those items, and to monitor the process and its financial controls through the audit mechanism. Accordingly, the Secretariat should assign priority to building capacity in the field to assume a higher level of procurement authority as quickly as possible (e.g., through recruitment and training of the appropriate field personnel and the production of user-friendly guidance documents) for all goods and services that are available locally and not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts (up to US$ 1 million, depending on mission size and needs). 169. Summary of key recommendations on logistics support and expenditure management: (a) The Secretariat should prepare a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the timelines proposed and corresponding to planning assumptions established by the substantive offices of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations; (b) The General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure to maintain at least five mission start-up kits in Brindisi, which should include rapidly deployable communications equipment. The start-up kits should then be routinely replenished with funding from the assessed contributions to the operations that drew on them;29 A/55/305 S/2000/809 (c) The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to US$ 50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund once it became clear that an operation was likely to be established, with the approval of ACABQ but prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution; (d) The Secretariat should undertake a review of the entire procurement policies and procedures (with proposals to the General Assembly for amendments to the Financial Rules and Regulations, as required), to facilitate in particular the rapid and full deployment of an operation within the proposed timelines; (e) The Secretariat should conduct a review of the policies and procedures governing the management of financial resources in the field missions with a view to providing field missions with much greater flexibility in the management of their budgets; (f) The Secretariat should increase the level of procurement authority delegated to the field missions (from $200,000 to as high as $1 million, depending on mission size and needs) for all goods and services that are available locally and are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts. IV. Headquarters resources and structure for planning and supporting peacekeeping operations 170. Creating effective Headquarters support capacity for peace operations means addressing the three issues of quantity, structure and quality, that is, the number of staff needed to get the job done; the organizational structures and procedures that facilitate effective support; and quality people and methods of work within those structures. In the present section, the Panel examines and makes recommendations on primarily the first two issues; in section VI below, it addresses the issue of personnel quality and organizational culture. 171. The Panel sees a clear need for increased resources in support of peacekeeping operations. There is particular need for increased resources in DPKO, the primary department responsible for the planning and support of the United Nations’ most complex and highproofil field operations. A. Staffing-levels and funding for Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations 172. Expenditures for Headquarters staffing and related costs to plan and support all peacekeeping operations in the field can be considered the United Nations direct, non-field support costs for peacekeeping operations. They have not exceeded 6 per cent of the total cost of peacekeeping operations in the last half decade (see table 4.1). They are currently closer to three per cent and will fall below two per cent in the current peacekeeping budget year, based on existing plans for expansion of some missions, such as MONUC in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the full deployment of others, such as UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone, and the establishment of a new operation in Eritrea and Ethiopia. A management analyst familiar with the operational requirements of large organizations, public or private, that operate substantial field-deployed elements might well conclude that an organization trying to run a field-oriented enterprise on two per cent central support costs was undersupporting its field people and very likely burning out its support structures in the process. 173. Table 4.1 lists the total budgets for peacekeeping operations from mid-1996 through mid-2001 (peacekeeping budget cycles run from July to June, offset six months from the United Nations regular budget cycle). It also lists total Headquarters costs in support of peacekeeping, whether inside or outside of DPKO, and whether funded from the regular budget or the Support Account for Peacekeeping Operations (the regular budget covers two years and its costs are apportioned among Member States according to the regular scale of assessment; the Support Account covers one year — the intent being that Secretariat staffing levels should ebb and flow with the level of field operations — and its costs are apportioned according to the peacekeeping scale of assessment).30 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Table 4.1 Ratio of total Headquarters support costs to total peacekeeping operations budgets, 1996-2001 (Millions of United States dollars) July 1996-June 1997 July 1997-June 1998 July 1998-June 1999 July 1999-June 2000 July 2000-June 2001a Peacekeeping budgets 1 260 911.7 812.9 1 417 2 582b Related Headquarters support costsc 49.2 52.8 41.0 41.7 50.2 Headquarters: field cost ratio 3.90% 5.79% 5.05% 2.95% 1.94% a Based on financing reports of the Secretary-General; excluding missions completed by 30 June 2000; including rough estimate for full deployment of MONUC, for which a budget has not yet been prepared. b Estimated. c Figures obtained from the Financial Controller of the United Nations, including all posts in the Secretariat (primarily in DPKO) funded through the regular biennium budget and the Support Account; figures also factor in what the costs would have been for in-kind contributions or “gratis personnel” had they been fully funded. 174. The Support Account funds 85 per cent of the DPKO budget, or about $40 million annually. Another $6 million for DPKO comes from the regular biennium budget. This $46 million combined largely funds the salaries and associated costs of DPKO’s 231 civilian, military and police Professionals and 173 General Service staff (but does not include the Mine Action Service, which is funded through voluntary contributions). The Support Account also funds posts in other parts of the Secretariat engaged in peacekeeping support, such as the Peacekeeping Financing Division and parts of the Procurement Division in the Department of Management, the Office of Legal Affairs and DPI. 175. Until mid-decade, the Support Account was calculated as 8.5 per cent of the total civilian staff costs of peacekeeping operations, but it did not take into consideration the costs of supporting civilian police personnel and United Nations Volunteers, or the costs of supporting private contractors or military troops. The fixed-percentage approach was replaced by the annual justification of every post funded by the Support Account. DPKO staffing levels grew little under the new system, however, partly because the Secretariat seems to have tailored its submissions to what it thought the political market would bear. 176. Clearly, DPKO and the other Secretariat offices supporting peacekeeping should expand and contract to some degree in relation to the level of activity in the field, but to require DPKO to rejustify, every year, seven out of eight posts in the Department is to treat it as though it were a temporary creation and peacekeeping a temporary responsibility of the Organization. Fifty-two years of operations would argue otherwise and recent history would argue further that continuing preparedness is essential, even during downturns in field activity, because events are only marginally predictable and staff capacity and experience, once lost, can take a long time to rebuild, as DPKO has painfully learned in the past two years. 177. Because the Support Account funds virtually all of DPKO on a year-by-year basis, that Department and the other offices funded by the Support Account have no predictable baseline level of funding and posts against which they can recruit and retain staff. Personnel brought in from the field on Support Account-funded posts do not know if those posts will exist for them one year later. Given current working conditions and the career uncertainty that Support Account funding entails, it is impressive that DPKO has managed to hold together at all. 178. Member States and the Secretariat have long recognized the need to define a baseline staffing/funding level and a separate mechanism to enable growth and retrenchment in DPKO in response to changing needs. However, without a review of DPKO staffing needs based on some objective management and productivity criteria, an appropriate baseline is difficult to define. While it is not in a position to conduct such a methodical management review of DPKO, the Panel believes that such a review should be conducted. In the meantime, the Panel believes that certain current staff shortages are plainly obvious and merit highlighting. 179. The Military and Civilian Police Division in DPKO, headed by the United Nations Military Adviser, has an authorized strength of 32 military officers and nine civilian police officers. The Civilian Police Unit has been assigned to support all aspects of United Nations international police operations, from doctrinal development through selection and deployment of31 A/55/305 S/2000/809 officers into field operations. It can, at present, do little more than identify personnel, attempt to pre-screen them with visiting selection assistance teams (an effort that occupies roughly half of the staff) and then see that they get to the field. Moreover, there is no unit within DPKO (or any other part of the United Nations system) that is responsible for planning and supporting the rule of law elements of an operation that in turn support effective police work, whether advisory or executive. 180. Eleven officers in the Military Adviser’s office support the identification and rotation of military units for all peacekeeping operations, and provide military advice to the political officers in DPKO. DPKO’s military officers are also supposed to find time to “train the trainers” at the Member State level, to draft guidelines, manuals and other briefing material, and to work with FALD to identify the logistics and other operational requirements of the military and police components of field missions. However, under existing staffing levels, the Training Unit consists of only five military officers in total. Ten officers in the Military Planning Service are the principal operational-level military mission planners within DPKO; six more posts have been authorized but have not yet all been filled. These 16 planning officers combined represent the full complement of military staff available to determine force requirements for mission start-up and expansion, participate in technical surveys and assess the preparedness of potential troop contributors. Of the 10 military planners originally authorized, one was assigned to draft the rules of engagement and directives to force commanders for all operations. Only one officer is available, part time, to manage the UNSAS database. 181. Table 4.2 contrasts the deployed strength of military and police contingents with the authorized strength of their respective Headquarters support staffs. No national Government would send 27,000 troops into the field with just 32 officers back home to provide them with substantive and operational military guidance. No police organization would deploy 8,000 police officers with only nine headquarters staff to provide them with substantive and operational policing support. Table 4.2 Ratio of military and civilian police staff at Headquarters to military and civilian police personnel in the fielda Military personnel Civilian police Peacekeeping operations 27 365 8 641 Headquarters 32 9 Headquarters: field ratio 0.1% 0.1% a Authorized military strength as of 15 June 2000 and civilian police as of 1 August 2000. 182. The Office of Operations in DPKO, in which the political Desk Officers or substantive focal points for particular peacekeeping operations reside, is another area that seems considerably understaffed. It currently has 15 Professionals serving as the focal points for 14 current and two potential new peace operations, or less than one officer per mission on average. While one officer may be able to handle the needs of one or even two smaller missions, this seems untenable in the case of the larger missions, such as UNTAET in East Timor, UNMIK in Kosovo, UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone and MONUC in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Similar circumstances apply to the logistics and personnel officers in DPKO’s Field Administration and Logistics Division, and to related support personnel in the Department of Management, the Office of Legal Affairs, the Department of Public Information and other offices which support their work. Table 4.3 depicts the total number of staff in DPKO and elsewhere in the Secretariat dedicated, full-time, to supporting the larger missions, along with their annual mission budgets and authorized staffing levels. 183. The general shortage of staff means that in many instances key personnel have no back-up, no way to cover more than one shift in a day when a crisis occurs six to 12 time zones away except by covering two shifts themselves, and no way to take a vacation, get sick or visit the mission without leaving their32 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Table 4.3 Total staff assigned on a full-time basis to support complex peacekeeping operations established in 1999 UNMIK (Kosovo) UNAMSIL (Sierra Leone) UNTAET (East Timor) MONUC (Democratic Republic of the Congo) Budget (estimated) July 2000-June 2001 $410 million $465 million $540 million $535 million Current authorized strength of key components 4 718 police 1 000-plus international civilians 13 000 military 8 950 military 1 640 police 1 185 international civilians 5 537 military 500 military observers Professional staff at Headquarters assigned full-time to support the operation Total Headquarters support staff 1 political officer 2 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 6 1 political officer 2 military 1 logistics coord. 1 finance specialist _______ 5 1 political officer 2 military 1 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 7 1 political officer 3 military 1 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 8 backstopping duties largely uncovered. In the current arrangements, compromises among competing demands are inevitable and support for the field may suffer as a result. In New York, Headquarters-related tasks, such as reporting obligations to the legislative bodies, tend to get priority because Member States’ representatives press for action, often in person. The field, by contrast, is represented in New York by an emaail a cable or the jotted notes of a phone conversation. Thus, in the war for a desk officer’s time, field operations often lose out and are left to solve problems on their own. Yet they should be accorded first priority. People in the field face difficult circumstances, sometimes life-threatening. They deserve better, as do the staff at Headquarters who wish to support them more effectively. 184. Although there appears to be some duplication in the functions performed by desk officers in DPKO and their counterparts in the regional divisions of DPA, closer examination suggests otherwise. The UNMIK desk officer’s counterpart in DPA, for example, follows developments in all of Southeastern Europe and the counterpart in OCHA covers all of the Balkans plus parts of the Commonwealth of Independent States. While it is essential that the officers in DPA and OCHA be given the opportunity to contribute what they can, their efforts combined yield less than one additional full-time-equivalent officer to support UNMIK. 185. The three Regional Directors in the Office of Operations should be visiting the missions regularly and engaging in a constant policy dialogue with the SRSGs and heads of components on the obstacles that Headquarters could help them overcome. Instead, they are drawn into the processes that occupy their desk officers’ time because the latter need the back-up. 186. These competing demands are even more pronounced for the Under-Secretary-General and Assistant Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations. The Under-Secretary-General and Assistant Secretary-General provide advice to the Secretary-General, liaise with Member State delegations and capitals, and one or the other vets every report on peacekeeping operations (40 in the first half of 2000) submitted to the Secretary-General for his approval and signature, prior to submission to the legislative bodies. Since January 2000, the two have briefed the Council in person over 50 times, in sessions lasting up to three hours and requiring several hours of staff preparation in the field and at Headquarters. Coordination meetings take further time away from substantive dialogue with the field missions, from field visits, from reflection on ways to improve the United Nations conduct of peacekeeping and from attentive management.33 A/55/305 S/2000/809 187. The staff shortages faced by the substantive side of DPKO may be exceeded by those in the administrative and logistics support areas, particularly in FALD. At this juncture, FALD provides support not only to peacekeeping operations but also to other field offices, such as the Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator in the Occupied Territories (UNSCO) in Gaza, the United Nations Verification Mission in Guatemala (MINUGUA) and a dozen other small offices, not to mention continuing involvement in managing and reconciling the liquidation of terminated missions. All of FALD adds approximately 1.25 per cent to the total cost of peacekeeping and other field operations. If the United Nations were to subcontract the administrative and logistics support functions performed by FALD, the Panel is convinced that it would be hard pressed to find a commercial company to take on the equivalent task for the equivalent fee. 188. A few examples will illustrate FALD’s pronounced staff shortages: the Staffing Section in FALD’s Personnel Management and Support Service (PMSS), which handles recruitment and travel for all civilian personnel as well as travel for civilian police and military observers, has just 10 professional recruitment officers, four of whom have been assigned to review and acknowledge the 150 unsolicited employment applications that the office now receives every day. The other six officers handle the actual selection process: one full-time and one half-time for Kosovo, one full-time and one half-time for East Timor, and three to cover all other field missions combined. Three recruitment officers are trying to identify suitable candidates to staff two civil administration missions that need hundreds of experienced administrators across a multitude of fields and disciplines. Nine to 12 months after they got under way, neither UNMIK nor UNTAET is fully deployed. 189. The Member States must give the Secretary-General some flexibility and the financial resources to bring in the staff he needs to ensure that the credibility of the Organization is not tarnished by its failure to respond to emergencies as a professional organization should. The Secretary-General must be given the resources to increase the capacity of the Secretariat to react immediately to unforeseen demands. 190. The responsibility for providing the people in the field the goods and services they need to do their jobs falls primarily on FALD’s Logistics and Communications Service (LCS). The job description of one of the 14 logistics coordinators in LCS might help to illustrate the workload that the entire Service currently endures. This individual is the lead logistics planner for the expansion of both the mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) and for the expansion of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) in Lebanon. The same individual is also responsible for drafting the logistics policies and procedures for the critical United Nations Logistics Base in Brindisi and for coordinating the preparation of the entire Service’s annual budget submissions. 191. Based on this cursory review alone and bearing in mind that the total support cost for DPKO and related Headquarters peacekeeping support offices does not even exceed $50 million per annum, the Panel is convinced that additional resources for that Department and the others which support it would be an essential investment to ensure that the over $2 billion the Member States will spend on peacekeeping operations in 2001 will be well spent. The Panel therefore recommends a substantial increase in resources for this purpose, and urge the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining the Organization’s requirements in full. 192. The Panel also believes that peacekeeping should cease to be treated as a temporary requirement and DPKO a temporary organizational structure. It requires a consistent and predictable baseline of funding to do more than keep existing missions afloat. It should have resources to plan for potential contingencies six months to a year down the road; to develop managerial tools to help missions perform better in the future; to study the potential impact of modern technology on different aspects of peacekeeping; to implement the lessons learned from previous operations; and to implement recommendations contained in the evaluation reports of the Office of Internal Oversight Services over the past five years. Staff should be given the opportunity to design and conduct training programmes for newly recruited staff at Headquarters and in the field. They should finish the guidelines and handbooks that could help new mission personnel do their jobs more professionally and in accordance with United Nations rules, regulations and procedures, but that now sit half finished in a dozen offices all around DPKO, because their authors are busy meeting other needs. 193. The Panel therefore recommends that Headquarters support for peacekeeping be treated as a34 A/55/305 S/2000/809 core activity of the United Nations, and as such that the majority of its resource requirements be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennial programme budget of the Organization. Pending the preparation of the next regular budget, it recommends that the Secretary-General approach the General Assembly as soon as possible with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the last Support Account submission. 194. The specific allocation of resources should be determined according to a professional and objective review of requirements, but gross levels should reflect historical experience of peacekeeping. One approach would be to calculate the regular budget baseline for Headquarters support of peacekeeping as a percentage of the average cost of peacekeeping over the preceding five years. The resulting baseline budget would reflect the expected level of activity for which the Secretariat should be prepared. Based on the figures provided by the Controller (see table 4.1), the average for the last five years (including the current budget year) is $1.4 billion. Pegging the baseline at five per cent of the average cost would yield, for example, a baseline budget of $70 million, roughly $20 million more than the current annual Headquarters support budget for peacekeeping. 195. To fund above-average or “surge” activity levels, consideration should be given to a simple percentage charge against missions whose budgets carry peacekeeping operations spending above the baseline level. For example, the roughly $2.6 billion in peacekeeping activity estimated for the current budget year exceeds the $1.4 billion hypothetical baseline by $1.2 billion. A one per cent surcharge on that $1.2 billion would yield an additional $12 million to enable Headquarters to deal effectively with that increase. A two per cent surcharge would yield $24 million. 196. Such a direct method of providing for surge capacity should replace the current, annual, post-bypoos justification required for the Support Account submissions. The Secretary-General should be given the flexibility to determine how such funds should best be utilized to meet a surge in activity, and emergency recruitment measures should apply in such instances so that temporary posts associated with surge requirements could be filled immediately. 197. Summary of key recommendations on funding headquarters support for peacekeeping operations: (a) The Panel recommends a substantial increase in resources for Headquarters support of peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining his requirements in full; (b) Headquarters support for peacekeeping should be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements for that purpose should be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennium programme budget of the Organization; (c) Pending the preparation of the next regular budget submission, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General approach the General Assembly with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the Support Account to allow immediate recruitment of additional personnel, particularly in DPKO. B. Need and proposal for the establishment of Integrated Mission Task Forces 198. There is currently no integrated planning or support cell in DPKO in which those responsible for political analysis, military operations, civilian police, electoral assistance, human rights, development, humanitarian assistance, refugees and displaced persons, public information, logistics, finance and personnel recruitment, among others, are represented. On the contrary, as described above, DPKO has no more than a handful of officers dedicated full-time to planning and supporting even the large complex operations, such as those in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL), Kosovo (UNMIK) and East Timor (UNTAET). In the case of a political peace mission or peace-building office, these functions are discharged within DPA, with equally limited human resources. 199. DPKO’s Office of Operations is responsible for pulling together an overall concept of operations for new peacekeeping missions. In this regard, it bears a heavy dual burden for political analysis and for internal coordination with the other elements of DPKO that are responsible for military and civilian police matters, logistics, finance and personnel. But each of these other elements has a separate organizational reporting chain, and many of them, in fact, are physically scattered across several different buildings. Moreover,35 A/55/305 S/2000/809 DPA, UNDP, OCHA, UNHCR, OHCHR, DPI, and several other departments, agencies, funds and programmes have an increasingly important role to play in planning for any future operation, especially complex operations, and need to be formally included in the planning process. 200. Collaboration across divisions, departments and agencies does occur, but relies too heavily on personal networks and ad hoc support. There are task forces convened for planning major peacekeeping operations, pulling together various parts of the system, but they function more as sounding boards than executive bodies. Moreover, current task forces tend to meet infrequently or even disperse once an operation has begun to deploy, and well before it has fully deployed. 201. Reversing the perspective, once an operation has been deployed, SRSGs in the field have overall coordinating authority for United Nations activities in their mission area but have no single working-level focal point at Headquarters that can address all of their concerns quickly. For example, the desk officer or his/her regional director in DPKO fields political questions for peacekeeping operations but usually cannot directly respond to queries about military, police, humanitarian, human rights, electoral, legal or other elements of an operation, and they do not necessarily have a ready counterpart in each of those areas. A mission impatient for answers will eventually find the right primary contacts themselves and may do so in dozens of instances, building its own networks with different parts of the Secretariat and relevant agencies. 202. The missions should not feel the need to build their own contact networks. They should know exactly who to turn to for the answers and support that they need, especially in the critical early months when a mission is working towards full deployment and coping with daily crises. Moreover, they should be able to contact just one place for those answers, an entity that includes all of the backstopping people and expertise for the mission, drawn from an array of Headquarters elements that mirrors the functions of the mission itself. The Panel would call that entity an Integrated Mission Task Force (IMTF). 203. This concept builds upon but considerably extends the cooperative measures contained in the guidelines for implementing the “lead” department concept that DPKO and DPA agreed to in June 2000, in a joint departmental meeting chaired by the Secretary-General. The Panel would recommend, for example, that DPKO and DPA jointly determine the leader of each new Task Force but not necessarily limit their choice to the current staff of either Department. There may be occasions when the existing workloads of the regional directors or political officers in either department preclude them from taking on the role fulltiime In those instances, it might be best to bring in someone from the field for this purpose. Such flexibility, including the flexibility to assign the task to the most qualified person for the job, would require the approval of funding mechanisms to respond to surge demands, as recommended above. 204. ECPS or a designated subgroup thereof should collectively determine the general composition of an IMTF, which the Panel envisages forming quite early in a process of conflict prevention, peacemaking, prospective peacekeeping or prospective deployment of a peace-building support office. That is, the notion of integrated, one-stop support for United Nations peaceanndsecurity field activities should extend across the whole range of peace operations, with the size, substantive composition, meeting venue and leadership matching the needs of the operation. 205. Leadership and the lead department concept have posed some problems in the past when the principal focus of United Nations presence on the ground has changed from political to peacekeeping or vice versa, causing not only a shift in the field’s primary Headquarters contact but a shift in the whole Headquarters supporting cast. As the Panel sees the IMTF working, the supporting cast would remain substantially the same during and after such transitions, with additions or subtractions as the nature of the operation changed but with no changes in core Task Force personnel for those functions that bridge the transition. IMTF leadership would pass from one member of the group to another (e.g., from a DPKO regional director or political officer to his or her DPA counterpart). 206. Size and composition would match the nature and the phase of the field activity being supported. Crisisrellate preventive action would require well informed political support that would keep a United Nations envoy apprised of political evolution within the region and other factors key to the success of his or her effort. Peacemakers working to end a conflict would need to know more about peacekeeping and peace-building36 A/55/305 S/2000/809 options, so that their potential and their limitations are both reflected in any peace accord that would involve United Nations implementation. Adviser-observers from the Secretariat working with the peacemaker would be affiliated with the IMTF that supports the negotiations, and keep it posted on progress. The IMTF leader could, in turn, serve as the peacemaker’s routine contact point at Headquarters, with rapid access to higher echelons of the Secretariat for answers to sensitive political queries. 207. An IMTF of the sort just described could be a “virtual” body, meeting periodically but not physically co-located, its members operating from their workday offices and tied together by modern information technology. To support their work, each should feed as well as have access to the data and analyses created and placed on the United Nations Intranet by EISAS, the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat proposed in paragraphs 65 to 75 above. 208. IMTFs created to plan potential peace operations could also begin as virtual bodies. As an operation seemed more likely to go forward, the Task Force should assume physical form, with all of its members co-located in one space, prepared to work together as a team on a continuing basis for as long as needed to bring a new mission to full deployment. That period may be up to six months, assuming that the rapid deployment reforms recommended in paragraphs 84-169 above have been implemented. 209. Task Force members should be formally seconded to IMTF for such duration by their home division, department, agency, fund or programme. That is, an IMTF should be much more than a coordinating committee or task force of the type now set up at Headquarters. It should be a temporary but coherent staff created for a specific purpose, able to be increased or decreased in size or composition in response to mission needs. 210. Each Task Force member should be authorized to serve not only as a liaison between the Task Force and his or her home base but as its key working-level decision maker for the mission in question. The leader of the IMTF — reporting to the Assistant Secretary-General for Operations of DPKO in the case of peacekeeping operations, and the relevant Assistant Secretary-General of DPA in the case of peacemaking efforts, peace-building support offices and special political missions — should in turn have line authority over his or her Task Force members for the period of their secondment, and should serve as the first level of contact for the peace operations for all aspects of their work. Matters related to long-term policy and strategy should be dealt with at the Assistant Secretary-General/Under-Secretary-General level in ECPS, supported by EISAS. 211. For the United Nations system to be prepared to contribute staff to an IMTF, responsibility centres for each major substantive component of peace operations need to be established. Departments and agencies need to agree in advance on procedures for secondment and on their support for the IMTF concept, in writing if necessary. 212. The Panel is not in a position to suggest “lead” offices for each potential component of a peace operation but believes that ECPS should think through this issue collectively and assign one of its members responsibility for maintaining a level of preparedness for each potential component of a peace operation other than the military, police and judicial, and logistics/administration areas, which should remain DPKO’s responsibility. The designated lead agency should be responsible for devising generic concepts of operations, job descriptions, staffing and equipment requirements, critical path/deployment timetables, standard databases, civilian standby arrangements and rosters of other potential candidates for that component, as well as for participation in the IMTFs. 213. IMTFs offer a flexible approach to dealing with time-critical, resource-intensive but ultimately temporary requirements to support mission planning, start-up and initial sustainment. The concept borrows heavily from the notion of “matrix management”, used extensively by large organizations that need to be able to assign the necessary talent to specific projects without reorganizing themselves every time a project arises. Used by such diverse entities as the RAND Corporation and the World Bank, it gives each staff member a permanent “home” or “parent” department but allows — indeed, expects — staff to function in support of projects as the need arises. A matrix management approach to Headquarters planning and support of peace operations would allow departments, agencies, funds and programmes — internally organized as suits their overall needs — to contribute staff to coherent, interdepartmental/inter-agency task forces built to provide that support.37 A/55/305 S/2000/809 214. The IMTF structure could have significant implications for how DPKO’s Office of Operations is currently structured, and in effect would supplant the Regional Divisions structure. For example, the larger operations, such as those in Sierra Leone, East Timor and Kosovo, each would warrant separate IMTFs, headed by Director-level officers. Other missions, such as the long-established “traditional” peacekeeping operations in Asia and the Middle East, might be grouped into another IMTF. The number of IMTFs that could be formed would largely depend on the amount of additional resources allocated to DPKO, DPA and related departments, agencies, funds and programmes. As the number of IMTFs increased, the organizational structure of the Office of Operations would become flatter. There could be similar implications for the Assistant Secretaries-General of DPA, to whom the heads of the IMTFs would report during the peacemaking phase or when setting up a large peacebuilldin support operation either as a follow-on presence to a peacekeeping operation or as a separate initiative. 215. While the regional directors of DPKO (and DPA in those cases where they were appointed as IMTF heads) would be in charge of overseeing fewer missions than at present, they would actually be managing a larger number of staff, such as those seconded full-time from the Military and Civilian Police Advisers’ Offices, FALD (or its successor divisions) and other departments, agencies, funds and programmes, as required. The size of the IMTFs will also depend on the amount of additional resources provided, without which participating entities would not be in a position to second their staff on a full-time basis. 216. It should also be noted that in order for the IMTF concept to work effectively, its members must be physically co-located during the planning and initial deployment phases. This will not be possible at present without major adjustments to current office space allocations in the Secretariat. 217. Summary of key recommendation on integrated mission planning and support: Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs), with members seconded from throughout the United Nations system, as necessary, should be the standard vehicle for mission-specific planning and support. IMTFs should serve as the first point of contact for all such support, and IMTF leaders should have temporary line authority over seconded personnel, in accordance with agreements between DPKO, DPA and other contributing departments, programmes, funds and agencies. C. Other structural adjustments required in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations 218. The IMTF concept would strengthen the capacity of DPKO’s Office of Operations to function as a real focal point for all aspects of a peacekeeping operation. However, structural adjustments are also required in other elements of DPKO, in particular to the Military and Civilian Police Division, FALD and the Lessons Learned Unit. 1. Military and Civilian Police Division 219. All civilian police officials interviewed at Headquarters and in the field expressed frustration with having police functions in DPKO included in a military reporting chain. The Panel agrees that there seems to be little administrative or substantive value added in this arrangement. 220. Military and civilian police officers in DPKO serve for three years because the United Nations requires that they be on active duty. If they wish to remain longer and would even leave their national military or police services to do so, United Nations personnel policy precludes their being hired into their previous position. Hence the turnover rate in the military and police offices of DPKO is high. Since lessons learned in Headquarters practice are not routinely captured, since comprehensive training programmes for new arrivals are non-existent and since user-friendly manuals and standard operating procedures remain half-complete, high turnover means routine loss of institutional memory that takes months of on-the-job learning to replace. Current staff shortages also mean that military and civilian police officers find themselves assigned to functions that do not necessarily match their expertise. Those who have specialized in operations (J3) or plans (J5) might find themselves engaged in quasi-diplomatic work or functioning as personnel and administration officers (J1), managing the continual turnover of people and units in the field, to the detriment of their ability to monitor operational activity in the field.38 A/55/305 S/2000/809 221. DPKO’s lack of continuity in these areas may also explain why, after over 50 years of deploying military observers to monitor ceasefire violations, DPKO still does not have a standard database that could be provided to military observers in the field to document ceasefire violations and generate statistics. At present, if one wanted to know how many violations had occurred over a six-month period in a particular country where an operation is deployed, someone would have to physically count each one in the paper copies of the daily situation reports for that period. Where such databases do exist, they have been created by the missions themselves on an ad hoc basis. The same applies to the variety of crime statistics and other information common to most civilian police missions. Technological advances have also revolutionized the way in which ceasefire violations and movements in demilitarized zones and removal of weapons from storage sites can be monitored. However, there is no one in DPKO’s Military and Civilian Police Division currently assigned to addressing these issues. 222. The Panel recommends that the Military and Police Division be separated into two separate entities, one for the military and the other for the civilian police. The Military Adviser’s Office of DPKO should be enlarged and restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured, so as to provide more effective support to the field and better informed military advice to senior officials in the Secretariat. The Civilian Police Unit should also be provided with substantial additional resources, and consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser. 223. To ensure a minimum of continuity of DPKO’s military and civilian police capacity, the Panel recommends that a percentage of the added positions in these two units be reserved for military and civilian police personnel who have prior United Nations experience and have recently left their national services, to be appointed as regular staff members. This would follow the precedent set in the Logistics and Communications Service of FALD, which includes a number of former military officers. 224. Civilian police in the field are increasingly involved in the restructuring and reform of local police forces, and the Panel has recommended a doctrinal shift that would make such activities a primary focus for civilian police in future peace operations (see paras. 39, 40 and 47 (b) above). However, to date, the Civilian Police Unit formulates plans and requirements for the police components of peace operations without the benefit of the requisite legal advice on local judicial structures, criminal laws, codes and procedures in effect in the country concerned. This is vital information for civilian police planners, yet it is not a function for which resources have hitherto been allocated from the Support Account, either to OLA, DPKO or any other department in the Secretariat. 225. The Panel therefore recommends that a new, separate unit be established in DPKO, staffed with the requisite experts in criminal law, specifically for the purpose of providing advice to the Civilian Police Adviser’s Office on those rule of law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in peace operations. This unit should also work closely with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva, the Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention in Vienna, and other parts of the United Nations system that focus on the reform of rule of law institutions and respect for human rights. 2. Field Administration and Logistics Division 226. FALD does not have the authority to finalize and present the budgets for the field operations that it plans, nor to actually procure the goods and services they need. That authority rests with the Peacekeeping Financing and Procurement Divisions of DM. All Headquarters-based procurement requests are processed by the 16 Support Account-funded procurement officers in the Procurement Division, who prepare the larger contracts (roughly 300 in 1999) for presentation to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts, negotiate and award contracts for goods and services not procured locally by the field missions, and formulate United Nations policies and procedures for both global and local mission procurement. The combination of staffing constraints and the extra steps entailed in this process appears to contribute to the procurement delays reported by field missions. 227. Procurement efficiency could be enhanced by delegating peacekeeping budgeting and presentation, allotment issuance and procurement authority to DPKO for a two-year trial period, with the corresponding transfer of posts and staff. In order to ensure accountability and transparency, DM should retain authority for accounts, assessment of Member States and treasury functions. It should also retain its overall39 A/55/305 S/2000/809 policy setting and monitoring role, as it has in the case of recruitment and administration of field personnel, authority and responsibility, which are already delegated to DPKO. 228. Furthermore, to avoid allegations of impropriety that may arise from having those responsible for budgeting and procurement working in the same division as those identifying the requirements, the Panel recommends that FALD be separated into two divisions: one for Administrative Services, in which the personnel, budget/finance and procurement functions would reside, and the other for Integrated Support Services (e.g., logistics, transport, communications). 3. Lessons Learned Unit 229. All are agreed on the need to exploit cumulating field experience but not enough has been done to improve the system’s ability to tap that experience or to feed it back into the development of operational doctrine, plans, procedures or mandates. The work of DPKO’s existing Lessons Learned Unit does not seem to have had a great deal of impact on peace operations practice, and the compilation of lessons learned seems to occur mostly after a mission has ended. This is unfortunate because the peacekeeping system is generating new experience — new lessons — on a daily basis. That experience should be captured and retained for the benefit of other current operators and future operations. Lessons learned should be thought of as a facet of information management that contributes to improving operations on a daily basis. Post-action reports would then be just one part of a larger learning process, the capstone summary rather than the principal objective of the entire process. 230. The Panel feels that this function is in urgent need of enhancement and recommends that it be located where it can work closely with and contribute effectively to ongoing operations as well as mission planning and doctrine/guidelines development. The Panel suggests that this might best be in the Office of Operations, which will oversee the functions of the Integrated Mission Task Forces that the Panel has proposed to integrate Headquarters planning and support for peace operations (see paras. 198-217 above). Located in an element of DPKO that will routinely incorporate representatives from many departments and agencies, the unit could serve as the peace operations “learning manager” for all of those entities, maintaining and updating the institutional memory that missions and task forces alike could draw upon for problem solving, best practices and practices to avoid. 4. Senior management 231. There are currently two Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO: one for the Office of Operations and the other for the Office of Logistics, Management and Mine Action (FALD and the Mine Action Service). The Military Adviser, who concurrently serves as the Director of the Military and Civilian Police Division, currently reports to the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations through one of the two Assistant Secretaries-General or directly to the Under-Secretary-General, depending on the nature of the issue concerned. 232. In the light of the various staff increases and structural adjustments proposed in the preceding sections, the Panel believes that there is a strong case to be made for the Department to be provided with a third Assistant Secretary-General. The Panel further believes that one of the three Assistant Secretaries-General should be designated as a “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and function as deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. 233. Summary of key recommendations on other structural adjustments in DPKO: (a) The current Military and Civilian Police Division should be restructured, moving the Civilian Police Unit out of the military reporting chain. Consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser; (b) The Military Adviser’s Office in DPKO should be restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military field headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured; (c) A new unit should be established in DPKO and staffed with the relevant expertise for the provision of advice on criminal law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in United Nations peace operations; (d) The Under-Secretary-General for Management should delegate authority and responsibility for peacekeeping-related budgeting and procurement functions to the Under-Secretary40 A/55/305 S/2000/809 General for Peacekeeping Operations for a two-year trial period; (e) The Lessons Learned Unit should be substantially enhanced and moved into a revamped DPKO Office of Operations; (f) Consideration should be given to increasing the number of Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO from two to three, with one of the three designated as the “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. D. Structural adjustments needed outside the Department of Peacekeeping Operations 234. Public information planning and support at Headquarters needs strengthening, as do elements in DPA that support and coordinate peace-building activities and provide electoral support. Outside the Secretariat, the ability of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to plan and support the human rights components of peace operations needs to be reinforced. 1. Operational support for public information 235. Unlike military, civilian police, mine action, logistics, telecommunications and other mission components, no unit at Headquarters has specific line responsibility for the operational requirements of public information components in peace operations. The most concentrated responsibility for missionrellate public information rests with the Office of the Spokesman of the Secretary General and the respective spokespersons and public information offices in the missions themselves. At Headquarters, four professional officers in the Peace and Security Section, nested within the Promotion and Planning Service of the Public Affairs Division in DPI, are responsible for producing publications, developing and updating web site content on peace operations, and dealing with other issues ranging from disarmament to humanitarian assistance. While the Section produces and manages information about peacekeeping, it has had little capacity to create doctrine, strategy or standard operating procedures for public information functions in the field, other than on a sporadic and ad hoc basis. 236. The DPI Peace and Security Section is being expanded somewhat through internal DPI redeployment of staff, but it should either be substantially expanded and made operational or the support function should be moved into DPKO, with some of its officers perhaps seconded from DPI. 237. Wherever the function is located, it should anticipate public information needs and the technology and people to meet them, set priorities and standard field operating procedures, provide support in the startuu phase of new missions, and provide continuing support and guidance through participation in the Integrated Mission Task Forces. 238. Summary of key recommendation on structural adjustments in public information: a unit for operational planning and support of public information in peace operations should be established, either within DPKO or within a new Peace and Security Information Service in DPI reporting directly to the Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information. 2. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs 239. The Department of Political Affairs (DPA) is the designated focal point for United Nations peacebuilldin efforts and currently has responsibility for setting up, supporting and/or advising peace-building offices and special political missions in a dozen countries, plus the activities of five envoys and representatives of the Secretary-General who have been given peacemaking or conflict prevention assignments. Regular budget funds that support these activities through the next calendar year are expected to fall $31 million or 25 per cent below need. Such assessed funding is in fact relatively rare in peace-building, where most activities are funded by voluntary donations. 240. DPA’s nascent Peace-building Support Unit is one such activity. In his capacity as Convener of ECPS and focal point for peace-building strategies, the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs must be able to coordinate the formulation of such strategies with the members of ECPS and other elements of the United Nations system, particularly those in the development and humanitarian fields given the cross-cutting nature of peace-building itself. To do so, the Secretariat is assembling voluntary funds from a number of donors41 A/55/305 S/2000/809 for a three-year pilot project in support of the unit. As the planning for this pilot unit evolves, the Panel urges DPA to consult with all stakeholders in the United Nations system that can contribute to its success, in particular UNDP, which is placing renewed emphasis on democracy/governance and other transition-related areas. 241. DPA’s executive office supports some of the operational efforts for which it is responsible, but it is neither designed nor equipped to be a field support office. FALD also provides support to some of the field missions managed by DPA, but neither those missions’ budgets nor DPA’s budget allocate additional resources to FALD for this purpose. FALD attempts to meet the demands of the smaller peace-building operations but acknowledges that the larger operations make severe, high-priority demands on its current staffing. Thus the needs of smaller missions tend to suffer. DPA has had satisfactory experience with support from the United Nations Office of Project Services (UNOPS), a fiveyeearold spin-off from UNDP that manages programmes and funds for many clients within the United Nations system, using modern management practices and drawing all of its core funding from a management charge of up to 13 per cent. UNOPS can provide logistics, management and recruitment support for smaller missions fairly quickly. 242. DPA’s Electoral Assistance Division (EAD) also relies on voluntary money to meet growing demand for its technical advice, needs assessment missions and other activities not directly involving electoral observation. As of June 2000, 41 requests for assistance were pending from Member States but the trust fund supporting such “non-earmarked” activities held just 8 per cent of the funding required to meet current requests through the end of calendar year 2001. So, as demand surges for a key element of democratic institution-building endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 46/137, EAD staff must first raise the programme funds needed to do their jobs. 243. Summary of key recommendations for peacebuilldin support in the Department of Political Affairs: (a) The Panel supports the Secretariat’s effort to create a pilot Peace-building Unit within DPA in cooperation with other integral United Nations elements, and suggests that regular budgetary support for the unit be revisited by the membership if the pilot programme works well. The programme should be evaluated in the context of guidance the Panel has provided in paragraph 46 above, and if considered the best available option for strengthening United Nations peace-building capacity it should be presented to the Secretary-General as per the recommendation contained in paragraph 47 (d) above; (b) The Panel recommends that regular budget resources for Electoral Assistance Division programmatic expenses be substantially increased to meet the rapidly growing demand for its services, in lieu of voluntary contributions; (c) To relieve demand on FALD and the executive office of DPA, and to improve support services rendered to smaller political and peacebuilldin field offices, the Panel recommends that procurement, logistics, staff recruitment and other support services for all such smaller, non-military field missions be provided by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). 3. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 244. OHCHR needs to be more closely involved in planning and executing the elements of peace operations that address human rights, especially complex operations. At present, OHCHR has inadequate resources to be so involved or to provide personnel for service in the field. If United Nations operations are to have effective human rights components, OHCHR should be able to coordinate and institutionalize human rights field work in peace operations; second personnel to Integrated Mission Task Forces in New York; recruit human rights field personnel; organize human rights training for all personnel in peace operations, including the law and order components; and create model databases for human rights field work. 245. Summary of key recommendation on strengthening the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: the Panel recommends substantially enhancing the field mission planning and preparation capacity of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with funding partly from the42 A/55/305 S/2000/809 regular budget and partly from peace operations mission budgets. V. Peace operations and the information age 246. Threaded through many parts of the present report are references to the need to better link the peace and security system together; to facilitate communications and data sharing; to give staff the tools that they need to do their work; and ultimately to allow the United Nations to be more effective at preventing conflict and helping societies find their way back from war. Modern, well utilized information technology (IT) is a key enabler of many of these objectives. The present section notes the gaps in strategy, policy and practice that impede the United Nations effective use of IT, and offers recommendations to bridge them. A. Information technology in peace operations: strategy and policy issues 247. The problem of IT strategy and policy is bigger than peace operations and extends to the entire United Nations system. That larger IT context is generally beyond the Panel’s mandate, but the larger issues should not preclude the adoption of common IT user standards for peace operations and for the Headquarters units that give support to them. FALD’s Communications Service can provide the satellite links and the local connectivity upon which missions can build effective IT networks and databases, but a better strategy and policy needs to be developed for the user community to help it take advantage of the technology foundations that are now being laid. 248. When the United Nations deploys a mission into the field, it is critical that its elements be able to exchange data easily. All complex peace operations bring together many different actors: agencies, funds, and programmes from throughout the United Nations system, as well as the Departments of the Secretariat; mission recruits who are new to the United Nations system; on occasion, regional organizations; frequently, bilateral aid agencies; and always, dozens to hundreds of humanitarian and development NGOs. All of them need a mechanism that makes it easier to share information and ideas efficiently, the more so because each is but the small tip of a very large bureaucratic iceberg with its own culture, working methods and objectives. 249. Poorly planned and poorly integrated IT can pose obstacles to such cooperation. When there are no agreed standards for data structure and interchange at the application level, the “interface” between the two is laborious manual recoding, which tends to defeat the purposes of investing in a networked and computerheeav working environment. The consequences can also be more serious than wasted labour, ranging from miscommunication of policy to a failure to “get the word” on security threats or other major changes in the operational environment. 250. The irony of distributed and decentralized data systems is that they need such common standards to function. Common solutions to common IT problems are difficult to produce at higher levels — between substantive components of an operation, between substantive offices at Headquarters, or between Headquarters and the rest of the United Nations system — in part because existing operational information systems policy formulation is scattered. Headquarters lacks a sufficiently strong responsibility centre for user-level IT strategy and policy in peace operations, in particular. In government or industry, such responsibility would rest with a “Chief Information Officer”. The Panel believes the United Nations needs someone at Headquarters, most usefully in EISAS, to play such a role, supervising development and implementation of IT strategy and user standards. He or she should also develop and oversee IT training programmes, both field manuals and hands-on training — the need for which is substantial and not to be underestimated. Counterparts in the SRSG’s office in each field mission should oversee implementation of the common IT strategy and supervise field training, both complementing and building on the work of FALD and the Information Technology Services Division (ITSD) in the Department of Management in providing basic IT structures and services. 251. Summary of key recommendation on information technology strategy and policy: Headquarters peace and security departments need a responsibility centre to devise and oversee the implementation of common information technology strategy and training for peace operations, residing in EISAS. Mission counterparts to that responsibility centre should also be appointed to43 A/55/305 S/2000/809 serve in the offices of the SRSGs in complex peace operations to oversee the implementation of that strategy. B. Tools for knowledge management 252. Technology can help to capture as well as disseminate information and experience. It could be much better utilized to help a wide variety of actors working in a United Nations mission’s area of operation to acquire and share data in a systematic and mutually supportive manner. United Nations development and humanitarian relief communities, for example, work in most of the places where the United Nations has deployed peace operations. These United Nations country teams, plus the NGOs that do complementary work at the grass-roots level, will have been in the region long before a complex peace operation arrives and will remain after it has left. Together, they hold a wealth of local knowledge and experience that could be helpful to peace operations planning and implementation. An electronic data clearing house, managed by EISAS to share this data, could assist mission planning and execution and also aid conflict prevention and assessment. Proper melding of these data and data gathered subsequent to deployment by the various components of a peace operation and their use with geographic information systems (GIS) could create powerful tools for tracking needs and problems in the mission area and for tracking the impact of action plans. GIS specialists should be assigned to every mission team, together with GIS training resources. 253. Current examples of GIS applications can be seen in the humanitarian and reconstruction work done in Kosovo since 1998. The Humanitarian Community Information Centre has pooled GIS data produced by such sources as the Western European Satellite Centre, the Geneva Centre for Humanitarian Demining, KFOR, the Yugoslav Institute of Statistics and the International Management Group. Those data have been combined to create an atlas that is available publicly on their web site, on CD-ROMs for those with slow or non-existent Internet access and in hard copy. 254. Computer simulations can be powerful learning tools for mission personnel and for the local parties. Simulations can, in principle, be created for any component of an operation. They can facilitate group problem-solving and reveal to local parties the sometimes unintended consequences of their policy choices. With appropriate broadband Internet links, simulations can be part of distance learning packages tailored to a new operation and used to pre-train new mission recruits. 255. An enhanced peace and security area on the United Nations Intranet (the Organization’s information network that is open to a specified set of users) would be a valuable addition to peace operations planning, analysis, and execution. A subset of the larger network, it would focus on drawing together issues and information that directly pertain to peace and security, including EISAS analyses, situation reports, GIS maps and linkages to lessons learned. Varying levels of security access could facilitate the sharing of sensitive information among restricted groups. 256. The data in the Intranet should be linked to a Peace Operations Extranet (POE) that would use existing and planned wide area network communications to link Headquarters databases in EISAS and the substantive offices with the field, and field missions with one another. POE could easily contain all administrative, procedural and legal information for peace operations, and could provide single-point access to information generated by many sources, give planners the ability to produce comprehensive reports more quickly and improve response time to emergency situations. 257. Some mission components, such as civilian police and related criminal justice units and human rights investigators, require added network security, as well as the hardware and software that can support the required levels of data storage, transmission and analysis. Two key technologies for civilian police are GIS and crime mapping software, used to convert raw data into geographical representations that illustrate crime trends and other key information, facilitate recognition of patterns of events, or highlight special features of problem areas, improving the ability of civilian police to fight crime or to advise their local counterparts. 258. Summary of key recommendations on information technology tools in peace operations: (a) EISAS, in cooperation with ITSD, should implement an enhanced peace operations element on the current United Nations Intranet and link it44 A/55/305 S/2000/809 to the missions through a Peace Operations Extranet (POE); (b) Peace operations could benefit greatly from more extensive use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, which quickly integrates operational information with electronic maps of the mission area, for applications as diverse as demobilization, civilian policing, voter registration, human rights monitoring and reconstruction; (c) The IT needs of mission components with unique information technology needs, such as civilian police and human rights, should be anticipated and met more consistently in mission planning and implementation. C. Improving the timeliness of Internetbaase public information 259. As the Panel noted in section III above, effectively communicating the work of United Nations peace operations to the public is essential to creating and maintaining support for current and future missions. Not only is it essential to develop a positive image early on to promote a conducive working environment but it is also important to maintain a solid public information campaign to garner and retain support from the international community. 260. The body now officially responsible for communicating the work of United Nations peace operations is the Peace and Security Section of DPI in Headquarters, as discussed in section IV above. One person in DPI is responsible for the actual posting of all peace and security content on the web site, as well as for posting all mission inputs to the web, to ensure that information posted is consistent and compatible with Headquarters web standards. 261. The Panel endorses the application of standards but standardized need not mean centralized. The current process of news production and posting of data to the United Nations web site slows down the cycle of updates, yet daily updates could be important to a mission in a fast-moving situation. It also limits the amount of information that can be presented on each mission. 262. DPI and field staff have expressed interest in relieving this bottleneck through the development of a “web site co-management” model. This seems to the Panel to be an appropriate solution to this particular information bottleneck. 263. Summary of key recommendation on timeliness of Internet-based public information: the Panel encourages the development of web site comanaggemen by Headquarters and the field missions, in which Headquarters would maintain oversight but individual missions would have staff authorized to produce and post web content that conforms to basic presentational standards and policy. * * * 264. In the present report, the Panel has emphasized the need to change the structure and practices of the Organization in order to enable it to pursue more effectively its responsibilities in support of international peace and security and respect for human rights. Some of those changes would not be feasible without the new capacities that networked information technologies provide. The report itself would have been impossible to produce without the technologies already in place at United Nations Headquarters and accessible to members of the Panel in every region of the world. People use effective tools, and effective information technology could be much better utilized in the service of peace. VI. Challenges to implementation 265. The present report targets two groups in presenting its recommendations for reform: the Member States and the Secretariat. We recognize that reform will not occur unless Member States genuinely pursue it. At the same time, we believe that the changes we recommend for the Secretariat must be actively advanced by the Secretary-General and implemented by his senior staff. 266. Member States must recognize that the United Nations is the sum of its parts and accept that the primary responsibility for reform lies with them. The failures of the United Nations are not those of the Secretariat alone, or troop commanders or the leaders of field missions. Most occurred because the Security Council and the Member States crafted and supported ambiguous, inconsistent and under-funded mandates and then stood back and watched as they failed, sometimes even adding critical public commentary as45 A/55/305 S/2000/809 the credibility of the United Nations underwent its severest tests. 267. The problems of command and control that recently arose in Sierra Leone are the most recent illustration of what cannot be tolerated any longer. Troop contributors must ensure that the troops they provide fully understand the importance of an integrated chain of command, the operational control of the Secretary-General and the standard operating procedures and rules of engagement of the mission. It is essential that the chain of command in an operation be understood and respected, and the onus is on national capitals to refrain from instructing their contingent commanders on operational matters. 268. We are aware that the Secretary-General is implementing a comprehensive reform programme and realize that our recommendations may need to be adjusted to fit within this bigger picture. Furthermore, the reforms we have recommended for the Secretariat and the United Nations system in general will not be accomplished overnight, though some require urgent action. We recognize that there is a normal resistance to change in any bureaucracy, and are encouraged that some of the changes we have embraced as recommendations originate from within the system. We are also encouraged by the commitment of the Secretary-General to lead the Secretariat toward reform even if it means that long-standing organizational and procedural lines will have to be breached, and that aspects of the Secretariat’s priorities and culture will need to be challenged and changed. In this connection, we urge the Secretary-General to appoint a senior official with responsibility for overseeing the implementation of the recommendations contained in the present report. 269. The Secretary-General has consistently emphasized the need for the United Nations to reach out to civil society and to strengthen relations with non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and the media, who can be useful partners in the promotion of peace and security for all. We call on the Secretariat to take heed of the Secretary-General’s approach and implement it in its work in peace and security. We call on them to constantly keep in mind that the United Nations they serve is the universal organization. People everywhere are fully entitled to consider that it is their organization, and as such to pass judgement on its activities and the people who serve in it. 270. There is wide variation in quality among Secretariat staff supporting the peace and security functions in DPKO, DPA and the other departments concerned. This observation applies to the civilians recruited by the Secretariat as well as to the military and civilian police personnel proposed by Member States. These disparities are widely recognized by those in the system. Better performers are given unreasonable workloads to compensate for those who are less capable. Naturally, this can be bad for morale and can create resentment, particularly among those who rightly point out that the United Nations has not dedicated enough attention over the years to career development, training and mentoring or the institution of modern management practices. Put simply, the United Nations is far from being a meritocracy today, and unless it takes steps to become one it will not be able to reverse the alarming trend of qualified personnel, the young among them in particular, leaving the Organization. If the hiring, promotion and delegation of responsibility rely heavily on seniority or personal or political connections, qualified people will have no incentive to join the Organization or stay with it. Unless managers at all levels, beginning with the Secretary-General and his senior staff, seriously address this problem on a priority basis, reward excellence and remove incompetent staff, additional resources will be wasted and lasting reform will become impossible. 271. The same level of scrutiny should apply to United Nations personnel in the field missions. The majority of them embody the spirit of what it means to be an international civil servant, travelling to war-torn lands and dangerous environments to help improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable communities. They do so with considerable personal sacrifice, and at times with great risks to their own physical safety and mental health. They deserve the world’s recognition and appreciation. Over the years, many of them have given their lives in the service of peace and we take this opportunity to honour their memory. 272. United Nations personnel in the field, perhaps more than any others, are obliged to respect local norms, culture and practices. They must go out of their way to demonstrate that respect, as a start, by getting to know their host environment and trying to learn as much of the local culture and language as they can. They must behave with the understanding that they are guests in someone else’s home, however destroyed that46 A/55/305 S/2000/809 home might be, particularly when the United Nations takes on a transitional administration role. And they must also treat one another with respect and dignity, with particular sensitivity towards gender and cultural differences. 273. In short, we believe that a very high standard should be maintained for the selection and conduct of personnel at Headquarters and in the field. When United Nations personnel fail to meet such standards, they should be held accountable. In the past, the Secretariat has had difficulty in holding senior officials in the field accountable for their performance because those officials could point to insufficient resources, unclear instructions or lack of appropriate command and control arrangements as the main impediments to successful implementation of a mission’s mandate. These deficiencies should be addressed but should not be allowed to offer cover to poor performers. The future of nations, the lives of those whom the United Nations has come to help and protect, the success of a mission and the credibility of the Organization can all hinge on what a few individuals do or fail to do. Anyone who turns out to be unsuited to the task that he or she has agreed to perform must be removed from a mission, no matter how high or how low they may be on the ladder. 274. Member States themselves acknowledge that they, too, need to reflect on their working culture and methods, at least as concerns the conduct of United Nations peace and security activities. The tradition of the recitation of statements, followed by a painstaking process of achieving consensus, places considerable emphasis on the diplomatic process over operational product. While one of the United Nations main virtues is that it provides a forum for 189 Member States to exchange views on pressing global issues, sometimes dialogue alone is not enough to ensure that billiondollla peacekeeping operations, vital conflict prevention measures or critical peacemaking efforts succeed in the face of great odds. Expressions of general support in the form of statements and resolutions must be followed up with tangible action. 275. Moreover, Member States may send conflicting messages regarding the actions they advocate, with their representatives voicing political support in one body but denying financial support in another. Such inconsistencies have appeared between the Fifth Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Matters on the one hand, and the Security Council and the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations on the other. 276. On the political level, many of the local parties with whom peacekeepers and peacemakers are dealing on a daily basis may neither respect nor fear verbal condemnation by the Security Council. It is therefore incumbent that Council members and the membership at large breathe life into the words that they produce, as did the Security Council delegation that flew to Jakarta and Dili in the wake of the East Timor crisis last year, an example of effective Council action at its best: res, non verba. 277. Meanwhile, the financial constraints under which the United Nations labours continue to cause serious damage to its ability to conduct peace operations in a credible and professional manner. We therefore urge that Member States uphold their treaty obligations and pay their dues in full, on time and without condition. 278. We are also aware that there are other issues which, directly or indirectly, hamper effective United Nations action in the field of peace and security, including two unresolved issues that are beyond the scope of the Panel’s mandate but critical to peace operations and that only the Member States can address. They are the disagreements about how assessments in support of peacekeeping operations are apportioned and about equitable representation on the Security Council. We can only hope that the Member States will find a way to resolve their differences on these issues in the interests of upholding their collective international responsibility as prescribed in the Charter. 279. We call on the leaders of the world assembled at the Millennium Summit, as they renew their commitment to the ideals of the United Nations, to commit as well to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to fully accomplish the mission which is, indeed, its very raison d’être: to help communities engulfed in strife and to maintain or restore peace. 280. While building consensus for the recommendations in the present report, we — the members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations — have also come to a shared vision of a United Nations, extending a strong helping hand to a community, country or region to avert conflict or to end violence. We see an SRSG ending a mission well accomplished, having given the people of a country the opportunity to do for themselves what they could not47 A/55/305 S/2000/809 do before: to build and hold onto peace, to find reconciliation, to strengthen democracy, to secure human rights. We see, above all, a United Nations that has not only the will but also the ability to fulfil its great promise and to justify the confidence and trust placed in it by the overwhelming majority of humankind.48 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex I Members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Mr. J. Brian Atwood (United States), President, Citizens International; former President, National Democratic Institute; former Administrator, United States Agency for International Development. Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi (Algeria), former Foreign Minister; Chairman of the Panel. Ambassador Colin Granderson (Trinidad and Tobago), Executive Director of Organization of American States (OAS)/United Nations International Civilian Mission in Haiti, 1993-2000; head of OAS election observation missions in Haiti (1995 and 1997) and Suriname (2000). Dame Ann Hercus (New Zealand), former Cabinet Minister and Permanent Representative of New Zealand to the United Nations; Head of Mission of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), 1998-1999. Mr. Richard Monk (United Kingdom), former member of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Government adviser on international policing matters; Commissioner of the United Nations International Police Task Force in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1998-1999. General (ret.) Klaus Naumann (Germany), Chief of Defence, 1991-1996; Chairman of the Military Committee of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), 1996-1999, with oversight responsibility for NATO Implementation Force/Stabilization Force operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the NATO Kosovo air campaign. Ms. Hisako Shimura (Japan), President of Tsuda College, Tokyo; served for 24 years in the United Nations Secretariat, retiring from United Nations service in 1995 as Director, Europe and Latin America Division of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations. Ambassador Vladimir Shustov (Russian Federation), Ambassador at large, with 30 years association with the United Nations; former Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York; former representative of the Russian Federation to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. General Philip Sibanda (Zimbabwe), Chief of Staff, Operations and Training, Zimbabwe Army Headquarters, Harare; former Force Commander of the United Nations Angola Verification Mission (UNAVEM III) and the United Nations Observer Mission in Angola (MONUA), 1995-1998. Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga (Switzerland), President of the Foundation of Moral Rearmament, Caux, and of the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining; former President of the International Committee of the Red Cross, 1987-1999. * * *49 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Office of the Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Dr. William Durch, Senior Associate, Henry L. Stimson Center; Project Director Mr. Salman Ahmed, Political Affairs Officer, United Nations Secretariat Ms. Clare Kane, Personal Assistant, United Nations Secretariat Ms. Caroline Earle, Research Associate, Stimson Center Mr. J. Edward Palmisano, Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellow, Stimson Center50 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex II References United Nations documents Annan, Kofi A. Preventing war and disaster: a growing global challenge. Annual report on the work of the Organization, 1999. (A/54/1) ________ Partnerships for global community. Annual report on the work of the Organization, 1998. (A/53/1) ________ Facing the humanitarian challenge: towards a culture of prevention. (ST/DPI/2070) ________ We the peoples: the role of the United Nations in the twenty-first century. The Millennium Report. (A/54/2000) Economic and Social Council: Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “In-depth evaluation of peacekeeping operations: start-up phase”. (E/AC.51/1995/2 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “In-depth evaluation of peacekeeping operations: termination phase”. (E/AC.51/1996/3 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “Triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its thirty-fifth session on the evaluation of peacekeeping operations: start-up phase”. (E/AC.51/1998/4 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “Triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its thirty-sixth session on the evaluation of peacekeeping operations: termination phase”. (E/AC.51/1999/5) General Assembly. Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on the review of the Field Administration and Logistics Division, Department of Peacekeeping Operations. (A/49/959) ________ Report of the Secretary-General entitled “Renewing the United Nations: A Programme for Reform”. (A/51/950) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa. (A/52/871) ________ Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/87 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on the audit of the management of service and ration contracts in peacekeeping missions. (A/54/335) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the annual report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services for the period 1 July 1998 to 30 June 1999. (A/54/393) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict entitled “Protection of children affected by armed conflict”. (A/54/430) ________ Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to General Assembly resolution 53/55, entitled “The fall of Srebrenica”. (A/54/549) ________ Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/839) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of the recommendations of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/670) General Assembly and Security Council. Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to the statement adopted by the Summit Meeting of the Security Council on 31 January 1992, entitled “An Agenda for Peace: preventive diplomacy, peacemaking and peace-keeping”. (A/47/277-S/24111)51 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ________ Position paper of the Secretary-General on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, entitled “Supplement to an Agenda for Peace”. (A/50/60-S/1995/1) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict. (A/55/163-S/2000/712) Security Council. Report of the Secretary-General on protection for humanitarian assistance to refugees and others in conflict situations. (S/1998/883) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the enhancement of African peacekeeping capacity. (S/1999/171) ________ Progress report of the Secretary-General on standby arrangements for peacekeeping. (S/1999/361) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the protection of civilians in armed conflict. (S/1999/957) ________ Letter dated 15 December 1999 from the Secretary-General addressed to the President of the Security Council, enclosing the report of the Independent Inquiry into the actions of the United Nations during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. (S/1999/1257) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the role of United Nations peacekeeping in disarmament, demobilization and reintegration. (S/2000/101) Letter dated 10 March 2000 from the Chairman of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) concerning the situation in Angola addressed to the President of the Security Council, enclosing the report of the Panel of Experts on Violations of Security Council Sanctions against UNITA. (S/2000/203) Secretary-General’s press release. Statement made by the Secretary-General at Georgetown University. (SG/SM/6901) Secretary-General’s Bulletin. Observance by United Nations forces of international humanitarian law. (ST/SGB/1999/13) United Nations Development Programme. Governance foundations for post-conflict situations: UNDP’s experience. Discussion paper prepared by the UNDP Management Development and Governance Division, January 2000. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Annual appeal 2000: overview of activities and financial requirements. Geneva. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Catalogue of emergency response tools. Document prepared by the Emergency Preparedness and Response Section. Geneva, 2000. United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), Institute of Policy Studies of Singapore (IPS) and National Institute for Research Advancement of Japan. Report of the 1997 Singapore Conference: humanitarian action and peacekeeping operations. New York, 1997. UNITAR, IPS and Japan Institute of International Affairs. The nexus between peacekeeping and peace-building: debriefing and lessons. Draft report of the 1999 Singapore Conference. New York, 2000. Goulding, Marrack. Practical measures to enhance the United Nations effectiveness in the field of peace and security. Report submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. New York, 30 June 1997. Other sources Berdal, Mats, and David M. Malone, eds. Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000. Berman, Eric G., and Katie E. Sams. Peacekeeping in Africa: capabilities and culpabilities. (UNIDIR/2000/3) Bigombe, Betty, Paul Collier and Nicholas Sambanis. Policies for building post-conflict peace. Paper presented at an ad hoc expert group meeting on the economics of civil conflicts in Africa, 7 and 8 April 2000, organized by the Economic Commission for Africa. Blechman, Barry M., William J. Durch, Wendy Eaton and Julie Werbel. Effective transitions from peace operations to sustainable peace: final report. DFI International, Washington, D.C., September 1997. Childers, Erskine, and Brian Urquhart. Towards a More Effective United Nations: Two Studies. Uppsala, Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, 1992.52 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Collier, Paul. Economic causes of civil conflict and their implications for policy. In Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall, Managing Global Chaos. Washington, D.C., United States Institute of Peace, forthcoming. Cousens, Elizabeth M., Donald Rothchild and Stephen John Stedman, eds. Ending Civil Wars, vol. II, Evaluating Peace Implementation. New York, Center for International Security and Cooperation of Stanford University and International Peace Academy, forthcoming. DeSoto, Alvaro, and Graciana del Castillo. Implementation of comprehensive peace agreements: staying the course in El Salvador. Global Governance, vol. 1, No. 2 (May-June 1995). Doyle, Michael W., and Nicholas Sambanis. International peace-building: a theoretical and quantitative analysis. Paper presented at a conference of the Center of International Studies and the World Bank, Princeton University, 17 and 18 March 2000. Fafo Programme for International Cooperation and Conflict Resolution. Command from the saddle: managing United Nations peace-building missions. Recommendations report of a forum on special representatives of the Secretary-General on the theme “Shaping the United Nations role in peace implementation”. Oslo, Peace Implementation Network, 1999. Fainberg, Anthony, Alan Shaw, Dean Cheng, Xavier Maruyama and Donald Gallagher. Technology for international peace operations. Washington, D.C., Institute for Technology Assessment, March 1998. Forman, Shepard, Stewart Patrick and Dirk Salomons. Recovering from conflict: strategy for an international response. New York University, Center on International Cooperation, February 2000. Government of Canada. Towards a Rapid Reaction Capability for the United Nations. Ottawa, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Department of National Defence, 1995. Griffin, Michèle and Bruce Jones. Building peace through transitional authority: new directions, major challenges. International Peacekeeping, vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 2000). Henkin, Alice H., ed. Honouring Human Rights and Keeping the Peace: Lessons from El Salvador, Cambodia and Haiti. Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1995. ________ Honouring Human Rights, from Peace to Justice: Recommendations to the International Community. Summary edition of Henkin, op. cit., Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1999. Holm, Tor Tanke, and Espen Barth Eide, eds. Peacebuilding and Police Reform. International Peacekeeping, vol. 6, No. 4 (Special issue, Winter 1999). Humanitarian Community Information Centre, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat. Kosovo atlas. Pristina, February 2000. Jett, Dennis C. Why Peacekeeping Fails. New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2000. Latter, Richard. Monitoring and verifying peace agreements. Report based on a Wilton Park conference 597 on the monitoring and verification of peace agreements, 24-26 March 2000, April 2000. Lehman, Ingrid A. Peacekeeping and Public Information: Caught in the Crossfire. London, Frank Cass, 1999. Lord Christopher. Advisory note for Stimson Center/United Nations Panel on Peace Operations. Prague, Prague Project on Emergency Criminal Justice Principles, Institute of International Relations, 27 June 2000. Moore, Jonathan, ed. Hard Choices. Lanham, Maryland, Rowman and Littlefield for the International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva, 1998. Plunkett, Mark. Justice re-establishment in United Nations peacekeeping: methods and techniques for the re-establishment of the rule of law in United Nations peace operations. 18 April 2000. Salerno, Reynolds M., Michael G. Vannoni, David S. Barber, Randall R. Parish and Rebecca L.53 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Frerichs. Enhanced peacekeeping with monitoring technologies. Sandia report. Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratories, 2000. Smillie, Ian, Lansana Gberie and Ralph Hazleton. The heart of the matter: Sierra Leone, diamonds and human security. Ottawa, Partnership Africa Canada, January 2000. Stedman, Stephen John. Spoiler problems in peace processes. International Security, vol. 22, No. 2 (Fall 1997). Stewart, Frances and A. Berry. The real causes of inequality. Challenge, vol. 43, No. 1 (2000). Stewart, Frances, Frank P. Humphreys and Nick Lee. Civil conflict in developing countries over the last quarter of a century: an empirical overview of economic and social consequences. Oxford Journal of Development Studies, vol. 25, No. 1 (February 1997). Thant, Myint-U and Elizabeth Sellwood. Knowledge and Multilateral Interventions: The United Nations Experiences in Cambodia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Royal Institute of International Affairs Discussion Paper, No. 83. London, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2000. Wallensteen, Peter, and Margareta Sollenberg. Armed conflict and regional conflict complexes, 1989-1997. Journal of Peace Research, vol. 35, No. 5 (1998). World Bank Institute and Interworks. The Transition from War to Peace: An Overview. Washington, D.C., 1999.54 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex III Summary of recommendations 1. Preventive action: (a) The Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000, in particular his appeal to “all who are engaged in conflict prevention and development — the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, Governments and civil society organizations — [to] address these challenges in a more integrated fashion”; (b) The Panel supports the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension, and stresses Member States’ obligations, under Article 2(5) of the Charter, to give “every assistance” to such activities of the United Nations. 2. Peace-building strategy: (a) A small percentage of a mission’s first-year budget should be made available to the representative or special representative of the Secretary-General leading the mission to fund quick impact projects in its area of operations, with the advice of the United Nations country team’s resident coordinator; (b) The Panel recommends a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police, other rule of law elements and human rights experts in complex peace operations to reflect an increased focus on strengthening rule of law institutions and improving respect for human rights in post-conflict environments; (c) The Panel recommends that the legislative bodies consider bringing demobilization and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations for the first phase of an operation in order to facilitate the rapid disassembly of fighting factions and reduce the likelihood of resumed conflict; (d) The Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) discuss and recommend to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. 3. Peacekeeping doctrine and strategy: once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandates professionally and successfully and be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate, with robust rules of engagement, against those who renege on their commitments to a peace accord or otherwise seek to undermine it by violence. 4. Clear, credible and achievable mandates: (a) The Panel recommends that, before the Security Council agrees to implement a ceasefire or peace agreement with a United Nations-led peacekeeping operation, the Council assure itself that the agreement meets threshold conditions, such as consistency with international human rights standards and practicability of specified tasks and timelines; (b) The Security Council should leave in draft form resolutions authorizing missions with sizeable troop levels until such time as the Secretary-General has firm commitments of troops and other critical mission support elements, including peace-building elements, from Member States; (c) Security Council resolutions should meet the requirements of peacekeeping operations when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations, especially the need for a clear chain of command and unity of effort;(d) The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when formulating or changing mission mandates, and countries that have committed military units to an operation should have access to Secretariat briefings to the Council on matters affecting the safety and security of their personnel, especially those meetings with implications for a mission’s use of force. 5. Information and strategic analysis: the Secretary-General should establish an entity, referred to here as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS), which would support the information and analysis needs of all members of ECPS; for management purposes, it should be administered by and report jointly to the heads of the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO).55 A/55/305 S/2000/809 6. Transitional civil administration: the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General invite a panel of international legal experts, including individuals with experience in United Nations operations that have transitional administration mandates, to evaluate the feasibility and utility of developing an interim criminal code, including any regional adaptations potentially required, for use by such operations pending the reestabllishmen of local rule of law and local law enforcement capacity. 7. Determining deployment timelines: the United Nations should define “rapid and effective deployment capacities” as the ability, from an operational perspective, to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days after the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. 8. Mission leadership: (a) The Secretary-General should systematize the method of selecting mission leaders, beginning with the compilation of a comprehensive list of potential representatives or special representatives of the Secretary-General, force commanders, civilian police commissioners, and their deputies and other heads of substantive and administrative components, within a fair geographic and gender distribution and with input from Member States; (b) The entire leadership of a mission should be selected and assembled at Headquarters as early as possible in order to enable their participation in key aspects of the mission planning process, for briefings on the situation in the mission area and to meet and work with their colleagues in mission leadership; (c) The Secretariat should routinely provide the mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation, and whenever possible should formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. 9. Military personnel: (a) Member States should be encouraged, where appropriate, to enter into partnerships with one another, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS), to form several coherent brigade-size forces, with necessary enabling forces, ready for effective deployment within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a traditional peacekeeping operation and within 90 days for complex peacekeeping operations; (b) The Secretary-General should be given the authority to formally canvass Member States participating in UNSAS regarding their willingness to contribute troops to a potential operation, once it appeared likely that a ceasefire accord or agreement envisaging an implementing role for the United Nations, might be reached; (c) The Secretariat should, as a standard practice, send a team to confirm the preparedness of each potential troop contributor to meet the provisions of the memoranda of understanding on the requisite training and equipment requirements, prior to deployment; those that do not meet the requirements must not deploy; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 military officers be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice to augment nuclei of DPKO planners with teams trained to create a mission headquarters for a new peacekeeping operation. 10. Civilian police personnel: (a) Member States are encouraged to each establish a national pool of civilian police officers that would be ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations on short notice, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System; (b) Member States are encouraged to enter into regional training partnerships for civilian police in the respective national pools, to promote a common level of preparedness in accordance with guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards to be promulgated by the United Nations; (c) Members States are encouraged to designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures for the provision of civilian police to United Nations peace operations; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving on-call list of about 100 police officers and related experts be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice with teams trained to create the civilian police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train incoming personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date;56 A/55/305 S/2000/809 (e) The Panel recommends that parallel arrangements to recommendations (a), (b) and (c) above be established for judicial, penal, human rights and other relevant specialists, who with specialist civilian police will make up collegial “rule of law” teams. 11. Civilian specialists: (a) The Secretariat should establish a central Internet/Intranet-based roster of pre-selected civilian candidates available to deploy to peace operations on short notice. The field missions should be granted access to and delegated authority to recruit candidates from it, in accordance with guidelines on fair geographic and gender distribution to be promulgated by the Secretariat; (b) The Field Service category of personnel should be reformed to mirror the recurrent demands faced by all peace operations, especially at the mid-to senior-levels in the administrative and logistics areas; (c) Conditions of service for externally recruited civilian staff should be revised to enable the United Nations to attract the most highly qualified candidates, and to then offer those who have served with distinction greater career prospects; (d) DPKO should formulate a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations, outlining, among other issues, the use of United Nations Volunteers, standby arrangements for the provision of civilian personnel on 72 hours' notice to facilitate mission startuup and the divisions of responsibility among the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security for implementing that strategy. 12. Rapidly deployable capacity for public information: additional resources should be devoted in mission budgets to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links. 13. Logistics support and expenditure management: (a) The Secretariat should prepare a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the timelines proposed and corresponding to planning assumptions established by the substantive offices of DPKO; (b) The General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure to maintain at least five mission start-up kits in Brindisi, which should include rapidly deployable communications equipment. These start-up kits should then be routinely replenished with funding from the assessed contributions to the operations that drew on them; (c) The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to US$50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, once it became clear that an operation was likely to be established, with the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) but prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution; (d) The Secretariat should undertake a review of the entire procurement policies and procedures (with proposals to the General Assembly for amendments to the Financial Rules and Regulations, as required), to facilitate in particular the rapid and full deployment of an operation within the proposed timelines; (e) The Secretariat should conduct a review of the policies and procedures governing the management of financial resources in the field missions with a view to providing field missions with much greater flexibility in the management of their budgets; (f) The Secretariat should increase the level of procurement authority delegated to the field missions (from $200,000 to as high as $1 million, depending on mission size and needs) for all goods and services that are available locally and are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts. 14. Funding Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations: (a) The Panel recommends a substantial increase in resources for Headquarters support of peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining his requirements in full; (b) Headquarters support for peacekeeping should be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements for this purpose should be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennial programme budget of the Organization; (c) Pending the preparation of the next regular budget submission, the Panel recommends that the57 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Secretary-General approach the General Assembly with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the Support Account to allow immediate recruitment of additional personnel, particularly in DPKO. 15. Integrated mission planning and support: Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs), with members seconded from throughout the United Nations system, as necessary, should be the standard vehicle for mission-specific planning and support. IMTFs should serve as the first point of contact for all such support, and IMTF leaders should have temporary line authority over seconded personnel, in accordance with agreements between DPKO, DPA and other contributing departments, programmes, funds and agencies. 16. Other structural adjustments in DPKO: (a) The current Military and Civilian Police Division should be restructured, moving the Civilian Police Unit out of the military reporting chain. Consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser; (b) The Military Adviser’s Office in DPKO should be restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military field headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured; (c) A new unit should be established in DPKO and staffed with the relevant expertise for the provision of advice on criminal law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in the United Nations peace operations; (d) The Under-Secretary-General for Management should delegate authority and responsibility for peacekeeping-related budgeting and procurement functions to the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations for a two-year trial period; (e) The Lessons Learned Unit should be substantially enhanced and moved into a revamped DPKO Office of Operations; (f) Consideration should be given to increasing the number of Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO from two to three, with one of the three designated as the “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. 17. Operational support for public information: a unit for operational planning and support of public information in peace operations should be established, either within DPKO or within a new Peace and Security Information Service in the Department of Public Information (DPI) reporting directly to the Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information. 18. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs: (a) The Panel supports the Secretariat’s effort to create a pilot Peace-building Unit within DPA, in cooperation with other integral United Nations elements, and suggests that regular budgetary support for this unit be revisited by the membership if the pilot programme works well. This programme should be evaluated in the context of guidance the Panel has provided in paragraph 46 above, and if considered the best available option for strengthening United Nations peace-building capacity it should be presented to the Secretary-General within the context of the Panel’s recommendation contained in paragraph 47 (d) above; (b) The Panel recommends that regular budget resources for Electoral Assistance Division programmatic expenses be substantially increased to meet the rapidly growing demand for its services, in lieu of voluntary contributions; (c) To relieve demand on the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD) and the executive office of DPA, and to improve support services rendered to smaller political and peacebuilldin field offices, the Panel recommends that procurement, logistics, staff recruitment and other support services for all such smaller, non-military field missions be provided by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). 19. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: the Panel recommends substantially enhancing the field mission planning and preparation capacity of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with funding partly from the regular budget and partly from peace operations mission budgets. 20. Peace operations and the information age: (a) Headquarters peace and security departments need a responsibility centre to devise and58 A/55/305 S/2000/809 oversee the implementation of common information technology strategy and training for peace operations, residing in EISAS. Mission counterparts to the responsibility centre should also be appointed to serve in the offices of the special representatives of the Secretary-General in complex peace operations to oversee the implementation of that strategy; (b) EISAS, in cooperation with the Information Technology Services Division (ITSD), should implement an enhanced peace operations element on the current United Nations Intranet and link it to the missions through a Peace Operations Extranet (POE); (c) Peace operations could benefit greatly from more extensive use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, which quickly integrates operational information with electronic maps of the mission area, for applications as diverse as demobilization, civilian policing, voter registration, human rights monitoring and reconstruction; (d) The IT needs of mission components with unique information technology needs, such as civilian police and human rights, should be anticipated and met more consistently in mission planning and implementation; (e) The Panel encourages the development of web site co-management by Headquarters and the field missions, in which Headquarters would maintain oversight but individual missions would have staff authorized to produce and post web content that conforms to basic presentational standards and policy.Организация Объединенных Наций A/55/305–S/2000/809 Генеральная Ассамблея Совет Безопасности Distr.: General 21 August 2000 Russian Original: English 00-59472S (R) 180800 180800 *0059472* Генеральная Ассамблея Совет Безопасности Пятьдесят пятая сессия Пятьдесят пятый год Пункт 87 предварительной повестки дня* Всестороннее рассмотрение всего вопроса об операциях по поддержанию мира во всех их аспектах Идентичные письма Генерального секретаря от 21 августа 2000 года на имя Председателя Генеральной Ассамблеи и Председателя Совета Безопасности 7 марта 2000 года я созвал Группу высокого уровня для проведения тщательного обзора мероприятий Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира и безопасности и выработки серии четких, точных, конкретных и практических рекомендаций, которые помогли бы Организации Объединенных Наций более эффективно проводить эти мероприятия в будущем. Я предложил бывшему министру иностранных дел Алжира г-ну Лахдару Брахими возглавить эту Группу, в которую вошли следующие видные деятели со всего мира, обладающие опытом работы в самых разных областях миротворческой деятельности, миростроительства, развития и гуманитарной помощи: г-н Брайан Атвуд, посол Колин Грандерсон, дама Энн Херкус, г-н Ричард Монк, генерал Клаус Науманн (в отставке), г-жа Хисако Симура, посол Владимир Шустов, генерал Филип Сибанда и д-р Корнелио Соммаруга. Буду признателен, если доклад Группы, который был препровожден мне в прилагаемом письме Председателя Группы от 17 августа 2000 года будет доведен до сведения государств-членов. Представленный Группой анализ отличают одновременно откровенность и объективность; ее рекомендации нацелены на перспективу, но вместе с тем разумны и практичны. По моему мнению, оперативное осуществление рекомендаций Группы необходимо для того, чтобы Организация Объединенных Наций приобрела подлинный авторитет как сила, отстаивающая мир. Многие рекомендации Группы касаются вопросов, целиком относящихся к кругу ведения Генерального секретаря, а другие требуют утверждения и поддержки директивных органов Организации Объединенных Наций. Я __________________ * A/55/150.ii A/55/305 S/2000/809 настоятельно призываю все государства-члены вместе со мной принять участие в рассмотрении, утверждении и поддержке осуществления указанных рекомендаций. В этой связи с радостью информирую Вас о том, что я поручил заместителю Генерального секретаря наблюдать за ходом выполнения содержащихся в докладе рекомендаций и курировать подготовку подробного плана осуществления, который я представлю Генеральной Ассамблее и Совету Безопасности. Весьма надеюсь, что доклад Группы, особенно предваряющее его резюме, будет доведен до сведения всех руководителей, которые соберутся в Нью-Йорке в сентябре 2000 года для участия в Саммите тысячелетия. Эта историческая встреча на высшем уровне дает нам уникальную возможность начать процесс обновления потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций в области обеспечения и созидания мира. Обращаюсь к Генеральной Ассамблее и Совету Безопасности за поддержкой в деле практической реализации той нацеленной на перспективу повестки дня, которая изложена в докладе. (Подпись) Кофи А. Аннанiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Письмо Председателя Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира от 17 августа 2000 года на имя Генерального секретаря Группа по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, которую Вы учредили в марте 2000 года, сочла для себя большой честью то, что Вы просили ее оценить способность Организации Объединенных Наций эффективно проводить операции в пользу мира и подготовить откровенные, конкретные и реалистичные рекомендации о путях укрепления этого потенциала. Г-н Брайен Этвуд, посол Колин Грандерсон, дейм Анн Херкус, г-н Ричард Монк, генерал (в отставке) Клаус Науманн, г-жа Хисако Симура, посол Владимир Шустов, генерал Филлип Сибанда, д-р Корнелио Соммаруга и я взялись за выполнение этой задачи из глубокого уважения к Вам и потому, что каждый из нас искренне считает, что система Организации Объединенных Наций может добиться больших успехов в борьбе за дело мира. Мы были весьма восхищены Вашей готовностью осуществить весьма критический анализ прошлых операций Организации Объединенных Наций в Руанде и Сребренице. Такая самокритика является редким явлением для любой крупной организации и особенно редким для Организации Объединенных Наций. Мы хотели бы отдать должное первому заместителю Генерального секретаря Луизе Фрешет и начальнику Канцелярии Генерального секретаря С. Икбалу Ризе, которые были вместе с нами на протяжении всех наших встреч и которые отвечали на наши многочисленные вопросы с неувядаемым терпением и ясностью. Они уделили нам немало времени и мы получили огромную пользу от их глубоких знаний в отношении нынешних ограничений и будущих потребностей Организации Объединенных Наций. Осуществить обзор и подготовить рекомендации в отношении реформы системы, столь масштабной и сложной, как операции Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, всего лишь за четыре месяца было весьма сложной задачей. Ее было бы невозможно осуществить, если бы не самоотверженная и большая работа, проделанная д-ром Уильямом Дурхом (при поддержке персонала Центра Стимсона) и г-ном Салманом Ахмедом из Организации Объединенных Наций, и если бы не готовность должностных лиц Организации Объединенных Наций по всей системе, включая нынешних руководителей миссий, поделиться своими мнениями как в ходе бесед, так и в нередко всеохватывающих критических высказываниях в отношении их собственных организаций и их собственного опыта. Бывшие руководители операции в пользу мира и командующие силами, ученые и представители неправительственных организаций также оказали большую помощь. Группа провела интенсивные обсуждения и прения. Много часов было посвящено обзору рекомендаций и поддержке анализа, которые, как мы знали, станут объектом пристального внимания и толкования. В течение трех отдельных трехдневных встреч в Нью-Йорке, Женеве и затем опять в Нью-Йорке мы обдумали букву и дух прилагаемого доклада. Содержащиеся в нем анализ и рекомендации отражают наш консенсус, который мы доводим до Вашего сведения в надежде на то, что он послужит делу проведенияiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 систематической реформы и обновления этой ключевой функции Организации Объединенных Наций. Как мы указываем в настоящем докладе, мы сознаем, что Вы занимаетесь осуществлением всеобъемлющей реформы Секретариата. Поэтому мы надеемся, что наши рекомендации входят в русло этого более широкого процесса, при необходимости — с незначительными коррективами. Мы понимаем, что не все наши рекомендации можно осуществить сразу же, но многие из них требуют неотложных действий и безоговорочной поддержки со стороны государств-членов. На протяжении этих месяцев мы видели и слышали отрадные высказывания со стороны государств-членов, больших и малых, с Юга и Севера, в поддержку необходимости безотлагательного совершенствования методов, используемых Организацией Объединенных Наций для урегулирования конфликтных ситуаций. Мы настоятельно призываем их принять решительные меры для реализации на практике тех наших рекомендаций, которые требуют официальных действий с их стороны. Группа полностью убеждена в том, что должностное лицо, которое, как мы предлагаем, будет назначено Вами для надзора за осуществлением наших рекомендаций как в рамках Секретариата, так и на уровне государств-членов, будет пользоваться Вашей полной поддержкой с учетом Вашей твердой веры в необходимость трансформации Организации Объединенных Наций в учреждение XXI века, которым оно должно стать для того, чтобы эффективно устранять нынешние и будущие угрозы миру во всем мире. И наконец, если мне будет позволено добавить кое-что от себя лично, я хотел бы выразить самую глубокую признательность каждому из моих коллег по этой Группе. Своими впечатляющими знаниями и опытом и своими совместными усилиями они содействовали осуществлению этого проекта. Они неуклонно демонстрировали наивысшую приверженность Организации и глубокое понимание ее потребностей. В ходе наших встреч и наших контактов на расстоянии они все были исключительно доброжелательны по отношении ко мне, неизменно готовыми оказать помощь, терпеливыми и щедрыми и тем самым они сделали мою — в качестве Председателя Группы — задачу, которая в ином случае была бы просто устрашающей, относительно простой и весьма приятной. (Подпись) Лахдар Брахими Председатель Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мираv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Доклад Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира Содержание Пункты Стр. Резюме . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii I. Необходимость перемен . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 1 II. Доктрина, стратегия и принятие решений в отношении операций в пользу мира . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–83 3 A. Определение элементов операций в пользу мира . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 3 B. Опыт прошлого . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–28 4 С. Последствия для превентивных действий. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–34 6 Резюме основных рекомендаций по превентивным действиям . . . . . . . . . . 34 8 D. Последствия для стратегии миростроительства . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–47 8 Резюме основных рекомендаций по миростроительству. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 11 E. Последствия для доктрины и стратегии поддержания мира . . . . . . . . . . . . 48–55 11 Резюме основной рекомендации по доктрине и стратегии поддержания мира . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 13 F. Четкие, пользующиеся доверием и осуществимые мандаты . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–64 13 Резюме основных рекомендаций по четким, пользующимся доверием и осуществимым мандатам. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 15 G. Потенциал в области сбора информации, анализа и стратегического планирования . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65–75 15 Резюме основной рекомендации по информационно-стратегическому анализу . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 17 H. Проблема временной гражданской администрации . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–83 17 Резюме основной рекомендации по временной гражданской администрации . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 19 III. Потенциал Организации Объединенных Наций по быстрому и эффективному развертыванию операций. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84–169 19 A. Определение того, что означает «быстрое и эффективное развертывание» . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–91 19 Резюме основной рекомендации по определению сроков развертывания 91 20 B. Эффективное руководство миссиями. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–101 21 Резюме основных рекомендаций по руководству миссиями . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 22 С. Военный персонал . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–117 22 Резюме основных рекомендаций по военному персоналу. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 26vi A/55/305 S/2000/809 D. Гражданская полиция . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–126 26 Резюме основных рекомендаций по сотрудникам гражданской полиции . 126 28 E. Гражданские специалисты . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127–145 28 1. Отсутствие резервных систем для реагирования на непредвиденные или особо большие запросы . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128–132 29 2. Трудности в плане привлечения и сохранения наилучших из внешних кандидатов. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133–135 30 3. Нехватка персонала на административных и вспомогательных должностях среднего и старшего уровня . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 31 4. Факторы, дестимулирующие выезд сотрудников для работы на местах . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–138 31 5. Устаревание категории «полевой службы». . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139–140 32 6. Отсутствие всеобъемлющей кадровой стратегии для операций в пользу мира . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141–144 32 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении гражданских специалистов. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 33 F. Потенциал в области общественной информации . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146–150 34 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций по созданию потенциала быстрого развертывания в области общественной информации . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 34 G. Материально-техническое обеспечение, процесс закупок и управление расходами . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151–169 34 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении материально-технического обеспечения и управления расходами . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 38 IV. Подразделения Центральных учреждений, занимающиеся планированием и обеспечением операций по поддержанию мира, и соответствующие ресурсы 170–245 39 A. Укомплектование кадрами и финансирование подразделений Центральных учреждений, занимающихся обеспечением операций по поддержанию мира . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172–197 39 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении финансирования поддержки операций по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениям 197 46 B. Необходимость создания комплексных целевых групп по подготовке миссий и предложение об их создании . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198–217 46 Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении комплексного планирования и поддержки миссий . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 50 С. Прочие структурные изменения, необходимые в ДОПМ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218–233 50 1. Отдел военной и гражданской полиции . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219–225 50 2. Отдел управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226–228 51vii A/55/305 S/2000/809 3. Группа обобщения опыта . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229–230 52 4. Старшие руководители. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231–232 53 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении прочих структурных изменений в ДОПМ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 53 D. Структурная реорганизация, которую необходимо осуществить за пределами Департамента операций по поддержанию мира. . . . . . . . . . . . . 234–245 53 1. Оперативная поддержка деятельности в области общественной информации . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235–238 53 Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении структурной реорганизации в области общественной информации . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 54 2. Поддержка деятельности в области миростроительства в Департаменте по политическим вопросам . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239–243 54 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении поддержки миростроительства в Департаменте по политическим вопросам. . 243 55 3. Поддержка операций в пользу мира в Управлении Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека . 244–245 56 Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении укрепления Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 56 V. Операции в пользу мира в информационный век. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246–264 56 A. Информационные технологии в рамках операций в пользу мира: вопросы стратегии и политики . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247–251 56 Резюме рекомендации в отношении стратегии и политики в области информационных технологий . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 57 B. Инструменты, необходимые для рационального использования полученных сведений и навыков . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252–258 57 Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении информационных технологий, которые можно было бы использовать в рамках операций в пользу мира . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 59 С. Более своевременное распространение общественной информации на базе Интернета. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259–264 59 Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении более своевременного распространения общественной информации на базе Интернета . . . . . . 263 60 VI. Вызовы в деле осуществления . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265–280 60 Приложение I. Члены Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира . . . . . . . . 64 II. Справочные материалы. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 III. Резюме рекомендаций . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70viii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Резюме Организация Объединенных Наций была создана для того, чтобы, говоря словами Устава, «избавить грядущие поколения от бедствий войны». Решение этой задачи является самой главной целью Организации и в очень большей степени представляет собой мерило для оценки Организации народами, интересам которых она призвана служить. В течение последнего десятилетия Организация Объединенных Наций неоднократно оказывалась не в состоянии решить эту задачу, и сегодня ее потенциал в этой области не повысился. Без подтверждения приверженности государств-членов, без существенных организационных изменений и более значительной финансовой поддержки Организация Объединенных Наций не сможет решать те важнейшие задачи по поддержанию мира и миростроительству, которые будут ставить перед ней государства-члены в предстоящие месяцы и годы. Есть много задач, которые не следует ставить перед миротворческими силами Организации Объединенных Наций, и есть много мест, в которые их не следует посылать. Однако в тех случаях, когда Организация Объединенных Наций все же направляет свои силы для поддержания мира, они должны быть готовы к встрече с сохраняющимися силами войны и насилия, имея при этом возможности и решимость для того, чтобы нанести им поражение. Генеральный секретарь просил Группу по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, состоящую из специалистов по различным аспектам предотвращения конфликтов, поддержания мира и миростроительства, проанализировать недостатки существующей системы и представить откровенные, конкретные и реалистичные рекомендации об изменении этой системы. Наши рекомендации касаются не только политики и стратегии, но и, может быть, еще в большей степени — оперативных и организационных аспектов, требующих изменений. Для того чтобы инициативы превентивного характера действительно приводили к уменьшению напряженности и предотвращению конфликтов, Генеральный секретарь должен получать недвусмысленную, твердую и постоянную политическую поддержку от государств-членов. Кроме того, как свидетельствует горький опыт Организации Объединенных Наций, накопленный за последнее десятилетие, никакое количество хороших намерений не станет заменой реальной возможности направлять дееспособные силы, в частности, для того чтобы обеспечить успех комплексной миротворческой операции. Но одной лишь силой нельзя обеспечить мир; сила может только подготовить пространство, в котором можно построить мир. Кроме того, изменения, рекомендуемые Группой, окажут долговременный эффект только в том случае, если государства-члены мобилизуют политическую волю для политической, финансовой и оперативной поддержки Организации Объединенных Наций, позволяющей ей стать реальной силой для защиты мира. Каждая из рекомендаций, содержащихся в настоящем докладе, направлена на устранение той или иной серьезной проблемы в области определения стратегического направления, принятия решений, быстрого развертывания, оперативного планирования и поддержки, а также в области современных информационных технологий. Ниже кратко излагаются основные оценки иix A/55/305 S/2000/809 рекомендации, в основном в том порядке, в каком они фигурируют в тексте самого доклада (в скобках указаны номера соответствующих пунктов доклада). Кроме того, в приложении III дается резюме рекомендаций. Опыт прошлого (пункты 15–28) Никого не должен удивлять тот факт, что некоторые из миссий прошлого десятилетия было особенно трудно выполнить: ведь они обычно развертывались там, где конфликт не привел к победе той или другой стороны, где вследствие военного тупика или международного давления или под влиянием наличия обоих этих факторов бои прекратились, но по крайней мере некоторые из сторон в конфликте не имели серьезного намерения прекратить противоборство. Таким образом, операции Организации Объединенных Наций не развертывались в постконфликтных ситуациях, а были направлены на создание таких ситуаций. При проведении таких комплексных операций миротворцы стараются сохранить мир в данном районе, тогда как миростроители пытаются добиться того, чтобы этот мир держался на собственной основе. Только в таких условиях появляются реальные возможности для вывода миротворческих сил, поэтому миротворцы и миростроители — это неразлучные партнеры. Последствия для превентивных действий и миростроительства: необходимость стратегии и поддержки (пункты 29–47) Как Организация Объединенных Наций, так и ее члены испытывают острую необходимость в разработке более эффективных стратегий предотвращения конфликтов, как в долгосрочной, так и в краткосрочной перспективе. В этой связи Группа одобряет рекомендации Генерального секретаря по вопросу о предотвращении конфликтов, которые содержатся в его докладе, посвященном новому тысячелетию (A/54/2000), и в его замечаниях на втором открытом заседания Совета Безопасности по вопросу о предотвращении конфликтов, состоявшемся в июле 2000 года. Она также предлагает Генеральному секретарю шире практиковать направление миссий по установлению фактов в районы напряженности для поддержки краткосрочной деятельности по предотвращению конфликтов. Кроме того, Совет Безопасности и Специальный комитет Генеральной Ассамблеи по операциям по поддержанию мира, сознавая, что Организация Объединенных Наций и в дальнейшем будет сталкиваться с необходимостью оказания помощи группам населения и народам в переходе от войны к миру, признали ключевую роль миростроительства в комплексных операциях в пользу мира. Поэтому системе Организации Объединенных Наций надо будет устранить один принципиальный недостаток в разработке, финансировании и осуществлении миростроительных стратегий и мероприятий. Вот почему Группа рекомендует, чтобы Исполнительный комитет по вопросам мира и безопасности (ИКМБ) представил Генеральному секретарю план укрепления постоянного потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций в области разработки миростроительных стратегий и осуществления программ в поддержку этих стратегий. Группа поддерживает, в частности, следующие изменения: такое изменение самой концепции применения гражданской полиции и соответствующих правоохранительных элементов в ходе операции в пользуxA/55/305 S/2000/809 мира, которое переносит акцент на единый подход к поддержанию правопорядка, уважению прав человека и оказанию помощи населению в деле достижения национального примирения в постконфликтный период; объединение программ разоружения, демобилизации и реинтеграции в рамках начисляемых бюджетов комплексных операций в пользу мира на их первом этапе; определенная свобода действий руководителей операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира в деле финансирования проектов, дающих быстрый эффект, которые оказывают реальное влияние на жизнь людей в районе миссии; более эффективное включение программ содействия проведению выборов в более широкую стратегию поддержки институтов управления. Последствия для миротворчества: необходимость эффективной доктрины и реалистичных мандатов (пункты 48–64) Группа признает, что согласие местных сторон, беспристрастность и использование силы только в порядке самообороны должны оставаться фундаментальными принципами миротворчества. Однако опыт показывает, что в контексте внутригосударственных/транснациональных конфликтов принципом согласия можно манипулировать самым различным образом. Поэтому применительно к операциям Организации Объединенных Наций беспристрастность должна означать соблюдение принципов Устава: если одна из сторон мирного соглашения явно и бесспорно нарушает его условия, дальнейшее одинаковое отношение Организации Объединенных Наций ко всем сторонам может в лучшем случае привести к неэффективности, а в худшем случае может быть равносильно сговору со злом. Ни одна неудача не нанесла большего ущерба престижу миротворческой деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций в 90-х годах, чем ее нежелание отличить жертву от агрессора. Раньше Организация Объединенных Наций часто не могла эффективно решать такие задачи. Однако одной из принципиальных отправных точек настоящего доклада является мысль как раз о том, что она должна быть в состоянии сделать это. Миротворцы Организации Объединенных Наций после завершения этапа развертывания должны быть в состоянии выполнить свой мандат профессионально и успешно. Это означает, что военные подразделения Организации Объединенных Наций должны быть способны защитить себя и другие компоненты миссии и выполнить мандат миссии. Правила применения вооруженной силы должны быть достаточно жесткими и не должны позволять, чтобы контингенты Организации Объединенных Наций уступали инициативу тем, кто на них нападает. А это, в свою очередь, означает, что Секретариат в ходе своего планирования не должен исходить из наилучших сценариев в тех случаях, когда местные силы действовали обычно по наихудшему сценарию. Это означает, что в мандатах должны быть конкретно указаны полномочия на применение силы участниками операции. Это подразумевает создание более крупных, лучше оснащенных и более дорогостоящих сил, но зато таких сил, которые в состоянии быть реальным сдерживающим фактором. В частности, войска Организации Объединенных Наций, формируемые для проведения комплексных операций, должны иметь подразделения полевой разведки и другие силы и средства, необходимые для организации эффективной обороны от противника,xi A/55/305 S/2000/809 готового прибегнуть к насилию. Кроме того, должно предполагаться, что миротворцы Организации Объединенных Наций — войска или полицейские, — которые становятся свидетелями насилия по отношению к гражданскому населению, имеют санкцию на то, чтобы с помощью имеющихся у них средств положить конец этому насилию в соответствии с основными принципами Организации Объединенных Наций. Однако операции, имеющие широкий и прямой мандат на защиту гражданского населения, должны обеспечиваться специальными ресурсами, которые необходимы для выполнения этого мандата. Секретариат должен докладывать Совету Безопасности то, что он обязан знать, а не то, что он хочет услышать, когда дается рекомендация в отношении количества сил и других ресурсов для новой миссии, и он должен устанавливать эти количества, исходя из реалистичных сценариев, учитывающих вероятные препятствия на пути к осуществлению. Мандаты Совета Безопасности должны, в свою очередь, отражать ясное понимание того, что миротворческие операции нуждаются в единой направленности усилий, когда развертывание этих операций происходит в потенциально опасных условиях. Нынешняя практика заключается в том, что Генеральный секретарь получает резолюцию Совета Безопасности, указывающую количество войск на бумаге, но он не знает при этом, получит ли он войска и другой персонал, которые необходимы для эффективного функционирования миссии, и будут ли они оснащены соответствующим образом. Группа считает, что, после того как реалистичные потребности миссии определены и согласованы, Совет должен оставлять свою санкционирующую резолюцию в виде проекта до тех пор, пока Генеральный секретарь не подтвердит, что он получил от государств-членов такие обязательства в отношении войск и других элементов, которые достаточны для удовлетворения этих потребностей. Государства-члены, которые выделяют сформированные военные подразделения для операции, должны приглашаться на консультации с членами Совета Безопасности во время разработки мандата; такие консультации можно было бы с большой пользой организационно оформить путем создания специальных вспомогательных органов Совета, как это предусмотрено в статье 29 Устава. Страны, предоставляющие войска, должны также приглашаться на секретариатские брифинги Совета Безопасности, касающиеся кризисов, которые связаны с вопросами безопасности персонала миссии, или касающиеся изменения или нового толкования мандата на применение силы. Новые возможности Центральных учреждений в деле обработки информации и стратегического анализа (пункты 65–75) Группа рекомендует создать новую структуру для сбора и анализа информации, чтобы удовлетворять информационно-аналитические потребности Генерального секретаря и членов Исполнительного комитета по вопросам мира и безопасности (ИКМБ). Без таких возможностей Секретариат будет оставаться учреждением, способным лишь реагировать на обстановку, будучи не в состоянии предвидеть развитие событий, а ИКМБ не сможет играть ту роль, ради которой он был создан. Секретариат ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу (СИСА),xii A/55/305 S/2000/809 который Группа предлагает создать, будет создавать и обновлять комплексные базы данных по вопросам мира и безопасности, эффективно распространять эту информацию в системе Организации Объединенных Наций, проводить анализ политики, разрабатывать долгосрочную стратегию для ИКМБ и обращать внимание руководства ИКМБ на зарождающиеся кризисы. Он мог бы также предлагать повестку дня самого ИКМБ и управлять ходом ее рассмотрения, что помогло бы преобразовать ИКМБ в такой орган, принимающий решения, который предусматривался первоначальными реформами Генерального секретаря. Группа предлагает создать СИСА путем объединения нынешнего Оперативного центра Департамента операций по поддержанию мира (ДОПМ) с целым рядом небольших разрозненных подразделений по разработке политики, а также путем включения небольшого числа военных аналитиков, экспертов по международным преступным группировкам и специалистов по информационным системам. СИСА должен обслуживать всех членов ИКМБ. Улучшение управления миссиями и руководства (пункты 92–101) Группа считает, что очень важно собирать всех руководителей новой миссии как можно раньше в Центральных учреждениях Организации Объединенных Наций, чтобы они участвовали в разработке концепции операций миссии, плана вспомогательных мероприятий, бюджета, штатного расписания и руководящих принципов, предлагаемых Центральными учреждениями. С этой целью Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю систематически, опираясь при этом на помощь государств-членов, составлять всеобъемлющий список потенциальных специальных представителей Генерального секретаря (СПГС), командующих силами, комиссаров гражданской полиции, их потенциальных заместителей и возможных руководителей других компонентов миссии, обеспечивая при этом широкое географическое представительство и равное соотношение между числом мужчин и женщин. Стандарты быстрого развертывания и дежурные списки экспертов (пункты 86–91 и 102–169) Первые 6–12 недель после прекращения огня или заключения мирного соглашения часто имеют решающее значение как для установления прочного мира, так и для обеспечения авторитета новой операции. Возможности, потерянные в течение этого периода, трудно компенсировать. Группа рекомендует Организации Объединенных Наций определить «потенциал быстрого и эффективного развертывания» как способность полностью развернуть традиционные миротворческие операции в течение 30 дней после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности о проведении такой операции и в течение 90 дней, когда речь идет о комплексных миротворческих операциях. Группа рекомендует обеспечить дальнейшее развитие Системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций (СРСООН), с тем чтобы она включала несколько сплоченных многонациональных формирований бригадного размера и необходимые силы обеспечения, которые были бы созданы государствами-членами, действующими сообща, с тем чтобы можно было более эффективно удовлетворять потребности в дееспособныхxiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 миротворческих силах, за создание которых выступает Группа. Группа рекомендует также Секретариату еще до начала развертывания направлять в каждую страну, которая может предоставить контингенты войск, группу специалистов для проверки готовности к миротворческим операциям Организации Объединенных Наций с точки зрения уровня подготовки и оснащения. Подразделения, не отвечающие предъявляемым требованиям, не должны развертываться. В целях обеспечения такого быстрого и эффективного развертывания Группа рекомендует подготовить в рамках СРСООН постоянно обновляемый «дежурный список» примерно 100 опытных, высококвалифицированных армейских офицеров, который был бы тщательно проверен и утвержден в ДОПМ. Группы людей, набранных из этого списка и готовых приступить к исполнению своих обязанностей в течение семи дней, преобразовывали бы широкие стратегические концепции миссии, разработанные в Центральных учреждениях, в конкретные оперативно-тактические планы еще до развертывания воинских контингентов и служили бы дополнением к базовому элементу из состава ДОПМ, который входит в состав первой группы, приступающей к выполнению миссии. Аналогичные дежурные списки гражданских полицейских, международных судебных экспертов, специалистов по уголовному праву и специалистов по правам человека должны включать достаточное количество фамилий, чтобы можно было по мере необходимости укреплять правоохранительные учреждения, и такие списки также должны быть составной частью СРСООН. Благодаря этому на основе этих списков можно было бы составлять группы заранее подготовленных специалистов, направляемых в район новой миссии до прибытия основной части гражданских полицейских и соответствующих специалистов, что содействовало бы быстрому и эффективному развертыванию правоохранительного компонента миссии. Группа призывает также государства-члены расширить национальные «резервы» полицейских и соответствующих специалистов, предназначенных для участия в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, чтобы содействовать удовлетворению высокого спроса на гражданских полицейских и соответствующих экспертов в области уголовного правосудия/правопорядка при проведении операций в пользу мира, когда речь идет о внутригосударственных конфликтах. Группа настоятельно призывает также государства-члены рассмотреть вопрос о формировании совместных региональных партнерских организаций и программ в целях обучения членов соответствующих национальных резервов доктринам и стандартам гражданской полиции Организации Объединенных Наций. Секретариат должен также в срочном порядке решить следующие задачи: создать транспарентный и децентрализованный механизм набора гражданского персонала для работы на местах; улучшить положение дел с сохранением в списках гражданских специалистов, которые нужны в каждой комплексной операции в пользу мира; создать резервную систему для обеспечения быстрого развертывания. Наконец, Группа рекомендует Секретариату радикально изменить нынешние системы и процедуры закупки для миротворческих миссий, чтобы содействовать быстрому развертыванию. Она рекомендует передать функции поxiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 составлению бюджета и снабжению миротворческих операций из Департамента по вопросам управления в ДОПМ. Группа предлагает создать новый, отдельный орган, занимающийся политикой и процедурами более рационального материально-технического обеспечения полевых операций; в большей степени делегировать полномочия в вопросах снабжения на низовые уровни; предоставить полевым миссиям больше свободы в управлении своим бюджетом. Группа также настоятельно призывает Генерального секретаря сформулировать и представить Генеральной Ассамблее для ее одобрения глобальную стратегию материально-технического обеспечения, которая охватывала бы создание запасов материальных средств и заключение постоянных контрактов с частным сектором на предоставление рядовых товаров и услуг. Пока же Группа рекомендует держать на Базе материально-технического снабжения Организации Объединенных Наций в Бриндизи, Италия, дополнительные комплекты снаряжения первой необходимости. Группа рекомендует также предоставить Генеральному секретарю с согласия Консультативного комитета по административным и бюджетным вопросам (ККАБВ) полномочия на выделение вплоть до 50 млн. долл. США еще задолго до принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности об учреждении новой операции, когда станет ясно, что высока вероятность санкционирования такой операции. Повышение возможностей Центральных учреждений по планированию и поддержке операций в пользу мира (пункты 170-197) Группа рекомендует рассматривать деятельность Центральных учреждений по поддержке миротворческих операций в качестве основной деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций, и поэтому большинство потребностей в таких ресурсах должно удовлетворяться за счет регулярного бюджета Организации. В настоящее время ДОПМ и другие подразделения, которые планируют и поддерживают миротворческие операции, финансируются главным образом средствами с вспомогательного счета, который возобновляется каждый год и финансирует только временные должности. Такой подход к финансированию и укомплектованию кадрами смешивает временный характер конкретных операций с явно постоянным характером операций по поддержанию мира и других операций в пользу мира, которые осуществляются как основные виды деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций. Такое положение дел явно неприемлемо. Общая стоимость содержания ДОПМ и связанных с ним вспомогательных подразделений Центральных учреждений, занимающихся вопросами миротворчества, не превышает 50 млн. долл. США в год, что составляет примерно два процента общих расходов на поддержание мира. Необходимо срочно выделить дополнительные ресурсы на эти структуры для обеспечения того, чтобы 2 млрд. долл. США, которые будут израсходованы на миротворческие цели в 2001 году, были израсходованы правильно. Поэтому Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю представить Генеральной Ассамблее предложение, излагающее потребности Организации в полном объеме. Группа считает, что следует провести методический управленческий обзор деятельности ДОПМ, но в то же время считает, что нехватка персонала вxv A/55/305 S/2000/809 некоторых областях совершенно очевидна. Например, ясно, что недостаточно иметь 32 сотрудника, для того чтобы обеспечивать военное планирование и руководство деятельностью 27 000 военнослужащих на местах, 9 сотрудников гражданской полиции для того, чтобы вести поиск кандидатов, проверку и обеспечивать руководство деятельностью 8600 полицейских, 15 сотрудников по политическим вопросам в Центральных учреждениях для 14 нынешних операций и двух новых операций или же выделять всего 1,25 процента общей стоимости миротворческой деятельности на административную и материально-техническую поддержку со стороны Центральных учреждений. Создание комплексных целевых групп по подготовке миссий в целях планирования и материально-технического обеспечения миссий (пункты 198-245) Группа рекомендует создать комплексные целевые группы по подготовке миссий (КЦГМ), сформированные из сотрудников, прикомандированных из самых различных подразделений системы Организации Объединенных Наций, с тем чтобы они планировали новые миссии и содействовали обеспечению их полного развертывания, благодаря чему можно было бы значительно увеличить поддержку, которую Центральные учреждения оказывают персоналу на местах. В настоящее время в Секретариате нет никакого органа комплексного планирования или материально-технического обеспечения, который объединял бы в своем составе людей, отвечающих за политический анализ, военные операции, гражданскую полицию, помощь в проведении выборов, права человека, развитие, гуманитарную помощь, беженцев и перемещенных лиц, общественную информацию, материально-техническое обеспечение, финансирование и набор персонала. Структурные изменения необходимы и в других частях ДОПМ, в том числе в Отделе военной и гражданской полиции, который должен быть реорганизован в два различных отдела, и в Отделе управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения (ОУПОМТО), который следует разделить на два отдела. Группу обобщения опыта следует укрепить и включить в Управление операций ДОПМ. Необходимо также укрепить подразделения Центральных учреждений, занимающиеся вопросами планирования и обеспечения общественной информации, и подразделения Департамента по политическим вопросам (ДПВ), особенно группу по проведению выборов. Что касается структур за пределами Секретариата, то необходимо увеличить потенциал Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека в области планирования и обеспечения тех компонентов операций в пользу мира, которые касаются прав человека. Следует рассмотреть вопрос о том, чтобы предоставить ДОПМ третью должность помощника Генерального секретаря и сделать одного из них первым помощником Генерального секретаря, который исполнял бы функции первого зама заместителя Генерального секретаря. Приведение операций в пользу мира в соответствие с потребностями информационного века (пункты 246-264) Современные, эффективно применяемые информационные технологии являются ключом к решению многих из вышеупомянутых задач, однакоxvi A/55/305 S/2000/809 недостатки в области стратегии, политики и практики мешают их эффективному использованию. В частности, в Центральных учреждениях нет достаточно сильного центра, отвечающего за стратегию и политику в области информационных технологий на уровне пользователя при проведении операций в пользу мира. В рамках СИСА следует назначить старшего чиновника с такими обязанностями, связанными с вопросами мира и безопасности, а в аппарате СПГС в каждой операции Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира должны быть сотрудники с аналогичными функциями. Как Центральные учреждения, так и полевые миссии нуждаются в глобальной межорганизационной информационной сети по операциям в пользу мира, с помощью которой миссии могли бы получить доступ, в частности, к базам данных СИСА, к результатам проведенных анализов и накопленному опыту. Трудности на пути осуществления (пункты 265-280) Группа считает, что вышеупомянутые рекомендации вполне укладываются в рамки того, чего можно ожидать от государств — членов Организации. Для осуществления некоторых из этих рекомендаций Организации потребуются дополнительные ресурсы, но мы не хотим сказать, что наилучший способ решения проблем Организации Объединенных Наций заключается лишь в предоставлении дополнительных ресурсов. В самом деле, никакое количество денег или ресурсов не может стать заменой значительных изменений в самой культуре Организации, которые остро необходимы. Группа призывает сотрудников Секретариата с большим вниманием отнестись к инициативам Генерального секретаря по привлечению гражданского общества и постоянно помнить о том, что Организация Объединенных Наций, в которой они работают, является универсальной организацией. Люди во всем мире имеют полное право считать ее своей организацией и уже поэтому судить о ее деятельности и о работающих в ней людях. Кроме того, существуют большие различия в качестве персонала, и те, кто входит в эту систему, охотнее всего признают это; на хорошо работающих сотрудников взваливают слишком много работы, чтобы компенсировать малую результативность менее способных сотрудников. Если Организация Объединенных Наций не примет мер для того, чтобы хорошая работа по-настоящему ценилась, она не сможет обратить вспять тревожную тенденцию, заключающуюся в том, что квалифицированные сотрудники, в том числе молодые, покидают Организацию. Более того, у высококвалифицированных людей не будет никаких стимулов для поступления в нее. Если руководители всех уровней, начиная с Генерального секретаря и его старших помощников, не станут серьезно заниматься этой проблемой в самом срочном порядке, если они не будут вознаграждать отличный труд и избавляться от некомпетентных, то дополнительные ресурсы будут растрачиваться бесполезно и реформа, дающая долгосрочный эффект, будет невозможной. Государства-члены также признают, что им необходимо обдумать культуру и методы своей работы. Например, члены Совета Безопасности и вообще все члены Организации обязаны превращать свои слова в дела, как это сделала,xvii A/55/305 S/2000/809 например, та делегация в Совете Безопасности, которая вылетела в Джакарту и Дили сразу после начала кризиса в Восточном Тиморе в 1999 году, — это прекрасный пример эффективных действий Совета: res, non verba. Мы, члены Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, призываем руководителей всего мира, которые соберутся на Саммит тысячелетия, подтверждая свою приверженность идеалам Организации Объединенных Наций, взять на себя также обязательство повысить возможности Организации Объединенных Наций по решению в полном объеме своей задачи, которая и является причиной ее существования, — оказывать помощь тем, кого затронула война, и поддерживать или восстанавливать мир. Добиваясь консенсуса по рекомендациям, содержащимся в настоящем докладе, мы пришли также к общему видению Организации Объединенных Наций, которая оказывала бы мощную поддержку населению, стране или региону в целях предотвращения конфликта или прекращения насилия. Мы считаем, что Специальный представитель Генерального секретаря успешно справился со своей задачей, если он дал народу той или иной страны возможность сделать ради себя то, что раньше сделать не удавалось: построить и консолидировать мир, добиться примирения, укрепить демократию, обеспечить права человека. Но прежде всего нам видится такая Организация Объединенных Наций, у которой есть не только воля, но и возможности для того, чтобы достичь ее великие цели и оправдать доверие, которым она пользуется практически у всего человечества.1 A/55/305 S/2000/809 I. Необходимость перемен 1. Если говорить словами Устава Организации Объединенных Наций, то она была создана для того, чтобы «избавить грядущие поколения от бедствий войны». Решение этой задачи представляет собой самую главную функцию Организации и, в весьма значительной степени, то мерило, по которому о ней судят народы, ради служения которым она и существует. В течение последнего десятилетия Организация Объединенных Наций неоднократно не справлялась с этой задачей; не может она сделать это и сегодня. Без существенных организационных изменений, большей финансовой поддержки и возобновленной приверженности со стороны государств-членов Организация Объединенных Наций не сможет выполнять крайне важные задачи в области поддержания мира и миростроительства, которые государства-члены будут возлагать на нее в предстоящие месяцы и годы. Есть много таких задач, которые не следует поручать миротворческим силам Организации Объединенных Наций, и есть много таких мест, куда их не следует посылать. Однако когда Организация Объединенных Наций все-таки направляет свои войска для поддержания мира, они должны быть готовы оказать сопротивление все еще сохраняющимся силам войны и насилия, обладая при этом способностью и решимостью нанести им сокрушительный удар. 2. Генеральный секретарь просил Группу по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, в состав которой входят лица, имеющие опыт в различных аспектах предотвращения конфликтов, поддержания мира и миростроительства (фамилии членов Группы перечислены в приложении I), проанализировать недостатки существующей системы и вынести откровенные, конкретные и реалистичные рекомендации в отношении изменений. Наши рекомендации касаются не только политики и стратегии, но и оперативных и организационных потребностей. 3. Чтобы быть в состоянии предпринимать превентивные инициативы для ослабления напряженности и недопущения конфликтов, Генеральный секретарь нуждается в определенной, мощной и постоянной политической поддержке со стороны государств-членов. За последнее десятилетие Организация Объединенных Наций неоднократно убеждалась в том, что, если мы хотим, чтобы миротворчество достигало своей цели, благие намерения, какими бы большими они ни были, не могут подменить собой фундаментальную способность проецировать внушительную по своему потенциалу силу. Вместе с тем сила сама по себе не может привести к миру; она может лишь создать пространство, в котором можно созидать мир. 4. Другими словами, главными условиями успеха будущих комплексных операций являются политическая поддержка, быстрое развертывание мощных по своей конфигурации сил и надежная стратегия миростроительства. Каждая рекомендация в настоящем докладе так или иначе предназначена для того, чтобы помочь обеспечить выполнение этих трех условий. Необходимость перемен стала ощущаться еще более остро после недавних событий в Сьерра-Леоне и с учетом ошеломляющей перспективы расширения операций Организации Объединенных Наций в Демократической Республике Конго. 5. Хотя эти изменения имеют существенно важный характер, они не будут оказывать длительного воздействия, если государства — члены Организации не отнесутся самым серьезным образом к своей обязанности обучать и оснащать свои собственные силы, а также наделять мандатом и соответствующими возможностями их коллективный инструмент, с тем чтобы совместными усилиями успешно справляться с угрозами миру. Они должны мобилизовать политическую волю в поддержку Организации Объединенных Наций в политическом, финансовом и оперативном отношениях — если, конечно, они решили действовать как Объединенные Нации, — для того, чтобы Организация внушала к себе доверие как сила, выступающая в пользу мира. 6. В рекомендациях, представляемых Группой, сбалансированы принципы и прагматизм и одновременно с этим учитываются дух и буква Устава Организации Объединенных Наций и соответствующая роль законодательных органов Организации. Они основаны на следующих предпосылках: a) главная ответственность государств-членов за поддержание международного мира и2A/55/305 S/2000/809 безопасности и необходимость укреплять — как в количественном, так и в качественном отношении — поддержку, оказываемую системе Организации Объединенных Наций в интересах осуществления этой ответственности; b) важнейшее значение четких, убедительных и обеспеченных надлежащими ресурсами мандатов, предоставляемых Советом Безопасности; c) сосредоточение внимания системы Организации Объединенных Наций на предотвращении конфликтов и, по мере возможности, ее раннее задействование; d) необходимость в более эффективном сборе и оценке информации в Центральных учреждениях Организации Объединенных Наций, включая расширенную систему раннего предупреждения о конфликтах, которая могла бы выявлять и распознавать угрозу или опасность конфликта и геноцида; e) важность того, чтобы система Организации Объединенных Наций соблюдала и поощряла международные документы и стандарты в области прав человека и нормы международного гуманитарного права во всех аспектах своей деятельности по обеспечению мира и безопасности; f) необходимость в наращивании потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций по содействию миростроительству — как превентивному, так и постконфликтному — на подлинно комплексной основе; g) крайняя необходимость в улучшении работы Центральных учреждений по планированию (включая многовариантное планирование) операций по поддержанию мира; h) признание того, что, хотя Организация Объединенных Наций накопила значительный опыт в деле планирования, развертывания и проведения традиционных миротворческих операций, она еще не приобрела потенциала, необходимого для оперативного развертывания более комплексных операций и эффективного их проведения; i) необходимость обеспечивать полевые миссии высококвалифицированными руководителями и управленческим персоналом, которых Центральные учреждения наделяли бы большей гибкостью и самостоятельностью в четких параметрах мандата и с четкими стандартами отчетности в отношении как расходов, так и результатов; j) крайняя необходимость в установлении и поддержании высокого уровня компетентности и добросовестности у персонала как в Центральных учреждениях, так и на местах, который должен получать подготовку и поддержку, необходимые для выполнения его работы и для продвижения по службе, руководствуясь при этом современными методами управления, позволяющими вознаграждать за хорошую работу и отсеивать некомпетентных сотрудников; k) важность того, чтобы должностные лица в Центральных учреждениях и на местах отвечали за результаты своей работы; при этом следует признать, что их необходимо наделять соразмерной ответственностью, властью и ресурсами для выполнения порученных им задач. 7. В настоящем докладе Группа рассмотрела многие убедительные доводы в пользу перемен в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций. Группа рассматривает свои рекомендации как минимальный пороговый уровень изменений, необходимых для того, чтобы дать системе Организации Объединенных Наций возможность стать эффективным и оперативным институтом XXI века. (Ключевые рекомендации резюмируются жирным шрифтом по всему тексту; кроме того, они приведены в едином резюме в приложении III.) 8. Прямая критика, звучащая в настоящем докладе, отражает коллективный опыт членов Группы, а также результаты бесед, проведенных на всех уровнях системы Организации Объединенных Наций. Количество людей, с которыми Группа провела беседы или от которых она получила письменные материалы, составляет более 200 человек. Были использованы такие источники, как постоянные представительства государств-членов, включая членов Совета Безопасности, Специальный комитет по операциям по поддержанию мира и персонал департаментов, занимающихся вопросами мира и безопасности, в Центральных учреждениях Организации Объединенных Наций в Нью-Йорке, в Отделении Организации Объединенных Наций в Женеве, в штаб-квартирах Управления Верховного комиссара3 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека (УВКПЧ) и Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по делам беженцев (УВКБ), в штаб-квартирах других фондов и программ Организации Объединенных Наций, во Всемирном банке и в составе всех нынешних операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира (перечень ссылок содержится в приложении II). II. Доктрина, стратегия и принятие решений в отношении операций в пользу мира 9. Система Организации Объединенных Наций, т.е. государства-члены, Совет Безопасности, Генеральная Ассамблея и Секретариат, должны осторожно брать на себя обязательства в отношении операций в пользу мира, объективно поразмыслив над опытом своей деятельности за последнее десятилетие. Она должна соответствующим образом скорректировать доктрину, которая лежит в основе операций в пользу мира; отладить свой механизм анализа и принятия решений так, чтобы реагировать на нынешние реальности и предвосхищать будущие потребности; и мобилизовать творческий потенциал, воображение и волю, необходимые для реализации новых и альтернативных решений в ситуациях, в которые миротворцы не могут и не должны направляться. A. Определение элементов операций в пользу мира 10. Операции Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира связаны с тремя главными видами деятельности: предотвращением конфликтов и установлением мира; поддержанием мира; и миростроительством. Долгосрочное предотвращение конфликтов позволяет заняться структурными источниками конфликтов ради строительства прочного фундамента мира. Если такой фундамент рушится, предотвращение конфликтов пытается укрепить его, обычно через дипломатические инициативы. Такие превентивные действия в силу самого своего определения являются малозаметной деятельностью; когда они осуществляются успешно, они могут вообще остаться незамеченными. 11. Установление мира относится к возникшим конфликтам и имеет своей целью попытаться остановить их с использованием инструментов дипломатии и посредничества. Лица, занимающиеся установлением мира, могут быть посланниками правительств, групп государств, региональных организаций или Организации Объединенных Наций, либо они могут представлять неофициальные и неправительственные группы, как это было, например, в случае переговоров, приведших к мирному соглашению для Мозамбика. Установление мира может даже быть работой одного известного лица, действующего самостоятельно. 12. Поддержание мира — это дело, которым занимаются уже 50 лет и которое за последнее десятилетие быстро трансформировалось из традиционной, преимущественно военной модели обеспечения соблюдения прекращения огня и разъединения сил после межгосударственных войн, вобрав в себя комплексную модель, состоящую из многочисленных военных и гражданских элементов, которые взаимодействуют между собой в целях установления мира в опасных условиях после гражданских войн. 13. Миростроительство — это термин, который возник не так давно и который, как он используется в настоящем докладе, описывает деятельность, проводимую после окончания конфликта с целью восстановить основы мира и дать инструменты для того, чтобы на этих основах построить нечто более значительное, чем просто отсутствие войны. Таким образом, миростроительство включает в себя — но отнюдь не ограничивается этим — реинтеграцию бывших комбатантов в гражданское общество, укрепление правопорядка (например, через подготовку и перестройку местной полиции, проведение реформ судебной и пенитенциарной систем), обеспечение большего уважения к правам человека посредством мониторинга, просвещения и расследования прошлых и нынешних нарушений, оказание технической помощи в целях демократического развития (включая помощь в проведении выборов и поддержку свободных средств массовой информации), а также поощрение методов урегулирования конфликтов и примирения.4A/55/305 S/2000/809 14. Важными элементами, дополняющими эффективное миростроительство, являются поддержка борьбы с коррупцией, осуществление программ разминирования в рамках гуманитарных операций, уделение особого внимание просвещению и мерам контроля в связи с вирусом иммунодефицита человека/синдрома приобретенного иммунодефицита (ВИЧ/СПИД), а также борьба с другими инфекционными заболеваниями. B. Опыт прошлого 15. Тихие успехи в деле краткосрочного предотвращения конфликтов и установления мира нередко, как указывалось выше, остаются в политическом отношении невидимыми. Личные посланники и представители Генерального секретаря (ПГС) или специальные представители Генерального секретаря (СПГС) порой дополняли дипломатические инициативы государств-членов, а порой брали на себя такие инициативы, которые государства-члены не могли с готовностью повторить. Примеры последних инициатив (взятые из области установления мира, а также из превентивной дипломатии) включают в себя достижение прекращения огня в ходе войны между Исламской Республикой Иран и Ираком в 1988 году, освобождение последних западных заложников в Ливане в 1991 году и предотвращение войны между Исламской Республикой Иран и Афганистаном в 1998 году. 16. Те, кто предпочитает уделять основное внимание основополагающим причинам конфликтов, доказывают, что такие связанные с кризисами усилия часто оказываются либо слишком незначительными, либо слишком запоздалыми. Однако если дипломатические инициативы будут предприниматься на более раннем этапе, они могут быть отвергнуты правительством, которое не видит или не хочет признать возникающую проблему, либо может даже само быть частью этой проблемы. Таким образом, долгосрочные превентивные стратегии являются необходимым дополнением к краткосрочным инициативам. 17. Вплоть до окончания «холодной войны» операции Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира в большинстве случаев имели традиционные мандаты на контроль за прекращением огня и не имели никаких прямых обязанностей в плане миростроительства. «Стратегия вхождения» — или последовательная цепь событий и решений, ведущих к развертыванию сил Организации Объединенных Наций, — была достаточно простой: война, прекращение огня, приглашение следить за соблюдением прекращения огня и развертывание военных наблюдателей или подразделений с этой целью одновременно с продолжением усилий по политическому урегулированию. Потребности в плане разведки были также относительно простыми, а угрозы для войск — относительно малыми. Однако традиционное поддержание мира, которое занимается симптомами, а не источниками конфликтов, не имеет присущей ему «стратегии ухода», а связанное с ним установление мира нередко требовало времени для достижения прогресса. В результате этого традиционные миротворцы оставались на местах в течение 10, 20, 30 и даже 50 лет (например, на Кипре, на Ближнем Востоке и в Индии/Пакистане). Если руководствоваться стандартами более комплексных операций, они являются относительно недорогостоящими, а в политическом отношении их легче сохранять, чем свертывать. Однако их также бывает трудно оправдать, если только они не сопровождаются серьезными и устойчивыми усилиями по установлению мира, направленными на превращение соглашения о прекращении огня в надежное и прочное мирное урегулирование. 18. После окончания «холодной войны» деятельность Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира часто сочеталась с миростроительством в комплексных операциях в пользу мира, развертываемых в условиях внутригосударственных конфликтов. Однако эти конфликтные ситуации одновременно оказывают воздействие на внешних субъектов и испытывают воздействие со стороны внешних субъектов, таких, как политические покровители, торговцы оружием, покупатели незаконно экспортируемых товаров, региональные державы, бросающие в огонь свои собственные войска, и соседние государства, принимающие у себя беженцев, которые порой подвергаются систематическому насилию с целью изгнать из их родных мест. При таких значительных трансграничных последствиях как для государственных, так и для негосударственных субъектов эти конфликты зачастую являются5 A/55/305 S/2000/809 определенно «транснациональными» по своему характеру. 19. Опасности и затраты в связи с операциями, которые должны действовать в таких условиях, являются гораздо более значительными, чем в случае традиционного поддержания мира. Однако сложность задач, возлагаемых на эти миссии, и неустойчивость ситуации на местах обычно возрастают одновременно. После окончания «холодной войны» такие комплексные и рискованные мандаты стали скорее правилом, чем исключением: на операции Организации Объединенных Наций возлагались обязанности по сопровождению грузов помощи, когда обстановка с точки зрения безопасности была настолько опасной, что гуманитарные операции нельзя было продолжать без большой угрозы для персонала гуманитарных учреждений; им давались мандаты на защиту гражданских жертв конфликтов, когда потенциальные жертвы находились в величайшей опасности, и мандаты на контроль за тяжелыми вооружениями, находившимися в распоряжении местных сторон, когда такие вооружения использовались для создания угрозы как для миссии, так и для местного населения. В двух экстремальных ситуациях операциям Организации Объединенных Наций была дана исполнительная, правозащитная и административная власть, поскольку местные органы власти либо не существовали, либо были неспособны функционировать. 20. Ни у кого не должно вызывать удивление то, что осуществлять эти миссии весьма сложно. Первоначально, в 90-х годах, перспективы казались более радужными: операции по осуществлению мирных соглашений были ограниченными по срокам, а не бессрочными, а успешное проведение национальных выборов, как представлялось, служило хорошей «стратегией ухода». Однако с тех пор операции Организации Объединенных Наций как правило развертывались тогда, когда конфликт не привел к победе одной из сторон: либо конфликт зашел в тупик по военным причинам, либо международное давление привело к приостановлению военных действий — но, так или иначе, конфликт не завершился. Таким образом, операции Организации Объединенных Наций развертываются не столько в постконфликтных ситуациях, сколько для создания таких ситуаций. Иными словами, они пытаются перевести незавершенный конфликт вместе с личными, политическими или иными мотивами, которые им двигали, с военной на политическую арену и сделать такой перевод постоянным. 21. Организации Объединенных Наций потребовалось немного времени, чтобы убедиться в том, что местные стороны подписывают мирные соглашения по самым различным соображениям, которые отнюдь не всегда благоприятствуют миру. «Вредители», т.е. группы (включая и стороны, подписавшие соглашение), которые отказываются от своих обязательств или каким-либо иным образом стремятся подорвать мирное соглашение с помощью насилия, ставили под угрозу осуществление мирного соглашения в Камбодже, бросали Анголу, Сомали и Сьерра-Леоне обратно в горнило гражданской войны и организовали убийство не менее 800 000 человек в Руанде. Организация Объединенных Наций должна быть готова эффективно бороться с такими «вредителями», если она хочет неизменно добиваться успехов в области поддержания мира или миростроительства в ситуациях внутригосударственных/транснациональных конфликтов. 22. В сообщениях о таких конфликтах все чаще и чаще подчеркивается тот факт, что потенциальные «вредители» имеют наибольший стимул для отхода от мирных соглашений тогда, когда они располагают независимым источником доходов, который позволяет оплачивать солдат, закупать оружие, обогащать руководителей фракций или который, вполне возможно, был даже мотивом для войны. История последних лет показывает, что, когда не удается пресечь приток таких доходов от незаконного экспорта наркотических средств, драгоценных камней или других весьма ценных товаров, мир не может быть устойчивым. 23. Соседние государства могут способствовать обострению проблемы, пропуская контрабандные товары, используемые для поддержки конфликта, выступая в качестве посредников или позволяя боевикам развертывать свои базы на их территории. Для оказания противодействия таким соседям, поддерживающим конфликт, операция в пользу мира должна пользоваться активной политической, материально-технической и/или военной поддержкой одной или нескольких великих держав6A/55/305 S/2000/809 или крупных региональных держав. Чем сложнее операция, тем важнее такая поддержка. 24. К числу других переменных величин, от которых зависит сложность осуществления мирного процесса, относятся прежде всего источники конфликтов. Ими могут быть экономические проблемы (например, вопросы нищеты, распределения доходов, дискриминации или коррупции), политические проблемы (откровенная борьба за власть), ресурсы и другие экологические вопросы (например, борьба за скудные запасы водных ресурсов) либо вопросы этнического происхождения, религии или грубых нарушений прав человека. Политические и экономические цели могут иметь более непостоянный характер и быть более открытыми для компромисса, чем цели, связанные с потребностями в ресурсах, этническим происхождением или религией. Во-вторых, ведение переговоров и осуществление мирных соглашений будут тем более сложными, чем более многочисленными являются местные стороны и более разнообразными являются их цели (например, некоторые могут стремиться к единству, а другие — к отделению). В-третьих, уровень потерь, степень перемещения населения и ущерб инфраструктуре будут воздействовать на уровень недовольства, вызванного войной, и тем самым на трудности на пути примирения, что требует рассмотрения прошлых нарушений прав человека, а также на стоимость и сложность восстановления. 25. Относительно менее опасные условия — всего лишь две стороны, приверженные миру, с конкурирующими, но согласованными целями, не имеющие незаконных источников доходов, с соседями и покровителями, приверженными делу мира, — являются довольно благоприятными. В менее благоприятных и более опасных условиях — три или более сторон с различной степенью приверженности делу мира, с различными целями, с независимыми источниками доходов и оружия и с соседями, готовыми покупать, продавать или провозить транзитом незаконные товары, — миссии Организации Объединенных Наций ставят под угрозу не только свой персонал, но и сам мир, если только они не выполняют своих задач с такой компетентностью и эффективностью, которых требует ситуация, и если они не пользуются серьезной поддержкой со стороны великих держав. 26. Крайне важно, чтобы участники переговоров, Совет Безопасности, те, кто занимается планированием миссии в Секретариате, и участники миссии в равной степени понимали, в каких из вышеуказанных военно-политических условий они окажутся, как эти условия могут измениться после их прибытия и что они реально могут планировать сделать, если и когда ситуация меняется. Каждый из этих факторов должен учитываться при разработке стратегии развертывания операции, да и при принятии основного решения о том, насколько осуществима операция и следует ли вообще пытаться ее провести. 27. В этих условиях столь же важно оценить, в какой степени местные органы власти готовы и способны принимать сложные, но необходимые политические и экономические решения и участвовать в развертывании процессов и создании механизмов для регулирования внутренних споров и предотвращения насилия или повторного возникновения конфликта. Это — факторы, над которыми полевая миссия и Организация Объединенных Наций практически не имеют контроля, и все же такая общая среда крайне важна для определения успеха операции в пользу мира. 28. Когда комплексные операции в пользу мира все-таки развертываются на местах, задача миротворцев, участвующих в операции, заключается в том, чтобы сохранить безопасные местные условия для миростроительства, а задача тех, кто занимается миростроительством, — поддержать политические, социальные и экономические изменения, позволяющие создать самоподдерживающиеся безопасные условия. Только такие условия обеспечивают хорошие возможности для ухода миротворческих сил, если только международное сообщество не готово мириться с возобновлением конфликтов после вывода таких сил. История учит нас тому, что миротворцы и миростроители являются неразлучными партнерами в комплексных операциях: хотя миростроители не могут функционировать без поддержки со стороны миротворцев, миротворцы не могут уйти без деятельности миростроителей. C. Последствия для превентивных действий7 A/55/305 S/2000/809 29. Операциями Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира было охвачено не более одной трети конфликтных ситуаций, существовавших в 90-е годы. Поскольку даже гораздо более усовершенствованные механизмы развертывания и поддержки операций Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира не позволят системе Организации Объединенных Наций реагировать с помощью таких операций на все конфликты во всех районах мира, существует безотлагательная необходимость того, чтобы Организация Объединенных Наций и ее государства-члены создали более эффективную систему долговременного предотвращения конфликтов. Предотвращение является, несомненно, гораздо более предпочтительным вариантом для тех, кто в ином случае страдал бы от последствий войны, и гораздо менее дорогостоящим вариантом для международного сообщества, чем военные действия, чрезвычайная гуманитарная помощь или восстановление после завершения войны. Как было отмечено Генеральным секретарем в его недавнем докладе для Ассамблеи тысячелетия (A/54/2000), «каждый шаг на пути к уменьшению бедности и достижению экономического роста на широкой основе — это шаг на пути к предотвращению конфликта». Во многих случаях внутренних конфликтов «нищета сочетается с острыми этническими или религиозными разногласиями», когда права меньшинств «не соблюдаются должным образом [и] органы государственной власти недостаточно открыты для всех». Следовательно, в таких случаях целью долгосрочных превентивных стратегий должна быть «защита прав человека и прав меньшинств, а также создание таких политических механизмов, в которых были бы представлены все группы. ... Каждая группа должна быть убеждена в том, что государство принадлежит всему народу». 30. Группа хотела бы выразить признательность созданной сейчас в рамках Организации Объединенных Наций целевой группе по вопросам мира и безопасности за ее работу в области долгосрочного предотвращения, в частности за концепцию, согласно которой занимающиеся вопросами развития подразделения системы Организации Объединенных Наций должны рассматривать гуманитарную деятельность и деятельность в области развития через «призму предотвращения конфликтов» и делать долгосрочное предотвращение одним из ключевых аспектов их работы, приспосабливая с этой целью такие уже существующие инструменты, как общие страновые оценки и Рамочная программа Организации Объединенных Наций по оказанию помощи в целях развития (РПООНПР). 31. Чтобы укрепить способность Организации Объединенных Наций уделять на ранних этапах внимание потенциальным новым комплексным чрезвычайным ситуациям и, тем самым, краткосрочному предотвращению конфликтов, примерно два года назад департаменты Центральных учреждений, участвующие в работе Исполнительного комитета по вопросам мира и безопасности (ИКМБ), создали Межведомственные/Междепартаментские координационные рамки, в которых сейчас участвует десять департаментов, фондов, программ и учреждений. Их активный элемент — Рамочная группа — ежемесячно собирается на уровне директоров для принятия решений в отношении районов, находящихся под угрозой, для планирования заседаний по проведению страновых (или ситуационных) обзоров и для установления превентивных мер. Хотя рамочный механизм улучшил междепартаментские контакты, он не накопил знаний на систематизированной основе и не занимается стратегическим планированием. Этим отчасти могут объясняться те трудности, с которыми сталкивается Секретариат, пытаясь убедить государства-члены в преимуществах подкрепления объявленной ими приверженности как долгосрочным, так и краткосрочным мерам по предотвращению конфликтов с помощью требующейся политической и финансовой поддержки. Тем временем в годовых докладах Генерального секретаря за 1997 и 1999 годы (A/52/1 и A/54/1) внимание было сосредоточено конкретно на вопросах предотвращения конфликтов. Комиссия Карнеги по предупреждению смертоносных конфликтов и Американская ассоциация содействия Организации Объединенных Наций, среди прочих, также подготовили ценные исследования по этой теме. Кроме того, более 400 сотрудников Организации Объединенных Наций прошли систематическую подготовку по вопросам «раннего предупреждения» в Колледже персонала Организации Объединенных Наций в Турине.8A/55/305 S/2000/809 32. В центре вопроса о краткосрочных превентивных мерах лежит использование миссий по установлению фактов и других ключевых инициатив Генерального секретаря. Однако они, как правило, наталкиваются на два основных препятствия. Во-первых, государства-члены, особенно наиболее малые и слабые из них, испытывают вполне понятную и законную обеспокоенность по поводу суверенитета. Такая обеспокоенность еще более возрастает перед лицом инициатив, предпринимаемых каким-либо другим государством-членом, особенно более могучим соседом, или какой-либо региональной организацией, в которой доминирует один из ее членов. Государство, испытывающее внутренние трудности, с большей готовностью согласится на инициативы Генерального секретаря с учетом признанной независимости и высокого морального авторитета его должности и с учетом буквы и духа Устава, который требует от Генерального секретаря предлагать свою помощь и предусматривает, что государства-члены будут оказывать ей «всемерную помощь», как это указывается, в частности, в статье 2(5) Устава. Миссии по установлению фактов являются одним из инструментов, с помощью которых Генеральный секретарь может облегчить предоставление своих добрых услуг. 33. Вторым препятствием для эффективных действий по предотвращению кризиса является разрыв между словесными заявлениями и финансовой и политической поддержкой превентивных мер. Ассамблея тысячелетия предоставляет всем, кого это касается, возможность вновь оценить свои обязательства в этой области и рассмотреть связанные с предотвращением рекомендации, содержащиеся в докладе Генерального секретаря для Ассамблеи тысячелетия и в его недавних выступлениях на втором открытом заседании Совета Безопасности по предотвращению конфликтов. На нем Генеральный секретарь подчеркнул необходимость более тесного сотрудничества между Советом Безопасности и другими главными органами Организации Объединенных Наций в вопросах предотвращения конфликтов и особо остановился на том, как наладить более тесное взаимодействие с негосударственными субъектами, включая корпоративный сектор, в деле содействия ослаблению или недопущению конфликтов. 34. Резюме основных рекомендаций по превентивным действиям: a) Группа одобряет рекомендации Генерального секретаря в отношении предотвращения конфликтов, содержащиеся в его докладе для Ассамблеи тысячелетия и в его выступлениях на втором открытом заседании Совета Безопасности по предотвращению конфликтов в июле 2000 года, и, в частности, его призыв в отношении того, что «все, кто занимается предотвращением конфликтов и вопросами развития — Организация Объединенных Наций, бреттон-вудские учреждения, правительства и организации гражданского общества, — должны решать все эти проблемы в комплексе»; b) Группа поддерживает более частое использование Генеральным секретарем миссии по установлению фактов в районах с напряженной обстановкой и подчеркивает обязательства государств-членов, согласно статье 2(5) Устава, оказывать «всемерную помощь» такой деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций. D. Последствия для стратегии миростроительства 35. Как Совет Безопасности, так и Специальный комитет по операциям по поддержанию мира, созданный Генеральной Ассамблеей, осознали и признали важность миростроительства в качестве неотъемлемого элемента для обеспечения успеха операций по поддержанию мира. В этой связи 29 декабря 1998 года Совет Безопасности принял заявление Председателя, в котором он призвал Генерального секретаря «изучить возможности создания структур постконфликтного миростроительства в рамках усилий системы Организации Объединенных Наций по обеспечению долгосрочного мирного урегулирования конфликтов ...». Специальный комитет по операциям по поддержанию мира в своем собственном докладе, выпущенном ранее в 2000 году, подчеркнул важность разработки и определения элементов миростроительства до их включения в мандаты комплексных операций в пользу мира, с тем чтобы облегчить последующее рассмотрение Генеральной Ассамблеей вопроса о9 A/55/305 S/2000/809 продолжении оказания поддержки ключевым элементам миростроительства после того, как комплексная операция подходит к концу. 36. Отделения по поддержке миростроительства или политические отделения Организации Объединенных Наций могут создаваться в качестве преемников других операций в пользу мира, как, например, в Таджикистане или Гаити, или как самостоятельные инициативы, как, например, в Гватемале или Гвинее-Бисау. Они содействуют упрочению мира в постконфликтных странах, взаимодействуя с правительствами и неправительственными субъектами и дополняя возможную текущую деятельность Организации Объединенных Наций в сфере развития, которая стремится оставаться вне политики, хотя и направляет помощь главным образом в места происхождения конфликтов. 37. Эффективное миростроительство требует активного вовлечения местных сторон, а такое вовлечение должно быть многопрофильным по своему характеру. Во-первых, все операции в пользу мира должны быть наделены возможностями заметно менять жизнь людей в районе действия миссии на относительно раннем этапе деятельности миссии. Руководитель миссии должен иметь право использовать небольшую часть фондов миссии на «проекты, дающие быструю отдачу», цель которых — добиться реальных улучшений в качестве жизни, с тем чтобы таким образом завоевывать доверие к новой миссии. Координатор-резидент/координатор по гуманитарным вопросам из уже существующей страновой группы Организации Объединенных Наций должен выступать в качестве главного советника по таким проектам для обеспечения эффективного расходования средств и для недопущения конфликта с другими программами развития или программами гуманитарной помощи. 38. Во-вторых, «свободные и справедливые» выборы должны рассматриваться как часть более широких усилий по укреплению органов управления. Выборы будут успешными только в том случае, если население, оправляющееся от последствий войны, будет отдавать предпочтение избирательным бюллетеням, а не пулям, в качестве надлежащего и надежного механизма, с помощью которого будут находить свое отражение их взгляды на правительство. Выборы должны поддерживаться более широким процессом демократизации и строительства гражданского общества, который включает в себя эффективное гражданское правление и культуру уважения основных прав человека, дабы выборы не были лишь средством подтверждения тирании большинства и дабы их результаты не были ниспровергнуты с помощью силы после ухода миротворческой операции. 39. В-третьих, наблюдатели из гражданской полиции Организации Объединенных Наций не являются миростроителями, если они лишь регистрируют или пытаются своим присутствием предотвратить факты злоупотреблений или другие неприемлемые деяния местных сотрудников полиции, что соответствовало традиционному и в некоторой степени узкому взгляду на возможности гражданской полиции. Сегодня миссии могут требовать, чтобы гражданской полиции поручались такие задачи, как реформирование, обучение и перестройка местных полицейских служб в соответствии с международными стандартами демократической полицейской деятельности и прав человека, и чтобы гражданская полиция обладала потенциалом эффективного реагирования на гражданские беспорядки и потенциалом самообороны. Кроме того, суды, в которые местные полицейские доставляют предполагаемых преступников, и пенитенциарные учреждения, в которые преступники попадают на основании закона, также должны быть в политическом отношении беспристрастными и свободными от запугивания или принуждения. Когда этого требуют миростроительные миссии, международные судебные эксперты, эксперты по пенитенциарной системе и специалисты в области прав человека, равно как и сотрудники гражданской полиции должны иметься в достаточном количестве для укрепления институтов, занимающихся обеспечением правопорядка. Когда это требуется в интересах обеспечения правосудия, примирения и борьбы с безнаказанностью, Совет Безопасности должен санкционировать выделение таких экспертов, а также соответствующих криминалистов-следователей и судебно-медицинских специалистов для содействия работе по задержанию и судебному преследованию лиц, обвиняемых в совершении военных преступлений, в поддержку международных уголовных трибуналов, созданных Организацией Объединенных Наций.10 A/55/305 S/2000/809 40. Хотя такой групповой подход может представляться самоочевидным, Организация Объединенных Наций сталкивалась в течение прошлого десятилетия с ситуациями, когда Совет Безопасности санкционировал развертывание нескольких тысяч сотрудников полиции в рамках операции по поддержанию мира, но возражал против самой концепции выделения в распоряжение тех же операций даже 20 или 30 экспертов по вопросам уголовного судопроизводства. Кроме того, необходимо лучше понять и проработать современную роль гражданской полиции. Короче говоря, необходимо изменить саму доктрину, касающуюся того, как Организация рассматривает и использует гражданскую полицию в операциях в пользу мира; также необходимо применять обеспеченный адекватными ресурсами групповой подход к отстаиванию принципов господства права и уважения прав человека с помощью экспертов по вопросам судопроизводства, пенитенциарной системы, прав человека и полицейской службы, которые действовали бы сообща скоординированным и коллегиальным образом. 41. В-четвертых, связанный с правами человека компонент любой операции в пользу мира является действительно крайне важным для эффективного миростроительства. Сотрудники Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека могут играть ведущую роль, например, в содействии осуществлению всеобъемлющей программы национального примирения. Связанные с правами человека компоненты операций в пользу мира не всегда пользуются той политической и административной поддержкой, которая им нужна, и не всегда их функции правильно понимаются другими компонентами. Таким образом, Группа подчеркивает важность обучения военного, полицейского и другого гражданского персонала по вопросам, относящимся к правам человека и соответствующим нормам международного гуманитарного права. В этой связи Группа дает высокую оценку бюллетеню Генерального секретаря от 6 августа 1999 года, озаглавленному «Соблюдение силами Организации Объединенных Наций норм международного гуманитарного права» (ST/SGB/1999/13). 42. В-пятых, разоружение, демобилизация и реинтеграция бывших комбатантов — ключ к немедленной постконфликтной стабильности и уменьшению опасности возобновления конфликта — представляют собой такую область, в которой миростроительство вносит прямой вклад в обеспечение общественной безопасности и правопорядка. Однако главная цель разоружения, демобилизации и реинтеграции не достигается, если осуществляются не все три элемента этой программы. Демобилизованные бойцы (которые практически всегда оказываются не полностью разоруженными) будут пытаться вернуться на путь насилия, если они не будут находить законных средств к существованию, т.е. если они не будут «реинтегрированы» в местную экономику. Однако реинтеграционный элемент разоружения, демобилизации и реинтеграции финансируется на добровольной основе, и финансовые средства на эти цели порой намного отстают от потребностей. 43. Разоружение, демобилизация и реинтеграция были элементом по крайней мере 15 операций по поддержанию мира за последние десять лет. Более десятка учреждений и программ Организации Объединенных Наций, а также международные и неправительственные организации финансируют эти программы. Отчасти потому, что так много субъектов вовлечены в планирование или поддержку разоружения, демобилизации и реинтеграции, эта программа не имеет специально назначенного координационного звена в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций. 44. Эффективное миростроительство также требует какого-то координационного центра для координации многочисленных и разнообразных видов деятельности, связанных с созиданием мира. По мнению Группы, сообщество доноров должно рассматривать Организацию Объединенных Наций как координатора деятельности по миростроительству. С этой целью есть большой смысл в создании в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций объединенного и постоянного организационного потенциала. Поэтому Группа считает, что заместитель Генерального секретаря по политическим вопросам в своем качестве организатора ИКМБ должен выступать как координатор для целей миростроительства. Группа также поддерживает прилагаемые Департаментом по политическим вопросам (ДПВ) и Программой развития Организации Объединенных Наций (ПРООН) совместные усилия по укреплению потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций в11 A/55/305 S/2000/809 этой области, поскольку эффективное миростроительство является, по сути дела, гибридом политической деятельности и деятельности в области развития, направленной на устранение источников конфликтов. 45. Департамент по политическим вопросам, Департамент операций по поддержанию мира (ДОПМ), Управление по координации гуманитарной деятельности (УКГД), Департамент по вопросам разоружения (ДВР), Управление по правовым вопросам (УПВ), ПРООН, Детский фонд Организации Объединенных Наций (ЮНИСЕФ), УВКПЧ и УВКБ, Специальный представитель Генерального секретаря по вопросу о детях и вооруженных конфликтах и Координатор Организации Объединенных Наций по вопросам безопасности представлены в ИКМБ; Группа Всемирного банка также получила приглашение участвовать в его работе. Таким образом, Исполнительный комитет представляет собой идеальный форум для формулирования стратегии миростроительства. 46. Тем не менее следует проводить различие между формулированием стратегий и осуществлением таких стратегий на основе рационального распределения труда между членами Исполнительного комитета. По мнению Группы, ПРООН располагает еще неосвоенным потенциалом в этой области, и она в сотрудничестве с другими учреждениями, фондами и программами Организации Объединенных Наций и Всемирным банком имеет все возможности для того, чтобы играть руководящую роль в осуществлении деятельности по миростроительству. В связи с этим Группа рекомендует, чтобы Исполнительный комитет по вопросам мира и безопасности предложил Генеральному секретарю план укрепления потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций по разработке стратегий миростроительства и осуществлению программ в поддержку этих стратегий. В этом плане следует также установить критерии для определения того, когда может быть обоснованным назначение старшего политического посланника или представителя Генерального секретаря для повышения значимости и усиления политической ориентации миросозидательной деятельности в том или ином конкретном регионе или той или иной стране, выходящих из конфликта. 47. Резюме основных рекомендаций по миростроительству: a) небольшая часть бюджета миссии на первый год должна выделяться в распоряжение Представителя или Специального представителя Генерального секретаря, возглавляющего миссию, для финансирования проектов, дающих быструю отдачу в районе деятельности миссии с учетом рекомендаций координатора-резидента страновой группы Организации Объединенных Наций; b) Группа рекомендует внести изменение в доктрину использования гражданской полиции, других правоохранительных элементов и экспертов по вопросам прав человека в составе комплексных операций в пользу мира, с тем чтобы отразить возросшее внимание, уделяемое укреплению правозащитных институтов и обеспечению большего уважения прав человека в постконфликтных ситуациях; c) Группа рекомендует законодательным органам рассмотреть вопрос о том, чтобы включать программы демобилизации и реинтеграции в бюджеты с разверсткой взносов комплексных операций в пользу мира на первом этапе операции, с тем чтобы таким образом содействовать быстрому распаду воюющих группировок и уменьшению опасности возобновления конфликта; d) Группа рекомендует Исполнительному комитету по вопросам мира и безопасности обсудить и рекомендовать Генеральному секретарю план укрепления постоянного потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций по разработке стратегий миростроительства и осуществлению программ в поддержку таких стратегий. E. Последствия для доктрины и стратегии поддержания мира 48. Группа согласна с тем, что согласие местных сторон, беспристрастность и использование силы только в порядке самообороны должны оставаться краеугольными принципами поддержания мира. Однако опыт показывает, что в контексте современных операций в пользу мира, связанных с внутригосударственными/транснациональными12 A/55/305 S/2000/809 конфликтами, местные стороны могут по-разному манипулировать своим согласием. Та или иная сторона может дать свое согласие на присутствие Организации Объединенных Наций лишь для того, чтобы выиграть время и переоснастить свои боевые силы, а потом снять свое согласие, когда миротворческая операция уже не отвечает ее интересам. Сторона может стремиться ограничить свободу передвижения участников операции, проводить политику упорного несоблюдения положений соглашения или вообще отказаться от своего согласия. Более того, несмотря на приверженность руководителей группировок делу мира, силы, непосредственно ведущие боевые действия, могут, попросту говоря, находиться под гораздо менее жестким контролем, чем обычные вооруженные силы, с которыми имеют дело традиционные миротворцы, и такие силы могут разбиваться на группы, чье существование и вызываемые этим последствия не были предусмотрены в мирном соглашении, на основе которого действует миссия Организации Объединенных Наций. 49. В прошлом Организация Объединенных Наций часто оказывалась неспособной эффективно реагировать на такие вызовы. Однако одной из коренных предпосылок настоящего доклада является то, что Организация должна быть в состоянии делать это. После своего развертывания миротворцы Организации Объединенных Наций должны быть в состоянии профессионально и успешно выполнять свой мандат. Это означает, что воинские подразделения Организации Объединенных Наций должны быть способны защищать себя, другие компоненты миссии и мандат миссии. Правила применения вооруженной силы не должны ограничивать контингенты такими мерами реагирования, как нанесение удара в ответ на удар, но должны позволять наносить достаточно сильные ответные удары, с тем чтобы ликвидировать источник смертоносного огня, ведущегося по войскам Организации Объединенных Наций или по людям, которых им поручено защищать, и в особо опасных ситуациях не должны вынуждать контингенты Организации Объединенных Наций уступать инициативу тем, кто на них нападает. 50. Беспристрастность в таких операциях должна, следовательно, означать соблюдение принципов Устава и целей мандата, основанного на таких принципах Устава. Такая беспристрастность отнюдь не равнозначна нейтралитету или равному обращению со всеми сторонами во всех случаях и в любое время, что может сводиться к политике умиротворения. В некоторых случаях местными сторонами могут быть не равные в моральном отношении субъекты, а явные агрессоры и жертвы, и поэтому миротворцы могут иметь не только оперативные обоснования для применения силы, но и моральное обязательство применить ее. Геноцид в Руанде зашел так далеко отчасти потому, что международное сообщество не смогло использовать или укрепить действовавшую тогда в стране операцию так, чтобы она могла противодействовать явному злу. Уже после этого Совет Безопасности в резолюции 1296 (2000) постановил, что преднамеренные действия против гражданских лиц в ситуациях вооруженного конфликта и отказ в доступе к гражданскому населению, страдающему от войны, в гуманитарных целях могут сами по себе представлять угрозу международному миру и безопасности и по этой причине вызывать действия со стороны Совета Безопасности. Если операция Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира уже развернута на местах, задача осуществления таких действий может быть возложена на нее — и она должна быть готова к этому. 51. Это, в свою очередь, означает, что Секретариат не должен применять исходные предпосылки планирования, предназначенные для наиболее благоприятных условий, к ситуациям, в которых местные субъекты на протяжении всей истории совершали наиболее неблагоприятные поступки. Это означает, что в мандатах должны быть четко закреплены полномочия операции на применение силы. Это означает бóльшие по численному составу, лучше оснащенные и более дорогостоящие силы, способные, однако, создавать угрозу убедительного сдерживания, в противовес символическому и не угрожающему присутствию, которым характеризуется традиционная деятельность по поддержанию мира. Силы Организации Объединенных Наций в составе комплексных операций должны по своему численному составу и по своей конфигурации быть такими, чтобы у потенциальных «вредителей» не оставалось никаких сомнений в отношении того, какой из двух подходов выбрала Организация. Такие силы должны располагать разведывательными и другими13 A/55/305 S/2000/809 разведывательными и другими возможностями, необходимыми для обороны против сторонников насилия. 52. Готовность государств-членов предоставлять войска в состав пользующейся доверием операции такого рода также предполагает готовность идти на риск жертв во имя выполнения мандата. Нежелание соглашаться с таким риском стало более заметным со времени проведения сложных миссий в середине 90-х годов, отчасти потому, что государствам-членам не совсем понятно, как определять их национальные интересы, идя на такой риск, и отчасти потому, что они могут не совсем точно понимать сами угрозы. Поэтому, добиваясь выделения сил, Генеральный секретарь должен быть в состоянии доказать, что страны, предоставляющие войска, да и все государства — члены Организации кровно заинтересованы в управлении конфликтом и его урегулировании, хотя бы в рамках более крупных усилий по установлению мира, которые олицетворяет Организация Объединенных Наций. При этом Генеральный секретарь должен быть в состоянии дать странам, которые могут предоставить войска, оценку риска с изложением того, как возник конфликт и как может быть достигнут мир, с анализом потенциала и целей местных сторон и с оценкой независимых финансовых ресурсов, находящихся в их распоряжении, и последствий наличия таких ресурсов для поддержания мира. Совет Безопасности и Секретариат должны также быть в состоянии добиться от стран, предоставляющих войска, доверия в отношении того, что стратегия и концепция операций для новой миссии являются разумными и что они будут направлять свои войска или полицейских для прохождения службы в составе компетентной миссии с эффективным руководством. 53. Группа осознает, что Организация Объединенных Наций не ведет войн. Когда требуются меры принуждения, они неизменно поручаются, с согласия Совета Безопасности, коалициям готовых к этому государств, действующим на основании главы VII Устава. 54. Устав ясно призывает к сотрудничеству с региональными и субрегиональными организациями в целях урегулирования конфликтов и установления и поддержания мира и безопасности. Организация Объединенных Наций активно и успешно участвует во многих таких программах сотрудничества в области предотвращения конфликтов, установления мира, выборов и оказания помощи в проведении выборов, наблюдения за правами человека и гуманитарной деятельности, а также в других миростроительных мероприятиях в различных частях мира. Что же касается операций по поддержанию мира, то здесь разумным представляется осторожный подход, поскольку военные ресурсы и потенциалы неравномерно распределены среди стран мира и войска во многих подверженных кризисам районах нередко оказываются менее подготовленными с точки зрения требований современного миротворчества, чем в других местах. Обучение, оснащение, материально-техническая поддержка и выделение других ресурсов региональным и субрегиональным организациям могут позволить миротворцам из всех регионов участвовать в операции Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира или развертывать региональные миротворческие операции на основе той или иной резолюции Совета Безопасности. 55. Резюме основной рекомендации по доктрине и стратегии поддержания мира: после своего развертывания миротворцы Организации Объединенных Наций должны быть в состоянии профессионально и успешно выполнять свои мандаты и должны быть способны защищать себя, другие компоненты миссии и мандат миссии с использованием ясных правил применения вооруженной силы против тех, кто отказывается от своих обязательств по мирному соглашению или кто каким-либо иным образом стремится подорвать его с помощью насилия. F. Четкие, пользующиеся доверием и осуществимые мандаты 56. Совет Безопасности как политический орган уделяет главное внимание достижению консенсуса, хотя он вполне может принимать решения и не на основе единогласия. Однако компромиссы, требующиеся для достижения консенсуса, могут достигаться за счет конкретности, и вытекающая из этого неопределенность может иметь серьезные последствия на местах, если в такой ситуации мандат по-разному толкуется различными элементами операции в пользу мира или если14 A/55/305 S/2000/809 местные субъекты усматривают нечто меньшее, чем полную приверженность Совета делу установления мира, что дает стимулы потенциальным «вредителям». Неопределенность может также прикрывать разногласия, возникающие на более позднем этапе под давлением кризиса, и тем самым предотвращать срочные действия Совета. Хотя Группа признает полезность политического компромисса во многих случаях, в данном случае она выступает за ясность, особенно в том, что касается операций, развертываемых в опасных ситуациях. Вместо того чтобы развертывать операцию в опасных местах с неясными инструкциями, Группа настоятельно призывает Совет воздерживаться от выдачи мандата на проведение такой миссии. 57. Наметки возможной операции Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира нередко впервые появляются тогда, когда участники переговоров, работающие над мирным соглашением, задумываются о том, как Организация Объединенных Наций будет осуществлять это соглашение. Хотя участники мирных переговоров (те, кто устанавливает мир) могут быть высококвалифицированными профессионалами, опытными в своем деле, существует гораздо меньшая вероятность того, что они в деталях осведомлены об оперативных потребностях солдат, полицейских, людей, занимающихся доставкой помощи, или консультантов по вопросам выборов в составе полевых миссий Организации Объединенных Наций. Миротворцы не из Организации Объединенных Наций имеют, пожалуй, еще меньшее представление об этих потребностях. И тем не менее в последние годы Секретариат был вынужден выполнять мандаты, разработанные в других местах и доведенные до его сведения через Совет Безопасности лишь, увы, с незначительными изменениями. 58. Группа считает, что Секретариат должен быть в состоянии убедительно доказывать Совету Безопасности, что просьбы об осуществлении Организацией Объединенных Наций соглашений о прекращении огня или о мире должны отвечать определенным минимальным условиям, прежде чем Совет будет выделять возглавляемые Организацией силы для выполнения таких соглашений; эти условия включают: возможность обеспечения присутствия консультантов-наблюдателей в ходе мирных переговоров; обеспечение того, чтобы любое соглашение соответствовало существующим международным стандартам в области прав человека и нормам гуманитарного права; обеспечение того, чтобы задачи, которые должна выполнять Организация Объединенных Наций, были достижимыми в оперативном отношении — причем здесь должна быть подчеркнута ответственность местных сторон за их поддержку — и либо содействовали устранению источников конфликтов, либо создавали возможности для того, чтобы этим могли заняться другие. Поскольку способность давать компетентные советы участникам переговоров может зависеть от детального знания обстановки на местах, Генеральный секретарь должен быть заранее наделен полномочиями на использование средств из Резервного фонда для операций по поддержанию мира, достаточных для проведения предварительной разведки местности в вероятном районе действия миссии. 59. Консультируя Совет в отношении потребностей миссии, Секретариат не должен устанавливать численный состав миссии и уровень других ресурсов исходя из того, что он предположительно считает приемлемым для Совета с политической точки зрения. Занимаясь самоцензурой в этом отношении, Секретариат обрекает самого себя и миссию не только на провал, но и на то, чтобы быть козлами отпущения за такой провал. Хотя представление и обоснование плановых оценок в соответствии с высокими оперативными стандартами может уменьшить вероятность проведения той или иной операции, нельзя навязывать государствам-членам мысль о том, что они делают что-то полезное для стран, находящихся в состоянии конфликта, когда на самом деле, не обеспечивая миссии достаточными ресурсами, они скорее всего соглашаются на напрасную трату людских ресурсов, времени и денег. 60. Кроме того, Группа считает, что до тех пор, пока Генеральный секретарь не будет в состоянии заручиться твердыми обязательствами государств-членов в отношении выделения сил, которые, по его мнению, необходимы для проведения операции, такая операция вообще не должна начинаться. Развертывание частичных сил, не способных15 A/55/305 S/2000/809 упрочить хрупкий мир, будет вначале укреплять, но затем разбивать надежды населения, охваченного конфликтом или оправляющегося от войны, и подрывать веру в Организацию Объединенных Наций в целом. В таких условиях Группа считает, что Совет Безопасности должен оставлять в виде проекта резолюцию, предусматривающую развертывание значительных сил для проведения новой миротворческой операции, до тех пор, пока Генеральный секретарь не сможет подтвердить, что от государств-членов получены заверения в отношении выделения необходимых войск. 61. Есть несколько путей уменьшения вероятности таких «пробелов» в плане обязательств, в том числе улучшенная координация и консультации между странами, способными предоставить войска, и членами Совета Безопасности в процессе выработки мандата. Рекомендации стран, предоставляющих войска, Совету Безопасности можно с пользой для дела институционализировать посредством создания специальных вспомогательных органов Совета, как это предусмотрено в статье 29 Устава. Государства-члены, выделяющие сформированные воинские подразделения в состав той или иной операции, должны, само собой разумеется, приглашаться для участия в проводимых Секретариатом для Совета Безопасности брифингах в отношении кризисов, которые сказываются на охране и безопасности персонала миссии, или в отношении изменений в мандате миссии или его нового толкования с точки зрения применения силы. 62. И наконец, желание Генерального секретаря обеспечить дополнительную защиту гражданских лиц в вооруженных конфликтах и действия Совета Безопасности по наделению миротворцев Организации Объединенных Наций явными полномочиями на защиту гражданских лиц в конфликтных ситуациях являются позитивными событиями. И действительно, миротворцы — военнослужащие или полицейские, — являющиеся свидетелями актов насилия против гражданских лиц, должны предположительно быть уполномочены прекращать их с использованием имеющихся в их распоряжении средств, действуя в поддержку основополагающих принципов Организации Объединенных Наций или, как было заявлено в докладе комиссии по проведению независимого расследования по Руанде, в соответствии с «порождаемыми у людей самим фактом ее присутствия настроениями и надеждами на то, что они окажутся под защитой [операции]» (см. S/1999/1257, стр. 53). 63. Однако Группа обеспокоена надежностью и осуществимостью столь всеобъемлющего мандата в этих вопросах. В нынешних районах действия миссий Организации Объединенных Наций имеются сотни тысяч гражданских лиц, находящихся под потенциальной угрозой насилия, и развернутые сейчас силы Организации Объединенных Наций могут защитить лишь небольшую часть этого населения, даже если им будет поручено делать это. Обещания в отношении такой защиты приводят к очень большим ожиданиям. Потенциально большой разрыв между желаемой целью и выделенными для ее достижения ресурсами создает возможность постоянного разочарования в последующих действиях Организации Объединенных Наций в этой области. Поэтому, если той или иной операции дается мандат на защиту гражданского населения, она также должна получать конкретные ресурсы, необходимые для выполнения такого мандата. 64. Резюме основных рекомендаций по четким, пользующимся доверием и осуществимым мандатам: a) Группа рекомендует, чтобы до того, как соглашаться на осуществление соглашения о прекращении огня или о мире с помощью возглавляемой Организацией Объединенных Наций операции по поддержанию мирa, Совет Безопасности был уверен в том, что соглашение отвечает таким пороговым условиям, как соответствие международным стандартам в области прав человека и осуществимость конкретно поставленных задач и установленных сроков; b) Совет Безопасности должен оставлять в виде проекта резолюции, санкционирующие развертывание миссий со значительными воинскими контингентами, до тех пор, пока Генеральный секретарь не получит от государств-членов твердых обещаний в отношении выделения войск и других крайне важных для поддержки миссии элементов, включая элементы миростроительства;16 A/55/305 S/2000/809 c) резолюции Совета Безопасности должны удовлетворять требованиям операций по поддержанию мира, когда они развертываются в потенциально опасных ситуациях, особенно в том, что касается четкого порядка подчинения и единства действий; d) Секретариат должен говорить Совету Безопасности то, что ему нужно знать, а не то, что он хотел бы услышать, при разработке и изменении мандатов миссий, и страны, обязавшиеся выделить воинские подразделения в состав той или иной операции, должны иметь доступ к проводимым Секретариатом для Совета брифингам по вопросам, сказывающимся на безопасности их персонала, и особенно к заседаниям, влекущим за собой определенные последствия с точки зрения использования силы в рамках миссии. G. Потенциал в области сбора информации, анализа и стратегического планирования 65. Стратегический подход Организации Объединенных Наций к предотвращению конфликтов, поддержанию мира и миростроительству будет требовать более тесного взаимодействия между главными оперативными департаментами Секретариата, занимающимися вопросами мира и безопасности. С этой целью они будут нуждаться в более усовершенствованных инструментах сбора и анализа соответствующей информации и поддержки ИКМБ, который является номинальным форумом высокого уровня для принятия решений по вопросам мира и безопасности. 66. Исполнительный комитет по вопросам мира и безопасности является одним из четырех «секторальных» исполнительных комитетов, учрежденных в рамках предложенного Генеральным секретарем в начале 1997 года первоначального пакета реформ (см. A/51/829, раздел A). Были также созданы комитеты по экономическим и социальным вопросам, оперативной деятельности в целях развития и гуманитарным вопросам. Управление Верховного комиссара по правам человека является членом всех четырех комитетов. Эти комитеты призваны «содействовать более согласованному и скоординированному управлению» работой участвующих в них департаментов, и им были делегированы «полномочия в вопросах принятия решений на исполнительном уровне и координации». Исполнительный комитет по вопросам мира и безопасности, возглавляемый заместителем Генерального секретаря по политическим вопросам, содействует более широкому обмену информацией и сотрудничеству между департаментами, однако он до сих пор еще не стал таким директивным органом, который предусматривался реформами 1997 года, и это признают сами его участники. 67. Нынешние уровни укомплектованности Секретариата и рабочие требования в секторе мира и безопасности в большей или меньшей степени исключают планирование политики на уровне департамента. Хотя большинство членов ИКМБ имеют подразделения, занимающиеся вопросами политики или планирования, они обычно вовлекаются в решение повседневных вопросов. Вместе с тем без существенного потенциала по сбору и анализу информации Секретариат будет оставаться лишь реагирующим органом, не способным опережать повседневные события, а ИКМБ не сможет выполнять ту роль, ради которой он был создан. 68. Генеральный секретарь и члены ИКМБ нуждаются в том, чтобы в Секретариате была создана профессиональная система для накопления знаний в отношении конфликтных ситуаций, эффективного распространения этих знаний среди широкого круга пользователей, подготовки аналитических оценок политики и формулирования долгосрочных стратегий. В настоящее время такой системы нет. Группа предлагает создать ее в виде секретариата ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу — или ИСИСА. 69. Секретариат ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу должен в основном формироваться за счет объединения различных департаментских подразделений, занимающихся анализом политики и информации в вопросах мира и безопасности, включая Группу анализа политики и Оперативный центр из Департамента операций по поддержанию мира, Группу планирования политики из Департамента по политическим вопросам, Группу разработки политики (или ее элементы) из17 A/55/305 S/2000/809 УКГД и Секцию наблюдения за средствами массовой информации и анализа из Департамента общественной информации (ДОИ). 70. Для предоставления такому секретариату экспертных знаний, которых нет в других подразделениях системы или которые нельзя взять из существующих структур, потребуется дополнительный персонал. Такой персонал будет включать руководящего сотрудника (на уровне директора), небольшую группу военных аналитиков, экспертов по вопросам полиции и высококвалифицированных специалистов по системному анализу информации, которые будут отвечать за управление конструированием и ведением баз данных ИСИСА и за обеспечение их доступности для Центральных учреждений и для полевых отделений и миссий. 71. С ИСИСА должны тесно сотрудничать Группа стратегического планирования из Канцелярии Генерального секретаря, Отдел оперативной ликвидации последствий стихийных бедствий из ПРООН, Группа по вопросам миростроительства (см. пункты 239–243 ниже), Группа информационного анализа из УКГД (она ведет информационную страничку по вопросам оказания помощи), нью-йоркские отделения связи УВКПЧ и УВКБ, Канцелярия Координатора Организации Объединенных Наций по вопросам безопасности и Сектор контроля, баз данных и информации из Департамента по вопросам разоружения. Группа Всемирного банка должна приглашаться для поддержания связи взаимодействия с использованием таких соответствующих элементов, как Группа по постконфликтным ситуациям в составе Банка. 72. Секретариат ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу, являясь общей службой, будет представлять ценность как в краткосрочном, так и в долгосрочном плане для членов Исполнительного комитета по вопросам мира и безопасности. Он будет усиливать функцию представления ежедневных сводок, которую выполняет Оперативный центр ДОПМ, и собирать из всех источников обновленную информацию о деятельности миссии и о соответствующих событиях по всему миру. Он мог бы обращать внимание руководства ИКМБ на зарождающийся кризис и проводить для него брифинг по такому кризису с использованием современных методов презентации. Он мог бы служить координационным пунктом для своевременного анализа широких тематических вопросов и для подготовки докладов Генеральному секретарю по таким вопросам. И наконец, с учетом всего нынешнего набора миссий, кризисов, интересов законодательных органов и вкладов членов ИКМБ, ИСИСА мог бы предлагать повестку дня для самого ИКМБ и управлять ею, оказывать поддержку работе ИКМБ и содействовать его превращению в директивный орган, предусмотренный в первоначальных реформах Генерального секретаря. 73. Секретариат ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу должен быть в состоянии использовать наилучший имеющийся опыт — как внутри системы Организации Объединенных Наций, так и за ее пределами — для отработки своих анализов по конкретным местам и ситуациям. Он должен предоставлять Генеральному секретарю и членам ИКМБ обобщенные оценки усилий Организации Объединенных Наций и других учреждений по устранению источников и симптомов нынешних и потенциальных конфликтов и должен быть в состоянии оценивать потенциальную пользу от дальнейшего вовлечения Организации Объединенных Наций и его последствия. Он должен предоставлять базовую справочную информацию для первоначальной работы комплексных целевых групп по подготовке миссии, которые Группа рекомендует (см. ниже, пункты 198–217) создать в целях планирования и поддержки развертывания миротворческих операций, и он должен по-прежнему обеспечивать анализ и управление информационным потоком между миссией и целевой группой непосредственно с момента учреждения миссии. 74. Секретариат ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу должен создавать, вести и использовать совместные, комплексные базы данных, которые в конечном итоге заменят множество копий закодированных телеграмм, ежедневные оперативные сводки, ежедневные подборки информационных материалов и неофициальные контакты с осведомленными коллегами, которые в настоящее время используются начальниками подразделений и лицами, ответственными за принятие решений, для того, чтобы быть в курсе событий, происходящих в их районах ответственности. При наличии18 A/55/305 S/2000/809 надлежащих гарантий такие базы данных могли бы использоваться потребителями, которые имеют доступ к внутренней информационной сети миротворческих операций (см. пункты 255 и 256 ниже). Такие базы данных, которые потенциально могут использоваться как Центральными учреждениями, так и полевыми операциями через все более дешевые коммерческие службы широкополосной связи, помогут произвести подлинную революцию в плане того, как Организация Объединенных Наций накапливает знания и анализирует ключевые вопросы мира и безопасности. Кроме того, в конечном итоге ИСИСА должен заменить собой механизм координационных рамок. 75. Резюме основной рекомендации по информационно-стратегическому анализу: Генеральному секретарю следует создать подразделение, которое в настоящем докладе именуется секретариатом ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу (ИСИСА) и которое будет удовлетворять информационно-аналитические потребности всех членов Исполнительного комитета; что касается аспекта подчинения, то им должны руководить главы Департамента по политическим вопросам и Департамента по поддержанию мира и он должен отчитываться непосредственно перед ними. H. Проблема временной гражданской администрации 76. Вплоть до середины 1999 года Организация Объединенных Наций имела лишь небольшое число полевых операций с элементами гражданской администрации или надзора за ней. Однако в июне 1999 года Секретариат получил указания создать временную гражданскую администрацию для Косово, а тремя месяцами спустя — для Восточного Тимора. Усилия Организации Объединенных Наций по развертыванию этих операций и управлению ими являются частью общей справочной информации к разделам настоящего доклада, касающимся быстрого развертывания и укомплектования и структуры Центральных учреждений. 77. На эти операции возложены задачи и обязанности, имеющие уникальный характер среди всех полевых операций Организации Объединенных Наций. Никакие другие операции не должны разрабатывать законодательство и обеспечивать его соблюдение, создавать таможенные службы и издавать распоряжения, устанавливать и взимать налоги на предпринимательскую деятельность и подоходные налоги, привлекать иностранные капиталовложения, разрешать имущественные споры и вопросы ответственности за военный ущерб, восстанавливать и эксплуатировать коммунальные предприятия, создавать банковскую систему, создавать школы и платить оклады учителям, собирать мусор — причем в условиях пострадавшего от войны общества и с использованием только добровольных взносов, поскольку бюджет миссии с разверсткой взносов, даже для таких миссий по делам «временной администрации», не предусматривает ассигнований на саму местную администрацию. Помимо этих задач такие миссии также должны пытаться восстановить гражданское общество и содействовать уважению прав человека в местах, где недовольство и недоброжелательство носят повсеместный и глубокий характер. 78. За этими проблемами кроется более крупный вопрос: должна ли вообще Организация Объединенных Наций заниматься этим делом и, если да, должно ли это рассматриваться как элемент операций в пользу мира или же оно должно находиться под управлением какой-то иной структуры. Хотя, вполне возможно, Совет Безопасности и не будет вновь поручать Организации Объединенных Наций заниматься вопросами временной гражданской администрации, никто этого не ожидал и в отношении Косово или Восточного Тимора. Внутригосударственные конфликты продолжаются, а будущую нестабильность трудно предвидеть, и поэтому, несмотря на явно двойственное отношение к гражданской администрации среди государств — членов Организации Объединенных Наций и внутри Секретариата, другие подобные миссии могут вполне учреждаться в будущем, причем на такой же безотлагательной основе. Таким образом, Секретариат сталкивается с неприятной дилеммой: исходить из того, что временная администрация — это краткосрочная обязанность, не готовиться к новым миссиям и плохо проявить себя, если он вдруг окажется вновь в прорыве, либо же как следует подготовиться и фактически напрашиваться19 A/55/305 S/2000/809 на проведение более частых операций такого рода только потому, что он хорошо подготовлен. Разумеется, если Секретариат считает, что в будущем временные администрации станут скорее правилом, чем исключением, в этом случае где-то в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций необходимо создать специальный и наделенный соответствующими обязанностями центр для решения таких задач. Пока же Департамент операций по поддержанию мира должен продолжать оказывать поддержку выполнению таких функций. 79. Между тем в рамках временной гражданской администрации возникает не терпящий отлагательств вопрос, которым обязательно нужно заняться — вопрос о «применимом праве». В двух районах, в которых операции Организации Объединенных Наций в настоящее время выполняют правоохранительные функции, местные судебные и правовые инстанции, как оказалось, либо отсутствуют, либо не имеют достаточной практики, либо подвержены запугиваниям со стороны вооруженных элементов. Более того, в обоих местах законодательные и правовые системы, существовавшие до возникновения конфликта, были поставлены под сомнение или отвергнуты основными группами, которые считаются жертвами конфликтов. 80. Вместе с тем, даже если выбор местного законодательного кодекса был бы ясным, занимающаяся вопросами правосудия команда в составе миссии сталкивалась бы с необходимостью освоения этого кодекса и связанных с ним процессуальных норм в достаточной степени для того, чтобы рассматривать и решать дела в судах. Различия в языке, культуре, традициях и опыте означают, что этот процесс освоения вполне может занимать полгода или даже больше. В настоящее время Организация Объединенных Наций не имеет ответа на вопрос о том, что должна делать такая операция, пока ее компонент, занимающийся вопросами правопорядка, карабкается ввысь по такой кривой обучения. Мощные местные политические группировки могут пользоваться — и пользовались — таким периодом освоения для создания своих собственных параллельных администраций, а преступные синдикаты с большим удовольствием заполняют любой правовой или правоохранительный вакуум, который они могут найти. 81. Задачи этих миссий были бы гораздо проще, если бы общий для системы Организации Объединенных Наций пакет мер в области правосудия позволял им применять временный законодательный кодекс, которому персонал миссий мог бы обучаться заранее, пока идут поиски окончательного ответа на вопрос «о применимом праве». Хотя в правовых подразделениях Секретариата сейчас не ведется никакой работы по этому вопросу, из бесед с исследователями становится ясно, что за пределами системы Организации Объединенных Наций наметились определенные подвижки в решении этой проблемы, и при этом указывается на принципы, руководящие установки, кодексы и процессуальные нормы, содержащиеся в нескольких десятках международных конвенций и деклараций, касающихся вопросов прав человека, гуманитарного права и руководящих указаний для работников полиции, прокуроров и работников пенитенциарных учреждений. 82. Такие исследования имеют своей целью выработку кодекса, содержащего основы как законодательных, так и процессуальных норм, с тем чтобы позволять любой операции применять принципы надлежащей судебной процедуры с использованием международных юристов и согласованных на международном уровне стандартов в случае таких преступлений, как убийство, изнасилование, поджог, похищение и нападение при отягчающих обстоятельствах. Имущественное право, по всей видимости, останется за рамками такого «типового кодекса», но любая операция будет, по крайней мере, в состоянии эффективно подвергать судебному преследованию тех, кто сжигает дома своих соседей, пока решается вопрос об имущественном праве. 83. Резюме основной рекомендации по временной гражданской администрации: Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю пригласить международных экспертов по правовым вопросам, включая лиц, имеющих опыт работы в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций, наделенных мандатами в отношении временной администрации, для оценки осуществимости и полезности20 A/55/305 S/2000/809 разработки временного уголовного кодекса, включая и любые региональные варианты, которые могут понадобиться, для использования такими операциями до восстановления правопорядка на местах и воссоздания местных правоохранительных органов. III. Потенциал Организации Объединенных Наций по быстрому и эффективному развертыванию операций 84. Многие наблюдатели ставили вопрос о том, почему Организации Объединенных Наций требуется так много времени для полномасштабного развертывания операций после принятия той или иной резолюции Совета Безопасности. Причин для этого много. Организация Объединенных Наций не имеет постоянной армии и не имеет постоянной полиции, предназначенной для полевых операций. У нее нет резервного корпуса руководителей миссии: специальных представителей Генерального секретаря и руководителей миссий, командующих силами, комиссаров полиции, главных административных сотрудников и других руководящих сотрудников начинают искать только тогда, когда в них возникает срочная необходимость. Система резервных соглашений, которая в настоящее время действует в отношении потенциального военного, полицейского и гражданского персонала, предоставляемого правительствами, еще не стала надежным источником ресурсов. Запасы наиболее важного оборудования, которое использовалось крупными миссиями в середине 90–х годов и затем было переведено на Базу материально-технического снабжения Организации Объединенных Наций (БСООН) в Бриндизи, Италия, значительно уменьшились за счет нынешнего резкого увеличения числа миссий, и пока нет никаких бюджетных положений, предусматривающих их быстрое пополнение. Процесс закупок для операций по поддержанию мира, вполне возможно, не способен обеспечить надлежащий баланс меду интересами рентабельности и финансовой ответственности, с одной стороны, и наиважнейшими оперативными потребностями с точки зрения своевременного реагирования и надежности миссии, с другой. Уже давно признана необходимость в резервных соглашениях для набора гражданского персонала в основных и вспомогательных областях, однако пока ничего не сделано для ее реализации. И наконец, у Генерального секретаря практически нет полномочий на приобретение, найм и заблаговременное размещение материальных запасов и людей, необходимых для быстрого развертывания какой-либо операции, прежде чем Совет Безопасности примет резолюцию об ее учреждении, независимо от того, насколько вероятной может казаться такая операция. 85. Короче говоря, пока в фундамент заложены лишь отдельные строительные блоки, позволяющие Организации Объединенных Наций быстро приобретать и развертывать людские и материальные ресурсы, требующиеся для начала любой комплексной операции в пользу мира в будущем. A. Определение того, что означает «быстрое и эффективное развертывание» 86. Обсуждения в Совете Безопасности, доклады Специального комитета по операциям по поддержанию мира и материалы, предоставленные Группе полевыми миссиями, Секретариатом и государствами-членами, — все они указывают на необходимость того, чтобы Организация Объединенных Наций существенно укрепила свой потенциал по быстрому и эффективному развертыванию новых полевых операций. Для укрепления этого потенциала Организация Объединенных Наций должна прежде всего договориться об основных параметрах определения того, что означает «быстрота» и «эффективность». 87. Первые 6–12 недель после заключения соглашения о прекращении огня или о мире нередко становятся самым критическим периодом с точки зрения установления стабильного мира и обеспечения доверия к миротворцам. Доверие и политический импульс, утраченные в течение этого периода, нередко бывает весьма сложно восстановить. Поэтому сроки развертывания должны быть продуманы соответствующим образом. Вместе с тем быстрое развертывание21 A/55/305 S/2000/809 военного, полицейского и гражданского персонала вряд ли поможет упрочить хрупкий мир и обеспечить доверие к операции, если этот персонал не оснащен для выполнения своих задач. Чтобы быть эффективным, персонал миссий нуждается в материальной части (оборудование и материально-техническое обеспечение), финансовых средствах (наличные средства для закупки товаров и услуг), информационном обеспечении (подготовка и брифинги), оперативной стратегии и, если говорить об операциях, развертываемых в условиях неопределенности, военном и политическом «центре тяжести», достаточным для того, чтобы персонал миссии мог предугадывать и пресекать возникающие у одной или нескольких сторон сомнения в отношении продвижения вперед мирного процесса. 88. Сроки быстрого и эффективного развертывания будут, несомненно, варьироваться в зависимости от военно-политической ситуации, которая является уникальной для каждой постконфликтной обстановки. Тем не менее первым шагом в деле укрепления потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций по быстрому развертыванию должно быть согласование такого стандарта, к которому Организация должна стремиться. Пока такого стандарта не существует. Поэтому Группа предлагает Организации Объединенных Наций создать оперативный потенциал для полного развертывания «традиционных» миротворческих операций в течение 30 дней после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности и комплексных миротворческих операций — в течение 90 дней. В последнем случае штаб миссии должен полностью создаваться и начинать функционировать в течение 15 дней. 89. Чтобы соблюдать эти сроки, Секретариату необходимо иметь — по отдельности или в сочетании — следующее: a) постоянные резервы военного, полицейского и гражданского персонала, материальных средств и финансовых средств; b) крайне надежные резервные потенциалы, которые можно было бы задействовать в кратчайшие сроки; или c) достаточное время для приобретения этих ресурсов, что будет требовать способности предвидеть потенциальные новые миссии, планировать их и производить первоначальные расходы в связи с ними за несколько месяцев до их начала. Некоторые из рекомендаций Группы направлены на укрепление аналитического потенциала Секретариата и на приведение его в соответствие с процессом планирования миссий, с тем чтобы позволить Организации Объединенных Наций быть лучше подготовленной к потенциальным новым операциям. Однако ни начало войны, ни заключение мира нельзя во всех случаях предвидеть заблаговременно. По сути дела, опыт показывает, что зачастую это вообще не удается сделать. Таким образом, Секретариат должен быть в состоянии поддерживать определенный общий уровень готовности за счет создания новых и укрепления существующих резервных потенциалов, дабы быть готовым к непредвиденным запросам. 90. Многие государства-члены выступают против создания постоянной армии или полиции Организации Объединенных Наций, не хотят заключать надежных резервных соглашений, предостерегают против расходования финансовых ресурсов на создание запасов оборудования или же уговаривают Секретариат не заниматься планированием потенциальных операций до того, как Генеральный секретарь получит конкретные, вызванные кризисом юридические полномочия на это. В таких условиях Организация Объединенных Наций не может развертывать операции «быстро и эффективно» в пределах предлагаемых сроков. Приведенный ниже анализ, показывает, что по крайней мере некоторые из этих обстоятельств должны измениться, с тем чтобы быстрое и эффективное развертывание стало возможным. 91. Резюме основной рекомендации по определению сроков развертывания: Организация Объединенных Наций должна определить «потенциал быстрого и эффективного развертывания» как способность, с оперативной точки зрения, полностью развертывать традиционные операции по поддержанию мира в течение 30 дней после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности и комплексные операции по поддержанию мира — в течение 90 дней. B. Эффективное руководство миссиями 92. Эффективное и динамичное руководство может обусловливать разницу между слаженной миссией, отличающейся высоким моральным духом22 A/55/305 S/2000/809 и большой эффективностью работы, несмотря на сложные условия, и миссией, которая пытается хотя бы сохранить некоторые из этих атрибутов. Иными словами, настрой в работе всей миссии может в значительной степени зависеть от характера и способности тех, кто ее возглавляет. 93. С учетом этой крайне важной роли нынешний подход Организации Объединенных Наций к набору, отбору, подготовке и поддержке руководителей ее миссий требует значительной доработки. Списки потенциальных кандидатов ведутся на неофициальной основе. Представители и специальные представители Генерального секретаря, руководители миссий, командующие силами, комиссары гражданской полиции и их соответствующие заместители могут отбираться лишь непосредственно перед принятием или даже после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности, учреждающей новую миссию. Они и другие руководители основных и административным компонентов могут встретиться друг с другом лишь по приезде в район миссии, после нескольких дней предварительных бесед с должностными лицами Центральных учреждений. Им будет изложен общий круг их полномочий, устанавливающий их генеральные задачи и обязанности, но они крайне редко будут выезжать из Центральных учреждений, имея в руках разработанную для той или иной конкретной миссии политику или оперативные указания. По крайней мере вначале они будут сами определять, как выполнять мандат Совета Безопасности и как устранять потенциальные трудности на пути его выполнения. Они должны разрабатывать стратегию выполнения мандата, одновременно с этим пытаясь создать политический/военный центр тяжести миссии и поддерживать потенциально неустойчивый мирный процесс. 94. Если принять во внимание политику отбора кандидатов, то этот процесс становится несколько более понятым. Политическая настороженность по поводу любой новой миссии может мешать Генеральному секретарю проводить отбор потенциальных кандидатов задолго до официального учреждения миссии. При отборе специальных представителей Генерального секретаря, представителей Генерального секретаря или других руководителей миссии Генеральный секретарь должен учитывать мнения членов Совета Безопасности, государств соответствующего региона и местных сторон, поскольку, чтобы работать эффективно, представитель/специальный представитель Генерального секретаря нуждается в доверии каждого из них. На выбор одного или нескольких заместителей специального представителя Генерального секретаря может влиять необходимость обеспечения географического распределения в руководстве миссии. Национальность командующего силами, комиссара полиции и их заместителей должна отражать состав военного и полицейского компонентов, но также должна учитывать и политический настрой местных сторон. 95. Хотя политические и географические соображения являются вполне понятными, по мнению Группы, управленческий талант и опыт работы заслуживают по крайней мере такого же большого внимания при выборе руководителей миссии. Исходя из личного опыта нескольких из членов Группы в деле руководства полевыми операциями, Группа выступает за то, чтобы собирать руководителей миссии как можно раньше, с тем чтобы они могли совместными усилиями помогать разрабатывать концепцию операций миссии, план ее поддержки, ее бюджет и ее потребности в персонале. 96. Чтобы облегчить такой ранний отбор, Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю вести на систематической основе и при содействии государств-членов всеобъемлющий перечень потенциальных специальных представителей Генерального секретаря, командующих силами, комиссаров полиции и потенциальных заместителей, а также кандидатов на должности руководителей других основных компонентов миссии, причем делать этот так, чтобы обеспечивать широкое географическое представительство и справедливую представленность мужчин и женщин. Такая база данных содействовала бы раннему выявлению и отбору группы руководителей. 97. Секретариату следует ввести в практику предоставление руководству миссии стратегических руководящих указаний и планов, помогающих им предвосхищать и преодолевать трудности на пути осуществления мандата, а также, по мере возможности, формулирование таких руководящих указаний и планов совместно с руководством23 A/55/305 S/2000/809 миссии. Кроме того, руководство должно проводить широкие консультации с соответствующей страновой группой Организации Объединенных Наций и с неправительственными организациями, действующими в районе миссии, с целью расширения и углубления его знаний в отношении данной конкретной местности, что имеет крайне важное значение для осуществления всеобъемлющей стратегии перехода от войны к миру. Координатор-резидент в рамках страновой группы должен более часто подключаться к официальному процессу планирования миссии. 98. Группа считает, что по крайней мере один из старших руководителей миссии должен иметь соответствующий опыт работы в Организации Объединенных Наций, предпочтительно как на местах, так и в Центральных учреждениях. Такое лицо помогало бы руководителям, взятым не из системы Организации Объединенных Наций, тем самым сокращая время, которое в ином случае потребовалось бы им для ознакомления с правилами, положениями, политикой и рабочими методами Организации, давая ответы на такие вопросы, которые подготовка до развертывания миссии вряд ли может охватить. 99. Группа отмечает прецедент, связанный с назначением координатора-резидента/гуманитарного координатора группы учреждений, фондов и программ Организации Объединенных Наций, занимающегося деятельностью в целях развития и оказанием гуманитарной помощи конкретной стране, на должность одного из заместителей Специального представителя Генерального секретаря в рамках комплексной операции в пользу мира. По нашему мнению, такой практики следует придерживаться там, где это возможно. 100. И наоборот, крайне важно, чтобы представители учреждений, фондов и программ Организации Объединенных Наций на местах содействовали работе Специального представителя (или Представителя) Генерального секретаря в его качестве координатора всей деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций в соответствующей стране. В ряде случаев попытки сыграть такую роль наталкивались на препятствия, вызванные явным бюрократическим сопротивлением координации. Такие тенденции не согласуются с концепцией семьи Организации Объединенных Наций, которую Генеральный секретарь всячески пытается пропагандировать. 101. Резюме основных рекомендаций по руководству миссиями: a) Генеральному секретарю следует систематизировать метод отбора руководителей миссии, начиная с составления всеобъемлющего перечня потенциальных представителей или специальных представителей Генерального секретаря, командующих силами, комиссаров гражданской полиции и их заместителей, а также других руководителей основных и административных компонентов с учетом справедливого географического представительства и справедливой представленности мужчин и женщин и при содействии государств-членов; b) всех руководителей миссии следует отбирать и собирать в Центральных учреждениях как можно раньше, с тем чтобы они могли принять участие в основных аспектах процесса планирования миссии и в брифингах о положении в районе действия миссии и с тем чтобы они могли встретиться и поработать со своими коллегами по руководству миссии; c) Секретариату следует регулярно предоставлять руководителям миссии стратегические установки и планы, позволяющие им предвосхищать и преодолевать трудности на пути осуществления мандата, и, по мере возможности, формулировать такие руководящие указания и планы совместно с руководством миссии. C. Военный персонал 102. Организация Объединенных Наций ввела в действие свою систему резервных соглашений в середине 90-х годов для того, чтобы укрепить свой потенциал быстрого развертывания и быть в состоянии реагировать на непредсказуемый и экспоненциальный рост требований в связи с учреждением нового поколения комплексных операций по поддержанию мира. Система резервных соглашений представляет собой базу данных о военном, полицейском и гражданском персонале и экспертах, которые, как указывается правительствами, могут — теоретически — быть24 A/55/305 S/2000/809 использованы в составе операций Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира с уведомлением за 7, 15, 30, 60 или 90 дней. В настоящее время эта база данных включает имена 147 900 человек из 87 государств-членов: 85 000 в составе воинских боевых подразделений; 56 700 в составе воинских подразделений поддержки; 1600 военных наблюдателей; 2150 гражданских полицейских; и 2450 других гражданских специалистов. Из 87 участвующих государств 31 государство заключило меморандумы о взаимопонимании с Организацией Объединенных Наций, перечисляющие их обязанности с точки зрения готовности соответствующего персонала, однако те же самые меморандумы кодифицируют и условный характер их обязательств. По сути дела, меморандум о взаимопонимании подтверждает, что государства сохраняют свое суверенное право «просто сказать нет» в ответ на просьбу Генерального секретаря о выделении своих сил в состав той или иной операции. 103. Хотя подробных статистических данных в отношении таких ответов не существует, многие государства-члены гораздо чаще говорят «нет», чем «да» в ответ на просьбы о развертывании сформированных воинских подразделений в составе возглавляемых Организацией Объединенных Наций миротворческих операций. В отличие от давней традиции, существовавшей в первые 50 лет деятельности Организации, когда развитые страны выделяли основную массу войск для миротворческих операций Организации Объединенных Наций, в последние несколько лет 77 процентов военнослужащих в составе сформированных воинских подразделений, развернутых в различных операциях Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира — по состоянию на конец июня 2000 года, — были выделены развивающимися странами. 104. Пять постоянных членов Совета Безопасности сейчас предоставляют гораздо меньше войск для возглавляемых Организацией Объединенных Наций операций, однако четыре из пяти постоянных членов выделили значительные силы в состав возглавляемых Организацией Североатлантического договора (НАТО) операций в Боснии и Герцеговине и в Косово, которые обеспечивают безопасные условия для функционирования Миссии Организации Объединенных Наций в Боснии и Герцеговине (МООНБГ) и Миссии Организации Объединенных Наций по делам временной администрации в Косово (МООНК). Соединенное Королевство также развернуло свои войска в Сьерра-Леоне в самый острый момент кризиса (они находятся не под оперативным контролем Организации Объединенных Наций), оказав тем самым существенное стабилизирующее воздействие, однако ни одна развитая страна в настоящее время не предоставляет войска для самых сложных с точки зрения безопасности миротворческих операций Организации Объединенных Наций, а именно для операций в Сьерра-Леоне (МООНСЛ) и в Демократической Республике Конго (МООНДРК). 105. Воспоминания о миротворцах, погибших в Могадишо и Кигали или взятых в заложники в Сьерре-Леоне, помогают объяснить те трудности, с которыми сталкиваются государства-члены, пытаясь убедить свои национальные законодательные власти и общественность в том, что они должны поддерживать развертывание своих войск в составе возглавляемых Организацией Объединенных Наций операций, особенно в Африке. Более того, развитые государства как правило не видят каких-либо стратегических национальных интересов в таких операциях. Сокращение численности национальных вооруженных сил и увеличение числа европейских региональных инициатив по поддержанию мира еще больше истощают резерв прекрасно обученных и экипированных воинских контингентов из развитых стран для несения службы в составе операций Организации Объединенных Наций. 106. Вот почему Организация Объединенных Наций сталкивается с весьма серьезной дилеммой. Такая миссия, как МООНСЛ, возможно, не испытывала бы тех проблем, с которыми она столкнулась весной этого года, если бы она имела в своем распоряжении такие же сильные войска, как те, которые сейчас несут службу во имя поддержания мира в составе Сил для Косово (СДК). Группа убеждена в том, что военные планировщики НАТО не согласились бы на развертывание в Сьерра-Леоне лишь 6000 военнослужащих, которые были первоначально санкционированы. Тем не менее вероятность развертывания в Африке в ближайшем будущем операции по типу СДК представляется весьма слабой с учетом нынешних25 A/55/305 S/2000/809 тенденций. Даже если бы Организация Объединенных Наций попыталась развернуть силы наподобие СДК, с учетом нынешних резервных соглашений неясно, откуда взялись бы войска и имущество. 107. Ряд развивающихся стран отвечают на просьбы о выделении сил по поддержанию мира, предоставляя войска, которые несут службу безупречно и преданно, на самом высоком профессиональном уровне, и действуя согласно новым процедурам в отношении принадлежащего контингентам имущества (соглашения «об аренде с обслуживанием»), которые были приняты Генеральной Ассамблеей и которые предусматривают, что национальные воинские контингенты должны привозить с собой практически все имущество и предметы снабжения, требующиеся для обеспечения их войск. Организация Объединенных Наций обязуется выплачивать возмещение странам, предоставляющим войска, за использование их имущества и предоставлять такие услуги и такую поддержку, которые не охватываются новыми процедурами в отношении принадлежащего контингентам имущества. В ответ на это страны, предоставляющие войска, обязуются соблюдать подписываемые ими меморандумы о взаимопонимании в отношении принадлежащего контингентам имущества. 108. И тем не менее Генеральный секретарь находится в невыгодном положении. Ему дают резолюцию Совета Безопасности, указывающую на бумаге санкционированную численность войск, но он не знает, получит ли он войска для развертывания на местах. Войска, которые в конечном итоге прибывают на театр действий, могут оказаться недостаточно оснащенными: некоторые страны дают солдат без винтовок, или с винтовками, но без касок, или с касками, но без пуленепробиваемых жилетов, либо даже без штатных транспортных средств (грузовики или бронетранспортеры). Войска могут быть необучены проведению операций по поддержанию мира, и, в любом случае, различные контингенты в составе какой-то одной операции вряд ли обучались или взаимодействовали друг с другом раньше. В некоторых подразделениях может не быть персонала, говорящего на языке, используемом в районе действия миссии. Даже если с точки зрения языка проблем нет, военные подразделения могут не иметь общих оперативных процедур, либо могут по разному толковать основные элементы командования и управления и правила применения вооруженной силы в рамках миссии, а также могут иметь различные соображения о требованиях миссии в отношении применения силы. 109. С этим необходимо покончить. Страны, предоставляющие войска, которые не могут выполнять положения своих соответствующих меморандумов о взаимопонимании, должны заявить об этом Организации Объединенных Наций и не должны развертывать свои войска. С этой целью Генеральному секретарю следует предоставить ресурсы и поддержку, необходимые для оценки степени готовности стран, способных предоставить войска, до развертывания и для подтверждения того, что положения меморандумов о взаимопонимании будут выполнены. 110. Еще одним шагом в направлении улучшения нынешней ситуации было бы предоставление Генеральному секретарю возможности собирать — немедленно после получения уведомления — военных планировщиков, штабных офицеров и других военно-технических экспертов, предпочтительно с опытом работы в составе миссий Организации Объединенных Наций, для установления связи взаимодействия с планировщиками миссии в Центральных учреждениях и затем для развертывания на местах вместе с основным элементом из Департамента операций по поддержанию мира, с тем чтобы они могли помочь организовать военный штаб миссии, как это санкционировано Советом Безопасности. Если использовать нынешнюю систему резервных соглашений, можно подготовить для этой цели, а также для усиления нынешних миссий в периоды кризиса «дежурный список» такого персонала, выделяемого государствами-членами с учетом справедливого географического распределения и тщательно проверяемого и отбираемого Департаментом операций по поддержанию мира. Лица, включаемые в такой дежурный список из примерно 100 офицеров, будут иметь звания от майора до полковника и будут рассматриваться — после их срочного вызова на службу — как военные наблюдатели Организации Объединенных Наций с соответствующими изменениями в статусе.26 A/55/305 S/2000/809 111. Персонал, отбираемый для включения в дежурный список, будет заранее подготовлен, с медицинской и административной точек зрения, для развертывания в любом уголке мира, будет участвовать в предварительной подготовке и будет брать на себя обязательство — сроком до двух лет — быть готовым к немедленному развертыванию с семидневным уведомлением. Каждые три месяца дежурный список будет обновляться за счет включения примерно 10– 15 новых офицеров, названных государствами-членами, которые должны будут пройти подготовку в течение первоначального трехмесячного периода. За счет постоянного обновления каждые три месяца дежурный список будет включать в себя примерно пять-семь команд, готовых к быстрому развертыванию. Первоначальная подготовка групп будет включать в себя в самом начале этап предварительной квалификационной подготовки и обучения (краткие однонедельные занятия в классе и стажировка в подразделениях системы Организации Объединенных Наций), за которым следует этап непосредственной профессиональной подготовки (развертывание в составе уже действующей операции Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира в качестве группы военных наблюдателей на срок примерно в 10 недель). После этого первоначального трехмесячного периода групповой подготовки офицеры будут возвращаться в свои соответствующие страны и пребывать в состоянии полной готовности. 112. При наличии соответствующей санкции Совета Безопасности одна или несколько из этих групп могут вызываться для немедленного прохождения службы. Они будут прибывать в Центральные учреждения Организации Объединенных Наций для короткой переподготовки и получения конкретных указаний, по мере необходимости, и для взаимодействия с планировщиками из состава комплексной целевой группы по подготовке миссии (КЦГМ) (см. пункты 198–217 ниже), созданной для этой операции, прежде чем они будут развернуты на местах. Задача групп будет заключаться в том, чтобы перевести широкие стратегические концепции миссии, разработанные комплексной целевой группой, на язык конкретных оперативных и тактических планов и приступить к осуществлению непосредственных задач по координации и взаимодействию в преддверии развертывания воинских контингентов. После ее развертывания передовая группа будет действовать до тех пор, пока ее не заменят развертываемые контингенты (обычно в течение двух-трех месяцев, но, в случае необходимости, и дольше — вплоть до шести месяцев). 113. Средства для финансирования первоначальной подготовки группы будут поступать из бюджета уже действующей миссии, в составе которой группа проходит первоначальную подготовку, а средства для финансирования дежурного развертывания будут поступать из бюджета предстоящей миссии по поддержанию мира. Организация Объединенных Наций не будет нести никаких расходов в связи с таким персоналом, пока он находится в состоянии полной готовности в своей стране, поскольку он будет выполнять свои обычные обязанности в составе национальных вооруженных сил. Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю представить наброски этого предложения с соответствующими деталями касательно его осуществления государствам-членам для немедленного претворения в жизнь в рамках существующей системы резервных соглашений. 114. Однако такого кадрового потенциала военного планирования на местах и связи взаимодействия в чрезвычайной обстановке будет недостаточно для обеспечения слаженности действий сил. По нашему мнению, чтобы действовать слаженно, сами воинские контингенты должны по меньшей мере быть обучены и оснащены в соответствии с единым стандартом, дополняемым совместным планированием на уровне командования контингентов. В идеальном случае они должны иметь возможность для проведения совместных полевых учений. 115. Если военные планировщики Организации Объединенных Наций считают, что бригады (примерно 5000 военнослужащих) вполне достаточно для эффективного сдерживания или для ликвидации насильственных угроз выполнению мандата той или иной операции, то в этом случае военный компонент такой операции Организации Объединенных Наций должен развертываться в качестве формирования бригадного состава, а не как скопление батальонов, незнакомых с доктриной, руководством и оперативной практикой друг друга. Такая бригада должна состоять из контингентов из27 A/55/305 S/2000/809 группы стран, которые вместе подготавливали, как предлагалось выше, общими нормативами боевой подготовки и оснащения, общую доктрину и общие мероприятия по организации оперативного управления силами. В идеальном случае, система резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций должна предусматривать несколько взаимослаженных формирований такого бригадного состава с необходимыми подразделениями поддержки, которые находились бы в состоянии готовности к полному развертыванию в течение 30 дней в случае традиционных операций по поддержанию мира и 90 дней — в случае комплексных операций. 116. С этой целью Организация Объединенных Наций должна разработать минимальные нормативы боевой подготовки, оснащения и другие нормативы, требующиеся для обеспечения участия сил в миротворческих операциях Организации Объединенных Наций. Государства-члены, располагающие необходимыми для этого средствами, могли бы налаживать партнерские отношения — в контексте системы резервных соглашений — для оказания финансовой, материальной, учебной и иной помощи менее развитым странам, предоставляющим войска, с тем чтобы они могли достичь такого минимального уровня и поддерживать его, дабы каждая из созданных таким образом бригад имела сопоставимо высокий уровень подготовки и была в состоянии опираться на эффективную оперативную поддержку. Создание такого формирования было целью группы государств, выступивших с идеей постоянной бригады высокой готовности резервных сил Организации Объединенных Наций (БВГООН) и создавших элемент планирования на командном уровне, который регулярно проводит совместную работу. Тем не менее предложенный механизм не предназначается для того, чтобы освободить отдельные государства от их обязанности активно участвовать в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира или чтобы исключить участие более мелких государств в таких операциях. 117. Резюме основных рекомендаций по военному персоналу: a) государства-члены следует призывать, в соответствующих случаях, к тому, чтобы они налаживали партнерские отношения друг с другом — в контексте системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций — с целью формирования нескольких взаимослаженных групп бригадного состава с необходимыми элементами поддержки, готовых к эффективному развертыванию в течение 30 дней после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности об учреждении традиционной операции по поддержанию мира и в течение 90 дней в случае комплексных миротворческих операций; b) Генерального секретаря следует уполномочить провести официальный опрос государств-членов, участвующих в системе резервных соглашений, на предмет их готовности выделять войска в состав потенциальной операции, когда возникает вероятность заключения соглашения или договоренности о прекращении огня, предусматривающих определенную роль для Организации Объединенных Наций в деле их выполнения; c) Секретариату следует ввести в практику направление группы для подтверждения степени готовности каждой страны, которая может предоставить войска, с точки зрения выполнения положений меморандумов о взаимопонимании, касающихся требований по боевой подготовке и оснащению, до развертывания; те страны, которые не удовлетворяют таким требованиям, не должны развертывать свои войска; d) Группа рекомендует подготовить в рамках системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций постоянно обновляемый «дежурный список» из примерно 100 офицеров, с тем чтобы иметь возможность — с уведомлением за семь дней — усиливать ядро планировщиков из состава Департамента операций по поддержанию мира группами, прошедшими подготовку по вопросам организации штаба миссии для новой миротворческой операции. D. Гражданская полиция 118. Гражданская полиция занимает второе место после военного компонента по численности28 A/55/305 S/2000/809 международных сотрудников, задействованных в миротворческих операциях Организации Объединенных Наций. Просьбы о выделении гражданской полиции в ходе операций, связанных с внутригосударственным конфликтом, будут, по всей видимости, занимать одно из первых мест во всех перечнях просьб об оказании помощи подорванному войной обществу в деле восстановления условий для социальной, экономической и политической стабильности. Справедливость и беспристрастность местных полицейских сил, которые гражданская полиция контролирует и обучает, имеют важнейшее значение для поддержания безопасных и спокойных условий, а их эффективность крайне важна в тех случаях, когда силы устрашения и преступные группировки продолжают препятствовать прогрессу на политическом и экономическом фронтах. 119. Группа уже доказывала (см. пункты 39, 40 и 47(b) выше) необходимость изменения доктрины использования гражданской полиции в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, с тем чтобы сосредоточить внимание прежде всего на реформе и перестройке местной полиции в дополнение к выполнению традиционных задач по консультированию, подготовке и надзору. Такое изменение потребует от государств-членов предоставления в распоряжение Организации Объединенных Наций еще более хорошо подготовленных и специализирующихся в различных областях полицейских экспертов, а ведь уже сейчас они сталкиваются с трудностями в плане удовлетворения даже нынешних потребностей. По состоянию на 1 августа 2000 года 25 процентов из 8641 должности сотрудников полиции, санкционированной для операций Организации Объединенных Наций, оставались вакантными. 120. В то время как государства-члены могут наталкиваться на внутренние политические трудности при направлении воинских подразделений в состав миротворческих операций Организации Объединенных Наций, правительства, как правило, сталкиваются с меньшими политическими проблемами при выделении своей гражданской полиции в состав операций в пользу мира. Однако государства-члены все-таки испытывают при этом трудности практического порядка, поскольку по своему численному составу и своей конфигурации их полицейские силы, как правило, предназначаются для удовлетворения только внутригосударственных потребностей. 121. В этих условиях нередко требуется много времени для того, чтобы найти, добиться откомандирования и затем обучить сотрудников полиции и соответствующих экспертов по вопросам судопроизводства, предназначенных для работы в составе миссий, и этот процесс отбора препятствует быстрому и эффективному развертыванию Организацией Объединенных Наций компонента гражданской полиции в составе той или иной миссии. Более того, полицейский компонент любой миссии может состоять из сотрудников полиции, взятых чуть ли не из 40 стран, которые никогда раньше друг с другом не встречались, не имеют никакого или почти никакого опыта работы в миссиях Организации Объединенных Наций и прошли слабую соответствующую подготовку, либо недостаточный инструктаж по конкретной миссии; к тому же, методы и доктрины организации полицейской службы в их соответствующих странах могут существенно отличаться друг от друга. Кроме того, срок службы сотрудников гражданской полиции в составе операций, как правило, составляет от шести месяцев до одного года. Все эти факторы крайне затрудняют выполнение комиссарами гражданской полиции в составе миссий задачи преобразования этой разношерстной группы сотрудников полиции во взаимослаженную и эффективную силу. 122. Поэтому Группа призывает государства-члены создать национальные резервные группы находящихся на действительной службе сотрудников полиции (усиливаемые, в случае необходимости, за счет недавно ушедших в отставку сотрудников полиции, отвечающих профессиональным и физическим требованиям), которые были бы в административном и медицинском отношениях готовы к развертыванию в составе операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира в контексте системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций. Численный состав такой резервной группы будет, естественно, варьироваться в зависимости от размеров и возможностей каждой страны. Группа гражданской полиции в составе Департамента операций по поддержанию мира должна оказывать государствам-членам помощь в установлении критериев отбора и требований в плане подготовки29 A/55/305 S/2000/809 сотрудников полиции в составе этих резервных групп путем выявления требующихся специалистов и экспертов и подготовки общих руководящих указаний в отношении обязательных профессиональных стандартов. После развертывания в составе миссии Организации Объединенных Наций гражданские полицейские должны отслужить по крайней мере один год в целях обеспечения минимального уровня преемственности. 123. Группа считает, что взаимослаженность полицейских компонентов будет еще больше укреплена, если государства, выделяющие сотрудников полиции, будут готовы проводить совместные учения, и поэтому Группа рекомендует государствам-членам, в соответствующих случаях, заключать новые и укреплять существующие региональные партнерские договоренности по вопросам подготовки полиции. Группа также призывает государства-члены, которые в состоянии делать это, оказывать помощь (например, путем обучения и предоставления оборудования) более мелким государствам, предоставляющим сотрудников полиции, с целью поддержания необходимого уровня готовности в соответствии с руководящими принципами, постоянно действующими инструкциями и нормативами профессиональной деятельности, разработанными Организацией Объединенных Наций. 124. Группа также рекомендует государствам-членам назначить в рамках своих правительственных структур единый орган, отвечающий за координацию и управление в вопросах предоставления сотрудников полиции в распоряжение операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира. 125. Группа считает, что Генерального секретаря следует уполномочить собирать — немедленно после получения уведомления — старших планировщиков и технических экспертов из состава гражданской полиции, предпочтительно имеющих опыт работы в миссиях Организации Объединенных Наций, для установления связи взаимодействия с планировщиками миссии в Центральных учреждениях и затем для развертывания на местах с целью помочь организовать штаб гражданской полиции миссии, как это санкционировано Советом Безопасности, в рамках резервного механизма, напоминающего дежурный список для военного штаба и связанные с этим процедуры. При вызове на службу лица, включенные в дежурный список, будут иметь такой же контрактный и правовой статус, как и другие сотрудники гражданской полиции, задействованные в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций. Механизмы обучения и развертывания сотрудников полиции, включенных в дежурный список, могут быть такими же, как и для военного компонента. Более того, совместная подготовка военнослужащих и гражданских полицейских, включенных в соответствующие списки, и их совместное участие в планировании миссии еще больше укрепляли бы взаимослаженность миссии и сотрудничество между компонентами миссии в начале каждой новой операции. 126. Резюме основных рекомендаций по сотрудникам гражданской полиции: a) государствам-членам рекомендуется создать национальную резервную группу сотрудников гражданской полиции, готовых к быстрому развертыванию в составе операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, в контексте системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций; b) государствам-членам рекомендуется заключать региональные партнерские договоренности о подготовке сотрудников гражданской полиции, включенных в их соответствующие национальные резервные группы, в целях обеспечения общего уровня готовности в соответствии с руководящими принципами, постоянно действующими инструкциями и нормативами профессиональной деятельности, которые будут выработаны Организацией Объединенных Наций; c) государствам-членам рекомендуется назначить в рамках их правительственных структур единый координационный орган для целей предоставления гражданской полиции в состав операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира; d) Группа рекомендует подготовить в рамках системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций постоянно обновляемый «дежурный список» из примерно 100 сотрудников полиции и соответствующих30 A/55/305 S/2000/809 экспертов, с тем чтобы иметь возможность — с уведомлением за семь дней — развертывать группы, прошедшие подготовку по вопросам создания компонента гражданской полиции в составе новой миротворческой операции, обучения прибывающих сотрудников и обеспечения большей взаимослаженности компонента на раннем этапе; e) Группа рекомендует создать, с учетом рекомендаций, содержащихся в подпунктах (a), (b) и (c) выше, параллельные механизмы для специалистов по вопросам судопроизводства, пенитенциарной системе, вопросам прав человека и других соответствующих специалистов, которые вместе со специалистами из гражданской полиции будут составлять коллегиальные группы по вопросам правопорядка. Е. Гражданские специалисты 127. Вплоть до настоящего времени Секретариат был не в состоянии находить, набирать и развертывать соответствующим образом подготовленный гражданский персонал, выполняющий основные и вспомогательные функции, в нужное время или в нужных количествах. В настоящее время вакантными остаются примерно 50 процентов полевых должностей в основных областях и до 40 процентов должностей в области администрации и материально-технического обеспечения в составе миссий, которые были учреждены от шести месяцев до одного года тому назад и которые по-прежнему крайне нуждаются в соответствующих специалистах. Некоторые из гражданских специалистов, используемых в составе миссий, оказались на должностях, которые не соответствуют их прежнему опыту, например в составе компонентов гражданской администрации Временной администрации Организации Объединенных Наций в Восточном Тиморе (ВАООНВТ) и МООНК. Кроме того, темпы набора практически совпадают с темпами ухода сотрудников миссии, уже пресытившихся теми рабочими условиями, в которых они вынуждены функционировать, включая и саму кадровую недоукомплектованность. Эти многочисленные вакансии и высокая текучесть кадров указывают на тревожный сценарий начала и проведения следующей комплексной миротворческой операции и затрудняют полномасштабное развертывание нынешних миссий. Эти проблемы усугубляются за счет нескольких факторов. 1. Отсутствие резервных систем для реагирования на непредвиденные или особо большие запросы 128. Каждая новая сложная задача, поручаемая новому поколению миротворческих операций, вызывает спрос, который система Организации Объединенных Наций неспособна удовлетворить в короткие сроки. Это явление впервые возникло в начале 90-х годов с развертыванием следующих операций по выполнению мирных соглашений: Временный орган Организации Объединенных Наций в Камбодже (ЮНТАК), Миссия наблюдателей Организации Объединенных Наций в Сальвадоре (МНООНС), Контрольная миссия Организации Объединенных Наций в Анголе (КМООНА) и Операция Организации Объединенных Наций в Мозамбике (ЮНОМОЗ). Система пыталась набрать в короткие сроки экспертов по таким вопросам, как помощь в проведении выборов, экономическое восстановление и реконструкция, контроль за соблюдением прав человека, производство радио-и телевизионных программ, судебные вопросы и организационное строительство. К середине десятилетия система создала до этих пор не существовавшие кадры людей, приобретших непосредственный опыт работы в этих областях. Однако по причинам, о которых пойдет речь ниже, многие из этих лиц ушли из системы. 129. Секретариат был вновь захвачен врасплох в 1999 году, когда он был вынужден укомплектовать персоналом миссии, отвечающие за организацию управления в Восточном Тиморе и в Косово. Очень мало сотрудников в Секретариате или в составе учреждений, фондов или программ Организации Объединенных Наций обладают техническими знаниями и опытом, необходимыми для руководства муниципалитетом или национальным министерством. Да и сами государства-члены не смогли сразу же заполнить этот пробел, поскольку они также не осуществляли никакого предварительного планирования с целью нахождения квалифицированных и годных к31 A/55/305 S/2000/809 использованию кандидатов в своих собственных национальных структурах. Более того, самим недоукомплектованным миссиям по вопросам временной администрации понадобилось некоторое время даже для уточнения того, что именно им требуется. В конечном итоге, несколько государств-членов предложили кандидатуры (причем порой без каких-либо затрат для Организации Объединенных Наций), способные удовлетворить значительную часть спроса. Однако Секретариат не в полной мере воспользовался этими предложениями, отчасти из-за стремления избежать однобокого — при таком раскладе — географического представительства в кадровом составе миссии. Также выдвигалась — но, видимо, слишком поздно, чтобы можно было проработать все детали, — идея о том, чтобы отдельные государства-члены брали на себя целые сектора управления («секторальную ответственность»). К этой идее стоит вновь вернуться, по крайней мере в плане выделения небольших групп гражданских администраторов со специализированными знаниями. 130. Чтобы быстро реагировать, обеспечивать контроль за качеством и удовлетворять даже прогнозируемый спрос, Секретариату потребуется создать и вести реестр гражданских кандидатов. Этот реестр (отличный от системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций) должен содержать в себе имена специалистов в различных областях, которых активно разыскивали (на индивидуальной основе или в партнерстве с организациями системы Организации Объединенных Наций, правительственными, межправительственными и неправительственными организации и/или при их содействии), которые прошли предварительную проверку, с которыми были проведены собеседования, которые прошли отбор и медицинский осмотр, получили основные ориентационные материалы, касающиеся работы в составе полевых миссий в целом, и которые изъявили готовность приступить к работе немедленно после получения уведомления. 131. Такого реестра в настоящее время нет. В результате этого приходится срочно звонить в государства–члены, департаменты и учреждения Организации Объединенных Наций и даже сами полевые миссии, с тем чтобы попытаться в последнюю минуту найти подходящих кандидатов в надежде, ко всему прочему, на то, что эти кандидаты будут в состоянии бросить все свои дела за один день. С помощью этого метода Секретариат смог набрать и развернуть в течение прошлого года по меньшей мере 1500 новых сотрудников, причем сюда не входит контролируемое перемещение имеющегося в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций персонала, однако контроль за качеством при этом пострадал. 132. Необходимо подготовить централизованный и размещенный во внутриорганизационной сети реестр, как это предлагается выше, который был бы доступен для соответствующих членов ИКМБ и велся бы с их помощью. В реестр следует включить и имена их собственных сотрудников, которых члены ИКМБ были бы готовы отпустить для работы в составе миссии. Потребуются некоторые дополнительные ресурсы для ведения этих реестров, однако принятым внешним кандидатам можно напоминать о том, чтобы они автоматически обновляли свои личные данные через Интернет, особенно в отношении их готовности к работе, и, кроме того, они должны быть в состоянии получать доступ — также через Интернет — к брифингам и учебным материалам. Полевым миссиям должен быть предоставлен доступ к такому реестру и должны быть делегированы полномочия по набору включенных в реестр кандидатов в соответствии с руководящими принципами, которые будут приняты Секретариатом в целях обеспечения справедливого географического распределения и справедливого соотношения мужчин и женщин. 2. Трудности в плане привлечения и сохранения наилучших из внешних кандидатов 133. Несмотря на столь специализированный характер системы набора, Организация Объединенных Наций в 90-е годы смогла набрать определенное количество весьма квалифицированных и преданных делу людей для работы в полевых миссиях. Они занимались избирательными бюллетенями в Камбодже, уклонялись от пуль в Сомали, в самый последний момент эвакуировались из Либерии и начали рассматривать артиллерийские обстрелы в бывшей Югославии как отличительную особенность их повседневной жизни. Тем не менее система Организации Объединенных Наций пока не создала контрактного механизма, позволяющего32 A/55/305 S/2000/809 надлежащим образом признавать и вознаграждать их работу, давая им определенные гарантии работы. Хотя верно то, что кандидатам для работы в миссиях ясно говорят о том, чтобы они не тешили себя иллюзиями насчет будущей работы, поскольку внешние кандидаты набираются для удовлетворения «временного» спроса, такие условия службы неспособны привлекать и удерживать в течение длительного времени наилучших из кандидатов. В целом необходимо переосмыслить сложившийся на протяжении истории взгляд на миротворчество как временное отклонение от нормы, а не как одну из основных функций Организации Объединенных Наций. 134. Так, по крайней мере отдельным из наилучших внешних кандидатов следует предлагать более долгосрочную работу вместо ограниченных по времени контрактов, которые им предлагают сейчас, а некоторых из них следует активно нанимать на должности в департаментах Секретариата, занимающихся комплексными чрезвычайными ситуациями, с тем чтобы увеличить количество работающего в Центральных учреждениях персонала с полевым опытом. Ограниченное число людей, набранных в состав миссий, смогли получить работу в Центральных учреждениях, однако это происходило, по-видимому, на специальной и индивидуальной основе, а не в соответствии с согласованной и транспарентной стратегией. 135. В настоящее время разрабатываются предложения для урегулирования этой ситуации путем предоставления лицам, набранным в состав миссий и отработавшим четыре года на местах, возможности получать «непрерывные назначения», когда это возможно; в отличие от нынешних контрактов эти назначения не будут ограничиваться сроком действия мандата конкретной миссии. Такие инициативы, если они будут приняты, помогут решить эту проблему применительно к тем, кто присоединился к полевым миссиям в середине десятилетия и до сих пор работают в рамках системы. Однако их может быть недостаточно для того, чтобы привлекать новых кандидатов, которые, как правило, должны будут работать по контрактам сроком от шести месяцев до одного года и при этом не всегда знать, найдется ли для них какая-либо работа после того, как закончится такой контракт. Мысль о том, что на протяжении четырех лет предстоит жить в состоянии неопределенности, может отпугивать некоторых из наилучших кандидатов, особенно семейных кандидатов, которые имеют большие возможности альтернативного трудоустройства (нередко с более конкурентоспособными условиями работы). Поэтому следует подумать о том, чтобы предлагать непрерывные контракты тем внешним кандидатам, которые особенно хорошо зарекомендовали себя, работая по крайней мере в течение двух лет в составе какой-либо операции в пользу мира. 3. Нехватка персонала на административных и вспомогательных должностях среднего и старшего уровня 136. Критическая нехватка персонала в ключевых административных областях (закупки, финансы, бюджет, кадры) и в областях материально-технической поддержки (ответственные за контракты, инженеры, специалисты по системному анализу информации, специалисты по планированию материально-технического обеспечения) была подлинным бичом для операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира на протяжении 90-х годов. Уникальный и специфический характер административных правил, положений и внутренних процедур Организации исключает возможность того, чтобы новые кандидаты брались за выполнение этих административных и материально-технических функций в динамичных условиях начала миссии без существенной предварительной подготовки. Хотя специальные учебные программы для такого персонала начали осуществляться еще в 1995 году, они пока не получили организационного оформления, поскольку наиболее опытных сотрудников — потенциальных инструкторов — не удается освободить от выполнения их обычных задач. В целом же, обучение и выпуск удобных для пользователя справочных документов входят в число первых проектов, которые откладывают, когда возникает срочная необходимость укомплектования новых миссий. Соответственно, обновленный вариант пособия по административному управлению в полевых условиях 1992 года все еще остается в виде проекта. 4. Факторы, дестимулирующие выезд сотрудников для работы на местах33 A/55/305 S/2000/809 137. Сотрудники Центральных учреждений, знакомые с правилами, положениями и процедурами, неохотно выезжают для работы в полевые миссии. Сотрудники как административных, так и основных органов должны добровольно вызваться для работы на местах, а их руководители должны согласиться отпустить их. Руководители департаментов нередко противятся выезду своих лучших сотрудников для работы на местах, пытаются их отговорить и/или отказываются отпустить на такую работу из-за нехватки компетентного персонала в их собственных подразделениях, которую, как они опасаются, нельзя будет устранить посредством привлечения для замены временного персонала. Еще один фактор, дестимулирующий потенциальных добровольцев, — это известные случаи, когда сотрудников, выехавших в полевые миссии, обходили при продвижении по службе в силу принципа «с глаз долой — из сердца вон». В большинстве случаев сотрудники, выезжающие в полевые операции, не могут брать с собой членов семьи в силу соображений безопасности — еще один фактор, вызывающий сокращение числа добровольцев. Ряд учреждений, фондов и программ Организации Объединенных Наций, ориентированных на деятельность на местах (УВКБ, Мировая продовольственная программа (МПП), ЮНИСЕФ, Фонд Организации Объединенных Наций в области народонаселения (ЮНФПА), ПРООН), располагают определенным числом высококвалифицированных потенциальных кандидатов для работы в операциях по поддержанию мира, но при этом сталкиваются с ограниченностью ресурсов и, как правило, в первую очередь пытаются укомплектовать свои собственные операции на местах. 138. Управление людских ресурсов при поддержке ряда междепартаментских целевых групп предложило ряд прогрессивных реформ, направленных на решение этих проблем. Они предусматривают обеспечение мобильности в рамках Секретариата и направлены на поощрение ротации сотрудников между Центральными учреждениями и отделениями на местах путем учета работы в миссиях при рассмотрении вопроса о продвижении по службе. Цель этих реформ заключается в уменьшении задержек с набором сотрудников и наделении руководителей департаментов всеми полномочиями по набору сотрудников. Группа считает важным оперативно утвердить эти инициативы. 5. Устаревание категории «полевой службы» 139. «Полевая служба» — единственная категория персонала в рамках Организации Объединенных Наций, сотрудники которой специально набираются для работы в операциях по поддержанию мира (и их условия службы и контракты разработаны соответствующим образом, а оклады и пособия и надбавки выплачиваются исключительно из бюджетов миссий). Однако эта категория во многом утратила свою привлекательность из-за того, что Организация не выделяла достаточно ресурсов для обеспечения служебного роста сотрудников категории полевой службы. Эта категория была создана в 50-е годы для формирования высокомобильной группы технических специалистов, которые оказывали бы помощь, в частности, воинским контингентам операций по поддержанию мира. По мере изменения характера операций менялись и функции, которые должны были выполнять сотрудники полевой службы. В конечном итоге к концу 80-х — началу 90-x годов некоторые из них продвинулись по службе и стали выполнять управленческие функции в компонентах административного управления и материально-технического обеспечения операций по поддержанию мира. 140. Наиболее опытные и квалифицированные сотрудники из этой группы сейчас буквально нарасхват: все они заняты в существующих миссиях, и многие из них достигли возраста выхода в отставку или приближаются к этому рубежу. Многие из остающихся сотрудников не обладают управленческими навыками или подготовкой, необходимыми для эффективного руководства ключевыми административными компонентами сложных операций по поддержанию мира. Другие обладают устаревшим багажом технических знаний. Таким образом, структура полевой службы не в состоянии более обеспечить удовлетворение всех или многих потребностей нового поколения операций по поддержанию мира в административном управлении или материально-техническом обеспечении. Поэтому Группа рекомендует незамедлительно пересмотреть структуру и основание для существования полевой службы, с тем чтобы они полнее отвечали34 A/55/305 S/2000/809 существующим и будущим потребностям полевых операций, с уделением особого внимания руководителям среднего и высшего звена в ключевых областях административного управления и материально-технического обеспечения. Обеспечение непрерывного развития и профессиональной подготовки этой категории персонала также должно рассматриваться в качестве приоритетной задачи, а условия их службы необходимо пересмотреть, с тем чтобы обеспечить привлечение и удержание наиболее квалифицированных кандидатов. 6. Отсутствие всеобъемлющей кадровой стратегии для операций в пользу мира 141. В настоящее время не существует всеобъемлющей кадровой стратегии, обеспечивающей надлежащий подбор гражданского персонала различных специальностей в любой конкретной операции. Необходимо мобилизовать все возможности по отысканию перспективных кандидатов, обладающих необходимыми навыками, в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций, привлекать специалистов, отсутствующих в системе Организации Объединенных Наций, путем внешнего набора и использовать ряд других промежуточных вариантов, таких, как привлечение добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций, сотрудников на условиях субподряда, коммерческих служб и персонала, набираемого на национальной основе. На протяжении последнего десятилетия Организация Объединенных Наций использовала все эти кадровые источники, однако это делалось на разовой основе, а не в соответствии с глобальной стратегией. Такая стратегия необходима для обеспечения результативности и эффективности деятельности с точки зрения затрат, а также для поддержания чувства сплоченности и морального климата в коллективе миссии. 142. В рамках этой кадровой стратегии следует в первую очередь урегулировать вопрос об использовании добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций в операциях по поддержанию мира. С 1992 года более 4000 добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций работали в 19 различных операциях по поддержанию мира. Только за последние 18 месяцев около 1500 добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций были направлены для работы в новые миссии в Восточном Тиморе, Косово и Сьерра-Леоне, где они занимаются вопросами гражданской администрации, проведением выборов, правами человека, административной поддержкой и материально-техническим обеспечением. Добровольцы Организации Объединенных Наций традиционно являются самоотверженными и компетентными в своей области специалистами. Исходя из опыта образцовой деятельности добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций, директивные органы рекомендовали шире использовать их в операциях по поддержанию мира, однако использование добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций в качестве дешевой рабочей силы рискует подорвать авторитет Программы и может отрицательно сказаться на моральном климате в миссии. Многие добровольцы Организации Объединенных Наций работают бок о бок с коллегами, которые получают в три–четыре раза больше за выполнение аналогичных функций. В настоящее время ДОПМ обсуждает с Программой добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций вопрос о заключении глобального меморандума о понимании, регулирующего использование добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций в операциях по поддержанию мира. Чрезвычайно важно, чтобы такой меморандум о понимании был частью более глобальной всеобъемлющей кадровой стратегии для операций в пользу мира. 143. Эта стратегия должна также включать, в частности, подробно разработанные предложения по созданию системы гражданских резервных соглашений (СГРС). СГРС должна содержать список сотрудников системы Организации Объединенных Наций, которые прошли предварительный отбор, медицинское освидетельствование и получили разрешение подразделений, в которых они работают, войти в состав группы по развертыванию миссии после получения уведомления за 72 часа. Соответствующим подразделениям системы Организации Объединенных Наций должны быть делегированы полномочия в отношении профессиональных групп, относящихся к соответствующей сфере их компетенции, по установлению партнерских отношений и подписанию меморандума о понимании с межправительственными и неправительственными организациями для выделения персонала в дополнение к группам по развертыванию миссии,35 A/55/305 S/2000/809 набранным из числа сотрудников системы Организации Объединенных Наций, и ответственность за эту деятельность. 144. Тот факт, что ответственность за разработку глобальной кадровой стратегии и гражданских резервных соглашений лежит исключительно на Отделе управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения (ОУПОМТО), действующем по собственной инициативе, как только у него появляется для этого время, сам по себе свидетельствует о том, что Секретариат не уделяет этому чрезвычайно важному вопросу достаточного внимания. Укомплектование миссии сверху донизу является, возможно, одним из важнейших элементов, предопределяющих успех миссии. Поэтому высшее руководство Секретариата должно уделять этому вопросу первоочередное внимание. 145. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении гражданских специалистов: а) Секретариату следует подготовить централизованный список заранее отобранных гражданских кандидатов, которые могут быть оперативно направлены в операции в пользу мира, и разместить его в Интернете/внутриорганизационной сети. Полевым миссиям должен быть предоставлен доступ к этому списку и делегированы полномочия по набору указанных в нем кандидатов в соответствии с руководящими принципами в отношении справедливого географического распределения и соотношения женщин и мужчин, которые должны быть промульгированы Секретариатом; b) следует реорганизовать категорию персонала полевой службы, с тем чтобы она соответствовала потребностям, которые постоянно возникают у всех операций в пользу мира, особенно в отношении сотрудников среднего и высшего уровня в областях административного управления и материально-технического обеспечения; с) следует пересмотреть условия службы гражданских сотрудников, набираемых из числа внешних кандидатов, с тем чтобы Организация Объединенных Наций могла привлекать наиболее квалифицированных кандидатов, а затем обеспечивать сотрудникам, продемонстрировавшим отличную работу, более широкие возможности для развития карьеры; d) ДОПМ следует разработать всеобъемлющую кадровую стратегию для операций в пользу мира, которая, среди прочего, регулировала бы использование добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций, вопросы резервных соглашений для выделения гражданских сотрудников с уведомлением за 72 часа для облегчения начального этапа миссии и распределение обязанностей между членами Исполнительного комитета по вопросам мира и безопасности за реализацию этой стратегии. F. Потенциал в области общественной информации 146. Практически для всех операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира действенный потенциал в области общественной информации и коммуникации в районах миссии является оперативной необходимостью. Эффективное распространение информации помогает бороться со слухами и дезинформацией и позволяет заручиться поддержкой местного населения. Оно может стать рычагом давления на лидеров противоборствующих группировок, повысить безопасность персонала Организации Объединенных Наций и выступить в качестве мультипликатора силы. Поэтому чрезвычайно важно, чтобы каждая операция в пользу мира разработала стратегии кампаний в области общественной информации, особенно в отношении ключевых аспектов мандата миссии, и чтобы самая первая группа, направляемая для содействия развертыванию новой миссии, уже располагала такими стратегиями и включала в свой состав персонал, необходимый для их осуществления. 147. Полевые миссии нуждаются в компетентных спикерах, которые были бы интегрированы в группы старших руководящих сотрудников и представляли бы миссию в рамках повседневных контактов с общественностью. Для эффективной работы спикер должен иметь опыт работы и навыки журналиста, а также знать, как действуют миссия и Центральные учреждения Организации Объединенных Наций. Необходимо также, чтобы он или она пользовались доверием СПГС и поддерживали хорошие отношения с другими36 A/55/305 S/2000/809 членами руководства миссии. Поэтому Секретариату необходимо активизировать свои усилия по подготовке и удержанию таких сотрудников. 148. Кроме того, необходимо, чтобы полевые операции Организации Объединенных Наций могли эффективно распространять информацию среди своих собственных сотрудников, информировать их о политике миссии и происходящих событиях и укреплять связи между компонентами, а также между вышестоящими и нижестоящими инстанциями. Новые информационные технологии представляют собой эффективный инструмент обеспечения такой коммуникации и должны включаться в комплекты снаряжения первой необходимости и материально-технические запасы, хранящиеся на БСООН в Бриндизи. 149. Следует увеличить объем ресурсов, выделяемых на деятельность в области общественной информации и связанные с нею персонал и информационные технологии, необходимые для распространения информации об операции, и на установление эффективных внутренних коммуникационных связей, который сегодня не так уж часто превышает 1 процент оперативного бюджета миссии, с тем чтобы привести эти ресурсы в соответствие с мандатом, размерами и потребностями миссии. 150. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций по созданию потенциала быстрого развертывания в области общественной информации: в бюджетах миссий следует предусмотреть выделение дополнительных ресурсов на деятельность в области общественной информации и связанные с нею персонал и информационные технологии, необходимые для распространения информации об операции, и на установление эффективных внутренних коммуникационных связей. G. Материально-техническое обеспечение, процесс закупок и управление расходами 151. Исчерпание материально-технических запасов Организации Объединенных Наций, значительное время, уходящее на выполнение заказов даже при использовании системных контрактов, «узкие места» в процессе закупок и задержки с получением денежной наличности для осуществления закупок на местах — все это еще больше затрудняет быстрое развертывание и эффективное функционирование миссий, которым на деле удается достичь санкционированной численности персонала. В отсутствие эффективного материально-технического обеспечения миссии не могут эффективно функционировать. 152. Время, которое требуется Организации Объединенных Наций для обеспечения полевых миссий базовым оборудованием и коммерческими услугами, необходимыми на начальном этапе и для полного развертывания миссии, определяются процессом закупки в Организации Объединенных Наций. Этот процесс регулируется Финансовыми положениями и правилами, промульгированными Генеральной Ассамблеей, и толкованием этих положений и правил Секретариатом (на языке Организации Объединенных Наций это называется «политикой и процедурами»). Эти положения, правила, политика и процедуры выливаются в следующий приблизительно восьмиэтапный процесс, которому должны следовать Центральные учреждения при обеспечении полевых миссий требуемыми им оборудованием и услугами: 1. Установление потребностей и подготовка заявки. 2. Удостоверение наличия финансовых средств для закупки данного предмета. 3. Начало процедуры «приглашения для участия в торгах» (ПУТ) или «просьбы представлять предложения» (ППП). 4. Оценка представленных заявок. 5. Направление материалов в Комитет Центральных учреждений по контрактам (КЦУК). 6. Заключение контракта и размещение заказа на производство. 7. Ожидание, пока будет произведен данный предмет. 8. Поставка данного предмета в миссию. 153. Большинство государственных организаций и коммерческих компаний придерживаются аналогичных процедур, хотя не у всех из них это занимает столько времени, сколько у Организации37 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Объединенных Наций. Например, в Организации Объединенных Наций весь этот процесс может занимать 20 недель при закупке конторской мебели, 17–21 неделю при закупке генераторов, 23– 27 недель при закупке сборных домов, 27 недель при закупке тяжелых автомобилей и 17–21 неделю при закупке аппаратуры связи. Вполне естественно, что ни один из указанных сроков не позволяет полностью развернуть миссию в предлагаемые сроки, если осуществление большинства процедур начинается лишь после учреждения операции. 154. Организация Объединенных Наций впервые выдвинула идею «комплектов снаряжения первой необходимости» для частичного решения этой проблемы в период резкого увеличения числа операций по поддержанию мира в середине 90-х годов. Комплекты снаряжения первой необходимости включают базовое оборудование, необходимое для развертывания и поддержания деятельности штаб-квартиры миссии, укомплектованный 100 сотрудниками, в первые 100 дней развертывания, которое заранее закуплено, упаковано и хранится в Бриндизи готовым к отправке в любой момент. Затем начисленные взносы на финансирование миссии, в которой используются эти наборы, направляются на формирование новых комплектов снаряжения первой необходимости, а после ликвидации миссии ее нерасходуемое имущество длительного пользования возвращается в Бриндизи и хранится на складе вместе с комплектами снаряжения первой необходимости. 155. Однако износ легких автомобилей и других предметов снабжения в условиях, характерных для послевоенного периода, может иногда приводить к тому, что их транспортировка и обслуживание оказываются сопряжены с более значительными расходами, чем продажа того или иного предмета снабжения или его разборка на запасные части и последующее приобретение совершенно нового предмета снабжения. Соответственно, Организация Объединенных Наций перешла к более частой продаже таких предметов снабжения на месте с аукционов, хотя Секретариат не уполномочен использовать вырученные от этого средства для приобретения нового оборудования, а должен возвращать их государствам-членам. Следует рассмотреть вопрос о предоставлении Секретариату возможности использовать полученные таким образом средства для приобретения нового оборудования, которое хранилось бы на складе в Бриндизи. Кроме того, следует также рассмотреть вопрос о предоставлении полевым миссиям общего разрешения на безвозмездную передачу — в консультации с координатором-резидентом Организации Объединенных Наций — по крайней мере части такого оборудования солидным местным неправительственным организациям в качестве одного из способов оказания содействия развитию формирующегося гражданского общества. 156. Тем не менее наличие этих комплектов снаряжения первой необходимости и материально-технических запасов, как представляется, значительно облегчило быстрое развертывание небольших по масштабам операций, учрежденных в середине и конце 90-х годов. Однако создание и расширение новых миссий сегодня опережает ликвидацию существующих операций, так что запасы предметов с долгими сроками закупки, необходимые для полного развертывания миссии, на БСООН оказались практически исчерпаны. Если не закрыть сегодня какую-либо из существующих крупных операций и не передать на БСООН все ее имущество в хорошем состоянии, то Организация Объединенных Наций в ближайшее время не будет располагать оборудованием, необходимым для начала и оперативного полного развертывания крупной миссии. 157. Существуют, разумеется, количественные пределы того имущества, которое Организация Объединенных Наций может и должна хранить в виде запасов на БСООН или в каком-нибудь другом месте. Хранящееся механическое оборудование нуждается в уходе, что может быть сопряжено с большими расходами, а отсутствие надлежащего обслуживания может привести к тому, что получаемые миссиями после долгого ожидания предметы снабжения оказываются нефункционирующими. Кроме того, на национальном уровне коммерческие и государственные организации все шире переходят к работе по принципу «нулевого уровня» материально-производственных запасов и/или запасов готовой продукции по причине высокого уровня альтернативных издержек, связанных с невозможностью высвобождения средств, потраченных на оборудование, которое, возможно, не будет использоваться в течение некоторого38 A/55/305 S/2000/809 времени. Кроме того, темпы технического прогресса сегодня приводят к устареванию определенных предметов снабжения, таких, как аппаратура связи и аппаратные средства информационных систем, не просто в течение нескольких лет, а в течение нескольких месяцев. 158. Соответственно, на протяжении последних нескольких лет Организация Объединенных Наций также движется в этом направлении и заключила около 20 действующих коммерческих системных контрактов на поставку пользующегося широким спросом имущества для операций по поддержанию мира, особенно тех компонентов, которые требуются на начальном этапе и на этапе расширения миссии. Благодаря системным контрактам Организации Объединенных Наций удалось значительно сократить время, уходящее на закупку предметов снабжения, в силу заблаговременного отбора продавцов, которые готовы в кратчайшие сроки выполнить производственные заявки. Тем не менее производство легких автомобилей в соответствии с существующим системным контрактом занимает 14 недель, а на доставку этих автомобилей необходимо еще четыре недели. 159. Генеральная Ассамблея приняла ряд мер для решения проблемы, обусловленной длительными сроками поставки. Создание Резервного фонда для операций по поддержанию мира, размеры которого после полной капитализации составят 150 млн. долл. США, обеспечило наличие постоянного резерва денежных средств, которые можно оперативно использовать. Генеральный секретарь может с разрешения Консультативного комитета по административным и бюджетным вопросам (ККАБВ) ассигновать из Фонда до 50 млн. долл. США на цели облегчения начального этапа миссии или непредвиденного расширения существующей операции. Впоследствии средства Фонда пополняются из бюджетов миссий после их утверждения или увеличения. Для принятия обязательств на сумму свыше 50 млн. долл. США требуется разрешение Генеральной Ассамблеи. 160. В исключительных случаях Генеральная Ассамблея по рекомендации ККАБВ предоставляет Генеральному секретарю полномочия на принятие обязательств в размере до 200 млн. долл. США для содействия начальному этапу крупных миссий (ВАООНВТ, МООННК и МООНДРК) до представления требуемых подробно разработанных предложений по бюджету, подготовка которых может занимать несколько месяцев. Все это — весьма обнадеживающие изменения, которые свидетельствуют о поддержке государствами-членами деятельности по укреплению потенциала Организации в области быстрого развертывания. 161. В то же время все эти процедуры могут осуществляться лишь после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности, санкционирующей учреждение миссии или ее передовых элементов. Если некоторые из этих мер не будут осуществлены достаточно заблаговременно до наступления желательной даты развертывания миссии или модифицированы таким образом, чтобы способствовать поддержанию минимального уровня материально-технических запасов, закупка которых требует долгого времени, то предлагаемых целевых показателей оперативного и эффективного развертывания достичь не удастся. 162. Соответственно, Секретариату следует сформулировать глобальную стратегию материально-технического обеспечения, с тем чтобы дать возможность оперативно и эффективно производить развертывание миссий в предлагаемые сроки развертывания. В основе разработки этой стратегии должен лежать анализ затрат и результатов, с тем чтобы определить, какие предметы снабжения, закупка которых требует долгого времени, должны храниться в запасах и в каком количестве, а какие предметы снабжения наиболее эффективно приобретать в рамках действующих контрактов с учетом, при необходимости, расходов на поставку в сжатые сроки для обеспечения проведения такой стратегии. Сотрудники, курирующие основные направления работы в департаментах, занимающихся вопросами мира и безопасности, должны будут дать лицам, отвечающим за планирование материально-технического обеспечения, предварительные данные о числе и видах операций, которые, возможно, потребуется создать в ближайшие 12-18 месяцев. Генеральный секретарь должен периодически представлять Генеральной Ассамблее на рассмотрение и утверждение подробные предложения по реализации этой стратегии, которые могут быть сопряжены со значительными финансовыми последствиями.39 A/55/305 S/2000/809 163. Тем временем Генеральной Ассамблее следует санкционировать и утвердить единовременное расходование средств на формирование трех новых комплектов снаряжения первой необходимости в Бриндизи (для доведения их общего числа до пяти штук), которые будут затем автоматически пополняться из бюджетов миссий, использующих эти наборы. 164. Для облегчения оперативного и эффективного развертывания операций в предлагаемые сроки следует наделить Генерального секретаря полномочиями на ассигнование до 50 млн. долл. США из Резервного фонда для операций по поддержанию мира до принятия Советом Безопасности резолюции, санкционирующей создание соответствующей миссии, но с разрешения ККАБВ. Средства Фонда должны автоматически пополняться из начисленных взносов на содержание миссий, на развертывание которых эти средства были израсходованы. Генеральному секретарю следует обратиться к Генеральной Ассамблее с просьбой рассмотреть вопрос об увеличении размеров Фонда, если он решит, что средства Фонда исчерпались в результате создания в ограниченные сроки нескольких миссий подряд. 165. Уже после начального этапа развертывания миссии полевые миссии нередко месяцами ждут необходимых им предметов снабжения, особенно в тех случаях, когда предположения, лежавшие в основе первоначальных планов, оказываются неточными или когда потребности миссии меняются в ответ на изменение обстановки. Даже если такие предметы снабжения имеются на местном рынке, существует целый ряд ограничений на закупку на местах. Во-первых, полевые миссии обладают ограниченной гибкостью и полномочиями, например, по оперативному переводу средств, сэкономленных по одной статье бюджета, на другую статью для удовлетворения непредвиденных потребностей. Во-вторых, миссиям, как правило, делегируются полномочия на совершение закупок на сумму не более 200 000 долл. США на каждый заказ на закупку. Закупки на более крупную сумму должны осуществляться Центральными учреждениями в соответствии с восьмиэтапным процессом принятия решений (см. пункт 152 выше). 166. Группа выступает в поддержку мер, направленных на сокращение масштабов вмешательства Центральных учреждений в управление полевыми миссиями на микроуровне и на наделение их полномочиями и гибкостью, требуемыми для поддержания авторитета и эффективности работы миссий при одновременном обеспечении их подотчетности. Однако в тех случаях, когда вмешательство Центральных учреждений действительно ведет к повышению эффективности, как в случае резервных соглашений, ответственность за закупки по-прежнему должна лежать на Центральных учреждениях. 167. Как свидетельствуют статистические данные, представленные Отделом закупок, из 184 заказов на закупку, подготовленных Центральными учреждениями в 1999 году для снабжения операций по поддержанию мира товарами и услугами на сумму от 200 000 долл. США до 500 000 долл. США, 93 процента касаются воздушного транспорта и перевозок, автотранспортных средств и компьютеров, и их выполнение осуществлялось либо путем проведения международных торгов, либо — в настоящее время — в рамках системных контрактов. При условии оперативной активизации этих системных контрактов и обеспечения своевременной поставки товаров и услуг вмешательство Центральных учреждений в этих случаях представляется обоснованным. Использование системных контрактов и международных торгов предположительно позволяет осуществлять оптовые закупки товаров и услуг дешевле, чем это можно было бы сделать на месте, и во многих случаях эти процедуры применяются для закупок товаров и услуг, вовсе отсутствующих в районах миссии. 168. Однако не вполне ясно, какова реальная польза от вмешательства Центральных учреждений в процесс закупки тех товаров и услуг, которые не охватываются системными контрактами или резервными соглашениями об оказании коммерческих услуг и которые легче закупить на месте по более низким ценам. В таких случаях было бы целесообразно делегировать полномочия по закупке таких предметов снабжения на места и осуществлять наблюдение и финансовый контроль за этой деятельностью при помощи механизма ревизии. Соответственно, Секретариату следует40 A/55/305 S/2000/809 уделить первоочередное внимание как можно более оперативному формированию на местах контингента сотрудников, способных взять на себя более высокий уровень полномочий в сфере закупок (например, путем набора и профессиональной подготовки соответствующих сотрудников на местах и выпуска понятных для пользователей руководящих документов) всех товаров и услуг, имеющихся на местном рынке и не охватываемых системными контрактами или резервными соглашениями об оказании коммерческих услуг (на сумму до 1 млн. долл. США в зависимости от размера и потребностей миссии). 169. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении материально-технического обеспечения и управления расходами: a) Секретариату следует сформулировать глобальную стратегию материально-технического обеспечения, с тем чтобы дать возможность оперативно и эффективно производить развертывание миссии в предлагаемые сроки и в соответствии с предположениями в области планирования, устанавливаемыми основными подразделениями Департамента операций по поддержанию мира; b) Генеральной Ассамблее следует санкционировать и утвердить единовременное расходование средств для доведения общего числа комплектов снаряжения первой необходимости в Бриндизи, которые должны включать быстро развертываемую аппаратуру связи, до пяти штук. Эти комплекты снаряжения первой необходимости должны затем постоянно пополняться в обычном порядке за счет средств, поступающих по линии начисленных взносов на финансирование операций, в рамках которых эти комплекты были использованы; c) Генерального секретаря следует наделить полномочиями с согласия ККАБВ, но до принятия соответствующей резолюции Совета Безопасности ассигновать из Резервного фонда для операций по поддержанию мира до 50 млн. долл. США, как только становится очевидным, что та или иная операция, вероятно, будет учреждена; d) Секретариату следует полностью пересмотреть политику и процедуры закупочной деятельности (обратившись, при необходимости, к Генеральной Ассамблее с предложениями внести изменения в Финансовые правила и положения) для облегчения, в частности, оперативного и полного развертывания операции в предлагаемые сроки; e) Секретариату следует провести обзор политики и процедур, регулирующих управление финансовыми ресурсами в полевых миссиях, в целях наделения полевых миссий гораздо большей гибкостью в управлении их бюджетами; f) Секретариату следует увеличить предельную сумму, на которую полевые миссии в соответствии с делегированными полномочиями могут производить закупки (с 200 000 долл. США вплоть до 1 млн. долл. США в зависимости от размера и потребностей миссии), в отношении всех товаров и услуг, имеющихся на местном рынке и не охватываемых системными контрактами или резервными соглашениями об оказании коммерческих услуг. IV. Подразделения Центральных учреждений, занимающиеся планированием и обеспечением операций по поддержанию мира, и соответствующие ресурсы 170. Создание в Центральных учреждениях эффективного потенциала по обеспечению операций в пользу мира означает решение вопросов количества, структуры и качества, т.е. определение числа сотрудников, необходимых для выполнения соответствующей работы; организационных структур и процедур, облегчающих эффективное обеспечение; и квалифицированных специалистов и качественных методов работы в этих структурах. В настоящем разделе Группа рассматривает главным образом первые два вопроса и выносит по ним рекомендации; в разделе VI ниже она рассматривает вопросы качества персонала и «организационной культуры». 171. Группа считает очевидной необходимость увеличения ресурсов, выделяемых на обеспечение операций по поддержанию мира. Особенно41 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ощутима необходимость увеличения ресурсов в ДОПМ, который несет главную ответственность за планирование и обеспечение наиболее сложных и заметных полевых операций Организации Объединенных Наций. A. Укомплектование кадрами и финансирование подразделений Центральных учреждений, занимающихся обеспечением операций по поддержанию мира 172. Расходы Центральных учреждений на персонал, занимающийся планированием и обеспечением всех операций по поддержанию мира на местах, и связанные с ним расходы можно рассматривать как прямые неполевые вспомогательные расходы Организации Объединенных Наций на операции по поддержанию мира. В последние пять лет они не превышали 6 процентов от совокупного объема расходов на операции по поддержанию мира (см. таблицу 4.1). В настоящее время они приближаются к 3 процентам и, судя по существующим планам расширения некоторых миссий, таких, как МООНДРК в Демократической Республике Конго, полного развертывания других миссий, таких, как МООНСЛ в Сьерра-Леоне, и создания новой операции в Эритрее и Эфиопии, сократятся в нынешнем бюджетном году до менее 2 процентов. Специалист по анализу вопросов управления, знакомый с оперативными потребностями крупных организаций, будь то государственных или частных, которые располагают значительными периферийными элементами, вполне может прийти к выводу, что организация, пытающаяся обеспечить должное функционирование своего ориентированного на полевую деятельность производства при 2-процентном уровне вспомогательных расходов центральной организации, не оказывает достаточной поддержки своим сотрудникам на местах и в процессе работы, вероятнее всего, не обеспечивает воспроизводства существующих вспомогательных структур. 173. В таблице 4.1 указаны совокупные бюджеты операций по поддержанию мира с середины 1996 года по середину 2001 года (бюджетный цикл операций по поддержанию мира начинается в июле и заканчивается в июне, отличаясь от цикла регулярного бюджета Организации Объединенных Наций на шесть месяцев). В ней также перечислены совокупные расходы Центральных учреждений на обеспечение деятельности по поддержанию мира, производимые как в рамках ДОПМ, так и за его пределами, и финансируемые как из регулярного бюджета, так и из вспомогательного счета для операций по поддержанию мира (регулярный бюджет охватывает двухгодичный период, и расходы из него пропорционально распределяются между государствами-членами в соответствии с регулярной шкалой взносов; цикл вспомогательного счета охватывает один год — цель этой меры заключается в обеспечении быстрого изменения кадровой структуры Секретариата в ответ на изменение масштабов полевых операций, — и его расходы пропорционально распределяются в соответствии со шкалой взносов для операций по поддержанию мира).42 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Таблица 4.1 Соотношение совокупных вспомогательных расходов Центральных учреждений и совокупных бюджетов операций по поддержанию мира, 1996– 2001 годы (В млн. долл. США) Июль 1996 года– июнь 1997 года Июль 1997 года– июнь 1998 года Июль 1998 года– июнь 1999 года Июль 1999 года– июнь 2000 года Июль 2000 года– июнь 2001 годаa Бюджеты операций по поддержанию мира 1 260 911,7 812,9 1 417 2 582b Соответствующие вспомогательные расходы Центральных учрежденийc 49,2 52,8 41,0 41,7 50,2 Соотношение расходов Центральных учреждений и полевых миссий 3,90% 5,79% 5,05% 2,95% 1,94% a На основе финансовых докладов Генерального секретаря; исключая миссии, завершенные к 30 июня 2000 года; включая предварительные данные о расходах в связи с полным развертыванием МООНДРК, бюджет которой пока не подготовлен. b Предварительные данные. c Данные получены от Финансового контролера Организации Объединенных Наций и включают расходы в связи со всеми должностями в Секретариате (главным образом в ДОПМ), которые финансируются из регулярного бюджета на двухгодичный период и со вспомогательного счета; в этих данных также учтены расходы, исчисленные на основе полного финансирования, которые пришлось бы производить в отсутствие взносов натурой и «безвозмездно предоставляемого персонала». 174. Из средств вспомогательного счета финансируется 85 процентов бюджета ДОПМ, или около 40 млн. долл. США в год. Еще 6 млн. долл. США на нужды ДОПМ поступает из регулярного бюджета на двухгодичный период. Эти 46 млн. долл. США предназначены главным образом для выплаты окладов и связанных с этим расходов 231 гражданскому, военному и полицейскому сотруднику категории специалистов и 173 сотрудникам категории общего обслуживания в ДОПМ (но не включая Службу по вопросам деятельности, связанной с разминированием, которая финансируется из добровольных взносов). Из средств вспомогательного счета также финансируются должности в других подразделениях Секретариата, занимающихся обеспечением операций по поддержанию мира, таких, как Отдел финансирования операций по поддержанию мира и отдельные компоненты Отдела закупок в Департаменте по вопросам управления, Управление по правовым вопросам и ДОИ. 175. До середины десятилетия размеры вспомогательного счета устанавливались на уровне в 8,5 процента от совокупного объема расходов операций по поддержанию мира по гражданскому персоналу, но при этом не учитывались расходы на вспомогательный персонал гражданской полиции и добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций и расходы на обеспечивающих вспомогательное обслуживание частных подрядчиков или воинские контингенты. Впоследствии вместо подхода, основанного на фиксированной процентной доле, была внедрена практика ежегодного обоснования каждой должности, финансируемой из средств вспомогательного счета. Однако в соответствии с этой новой системой штатное расписание ДОПМ увеличилось незначительно, отчасти в силу того, что Секретариат, по-видимому, при представлении своих заявок руководствовался своими представлениями о том, на что готовы пойти политические круги. 176. Очевидно, что размеры ДОПМ и других подразделений Секретариата, обеспечивающих деятельность по поддержанию мира, должны43 A/55/305 S/2000/809 увеличиваться и уменьшаться в определенной зависимости от масштабов деятельности на местах, однако требовать от ДОПМ каждый год обосновывать потребность в семи из восьми должностей в Департаменте равнозначно утверждению, что этот орган носит временный характер, а поддержание мира является временной функцией Организации. Пятьдесят два года операций свидетельствуют об обратном, а опыт последних лет является лишним доказательством необходимости обеспечения постоянной готовности, даже во время снижения активности на местах, поскольку наступление соответствующих событий практически никогда нельзя предугадать, а восстановление кадрового потенциала, утраченного с уходом квалифицированных и опытных сотрудников, может занять долгое время, как на собственном опыте убедился ДОПМ в последние два года. 177. Поскольку ежегодно финансируются из средств вспомогательного счета практически все расходы ДОПМ, этот департамент, как и другие подразделения, финансируемые со вспомогательного счета, не имеет предсказуемого базового уровня финансирования и должностей, на которые он мог бы набирать и удерживать сотрудников. Сотрудники, набираемые на местах на должности, финансируемые со вспомогательного счета, не знают, будут ли эти должности существовать через год. С учетом существующих условий работы и отсутствия уверенности в возможности развития карьеры у сотрудников, должности которых финансируются со вспомогательного счета, удивительно, что ДОПМ до сих пор существует. 178. Государства-члены и Секретариат с давних пор признают необходимость установления базового числа сотрудников/уровня финансирования и отдельного механизма для обеспечения расширения и сокращения ДОПМ в ответ на изменение потребностей. Однако надлежащий базовый уровень сложно установить без анализа кадровых потребностей ДОПМ на основе определенных объективных критериев управления и производительности. Хотя Группа не может сама провести такой методологический анализ вопросов управления в ДОПМ, она полагает, что такой анализ необходим. В то же время Группа считает, что существующая нехватка кадров в отдельных областях совершенно очевидна, и этот вопрос заслуживает особого внимания. 179. Установленное штатное расписание Отдела военной и гражданской полиции в ДОПМ, который возглавляет Военный советник Организации Объединенных Наций, составляет 32 сотрудника военной полиции и 9 сотрудников гражданской полиции. Группе гражданской полиции поручено оказывать содействие в осуществлении всех аспектов международных полицейских операций Организации Объединенных Наций: от разработки доктрины до отбора сотрудников и их направления в полевые операции. В настоящее время ее возможностей хватает лишь на то, чтобы определять кандидатов, пытаться произвести их предварительную проверку путем направления групп по оказанию помощи в отборе кандидатов (деятельность, в которой занята примерно половина сотрудников) и затем обеспечивать их отправку на места. Кроме того, в рамках ДОПМ (или любого другого органа системы Организации Объединенных Наций) нет подразделения, отвечающего за планирование и обеспечение деятельности правоохранительных элементов операции, которые, в свою очередь, оказывали бы эффективную помощь — консультативную или исполнительную — полиции в ее работе. 180. Одиннадцать сотрудников в Канцелярии Военного советника обеспечивают идентификацию и ротацию воинских подразделений во всех операциях по поддержанию мира и оказывают консультативные услуги по военным вопросам политическим сотрудникам ДОПМ. Кроме того, предполагается, что офицеры, работающие в ДОПМ, должны изыскивать время для «подготовки инструкторов» на уровне государств-членов, разработки руководящих принципов, составления пособий и других информационных материалов и еще сотрудничать с ОУПОМТО в определении потребностей военного и полицейского компонентов полевых миссий в материально-техническом обеспечении и других оперативных потребностей. Однако при существующем уровне укомплектования кадрами в Учебной группе работает всего пять военных офицеров. Десять офицеров в Службе военного планирования являются главными сотрудниками по военному планированию оперативной деятельности миссий в рамках ДОПМ; в утвержденном штатном44 A/55/305 S/2000/809 расписании предусмотрено еще шесть должностей, однако их пока не удалось полностью заполнить. Эти 16 офицеров, занимающихся вопросами планирования, представляют собой весь контингент военных сотрудников, привлекаемых для определения потребностей в силах на начальном этапе миссии и на этапе ее расширения, участия в подготовке технических обследований и оценки готовности стран, которые могут предоставить войска. Из 10 офицеров, занимающихся вопросами планирования, которые занимают первоначально утвержденные должности, одному было поручено готовить проекты правил применения вооруженной силы и директив для командующих силами во всех операциях. Лишь один офицер может заниматься работой с базой данных ЮНСАС, да и то не все время. 181. В таблице 4.2 для сравнения приводятся данные о численности развернутых военных и полицейских контингентов и утвержденной численности соответствующих сотрудников Центральных учреждений, занимающихся вспомогательным обеспечением. Ни одно национальное правительство не направило бы для службы на местах 27 000 военнослужащих, если бы основное и оперативное руководство военной операцией на родине осуществляли всего 32 человека. Ни одна полицейская организация не направила бы 8000 сотрудников полиции, если бы основную и оперативную поддержку полицейской деятельности оказывали лишь девять штабных сотрудников. Таблица 4.2 Соотношение военного персонала и персонала гражданской полиции в Центральных учреждениях и военного персонала и персонала гражданской полиции на местахa Военный персонал Персонал гражданской полиции Операции по поддержанию мира 27 365 8 641 Центральные учреждения 32 9 Соотношение персонала в Центральных учреждениях и полевых операциях 0,1% 0,1% a Санкционированная численность военного персонала по состоянию на 15 июня 2000 года и численность гражданской полиции по состоянию на 1 августа 2000 года. 182. Еще одна область, где ощущается острая нехватка сотрудников, — это Управление операций ДОПМ, где работают сотрудники, курирующие отдельные операции по поддержанию мира, или координаторы основной деятельности. В настоящее время в Управлении работает 15 сотрудников категории специалистов, выполняющих функции координаторов деятельности в рамках 14 существующих и 2 возможных новых операций в пользу мира, т.е. на каждую миссию в среднем приходится менее одного сотрудника. Хотя один сотрудник может справиться с удовлетворением потребностей одной или даже двух мелких миссий, это, как представляется, совершенно невозможно в случае более крупных миссий, таких, как ВАООНВТ в Восточном Тиморе, МООНК в Косово, МООНСЛ в Сьерра-Леоне и МООНДРК в Демократической Республике Конго. В аналогичных условиях работают и сотрудники, занимающиеся материально-техническим обеспечением и кадрами, в Отделе управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения ДОПМ, и соответствующий вспомогательный персонал Департамента по вопросам управления, Управления по правовым вопросам, Департамента общественной информации и других подразделений, обеспечивающих деятельность миссий. В таблице 4.3 приводятся данные об общей численности персонала ДОПМ и других подразделений Секретариата, которые занимаются исключительно обеспечением крупных миссий, в сравнении с данными о годовых бюджетах миссий и санкционированным числом должностей. 183. Общая нехватка персонала означает, что во многих случаях ключевых сотрудников абсолютно некем заменить, что в тех случаях, когда кризис происходит в районе, разница во времени с которым составляет 6–12 часов, невозможно организовать еще одну смену, и люди вынуждены работать по две смены подряд, и что любой уход в отпуск, невыход на работу по болезни или выезд в миссию влечет за собой оголение значительного участка работы по45 A/55/305 S/2000/809 вспомогательному обеспечению. В нынешних условиях попытки удовлетворить конкурирующие требования неизбежно заставляют искать компромиссные решения, а в результате может пострадать обеспечение деятельности на местах. В Нью-Йорке первоочередное внимание, как правило, уделяется выполнению задач, связанных с деятельностью Центральных учреждений, таких, как представление докладов директивным органам, поскольку на этом настаивают — нередко лично — представители государств-членов. В отличие от этого потребности полевых миссий представлены в Нью-Йорке сообщениями, полученными по электронной почте, телеграммами или обрывочными записями телефонных разговоров. Соответственно, в борьбе за внимание сотрудников, курирующих основные направления деятельности, полевые операции нередко проигрывают и вынуждены сами решать свои проблемы. Между тем, им должно уделяться первоочередное внимание. Люди, работающие на местах, сталкиваются с трудностями, нередко угрожающими их жизни. Они заслуживают лучшего, как и те сотрудники в Центральных учреждениях, которые пытаются оказывать им более эффективную поддержку. Таблица 4.3 Общее число сотрудников, занимающихся на постоянной основе обеспечением сложных операций по поддержанию мира, учрежденных в 1999 году МООНК (Косово) МООНСЛ (Сьерра—Леоне) ВАООНВТ (Восточный Тимор) МООНДРК (Демократическая Республика Конго) Бюджет (смета) на июль 2000 года — июнь 2001 года 410 млн. долл. США 465 млн. долл. США 540 млн. долл. США 535 млн. долл. США Санкционированная численность ключевых компонентов в настоящее время 4718 полицейских; более 1000 международных гражданских сотрудников 13 000 военнослужащих 8950 военнослужащих; 1640 полицейских; 1185 международных гражданских служащих 5537 военнослужащих; 500 военных наблюдателей Сотрудники категории специалистов в Центральных учреждениях, занимающиеся обеспечением операций на постоянной основе 1 сотрудник по политическим вопросам; 2 сотрудника гражданской полиции; 1 координатор материально-технического обеспечения; 1 гражданский специалист по кадрам; 1 сотрудник по политическим вопросам; 2 военнослужащих; 1 координатор материально-технического обеспечения; 1 финансовый 1 сотрудник по политическим вопросам; 2 военнослужащих; 1 сотрудник гражданской полиции; 1 координатор материально-технического обеспечения; 1 сотрудник по политическим вопросам; 3 военнослужащих; 1 сотрудник гражданской полиции; 1 координатор материально-технического обеспечения;46 A/55/305 S/2000/809 МООНК (Косово) МООНСЛ (Сьерра—Леоне) ВАООНВТ (Восточный Тимор) МООНДРК (Демократическая Республика Конго) 1 финансовый специалист специалист 1 гражданский специалист по набору кадров; 1 финансовый специалист 1 гражданский специалист по набору кадров; 1 финансовый специалист Всего сотрудников Центральных учреждений, занимающихся вспомогательным обеспечением 6 5 7 8 184. Хотя на первый взгляд наблюдается определенное дублирование функций, выполняемых сотрудниками, курирующими основные направления в ДОПМ, и аналогичными сотрудниками в региональных отделениях ДПВ, более внимательное изучение свидетельствует об обратном. Например, сотрудник ДПВ, занимающийся такой же деятельностью, что и сотрудник, курирующий МООНК, следит за событиями во всей Юго-Восточной Европе, а аналогичный сотрудник в УКГД следит за всеми Балканами и частью Содружества Независимых Государств. Хотя чрезвычайно важно обеспечить, чтобы сотрудники ДПВ и УКГД имели возможность вносить посильный вклад, их деятельность в совокупности дает меньше для обеспечения МООНК, чем добавление еще одного сотрудника, занятого на постоянной основе. 185. Три региональных директора в Управлении операций должны регулярно выезжать в миссии и поддерживать непрерывный диалог по вопросам политики с СПГС и руководителями компонентов для обсуждения проблем, в решении которых могли бы помочь Центральные учреждения. Вместо этого они вынуждены заниматься процедурами, относящимися к компетенции их сотрудников, курирующих отдельные направления, поскольку последние нуждаются в помощи. 186. Эти конкурирующие требования еще более ярко выражены в случае заместителя Генерального секретаря и помощника Генерального секретаря, занимающихся операциями по поддержанию мира. Заместитель Генерального секретаря и помощник Генерального секретаря консультируют Генерального секретаря, поддерживают контакты с делегациями и столицами государств-членов, и кто-нибудь из них обязательно проверяет каждый доклад об операциях по поддержанию мира (40 докладов в первой половине 2000 года), представляемый Генеральному секретарю на утверждение и подписание до представления директивным органам. С января 2000 года эти два сотрудника более 50 раз лично выступали в Совете, причем эти выступления занимали до трех часов и требовали от сотрудников на местах и в Центральных учреждениях по несколько часов для подготовки. Кроме того, координационные совещания отнимают дополнительное время от обсуждения вопросов существа с полевыми миссиями, от визитов на места, от обдумывания способов повышения эффективности проводимой Организацией Объединенных Наций деятельности по поддержанию мира и от внимательного управления. 187. Еще более остро, чем среди сотрудников ДОПМ, занимающихся основной деятельностью, нехватка персонала, возможно, ощущается в областях административной поддержки и материально-технического обеспечения, в частности в ОУПОМТО. На данном этапе ОУПОМТО оказывает поддержку не только операциям по поддержанию мира, но и другим полевым отделениям, таким, как Канцелярия Специального координатора Организации Объединенных Наций на оккупированных территориях (ЮНСКО) в Газе, Контрольная миссия Организации Объединенных Наций в Гватемале (МИНУГУА) и десяток других мелких отделений, а также продолжает участвовать в управлении ликвидацией прекращенных миссий и выверке счетов. Все расходы ОУПОМТО составляют примерно 1,25 процента от совокупного объема расходов операций по поддержанию мира и других47 A/55/305 S/2000/809 полевых операций. Группа убеждена, что если бы Организации Объединенных Наций пришлось передать выполнение возложенных в настоящее время на ОУПОМТО функций административной поддержки и материально-технического обеспечения субподрядчику, ей пришлось бы серьезно потрудиться, чтобы отыскать коммерческую компанию, которая согласилась бы выполнять эквивалентную работу за эквивалентную плату. 188. Приведем несколько примеров, наглядно показывающих явную нехватку кадров в ОУПОМТО: Кадровая секция в Службе кадрового управления и поддержки (СКУП) ОУПОМТО, которая занимается набором кадров и организацией поездок всех гражданских сотрудников, а также поездок сотрудников гражданской полиции и военных наблюдателей, укомплектована всего десятью сотрудниками по набору кадров категории специалистов, четверым из которых было поручено каждый день рассматривать 150 незапрошенных заявок о приеме на работу, которые это подразделение теперь ежедневно получает, и подтверждать их получение. Остальные шесть сотрудников занимаются процессом фактического отбора кандидатов: один сотрудник в течение полного рабочего дня и один в течение половины рабочего дня отбирают кандидатов для Косово, один сотрудник в течение полного рабочего дня и один в течение половины рабочего дня — для Восточного Тимора, а остальные трое обеспечивают удовлетворение потребностей всех остальных полевых миссий. Три сотрудника по набору кадров пытаются выявить подходящих кандидатов для укомплектования штатов двух миссий гражданской администрации, которые нуждаются в сотнях опытных администраторов, специализирующихся в самых разных областях и отраслях. Через 9–12 месяцев после учреждения ни МООНК, ни ВАООНВТ не развернуты в полном объеме. 189. Государствам-членам надлежит дать Генеральному секретарю определенное поле для маневра и предоставить в его распоряжение финансовые ресурсы для набора требуемых ему сотрудников, с тем чтобы гарантировать, что авторитет Организации не будет подорван ее неспособностью реагировать на чрезвычайные обстоятельства так, как это должна делать профессиональная организация. Следует предоставить Генеральному секретарю ресурсы для укрепления потенциала Секретариата немедленно реагировать на непредвиденные потребности. 190. Ответственность за обеспечение сотрудников, работающих на местах, товарами и услугами, необходимыми им для выполнения своей работы, лежит главным образом на Службе материально-технического обеспечения и связи (СМТОС) ОУПОМТО. Для иллюстрации рабочей нагрузки, лежащей в настоящее время на всей этой Службе, полезно было бы привести описание должностных функций одного из 14 координаторов материально-технического обеспечения в СМТОС. Этот сотрудник является ведущим специалистом по планированию материально-технического обеспечения в связи с расширением миссии в Демократической Республике Конго (МООНДРК) и расширением Временных сил Организации Объединенных Наций в Ливане (ВСООНЛ). Он же отвечает за подготовку проекта процедур и политики в области материально-технического обеспечения для имеющей чрезвычайно важное значение Базы материально-технического снабжения Организации Объединенных Наций в Бриндизи и за координацию подготовки проекта годового бюджета всей Службы. 191. Руководствуясь результатами одного только этого беглого анализа и принимая во внимание тот факт, что совокупный объем вспомогательных расходов ДОПМ и соответствующих подразделений Центральных учреждений, занимающихся обеспечением операций по поддержанию мира, не превышает даже 50 млн. долл. США в год, Группа убеждена в том, что выделение этому Департаменту и другим подразделениям, оказывающим ему помощь, дополнительных ресурсов стало бы важным капиталовложением в обеспечение надлежащего расходования суммы, превышающей 2 млрд. долл. США, которую государства-члены выделят на операции по поддержанию мира в 2001 году. В этой связи Группа рекомендует значительно увеличить объем ресурсов, выделяемых на эти цели, и настоятельно призывает Генерального секретаря представить Генеральной Ассамблее предложение с изложением всех потребностей Организации в полном объеме. 192. Группа также убеждена в том, что пора прекратить рассматривать деятельность по48 A/55/305 S/2000/809 поддержанию мира как временную функцию, а ДОПМ как временную организационную структуру. Для того чтобы его деятельность не ограничивалась попытками удержать «на плаву» существующие миссии, необходимо обеспечить последовательный и предсказуемый базовый уровень финансирования. Департамент должен располагать ресурсами для подготовки планов на случай возможных чрезвычайных обстоятельств, которые могут возникнуть через 6–12 месяцев; для разработки инструментов управления в целях оказания миссиям содействия в повышении эффективности их будущей деятельности; для изучения потенциального воздействия современных технологий на различные аспекты деятельности по поддержанию мира; для учета опыта, приобретенного в ходе прежних операций; и для осуществления рекомендаций, содержащихся в подготовленных в последние пять лет докладах Управления служб внутреннего надзора об оценке. Следует предоставить сотрудникам возможность разрабатывать и внедрять программы профессиональной подготовки для вновь набранных сотрудников в Центральных учреждениях и на местах. Они должны завершить подготовку руководящих принципов и пособий, которые могли бы помочь новому персоналу миссий более профессионально выполнять свои функции в соответствии с правилами, положениями и процедурами Организации Объединенных Наций, но которые в настоящее время в «сыром» виде разбросаны по десяткам столов во всем ДОПМ, поскольку их авторы заняты удовлетворением других потребностей. 193. Поэтому Группа рекомендует рассматривать поддержку деятельности по поддержанию мира, оказываемую Центральными учреждениями, в качестве ключевой деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций и, соответственно, покрывать большинство потребностей в ресурсах в рамках механизма составления бюджета по программам на двухгодичный период. До подготовки следующего регулярного бюджета Организации Объединенных Наций она рекомендует Генеральному секретарю как можно скорее обратиться к Генеральной Ассамблее с просьбой о внеочередном дополнительном увеличении средств на вспомогательном счете. 194. Конкретное распределение ресурсов должно определяться с учетом профессионального и объективного анализа потребностей, однако совокупный объем должен отражать исторические тенденции в динамике деятельности по поддержанию мира. Один из подходов мог бы заключаться в определении базового уровня ассигнований из регулярного бюджета на обеспечиваемую Центральными учреждениями поддержку деятельности по поддержанию мира в качестве процентной доли от среднего уровня расходов на операции по поддержанию мира за предыдущие пять лет. Рассчитанный таким образом базовый бюджет отражал бы ожидаемый уровень деятельности, к которому должен быть готов Секретариат. Судя по данным, представленным Контролером (см. таблицу 4.1), средний уровень расходов за последние пять лет (включая текущий бюджетный год) составляет 1,4 млрд. долл. США. Если, например, установить базовый уровень равным 5 процентам от среднего объема расходов, то базовый бюджет составит 70 млн. долл. США, что примерно на 20 млн. долл. США превышает существующий в настоящее время годовой бюджет Центральных учреждений на вспомогательное обслуживание операций по поддержанию мира. 195. Для финансирования уровней деятельности, превышающих средний показатель, или «пиковых» нагрузок, следует рассмотреть возможность взимания простой процентной комиссии с миссий, бюджеты которых обусловливают увеличение объема расходов сверх базового уровня. Например, предусмотренные на нынешний бюджетный год расходы на деятельность по поддержанию мира, равные примерно 2,6 млрд. долл. США, на 1,2 млрд. долл. США превышают гипотетический базовый уровень в 1,4 млрд. долл. США. Установление 1-процентной надбавки на эту сумму в 1,2 млрд. долл. США обеспечит получение Центральными учреждениями дополнительно 12 млн. долл. США, что позволит им эффективно справиться с указанным увеличением. Двухпроцентная надбавка даст 24 млн. долл. США. 196. Такой прямой метод обеспечения покрытия «пиковых» нагрузок должен заменить используемую в настоящее время процедуру ежегодного обязательного обоснования каждой должности при представлении проекта бюджета по вспомогательному счету. Следует дать49 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Генеральному секретарю возможность гибко подходить к определению того, как наилучшим образом использовать такие средства в ответ на резкое увеличение масштабов деятельности, и применять в таких случаях чрезвычайные меры по набору персонала, с тем чтобы обеспечивать возможность незамедлительного заполнения временных должностей в связи с резким ростом потребностей. 197. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении финансирования поддержки операций по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениях: a) Группа рекомендует существенно увеличить объем ресурсов для поддержки операций по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениях и настоятельно призывает Генерального секретаря представить Генеральной Ассамблее предложение с изложением всех своих потребностей; b) поддержка деятельности по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениях должна рассматриваться в качестве ключевой деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций, и поэтому большинство потребностей Организации в ресурсах для указанной цели должно покрываться в рамках механизма составления ее регулярного бюджета по программам на двухгодичный период; с) до подготовки следующего регулярного бюджета Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю обратиться к Генеральной Ассамблее с просьбой о внеочередном дополнительном увеличении средств на вспомогательном счете, с тем чтобы можно было безотлагательно набрать дополнительный персонал, в частности в ДОПМ. B. Необходимость создания комплексных целевых групп по подготовке миссий и предложение об их создании 198. В настоящее время в Департаменте операций по поддержанию мира отсутствует какая-либо единая структура, которая занималась бы вопросами планирования или поддержки миссий и в которой были бы представлены те, кто отвечает, в частности, за политический анализ, военные операции, деятельность гражданской полиции, деятельность в области прав человека и развития, гуманитарную помощь, помощь беженцам и перемещенным лицам, общественную информацию, материально-техническое обеспечение, финансы и набор персонала. Напротив, как указывалось выше, в ДОПМ имеется лишь весьма ограниченное число сотрудников, на постоянное основе занимающихся планированием и поддержкой даже таких крупных комплексных операций, как операции в Сьерра-Леоне (МООНСЛ), Косово (МООНК) и Восточном Тиморе (ВАООНВТ). Что касается политического обеспечения миссий в пользу мира или миростроительства, то эти функции выполняются в рамках ДПВ с использованием столь же ограниченных кадровых ресурсов. 199. Управление операцией ДОПМ отвечает за выработку общей концепции операций новых миссий по поддержанию мира. В этой связи оно несет тяжелое двойное бремя проведения политического анализа и обеспечения внутренней координации с другими подразделениями ДОПМ, которые отвечают за военные вопросы и деятельность гражданской полиции, материально-техническое обеспечение, финансы и персонал. Однако в каждом из этих подразделений существует отдельная организационная структура подчиненности и многие из этих подразделений географически разбросаны, размещаясь в нескольких зданиях. Кроме того, при планировании всех будущих операций, особенно комплексных операций, все более важную роль будут играть ДПВ, ПРООН, УКГД, УВКБ, УВКПЧ, ДОИ и ряд других департаментов, учреждений, фондов и программ, которых необходимо официально подключать к процессу планирования. 200. Сотрудничество между отделами, департаментами и учреждениями имеет место, однако чрезмерно зависит от личных контактов и эпизодической поддержки. Существуют целевые группы, создаваемые для планирования крупных операций по поддержанию мира и объединяющие представителей различных компонентов системы, однако они функционируют в большей степени как дискуссионные форумы, чем как исполнительные органы. Кроме того, существующие целевые группы как правило встречаются весьма редко или50 A/55/305 S/2000/809 даже прекращают свою работу, как только начинается развертывание операции и задолго до того, как она будет полностью развернута. 201. С другой стороны, после развертывания операции СПГС на местах полномочны обеспечивать общую координацию деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций в районе своей миссии, однако у них нет единого координационного контакта на рабочем уровне в Центральных учреждениях, через который они могли бы быстро решать свои проблемы. Например, сотрудник по оперативным вопросам или его/ее региональный директор в ДОПМ занимаются политическими вопросами операций по поддержанию мира, однако обычно не могут самостоятельно ответить на запросы в отношении военных, полицейских, гуманитарных, избирательных, правовых элементов, элементов в области прав человека и других элементов операции, и они не всегда имеют возможность оперативно обратиться к коллегам, курирующим каждую из этих областей. Миссия, которой срочно необходимы ответы, в конечном счете сама установит прямые контакты, и она может делать это в десятках случаях, налаживая свои собственные контакты с различными подразделениями Секретариата и соответствующими учреждениями. 202. Миссии не должны испытывать необходимость в создании своей собственной контактной сети. Они должны точно знать, к кому обратиться за необходимыми им ответами и поддержкой, особенно в решающие первые месяцы, когда миссия решает вопросы полного развертывания и ежедневно сталкивается с проблемами. Кроме того, они должны иметь возможность получить ответ на эти вопросы в одном месте, в структуре, которая включала бы весь необходимый для миссии вспомогательный персонал и специалистов, представляющих самые разнообразные подразделения Центральных учреждений, и состав которой отражал бы функции самой миссии. Группа назвала бы это подразделение комплексной целевой группой по подготовке миссии (КЦГМ). 203. Эта идея отражает, а также значительно расширяет те меры по сотрудничеству, которые предусмотрены в руководящих принципах реализации идеи «ведущего» департамента, которые были согласованы ДОПМ и ДПВ в июне 2000 года на совместном междепартаментском совещании под председательством Генерального секретаря. Группа рекомендовала бы, например, чтобы ДОПМ и ДПВ совместно подбирали руководителя каждой новой целевой группы, но необязательно ограничивали свой выбор имеющимися в этих двух департаментах сотрудниками. Возможны случаи, когда из-за текущей рабочей нагрузки региональные директоры или сотрудники по политическим вопросам в этих департаментах не смогут полноценно выполнять эту роль. В этих случаях может оказаться целесообразным привлечь для этой цели кого-либо с мест. Такая гибкость, включая гибкость в возложении задачи на наиболее квалифицированного с точки зрения выполнения работы сотрудника потребует утверждения механизмов финансирования для реагирования на «пиковый» спрос, как это рекомендуется выше. 204. ИКМБ или выделенная в его составе подгруппа должны коллективно определять общий состав КЦГМ, которую, по мнению Группы, следует формировать на достаточно ранних этапах процесса предотвращения конфликта, миротворчества, поддержания мира или создания в перспективе отделений для поддержки миростроительства. То есть концепция комплексной централизованной поддержки деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций в области мира и безопасности на местах должна охватывать весь диапазон операций в пользу мира, и размер КЦГМ, ее основной состав, место проведения ее заседаний и ее руководство должны отвечать потребностям операции. 205. Концепция руководящей роли и ведущего департамента создавала ряд проблем ранее, когда основное предназначение присутствия Организации Объединенных Наций на местах менялось с политического на миротворческое или наоборот, что приводило не только к смене основной контактной структуры для миссии в Центральных учреждениях, но и к смене всего вспомогательного персонала в Центральных учреждениях. Группа полагает, что при работе КЦГМ вспомогательный персонал будет оставаться практически неизменным как в ходе, так и после таких переходных изменений с добавлениями или исключениями по ходу изменения характера операции, но с сохранением ключевого персонала целевой группы на тех направлениях, которые обеспечивают такой переход. Руководство КЦГМ будет переходить от51 A/55/305 S/2000/809 одного члена группы к другому (например, от регионального директора или сотрудника по политическим вопросам ДОПВ к его или ее коллеге из ДПВ). 206. Размер и состав Группы будет соответствовать характеру и этапу поддерживаемой на местах деятельности. Действия, связанные с предотвращением кризиса, потребуют хорошо информированной политической поддержки, которая обеспечит постоянное информирование представителя Организации Объединенных Наций о развитии политической ситуации в рамках региона, о других факторах, играющих ключевую роль с точки зрения успеха его или ее усилий. Миротворцам, стремящимся урегулировать конфликт, будет необходимо больше информации о вариантах поддержания мира и миростроительства, с тем чтобы как их возможности, так и их ограничения находили отражение в любом мирном соглашении, которое будет предусматривать его осуществление Организацией Объединенных Наций. Советники-наблюдатели из Секретариата, работающие с миротворцами, будут связаны с КЦГМ, которая обеспечивает поддержку переговоров, и будут информировать ее о достигнутом прогрессе. Руководитель КЦГМ сможет в свою очередь поддерживать каждодневный контакт с миротворцами в Центральных учреждениях, обеспечивая им быстрый доступ к руководству Секретариата для получения ответа на сложные политические вопросы. 207. КЦГМ такого характера, о котором говорилось выше, могла бы быть «виртуальным» органом, члены которого встречаются периодически, но физически не сосредоточены в одном помещении, работают на своих обычных рабочих местах и связываются между собой с помощью современных информационных технических средств. Для обеспечения поддержки своей работы каждый из них должен пополнять, а также использовать данные и аналитические материалы, подготавливаемые и размещаемые во внутриорганизационной сети Организации Объединенных Наций ИСИСА, Секретариатом ИКМБ, по информационно-стратегическому анализу, который предлагается в пунктах 65–75 выше. 208. КЦГМ, создаваемые для планирования возможных операций в пользу мира, могли бы также начинать свою работу в качестве «виртуальных» органов. По мере повышения вероятности развертывания операции Целевая группа должна приобретать физические очертания с размещением в одном помещении всех ее членов, готовых работать совместно в качестве команды на постоянной основе до тех пор, пока это необходимо для обеспечения полного развертывания новой миссии. Этот период может составлять до шести месяцев при условии, что будут проведены реформы в целях обеспечения быстрого развертывания, рекомендованные в пунктах 84–169 выше. 209. На указанный период члены Целевой группы должны официально откомандировываться в состав КЦГМ из своих отделов, департаментов, учреждений, фондов или программ. То есть КЦГМ должна быть не просто координационным комитетом или целевой группой того типа, который в настоящее время используется в Центральных учреждениях. Она должна располагать временным, но сплоченным коллективом, сформированным для достижения конкретной цели с возможностью расширения или уменьшения ее размера или изменения состава с учетом потребностей миссии. 210. Каждый член Целевой группы должен быть уполномочен выступать не только в качестве сотрудника связи между Целевой группой и направившим его или ее подразделением, но и являться ключевым ее членом, принимающим на рабочем уровне решения по данной миссии. Руководитель КЦГМ, подчиняющийся помощнику Генерального секретаря по операциям из ДОПМ в случае операций по поддержанию мира и соответствующему помощнику Генерального секретаря из ДПВ в случае миротворческих усилий, отделений по поддержке миростроительства и специальных политических миссий, должен в свою очередь являться непосредственным руководителем для членов его или ее Целевой группы на период их откомандирования и должен являться для операций в пользу мира самой первой инстанцией по всем аспектам их работы. Вопросы, касающиеся долгосрочной политики и стратегии, должны решаться на уровне помощника заместителя Генерального секретаря в ИКМБ при поддержке ИСИСА.52 A/55/305 S/2000/809 211. Чтобы система Организации Объединенных Наций была готова предоставлять сотрудников КЦГМ, в рамках каждого крупного основного компонента операций по поддержанию мира следует назначить центральное ответственное подразделение. Департаментам и учреждениям необходимо заранее согласовать процедуры откомандирования и договориться о поддержке КЦГМ, если необходимо в письменной форме. 212. Группа не готова предложить «ведущие» подразделения по каждому возможному компоненту операции в пользу мира, однако считает, что ИКМБ следует коллективно продумать этот вопрос и назначить одного из своих членов ответственным за поддержание готовности каждого возможного компонента операции в пользу мира в областях, помимо военных вопросов, полицейской деятельности и работы судебной системы и материально-технического/административного обеспечения, за которые должен по-прежнему отвечать ДОПМ. Назначенное ведущее учреждение должно отвечать за выработку общих концепций операции, подготовку описаний должностных обязанностей, определение потребностей в персонале и оборудовании, составление важнейших маршрутов/графиков развертывания, стандартных баз данных, резервных соглашений по гражданскому персоналу и списков других потенциальных кандидатов для указанного компонента, а также для участия в работе КЦГМ. 213. КЦГМ обеспечивает гибкий подход к удовлетворению срочных, ресурсоемких, но в конечном счете временных потребностей в связи с поддержкой процесса планирования миссии, ее начального этапа и первоначального обеспечения. В этой концепции широко используется понятие «матричного управления», которое широко применяется крупными организациями, когда им требуется выделить необходимых специалистов для выполнения конкретных проектов без проведения реорганизации каждый раз, когда появляется какой-либо проект. Эта концепция, которая используется такими разными учреждениями, как корпорация РЭНД и Всемирный банк, дает каждому сотруднику «свой» постоянный департамент, однако допускает, а фактически и предполагает то, что сотрудники по мере необходимости будут заниматься поддержкой осуществления проектов. Подход к планированию и поддержке операций в пользу мира в Центральных учреждениях на основе матричного управления позволит департаментам, учреждениям, фондам и программам, внутренняя структура которых отвечает их основным потребностям, выделять сотрудников в состав объединенных междепартаментских/межучрежденческих целевых групп, создаваемых для оказания такой поддержки. 214. Структура КЦГМ может иметь значительные последствия с точки зрения нынешней структуры Управления операций ДОПМ и фактически может прийти на смену структуре региональных отделов. Например, в случае крупных операций, таких, как операции в Сьерра-Леоне, Восточном Тиморе и Косово, было бы оправдано создавать отдельные КЦГМ, возглавляемые сотрудниками на уровне директора. Другие миссии, такие, как давно созданные «традиционные» операции по поддержанию мира в Азии и на Ближнем Востоке, могли бы быть сгруппированы и отнесены к ведению другой КЦГМ. Количество КЦГМ, которые могли бы быть сформированы, будет в основном зависеть от объема выделяемых ДОПМ, ДПВ и смежным департаментам, учреждениям, фондам и программам дополнительных ресурсов. По мере увеличения числа КЦГМ организационная структура Управления операций станет более плоской. Возможны аналогичные последствия для помощников Генерального секретаря в ДПВ, которым будут подчиняться руководители КЦГМ на этапе миротворческой деятельности или при создании крупной операции по поддержке миростроительства либо после операции по поддержанию мира, либо в качестве отдельной инициативы. 215. Хотя региональные директора в ДОПМ (и в ДПВ в тех случаях, когда они назначаются в качестве руководителей КЦГМ) будут отвечать за осуществление надзора над меньшим числом миссий, чем в настоящее время, они будут фактически руководить большим числом сотрудников, таких, как те, кто откомандирован для работы в течение полного рабочего дня из подразделений советников по вопросам военной и гражданской полиции, ОУПОМТО (или отделов, которые его сменят), а также других департаментов, учреждений, фондов и программ, если возникнет такая необходимость. Размер КЦГМ будет также зависеть от объема выделенных дополнительных ресурсов, без которых участвующие подразделения53 A/55/305 S/2000/809 не смогут откомандировать своих сотрудников для работы в течение полного рабочего дня. 216. Следует также отметить, что для эффективной работы КЦГМ ее члены должны быть физически сосредоточены в одном помещении на этапах планирования и первоначального развертывания. Это не представляется возможным в настоящее время без существенного изменения нынешнего распределения служебных помещений в Секретариате. 217. Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении комплексного планирования и поддержки миссий: комплексные целевые группы по планированию миссий (КЦГМ), члены которых откомандировываются, при необходимости, из различных подразделений системы Организации Объединенных Наций, должны быть стандартным механизмом осуществления планирования и поддержки конкретных миссий. КЦГМ должны выступать в качестве первой инстанции для контакта по всем вопросам такой поддержки, и руководители КЦГМ должны временно являться непосредственными руководителями откомандированных сотрудников в соответствии с соглашениями между ДОПМ, ДПВ и другими участвующими департаментами, программами, фондами и учреждениями. C. Прочие структурные изменения, необходимые в ДОПМ 218. Концепция КЦГМ укрепит потенциал Управления операций ДОПМ с точки зрения выполнения функций реального координатора всех аспектов той или иной операции по поддержанию мира. Однако также необходимы структурные изменения в других элементах ДОПМ, в частности в Отделе военной и гражданской полиции, ОУПОМТО и Группе обобщения опыта. 1. Отдел военной и гражданской полиции 219. Все опрошенные сотрудники Центральных учреждений и на местах, занимающиеся вопросами деятельности гражданской полиции, выразили неудовлетворенность тем, что функции, связанные с деятельностью полиции в ДОПМ, включены в военную цепочку управления. Группа согласна с тем, что в такой системе, как представляется, мало административного или практического смысла. 220. Военные и гражданские полицейские работают в ДОПМ три года, поскольку Организация Объединенных Наций требует, чтобы они находились на действительной службе. Если они хотят остаться на более длительное время и для этого даже готовы уйти со своей национальной военной или полицейской службы, кадровая политика Организации Объединенных Наций не разрешает набирать их на ранее занимаемые ими должности. Поэтому в подразделениях военной и гражданской полиции в ДОПМ велика текучесть. Поскольку накопленный опыт не находит своего регулярного отражения в практической деятельности Центральных учреждений, поскольку всесторонние программы профессиональной подготовки новых сотрудников отсутствуют и поскольку так и не завершена работа над удобными в пользовании справочниками и стандартными процедурами оперативной деятельности, высокая текучесть означает регулярную утрату институциональной памяти, для восполнения которой требуются месяцы практической работы. Нынешняя нехватка персонала также означает, что военным и гражданским полицейским поручают функции, которые не всегда соответствуют их профессиональному опыту. Те, кто специализировался на операциях (J3) или планировании (J5), могут столкнуться с необходимостью заниматься квазидипломатической работой или функционировать в качестве кадровых и административных сотрудников (J1), решая вопросы, связанные с постоянной сменой сотрудников и подразделений на местах, в ущерб своей способности осуществлять контроль над оперативной деятельностью на местах. 221. Отсутствие в ДОПМ преемственности в этих вопросах может также объяснить то, почему ДОПМ, уже 50 лет направляя военных наблюдателей для контроля за соблюдением соглашений о прекращении огня, до сих пор не имеет стандартной базы данных, которую можно было бы предоставить в распоряжение военных наблюдателей на местах для регистрации нарушений прекращения огня и ведения статистической отчетности. В настоящее время, если кому-то захочется узнать, сколько нарушений имело место за 6-месячный период в той или иной54 A/55/305 S/2000/809 конкретной стране, где осуществляется операция, придется физически подсчитывать бумажные экземпляры ежедневных сводок событий за этот период. Там, где такие базы данных существуют, они создавались самими миссиями на индивидуальной основе. То же самое можно сказать о разнообразной статистике преступности и другой информации, общей для большинства миссий гражданской полиции. Технический прогресс также радикально изменил возможности контроля за нарушениями прекращения огня и передвижениями в демилитаризованной зоне и извлечением оружия из мест хранения. Однако в настоящее время в Отделе военной и гражданской полиции ДОПМ никому не поручено заниматься решением этих вопросов. 222. Группа рекомендует разделить Отдел военной и гражданской полиции на два отдельных подразделения: одно — военной, а другое — гражданской полиции. Канцелярию Военного советника в ДОПМ следует расширить, а ее структуру изменить таким образом, чтобы она ближе соответствовала структуре военных штабов операций Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира для обеспечения более эффективной поддержки операции на месте и предоставления более полных военных консультаций руководству Секретариата. Группе гражданской полиции также следует выделить значительные дополнительные ресурсы и рассмотреть вопрос о повышении ранга и уровня советника по вопросам гражданской полиции. 223. Для обеспечения минимально необходимой преемственности в подразделениях военной и гражданской полиции Департамента операций по поддержанию мира Группа рекомендует зарезервировать определенную долю дополнительных должностей в этих двух подразделениях для военных и гражданских полицейских, которые имеют опыт работы в Организации Объединенных Наций и недавно покинули свои национальные службы, с тем чтобы их назначить в качестве обычных сотрудников. Это соответствует прецеденту Службы материально-технического обеспечения и связи ОУПОМТО, в которой работает несколько бывших армейских офицеров. 224. Гражданские полицейские на местах все чаще занимаются вопросами перестройки и реформирования местных полицейских сил, и Группа рекомендует внести изменения в концептуальные подходы, чтобы сделать такую деятельность центральной для гражданской полиции в будущих операциях в пользу мира (см. пункты 39, 40 и 47(b) выше). Однако пока Группа гражданской полиции занимается планированием и определением потребностей полицейских компонентов операции в пользу мира, не имея необходимой консультативной правовой помощи по вопросам местных судебных структур, уголовного права, кодексов и процедур, действующих в соответствующей стране. Эта информация исключительно важна для тех, кто планирует деятельность гражданской полиции, однако до сих пор со вспомогательного счета ресурсы на эту деятельность не выделялись ни для УПВ, ни для ДОПМ или любого другого департамента Секретариата. 225. Поэтому Группа рекомендует создать в ДОПМ новое отдельное подразделение, укомплектованное необходимыми специалистами в области уголовного права, особенно для целей оказания консультативной помощи подразделению, которое возглавляет советник по вопросам гражданской полиции, по тем вопросам господства права, которые играют решающую роль в обеспечении эффективного использования гражданской полиции в операциях в пользу мира. Это подразделение должно также тесно сотрудничать с Управлением Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека в Женеве, Управлением по контролю над наркотиками и предупреждению преступности в Вене и другими учреждениями системы Организации Объединенных Наций, которые занимаются реформой правоохранительных учреждений и вопросами соблюдения прав человека. 2. Отдел управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения 226. ОУПОМТО не уполномочен ни составлять в окончательном виде и представлять бюджеты планируемых им полевых операций, ни осуществлять фактическую закупку необходимых им товаров и услуг. Этими полномочиями наделены Отдел по финансированию операций по поддержанию мира и Отдел закупок ДУ. Все подаваемые в Центральных учреждениях заявки на55 A/55/305 S/2000/809 закупки обрабатываются в Отделе закупок 16 сотрудниками по закупкам, должности которых финансируются со вспомогательного счета и которые готовят крупные контракты (примерно 300 в 1999 году) для представления Комитету по контрактам Центральных учреждений, ведут переговоры и заключают контракты на товары и услуги, не закупаемые на месте полевыми миссиями, и разрабатывают политику и процедуры Организации Объединенных Наций в отношении как глобальных закупок, так и закупок на месте. Как представляется, сочетание кадровых трудностей и лишних этапов, предусмотренных в этом процессе, ведет к задержкам в закупочной деятельности, о которых сообщают полевые миссии. 227. Эффективность закупочной деятельности можно было бы повысить путем делегирования ДОПМ на пробный двухлетний период полномочий по составлению и представлению бюджета операций по поддержанию мира, выделению утвержденных средств и проведению закупок с соответствующим переводом должностей и сотрудников. С тем чтобы обеспечить подотчетность и транспарентность, ДУ должен сохранить полномочия, связанные со счетами, начислением взносов государствам-членам и казначейскими функциями. Он также должен сохранить свою общую роль в плане выработки политики и обеспечения контроля, которую он выполняет в вопросах набора полевого персонала и управления им, в вопросах, полномочия и ответственность за решение которых уже делегированы ДОПМ. 228. Кроме того, с тем чтобы избежать обвинений в нарушениях, которые возможны в связи с тем, что те, кто отвечает за составление бюджета и проведение закупок, работают в том же департаменте, что и те, кто определяет потребности, Группа рекомендует разделить ОУПОМТО на два отдела: Отдел административного обслуживания, в котором были бы сосредоточены функции в области персонала, бюджета/финансов и закупочной деятельности, и Отдел комплексного вспомогательного обслуживания (например, материально-техническое обеспечение, транспорт, связь). 3. Группа обобщения опыта 229. Все согласны с необходимостью использовать накопленный опыт деятельности на местах, однако еще недостаточно делается для повышения способности системы задействовать этот опыт или учесть его при разработке оперативной доктрины, планов, процедур или мандатов. Как представляется, деятельность существующей Группы обобщения опыта ДОПМ не оказала сколь-нибудь значительного воздействия на практику осуществления операций в пользу мира, и, как представляется, обобщение накопленного опыта происходит в основном после завершения миссии. Такое положение дел вызывает сожаление, поскольку система поддержания мира ежедневно дает новый опыт и новые уроки. Этот опыт следует обобщать и сохранять для использования в других текущих и будущих операциях. Изучение опыта следует рассматривать в качестве одного из аспектов управления информацией, которое способствует повышению эффективности операций на текущей основе. Отчеты о проведенной деятельности будут в этом случае являться лишь одной из частей более широкого процесса расширения знаний, кратким обобщением результатов, а не главной целью всего процесса. 230. Группа считает, что эту деятельность настоятельно необходимо совершенствовать, и рекомендует выполнять ее там, где она может быть тесно увязана с текущими операциями и эффективно использована при их осуществлении, а также при планировании миссий и выработке доктрины/руководящих принципов. Группа полагает, что лучше всего для этого подходит Управление операций, которое будет осуществлять надзор над функционированием КЦГМ, предлагаемых Группой для обеспечения комплексного подхода к планированию и поддержке операций в пользу мира в Центральных учреждениях (см. пункты 198–217 выше). Эта группа, располагаясь в одном из подразделений Департамента операций по поддержанию мира, в котором на регулярной основе будут работать представители многих департаментов и учреждений, может выступать в роли «руководителя процесса обучения» по операциям в пользу мира для всех этих подразделений, поддерживая и обновляя институциональную память, на которую как миссии, так и полевые56 A/55/305 S/2000/809 группы могли бы опираться для решения проблем, обобщения передового опыта, а также с тем, чтобы избежать повторения ошибок. 4. Старшие руководители 231. В ДОПМ в настоящее время имеется два помощника Генерального секретаря: один в Управлении операций, а другой — в Управлении по вопросам материально-технического обеспечения, управления и деятельности, связанной с разминированием (ОУПОМТО и Служба разминирования). Военный советник, который одновременно является директором Отдела военной и гражданской полиции, в настоящее время представляет доклад заместителю Генерального секретаря по операциям по поддержанию мира через одного из двух помощников Генерального секретаря или непосредственно заместителю Генерального секретаря в зависимости от характера соответствующего вопроса. 232. С учетом различных увеличений штатов и структурных изменений, предлагаемых в предыдущих разделах Группа считает, что существуют веские доводы в пользу выделения Департаменту третьей должности помощника Генерального секретаря. Группа далее считает, что один из помощников Генерального секретаря должен быть назначен в качестве «первого помощника Генерального секретаря» и должен функционировать в качестве заместителя заместителя Генерального секретаря. 233. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении прочих структурных изменений в ДОПМ: a) структуру нынешнего Отдела военной и гражданской полиции следует изменить, выведя Группу гражданской полиции из военной цепочки управления. Следует рассмотреть вопрос о повышении ранга и уровня советника по вопросам гражданской полиции; b) структуру Канцелярии военного советника в ДОПМ следует изменить, с тем чтобы она ближе соответствовала структуре полевых военных штабов операций Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира; c) в ДОПМ следует создать новое подразделение и укомплектовать его соответствующими специалистами для предоставления консультаций по вопросам уголовного права, которые исключительно важны для эффективного использования гражданской полиции в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира; d) заместителю Генерального секретаря по вопросам управления следует делегировать заместителю Генерального секретаря по вопросам операций по поддержанию мира на пробный двухлетний период полномочия и ответственность в области составления бюджета и осуществления закупок в связи с деятельностью по поддержанию мира; e) Группу обобщения опыта следует значительно укрепить и перевести в состав Управления операций ДОПМ; f) следует рассмотреть вопрос о том, чтобы увеличить число должностей уровня помощника Генерального секретаря в ДОПМ с двух до трех и назначить одного из трех «главным помощником Генерального секретаря», который выполнял бы функции заместителя заместителя Генерального секретаря. D. Структурная реорганизация, которую необходимо осуществить за пределами Департамента операций по поддержанию мира 234. В Центральных учреждениях необходимо укрепить планирование и поддержку деятельности в области общественной информации, а также те подразделения в ДПВ, которые обеспечивают поддержку и координацию мероприятий в области миростроительства и оказывают помощь в проведении выборов. Вне структуры Секретариата следует укрепить возможности Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека в области планирования и поддержки компонентов операций в пользу мира, связанных с правами человека. 1. Оперативная поддержка деятельности в области общественной информации57 A/55/305 S/2000/809 235. В отличие от компонентов миссий, связанных с военными аспектами, гражданской полицией, разминированием, материально-техническим обеспечением, телекоммуникацией и иными аспектами, в Центральных учреждениях нет ни одного подразделения, которое конкретно отвечало бы за удовлетворение оперативных потребностей компонентов операций в пользу мира, связанных с общественной информацией. В наиболее сконцентрированном виде ответственность за деятельность в области общественной информации в контексте миссий лежит на Канцелярии Пресс-секретаря Генерального секретаря и соответствующих пресс-секретарях и сотрудниках по общественной информации самих миссий. В Центральных учреждениях за подготовку публикаций, размещение и обновление на Web-сайте материалов об операциях в пользу мира и решение других вопросов, начиная с разоружения и кончая гуманитарной помощью, отвечают четыре сотрудника категории специалистов в Секции по вопросам мира и безопасности, входящей в состав Службы распространения информации и планирования Отдела по связям с общественностью ДОИ. Хотя эта Секция готовит и обновляет информацию о миротворческой деятельности, ее возможности в плане разработки доктрины, стратегии или стандартных оперативных процедур в отношении функций в области общественной информации на местах весьма ограничены — она в состоянии делать это нерегулярно и в какой-то конкретной ситуации. 236. В настоящее время Секция по вопросам мира и безопасности в ДОИ несколько расширяется за счет перераспределения сотрудников внутри Департамента, однако следует либо существенно расширить эту Секцию, с тем чтобы она заработала эффективно, либо передать функцию поддержки ДОПМ, возможно, прикомандировав некоторых ее сотрудников из ДОИ. 237. Какое бы подразделение ни выполняло эту функцию, оно должно прогнозировать потребности в общественной информации и технические и людские ресурсы, необходимые для их удовлетворения, определять приоритеты и стандартные оперативные процедуры на местах, оказывать поддержку на начальном этапе развертывания новых миссий и обеспечивать постоянную поддержку и руководство посредством участия в работе комплексных целевых групп по подготовке миссий. 238. Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении структурной реорганизации в области общественной информации: либо в рамках ДОПМ, либо в рамках новой информационной службы по вопросам мира и безопасности в составе ДОИ, подчиняющейся непосредственно заместителю Генерального секретаря по коммуникации и общественной информации, следует создать подразделение по оперативному планированию и поддержке деятельности в области общественной информации в рамках операций в пользу мира. 2. Поддержка деятельности в области миростроительства в Департаменте по политическим вопросам 239. На Департамент по политическим вопросам (ДПВ) возложена функция центра по координации в Организации Объединенных Наций усилий по миростроительству, и в настоящее время он отвечает за создание и поддержку отделений по вопросам миростроительства и специальных политических миссий в десятках стран и/или за оказание им консультативной помощи, а также за деятельность пяти посланников и представителей Генерального секретаря, которым поручено заниматься вопросами установления мира и предотвращения конфликтов. Ожидается, что размер средств по регулярному бюджету, выделенных на финансирование этих мероприятий до конца следующего календарного года, будет меньше необходимого уровня на 31 млн. долл. США или на 25 процентов. Более того, такое финансирование за счет начисленных взносов является относительно редким явлением в деятельности по миростроительству, где большинство мероприятий финансируются за счет добровольных взносов. 240. Одним из таких мероприятий является создание в ДПВ Группы поддержки миростроительства. В своем качестве назначенного организатора работы Исполнительного комитета по вопросам мира и безопасности и координатора стратегий в области миростроительства заместитель Генерального секретаря по политическим вопросам должен быть в состоянии координировать разработку таких стратегий с членами ИКМБ и58 A/55/305 S/2000/809 другими подразделениями системы Организации Объединенных Наций, особенно с теми, которые занимаются вопросами развития и гуманитарной деятельности, учитывая комплексный характер самого миростроительства. С этой целью Секретариат занимается мобилизацией добровольных взносов от ряда доноров на осуществление в течение трех лет экспериментального проекта, предназначенного для оказания поддержки этому подразделению. Сейчас, когда это экспериментальное подразделение находится в стадии планирования, Группа обращается к ДПВ с настоятельным призывом проконсультироваться со всеми заинтересованными участниками в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций, которые могут внести свой вклад в его успешную работу, особенно с ПРООН, которая уделяет сейчас повышенное внимание вопросам демократии/управления и другим вопросам, связанным с деятельностью на переходном этапе. 241. Исполнительная канцелярия ДПВ оказывает поддержку некоторым оперативным мероприятиям, за которые отвечает ДПВ, однако она не наделена соответствующими функциями и не оснащена необходимыми средствами для того, чтобы служить в качестве отделения по оказанию поддержки на местах. ОУПОМТО также оказывает поддержку некоторым полевым миссиям, руководство которыми осуществляет ДПВ, однако ни бюджеты этих миссий, ни бюджет ДПВ не предусматривают выделение ОУПОМТО дополнительных ресурсов на эти цели. ОУПОМТО пытается удовлетворять потребности менее крупных операций по поддержанию мира, но признает при этом, что его нынешние кадровые ресурсы используются главным образом для решения приоритетных задач, стоящих перед более крупными операциями. Это делается, как правило, в ущерб менее крупным миссиям. В ДПВ накоплен положительный опыт работы при содействии Управления Организации Объединенных Наций по обслуживанию проектов (ЮНОПС) — подразделения, которое пять лет назад было выделено из состава ПРООН и которое управляет сейчас программами и фондами по поручению многих заказчиков в системе Организации Объединенных Наций с использованием современных методов управления, при этом все свои основные финансовые средства оно получает за счет комиссионных в размере до 13 процентов, взимаемых за оказываемые им управленческие услуги. ЮНОПС в состоянии достаточно быстро организовать материально-техническое обеспечение, управление и помощь в наборе персонала для менее крупной миссии. 242. Отдел по оказанию помощи в проведении выборов (ОПВ) ДПВ также полагается на добровольные взносы в деле удовлетворения растущих потребностей в его технических консультациях, осуществления миссий по оценке потребностей и проведения других мероприятий, напрямую не связанных с наблюдением за проведением выборов. По состоянию на июнь 2000 года от государств-членов поступила 41 заявка на оказание помощи, однако в целевом фонде, предназначенном для оказания поддержки таким «непредусмотренным» мероприятиям, средства имелись лишь в размере всего 8 процентов от того уровня, который требуется для удовлетворения текущих потребностей до конца календарного 2001 года. Таким образом сейчас, когда резко возрос спрос на один из ключевых элементов строительства демократических институтов, который был одобрен Генеральной Ассамблеей в резолюции 46/137, сотрудники ОПВ должны сначала мобилизовать средства по программе, необходимые для выполнения поставленных перед ними задач. 243. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении поддержки миростроительства в Департаменте по политическим вопросам: а) Группа поддерживает усилия, предпринимаемые Секретариатом по созданию в рамках ДПВ в сотрудничестве с другими элементами Организации Объединенных Наций экспериментального подразделения по миростроительству, и предлагает государствам-членам вернуться к вопросу о финансировании этого подразделения по линии регулярного бюджета в том случае, если результаты экспериментальной программы окажутся успешными. Эту программу следует оценить в контексте рекомендации Группы в пункте 46 выше и, в том случае, если ее сочтут наиболее оптимальным вариантом укрепления потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций в области миростроительства, ее следует представить Генеральному секретарю, как это рекомендовано в пункте 47(d) выше;59 A/55/305 S/2000/809 b) Группа рекомендует вместо добровольных взносов значительно увеличить объем средств, выделяемых по линии регулярного бюджета на программы Отдела по оказанию помощи в проведении выборов, с тем чтобы он мог оперативно удовлетворять потребности в его услугах; с) в целях уменьшения нагрузки на ОУПОМТО и исполнительную канцелярию ДПВ и повышения качества обслуживания менее крупных полевых отделений, занимающихся политическими аспектами и аспектами миростроительства, Группа рекомендует, чтобы вопросами закупок, материально-технического обеспечения, набора персонала и другими вопросами обслуживания всех таких менее крупных полевых миссий, не связанных с решением военных задач, занималось Управление Организации Объединенных Наций по обслуживанию проектов (ЮНОПС). 3. Поддержка операций в пользу мира в Управлении Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека 244. УВКПЧ следует более активно участвовать в планировании и осуществлении тех элементов операций в пользу мира, которые связаны с правами человека, особенно в тех случаях, когда речь идет о комплексных операциях. В настоящее время это Управление не располагает адекватными ресурсами для такого участия или выделения персонала для работы на местах. Чтобы у операций Организации Объединенных Наций были эффективные компоненты, связанные с правами человека, УВКПЧ должно быть в состоянии координировать и институционализировать деятельность в области прав человека на местах в рамках операций в пользу мира; прикомандировать персонал в состав комплексных целевых групп по подготовке миссий в Нью-Йорке; набирать персонал по вопросам прав человека для работы на местах; организовывать подготовку всего персонала операций в пользу мира по вопросам прав человека, включая компоненты, связанные с обеспечением правопорядка; и создавать типовые базы данных о деятельности в области прав человека на местах. 245. Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении укрепления Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека: Группа рекомендует значительно укрепить потенциал Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека в области планирования и подготовки полевых миссий, при этом финансирование должно осуществляться частично по линии регулярного бюджета, а частично по линии бюджета операций в пользу мира. V. Операции в пользу мира в информационный век 246. Через многие части настоящего доклада красной нитью проходит мысль о необходимости лучше увязывать между собой вопросы мира и безопасности; содействовать коммуникации и обмену данными; предоставлять в распоряжение сотрудников инструменты, необходимые им в их работе; и в конечном счете создавать возможности для того, чтобы Организация Объединенных Наций могла более эффективно предотвращать конфликты и помогать обществам выходить из состояния войны. Одним из ключей к достижению многих из этих целей являются современные и хорошо зарекомендовавшие себя информационные технологии. В настоящем разделе отмечается разрыв между стратегией, политикой и практикой, который мешает эффективному использованию информационных технологий в Организации Объединенных Наций, и предлагаются рекомендации по его устранению. A. Информационные технологии в рамках операций в пользу мира: вопросы стратегии и политики 247. Проблема стратегии и политики в области информационных технологий выходит за рамки операций в пользу мира и затрагивают всю систему Организации Объединенных Наций. Мандат Группы в принципе не охватывает информационные технологии в этом более широком контексте, однако более крупные вопросы не должны препятствовать применению общих подходов к использованию информационных технологий в рамках операций в пользу мира и к тем подразделениям в Центральных60 A/55/305 S/2000/809 учреждениях, которые оказывают им поддержку. Служба коммуникации ОУПОМТО может обеспечить связь через спутник и локальные сети, благодаря чему миссии могут создавать эффективные информационные сети и базы данных, однако необходимо разработать более совершенные стратегии и политику, с тем чтобы помочь пользователям в освоении закладываемых сейчас основ технологий. 248. Когда Организация Объединенных Наций разворачивает миссию на месте, важно, чтобы ее элементы были в состоянии легко обмениваться между собой данными. В рамках всех комплексных операций в пользу мира задействуются многие различные действующие лица: учреждения, фонды и программы системы Организации Объединенных Наций, а также департаменты Секретариата; набранные в состав миссии сотрудники, впервые оказавшиеся в системе Организации Объединенных Наций; иногда региональные организации; часто двусторонние учреждения по оказанию помощи; и всегда десятки и сотни неправительственных организаций, занимающихся гуманитарными вопросами и вопросами развития. Все они нуждаются в механизме, который облегчал бы эффективный обмен информацией и идеями, особенно в силу того, что каждый из них является лишь небольшой верхушкой очень крупного бюрократического айсберга со своей культурой, методами работы и целями. 249. Плохо спланированные и плохо интегрированные информационные технологии могут создавать препятствия для налаживания такого сотрудничества. Когда на уровне прикладного программного обеспечения нет согласованных стандартов в отношении структуры и обмена данными, то в таком случае «взаимодействие между двумя участниками выливается в трудоемкий процесс перекодировки данных вручную, который сводит на нет вложения средств в создание рабочих мест, подсоединенных к информационным сетям и хорошо оснащенных компьютерами. Последствия этого также могут быть более серьезными, чем напрасный труд — начиная от искажения сути политики и кончая неспособностью «уловить» угрозы безопасности или другие серьезные изменения в оперативной обстановке. 250. Парадокс, связанный с такими децентрализованными системами распределенной обработки данных, заключается в том, что для нормального функционирования они как раз нуждаются в таких общих стандартах. Общие решения общих проблем, связанных с информационными технологиями, трудно выработать на более высоких уровнях — на уровне основных компонентов той или иной операции, основных отделений в Центральных учреждениях или на уровне Центральных учреждений и остальной системы Организации Объединенных Наций — отчасти из-за того, что политика в области оперативных информационных систем в настоящее время разрабатывается в разных местах. В Центральных учреждениях отсутствует достаточно мощный центральный орган, который отвечал бы за выработку стратегии и политики использования информационных технологий, особенно в случае операций в пользу мира. В государственном ведомстве или на производстве такая функция была бы возложена на главного сотрудника по вопросам информации. Группа считает, что Организации Объединенных Наций нужен кто-то на уровне Центральных учреждений (с наибольшей пользой это можно было бы делать в Секретариате по информационно-стратегическому анализу), кто играл бы такую роль, осуществляя надзор за разработкой и осуществлением стратегии в области информационных технологий и стандартов для пользователей. Ему или ей следует также разрабатывать и контролировать учебные программы по информационным технологиям, связанные как с составлением справочников для использования в полевых условиях, так и с практической подготовкой. Потребность в этом является значительной, и ее не следует недооценивать. Соответствующие сотрудники в канцелярии Специального представителя Генерального секретаря в каждой полевой миссии должны следить за применением единой стратегии в области информационных технологий и контролировать процесс подготовки кадров на местах, дополняя и закрепляя то, что делается ОУПОМТО и Отделом информационно-технического обслуживания (ОИТО) Департамента по вопросам управления в том, что касается основных структур и услуг в области информационных технологий.61 A/55/305 S/2000/809 251. Резюме рекомендации в отношении стратегии и политики в области информационных технологий: департаментам Центральных учреждений, занимающимся вопросами мира и безопасности, нужен центр, который организационно входил бы в состав Секретариата по информационно-стратегическому анализу и функции которого заключались бы в разработке и контроле за осуществлением единой стратегии в области информационных технологий и подготовки соответствующих кадров для операций в пользу мира. Кроме того, для контроля за осуществлением такой стратегии в состав канцелярий специальных представителей Генерального секретаря в рамках комплексных операций в пользу мира следует назначать соответствующих сотрудников, круг ведения которых соответствовал бы кругу ведения этого функционального центра. B. Инструменты, необходимые для рационального использования полученных сведений и навыков 252. Технологии могут помочь в получении, а также в передаче информации и опыта. Их можно было бы использовать гораздо более рационально, для того чтобы помочь широкому кругу лиц, действующих в районе операций миссии Организации Объединенных Наций, в получении данных и обмене ими на систематической и взаимовыгодной основе. Например, учреждения Организации Объединенных Наций, занимающиеся вопросами развития и гуманитарной помощи, действуют в большинстве точек, где развернуты операции Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира. Эти страновые группы Организации Объединенных Наций и неправительственные организации, занимающиеся дополняющей деятельностью на низовом уровне, появляются в регионе задолго до развертывания комплексной операции в пользу мира, и они остаются там после ее свертывания. Вместе взятые они обладают богатым опытом и знаниями, которые они приобрели за счет работы в местных условиях и которые могли бы оказаться полезными при планировании и осуществлении операций в пользу мира. Руководимый Секретариатом по информационно-стратегическому анализу центр анализа и обработки электронных данных в целях их обмена мог бы помочь при планировании и осуществлении миссии, а также содействовать в деле предотвращения и оценки конфликтов. Благодаря надлежащему объединению этих данных и данных, собранных после развертывания различных компонентов той или иной операции в пользу мира, и их использованию в сочетании с географическими информационными системами (ГИС) можно было бы создать мощные инструменты для выявления потребностей и проблем в районе осуществления миссии, а также для оценки отдачи, получаемой в результате реализации планов действий. В состав каждой миссии следует назначать специалистов в области ГИС, а также выделять соответствующие ресурсы для учебной подготовки, связанной с использованием ГИС. 253. Свежими примерами применения ГИС могут служить гуманитарные мероприятия и мероприятия по восстановлению, осуществляемые в Косово с 1998 года. Информационный центр гуманитарного сообщества обобщает данные ГИС, получаемые из таких источников, как Западноевропейский спутниковый центр, Женевский центр гуманитарного разминирования, СДК, Югославский институт статистики и Международная группа управления. Эти данные были объединены в целях создания атласа, который размещен на их Web-сайте, есть на КД-ПЗУ для тех, кто имеет медленный доступ к Интернету или не имеет его вообще, а также в печатном виде. 254. Весьма эффективным учебным пособием для персонала миссий и для сторон на местах может быть компьютерное моделирование. В принципе может быть смоделирован любой компонент той или иной операции. Это моделирование может облегчить групповое решение проблем и продемонстрировать сторонам на местах те последствия их решений в вопросах политики, которые они порой не в состоянии предусмотреть. При наличии соответствующего высокоскоростного доступа к Интернету компьютерное моделирование может стать частью пособий для дистанционного обучения, составленных с учетом той или иной новой операции и используемых для предварительной подготовки новобранцев в составе миссии.62 A/55/305 S/2000/809 255. Весьма ценным подспорьем в деле планирования, анализа и проведения операций в пользу мира стал бы расширенный раздел, посвященный вопросам мира и безопасности, во внутриорганизационной сети Организации Объединенных Наций (информационной сети Организации, которая открыта для определенных пользователей). Являясь подразделом более крупной сети, этот раздел был бы сосредоточен на сведении воедино вопросов и данных, имеющих прямое отношение к миру и безопасности, включая аналитические материалы, подготавливаемые Секретариатом по информационно-стратегическому анализу, оперативные сводки, карты ГИС и ссылки на обобщенный опыт. Введение различных уровней допуска к секретным материалам могло бы способствовать обмену секретными сведениями между ограниченным числом пользователей. 256. Материалы, размещаемые во внутриорганизационной сети должны иметь гиперсвязь с межорганизационной сетью операций в пользу мира — сетью, которая будет использовать существующие и планируемые глобальные коммуникационные сети для того, чтобы связать между собой базы данных Центральных учреждений в Секретариате по информационно-стратегическому анализу и оперативные отделения на местах и полевые миссии. В межорганизационной сети операций в пользу мира можно было бы легко размещать всю административную, процедурную и юридическую информацию в отношении операций в пользу мира, и эта сеть могла бы обеспечить единый канал доступа к информации, получаемой из многих источников, предоставить плановикам возможность быстрее готовить всеобъемлющие доклады и сократить время реагирования на возникновение чрезвычайных ситуаций. 257. Некоторые компоненты миссий, такие, как гражданская полиция и связанные с ней подразделения уголовного правосудия и сотрудники, занимающиеся расследованиями нарушений прав человека, нуждаются в дополнительной защите сети, а также в аппаратном и программном обеспечении, которое могло бы соответствовать требованиям, предъявляемым к хранению, передаче и анализу данных. Двумя важнейшими технологиями, которыми могла бы пользоваться гражданская полиция, являются программа ГИС и программа составления карты преступности, используемые для преобразования необработанных данных в географические подборки, которые показывают тенденции в преступности и содержат другие важнейшие сведения, облегчают задачи установления внутренних связей между событиями или указывают на характерные особенности проблемных районов, что способствует расширению возможности гражданской полиции бороться с преступностью или консультировать своих коллег из местных правоохранительных органов. 258. Резюме ключевых рекомендаций в отношении информационных технологий, которые можно было бы использовать в рамках операций в пользу мира: а) в сотрудничестве с ОИТО Секретариату по информационно-стратегическому анализу следует разместить во внутриорганизационной сети Организации Объединенных Наций расширенный раздел, посвященный операциям в пользу мира, и установить гиперсвязь с миссиями через межорганизационную сеть операций в пользу мира;b) операции в пользу мира могли бы очень выиграть от более широкого использования географической информационной системы (ГИС), которая обеспечивает быстрое интегрирование оперативных сведений с электронными картами района осуществления миссии в таких целях, как демобилизация, деятельность гражданской полиции, регистрация избирателей, наблюдение за соблюдением прав человека и реконструкция; с) следует прогнозировать и более последовательно учитывать при планировании и проведении миссии информационные потребности компонентов миссии, обладающих уникальными информационными потребностями, таких, как гражданская полиция и компонент по правам человека. С. Более своевременное распространение общественной информации на базе Интернета63 A/55/305 S/2000/809 259. Как отметила Группа в разделе III выше, эффективное распространение среди общественности информации о деятельности в рамках операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира имеет важнейшее значение для мобилизации и сохранения поддержки существующих и будущих миссий. Важно не только формировать позитивный имидж на начальном этапе в целях создания благоприятных условий для проведения операций, но и проводить эффективную кампанию в области общественной информации в целях мобилизации и сохранения поддержки со стороны международного сообщества. 260. Органом, официально отвечающим за распространение информации о деятельности в рамках операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, является Секция по вопросам мира и безопасности ДОИ в Центральных учреждениях, о которой говорилось в разделе IV выше. Один сотрудник ДОИ отвечает за размещение на Web-сайте всех материалов, касающихся вопросов мира и безопасности, а также всей информации, направляемой миссиями для Web-сайта, в целях обеспечения того, чтобы размещаемые на Web-сайте материалы отвечали требованиям, предъявляемым к Web-сайтам Центральных учреждений. 261. Группа одобряет применение стандартов, однако стандартизация совсем не обязательно означает централизацию. Нынешний процесс подготовки новостей и размещения материалов на Web-сайте Организации Объединенных Наций замедляет процесс составления сводок, однако ежедневные сводки могли бы быть важны для той или иной миссии в быстро меняющейся обстановке. Он также ограничивает объем информации, которую можно привести по каждой миссии. 262. ДОИ и сотрудники на местах проявили заинтересованность в решении этой проблемы путем разработки модели «совместного управления Web-сайтом». Как представляется Группе, это могло бы стать оптимальным вариантом решения этой конкретной информационной проблемы. 263. Резюме ключевой рекомендации в отношении более своевременного распространения общественной информации на базе Интернета: Группа поддерживает идею разработки модели совместного управления Web-сайтом Центральными учреждениями и полевыми миссиями, в рамках которой Центральные учреждения осуществляли бы общий надзор, а отдельные миссии поручали бы конкретным сотрудникам готовить и размещать на Web-сайте материалы, отвечающие стандартам и политике в отношении изложения материалов. **** 264. В настоящем докладе Группа особо отметила необходимость изменения структуры и практики Организации, с тем чтобы она могла более эффективно выполнять свои функции в поддержку международного мира и безопасности и уважения прав человека. Некоторые из этих изменений нельзя будет осуществить без использования новых возможностей, которые предоставляют сетевые информационные технологии. Сам настоящий доклад нельзя было бы подготовить без использования тех технологий, которые уже внедрены в Центральных учреждениях Организации Объединенных Наций и доступны для членов Группы в каждом регионе мира. Люди пользуются эффективными инструментами, и эффективные информационные технологии можно было бы использовать в интересах мира гораздо более рационально. VI. Вызовы в деле осуществления 265. Изложенные в настоящем докладе рекомендации в отношении проведения реформы рассчитаны на две группы — государств-членов и Секретариат. Мы понимаем, что реформы не будет, если государства-члены действительно не будут ею заниматься. Вместе с тем мы считаем, что рекомендованные нами изменения в Секретариате должны активно продвигаться Генеральным секретарем и осуществляться работающими под его началом руководителями. 266. Государства-члены должны признать, что Организация Объединенных Наций — это сумма составляющих ее частей, и согласиться с тем, что главная ответственность за проведение реформы лежит на них. Неудачи Организации Объединенных Наций — это неудачи не одного Секретариата или командующих силами или руководителей полевых64 A/55/305 S/2000/809 миссий. В большинстве случаев неудачи объясняются тем, что Совет Безопасности и государства-члены разрабатывали и поддерживали нечеткие, непоследовательные и не обеспеченные достаточными финансовыми средствами мандаты, а затем, встав в сторону, наблюдали, как они проваливались, иногда даже публично критически высказываясь по этому поводу, — как раз в тот момент, когда репутация Организации Объединенных Наций подвергалась самым суровым испытаниям. 267. Последним примером того, с чем нельзя больше мириться, являются недавно возникшие в Сьерра-Леоне проблемы командования и управления. Страны, предоставляющие войска, должны обеспечивать, чтобы предоставляемые ими военнослужащие в полной мере понимали важное значение единого порядка подчинения, оперативного контроля со стороны Генерального секретаря и стандартных оперативных процедур и правил применения вооруженной силы в рамках миссии. Важно, чтобы порядок подчинения в рамках той или иной операции был понятен и соблюдался, и в этом плане национальные столицы обязаны воздерживаться от отдачи командующими их контингентами приказов в отношении оперативных вопросов. 268. Мы в курсе того, что Генеральный секретарь осуществляет всеобъемлющую программу реформы, и понимаем, что наши рекомендации, возможно, необходимо будет скорректировать, с тем чтобы они вписались в эту общую картину. Кроме того, рекомендованные нами реформы в Секретариате и в рамках системы Организации Объединенных Наций в целом за один день не осуществить, хотя в некоторых случаях необходимы срочные меры. Мы понимаем, что сопротивление переменам в рамках любой бюрократии — это нормальное явление, поэтому нас воодушевляет то, что предложение о некоторых изменениях, которые мы оформили в виде своих рекомендаций, исходят от самой системы. Нас также воодушевляет приверженность Генерального секретаря делу реформирования Секретариата, даже если это означает, что какие-то давно налаженные организационные и процедурные связи будут нарушены и что какие-то аспекты приоритетов Секретариата и сформировавшейся в нем культуры придется поставить под сомнение и изменить. В этой связи мы обращаемся к Генеральному секретарю с настоятельным призывом назначить старшее должностное лицо, которое отвечало бы за контроль за осуществлением изложенных в настоящем докладе рекомендаций. 269. Генеральный секретарь постоянно говорит о необходимости того, чтобы Организация Объединенных Наций наладила взаимодействие с гражданским обществом и укрепила связи с неправительственными организациями, академическими институтами и средствами массовой информации, которые могут стать полезными партнерами в деле содействия обеспечению мира и безопасности для всех. Мы призываем Секретариат взять на вооружение предлагаемый Генеральным секретарем подход и применить его в деятельности в интересах мира и безопасности. Мы призываем его постоянно помнить о том, что Организация Объединенных Наций, которую он обслуживает, является универсальной организацией. Люди — где бы они ни находились — имеют все основания считать, что это их организация, а посему судить о ее деятельности и о тех, кто в ней работает. 270. Сотрудники Секретариата, выполняющие функции в вопросах мира и безопасности в составе ДОПМ, ДПВ и других соответствующих департаментов, очень сильно отличаются друг от друга по своей квалификации. Это замечание относится и к гражданским сотрудникам, набранным Секретариатом, а также к военнослужащим и персоналу гражданской полиции, которые предлагаются государствами-членами. Эти различия широко признаются теми, кто работает в системе. Более эффективным работникам даются неразумно большие задания, чтобы компенсировать работу менее способных. Естественно, что это может отрицательно сказываться на моральном климате и порождать недовольство, особенно среди тех, кто вполне справедливо указывает на то, что Организация Объединенных Наций в последние годы не уделяла достаточно внимания развитию карьеры, профессиональной подготовке и наставничеству или внедрению современных методов управления. Проще говоря, Организация Объединенных Наций сегодня далека от того, чтобы быть «меритократией», т.е. системой, где сотрудники выделяются по достоинствам, и пока она не примет65 A/55/305 S/2000/809 меры к тому, чтобы стать таковой, она не будет в состоянии обратить вспять тревожную тенденцию, заключающуюся в том, что из Организации уходят квалифицированные кадры, особенно молодые. Если при найме на работу, продвижении по службе и делегировании полномочий основной упор делается на стаже или личных или политических связях, то у квалифицированных кадров не будет стимулов к тому, чтобы идти на работу в Организацию или оставаться в ней. До тех пор пока руководители на всех уровнях — начиная с Генерального секретаря и работающих под его началом сотрудников — не займутся всерьез и в срочном порядке решением этой проблемы, не будут вознаграждать за отличную работу и не будут расставаться с некомпетентными сотрудниками, дополнительные ресурсы будут использованы впустую, а долгосрочная реформа станет невозможной. 271. Столь же пристальное внимание следует обратить и на персонал Организации Объединенных Наций в составе полевых миссий. Большинство из работающих там сотрудников воплощает в себе дух того, что значит быть международным гражданским служащим, который отправляется в растерзанные войной страны и опасные точки для того, чтобы помочь улучшить жизнь наиболее уязвимых общин мира. Они делают это ценой значительных личных жертв и иногда с большим риском для собственной безопасности и умственного здоровья. Они заслуживают того, чтобы мир отметил их и выразил им признательность. За прошедшие годы многие из них отдали свою жизнь делу мира, и мы пользуемся настоящей возможностью для того, чтобы почтить их память. 272. Сотрудники Организации Объединенных Наций на местах, возможно, больше, чем кто-либо иной, обязаны уважать местные нормы, культуру и обычаи. Они обязаны сделать все, чтобы продемонстрировать это уважение сначала путем ознакомления с условиями, существующими в принимающей стране, и попытаться как можно больше узнать местную культуру и местный язык. Они обязаны вести себя, отдавая отчет в том, что они являются гостем в чьем-то доме, каким бы разрушенным этот дом ни был, особенно в тех случаях, когда Организация Объединенных Наций берет на себя функцию временной администрации. И они обязаны относиться друг к другу с уважением и соблюдением достоинства, демонстрируя особую чувствительность к гендерным вопросам и культурным различиям. 273. Иными словами, мы полагаем, что к вопросам отбора и поведения персонала в Центральных учреждениях и на местах следует подходить с самыми высокими мерками, когда сотрудники Организации Объединенных Наций оказываются неспособными соответствовать таким меркам, их следует привлекать к ответу. В прошлом Секретариату было трудно привлекать руководителей на местах к ответственности за их работу, поскольку эти руководители могли ссылаться на нехватку ресурсов, нечеткость инструкций или отсутствие надлежащих механизмов командования и управления как на главные препятствия для успешного выполнения мандата миссии. Эти негативные моменты следует учитывать, однако нельзя позволять, чтобы ими прикрывались нерадивые работники. Будущее наций, жизни тех, кому Организация Объединенных Наций пришла помочь и предложила защиту, успех той или иной миссии и репутация Организации — все это зависит от того, что удается или не удается сделать нескольким людям. Любой человек, оказавшийся непригодным к выполнению той или иной задачи, которую он или она согласились выполнять, должен быть отозван из миссии независимо от того, как высоко или как низко он или она находится на служебной лестнице. 274. Сами государства-члены признают, что и им нужно подумать над их культурой и методами работы, по крайней мере в том, что касается осуществления деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций в области мира и безопасности. Сложившаяся традиция зачитывания заявлений, за которым следует кропотливая работа по достижению консенсуса, характеризуется тем, что значительный упор при этом делается на дипломатическом процессе в ущерб конкретному результату. Хотя одним из многих достоинств Организации Объединенных Наций является как раз то, что она представляет собой форум, на котором 189 государств-членов имеют возможность обменяться мнениями по актуальным глобальным проблемам, одного диалога, порой, бывает недостаточно для обеспечения того, чтобы миротворческие операции стоимостью в миллиард66 A/55/305 S/2000/809 долларов, жизненно важные меры по предотвращению конфликтов или важнейшие усилия в области установления мира несмотря ни на что увенчались успехом. За выражениями общей поддержки в виде заявлений и резолюций должны следовать конкретные действия. 275. Кроме того, государства-члены могут посылать противоречивые сигналы в отношении тех мер, которые они поддерживают, когда их представители в одном органе заявляют о поддержке политической, а в другом отказывают в поддержке финансовой. Как представляется, такая непоследовательность имеет место в отношениях между Пятым комитетом, занимающимся административными и бюджетными вопросами, с одной стороны, и Советом Безопасности и Специальным комитетом по операциям по поддержанию мира — с другой. 276. Что касается политического уровня, то у многих сторон на местах, с которыми ежедневно приходится иметь дело тем, кто занимается установлением и поддержанием мира, может не быть ни уважения, ни страха перед осуждающими заявлениями Совета Безопасности. Поэтому члены Совета и государства-члены в целом обязаны вдохнуть жизнь в произносимые ими слова, как это сделала делегация Совета Безопасности, которая прилетела в Джакарту и Дили после возникшего в прошлом году кризиса в Восточном Тиморе, что является образцом эффективных действий Совета: res, non verba (дела, а не слова). 277. Между тем, финансовые трудности, с которыми приходится сталкиваться Организации Объединенных Наций в своей работе, по-прежнему серьезным образом сказываются на ее способности эффективно и на профессиональном уровне проводить операции в пользу мира. Поэтому мы обращаемся к государствам-членам с настоятельным призывом выполнять свои договорные обязательства и выплачивать свои взносы в полном объеме, своевременно и без каких бы то ни было условий. 278. Мы также сознаем, что есть и другие вопросы, которые прямо или косвенно мешают Организации Объединенных Наций эффективно действовать в вопросах мира и безопасности, в том числе два нерешенных вопроса, которые выходят за рамки мандата Группы, но имеют важнейшее значение для операций в пользу мира. Оба могут быть решены лишь государствами-членами. Речь идет о разногласиях в вопросах порядка начисления взносов на цели операций по поддержанию мира и справедливого представительства в Совете Безопасности. Мы лишь можем надеяться на то, что государства-члены найдут путь к устранению существующих между ними разногласий в этих вопросах в интересах выполнения их коллективной международной ответственности, которая предусмотрена в Уставе. 279. Мы призываем мировых лидеров, собравшихся на Саммите тысячелетия для того, чтобы подтвердить свою приверженность идеалам Организации Объединенных Наций, заявить и о своей приверженности укреплению потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций, необходимого для выполнения миссии, являющейся по сути дела смыслом ее существования: помогать общинам, охваченным конфликтом, и поддерживать или восстанавливать мир. 280. В процессе формирования консенсуса в отношении изложенных в настоящем докладе рекомендаций мы, члены Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, пришли также к единому видению Организации Объединенных Наций, которая протягивает свою крепкую руку помощи общине, стране или региону в целях предотвращения конфликта или прекращения насилия. Нам видится СПГС, завершающий хорошо выполненную миссию, после того как народу той или иной страны была предоставлена возможность сделать для себя то, чего он не мог сделать раньше: построить и удержать мир, добиться примирения, укрепить демократию, гарантировать права человека. Нам видится, прежде всего, Организация Объединенных Наций, у которой есть не только желание, но и способность реализовать заложенный в нее огромный потенциал и оправдать доверие, возлагаемое на нее подавляющим большинством человечества.67 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Приложение I Члены Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира Г-н Дж. Брайен Этвуд (Соединенные Штаты Америки), председатель «Ситизенз интернэшнл»; бывший председатель Национального демократического института; бывший администратор Агентства международного развития Соединенных Штатов Америки. Г-н Лахдар Брахими (Алжир), бывший министр иностранных дел; Председатель Группы. Посол Колин Грандерсон (Тринидад и Тобаго), Исполнительный директор Международной гражданской миссии Организации американских государств (ОАГ)/Организации Объединенных Наций в Гаити, 1993–2000 годы; руководитель Миссии ОАГ по наблюдению за выборами в Гаити (1995 и 1997 годы) и в Суринаме (2000 год). Дейм Анн Херкус (Новая Зеландия), бывший член кабинета министров и Постоянный представитель Новой Зеландии при Организации Объединенных Наций; глава Миссии Вооруженных сил Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира на Кипре (ВСООНК), 1998–1999 годы. Г-н Ричард Монк (Соединенное Королевство), бывший член Инспектората полиции Ее Величества и правительственный советник по международным полицейским вопросам; Комиссар Специальных международных полицейских сил в Боснии и Герцеговине, 1998–1999 годы. Генерал (в отставке) Клаус Науманн (Германия), начальник штаба обороны, 1991–1996 годы; председатель Военного комитета Организации Североатлантического договора (НАТО), 1996–1999 годы, отвечавший за надзор за операциями Сил по выполнению Соглашения/Сил по стабилизации в Боснии и Герцеговине и за военно-воздушной кампанией НАТО в Косово. Г-жа Хисако Симура (Япония), президент Колледжа Цуда, Токио; работала на протяжении 24 лет в Секретариате Организации Объединенных Наций, уйдя в отставку в 1995 году с должности директора Отдела стран Европы и Латинской Америки Департамента операций по поддержанию мира. Посол Владимир Шустов (Российская Федерация), посол по особым поручениям, на протяжении 30 лет связан с Организацией Объединенных Наций; бывший заместитель Постоянного представителя при Организации Объединенных Наций в Нью-Йорке, бывший представитель Российской Федерации при Организации по безопасности и сотрудничеству в Европе. Генерал Филлип Сибанда (Зимбабве), начальник штаба, оперативная и боевая подготовка, штаб армии Зимбабве, Хараре; бывший Командующий Силами Контрольной миссии Организации Объединенных Наций в Анголе (КМООНА III) и Миссии наблюдателей Организации Объединенных Наций в Анголе (МНООНА), 1995–1998 годы.68 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Д-р Корнелио Соммаруга (Швейцария), президент Фонда за моральное перевооружение, Ко, и Международного центра по гуманитарному разминированию в Женеве; бывший президент Международного комитета Красного Креста, 1987–1999 годы. * * * Канцелярия Председателя Группы по операциям Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира Д-р Уильям Дурх, старший сотрудник Центра им. Генри Л. Стимсона; директор проекта Г-н Салман Ахмед, сотрудник по политическим вопросам, Секретариат Организации Объединенных Наций Г-жа Клэр Кейн, личный помощник, Секретариат Организации Объединенных Наций Г-жа Каролайн Эрл, младший научный сотрудник, Центр Стимсона Г-н Дж. Эдвард Палмисано, лауреат Стипендии мира им. Герберта Сковиля младшего, Центр Стимсона69 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Приложение II Справочные материалы Документы Организации Объединенных Наций Аннан, Кофи А. Предотвращение войн и предупреждение бедствий: усиливающийся глобальный вызов. Годовой доклад о работе Организации, 1999 год (A/54/1). Партнерство во имя всемирного сообщества. Годовой доклад о работе Организации, 1998 год (A/53/1). Реагирование на гуманитарный вызов: к культуре предотвращения. (ST/DPI/2070) «Мы, народы: роль Организации Объединенных Наций в XXI веке» (Доклад Ассамблее тысячелетия (A/54/2000). Экономический и Социальный Совет. Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора, озаглавленный «Окончательный доклад об углубленной оценке операций по поддержанию мира: начальный этап» (E/AC.51/1995/2 и Corr.1). Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора, озаглавленный «Окончательный доклад об углубленной оценке операций по поддержанию мира: этап прекращения операций» (E/AC.51/1996/3 и Corr.1). Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора, озаглавленный «Трехгодичный обзор осуществления вынесенных Комитетом по программе и координации на его тридцать пятой сессии рекомендаций в отношении оценки операций по поддержанию мира: начальный этап» (E/AC.51/1998/4 и Corr.1). Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора, озаглавленный «Трехгодичный обзор осуществления вынесенных Комитетом по программе и координации на его тридцать шестой сессии рекомендаций в отношении оценки операций по поддержанию мира: этап прекращения операций» (E/AC.51/1999/5). Генеральная Ассамблея. Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора об обзоре функционирования Отдела Управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения Департамента операций по поддержанию мира (A/49/959). Доклад Генерального секретаря, озаглавленный «Обновление Организации Объединенных Наций: программа реформы» (A/51/950). Доклад Генерального секретаря о причинах конфликтов и содействии обеспечению прочного мира и устойчивого развития в Африке (A/52/871). Доклад Специального комитета по операциям по поддержанию мира (A/54/87 и Corr.1). Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора о проверке управления деятельностью по контрактам на предоставление услуг и снабжение продовольствием в миссиях по поддержанию мира (A/54/335). Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая годовой доклад Управления служб внутреннего надзора, охватывающий деятельность за период с 1 июля 1998 года по 30 июня 1999 года (A/54/393). Записка Генерального секретаря, препровождающая доклад Специального представителя Генерального секретаря по вопросу о положении детей в вооруженных конфликтах, озаглавленный «Защита детей, затрагиваемых вооруженными конфликтами» (A/54/430). Доклад Генерального секретаря, представляемый во исполнение резолюции 53/55 Генеральной Ассамблеи, озаглавленный «Падение Сребреницы» (A/54/549). Доклад Специального комитета по операциям по поддержанию мира (A/54/839). Доклад Генерального секретаря об осуществлении рекомендаций Специального комитета по операциям по поддержанию мира (A/54/670). Генеральная Ассамблея и Совет Безопасности. Доклад Генерального секретаря в соответствии с заявлением, принятым 31 января 1992 года на заседании Совета Безопасности на высшем уровне, озаглавленный «Повестка дня для мира:70 A/55/305 S/2000/809 превентивная дипломатия, миротворчество и поддержание мира» (A/47/277-S/24111). Позиционный документ Генерального секретаря по случаю пятидесятой годовщины Организации Объединенных Наций, озаглавленный «Дополнение к Повестке дня для мира» (A/50/60-S/1995/1). Доклад Генерального секретаря о детях в вооруженных конфликтах (A/55/163-S/2000/712). Совет Безопасности. Доклад Генерального секретаря о защите в отношении гуманитарной помощи беженцам и другим лицам в ходе конфликтов (S/1998/883). Доклад Генерального секретаря об укреплении миротворческого потенциала Африки (S/1999/171). Очередной доклад Генерального секретаря о резервных соглашениях, касающихся операций по поддержанию мира (A/1999/361). Доклад Генерального секретаря Совету Безопасности по вопросу о защите гражданских лиц в вооруженном конфликте (S/1999/957). Письмо Генерального секретаря от 15 декабря 1999 года на имя Председателя Совета Безопасности, препровождающее доклад Комиссии по проведению независимого расследования деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций в период геноцида в Руанде в 1994 году (S/1999/1257). Доклад Генерального секретаря о роли операций Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира в контексте разоружения, демобилизации и реинтеграции (S/2000/101). Письмо Председателя Комитета Совета Безопасности, учрежденного резолюцией 864 (1993) о положении в Анголе, от 10 марта 2000 года на имя Председателя Совета Безопасности, препровождающее доклад Группы экспертов о нарушениях санкций, введенных Советом Безопасности против УНИТА (S/2000/203). Secretary-General’s Press release. Statement made by the Secretary-General at Georgetown University. (SG/SM/6901). Бюллетень Генерального секретаря. Соблюдение Силами Организации Объединенных Наций норм международного гуманитарного права (ST/SGB/1999/13). United Nations Development Programme. Governance foundations for post-conflict situations: UNDP’s experience. Discussion paper prepared by the UNDP Management Development and Governance Division, January 2000. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Annual appeal 2000: overview of activities and financial requirements. Geneva. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Catalogue of emergency response tools. Document prepared by the Emergency Preparedness and Response Section. Geneva, 2000. United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), Institute of Policy Studies of Singapore (IPS) and National Institute for Research Advancement of Japan. Report of the 1997 Singapore Conference: humanitarian action and peacekeeping operations. New York, 1997. UNITAR, IPS and Japan Institute of International Affairs. The nexus between peacekeeping and peacebuilding: debriefing and lessons. Draft report of the 1999 Singapore Conference. New York, 2000. Goulding, Marrack. Practical measures to enhance the United Nations’ effectiveness in the field of peace and security, Report submitted to the Secretary-General. New York, 30 June 1977. Другие источники Berdal, Mats, and David M. Malone, eds. Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000. Berman, Eric G., and Katie E. Sams. Peacekeeping in Africa: capabilities and culpabilities. (UNIDIR/2000/3). Bigombe, Betty, Paul Collier and Nicholas Sambanis. Policies for building post-conflict peace. Paper presented at an ad hoc expert group meeting on the economics of civil conflicts in Africa, 7 and 8 April 2000, organized by the Economic Commission for Africa. Blechman, Barry M., William J. Durch, Wendy Eaton and Julie Werbel. Effective transitions from peace operations to sustainable peace: final report. DFI International, Washington, D.C., September 1997.71 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Childers, Erskine, and Brian Urquhart. Towards a More Effective United Nations: Two studies. Uppsala, Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, 1992. Collier, Paul. Economic causes of civil conflict and their implications for policy. In Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall, Managing Global Chaos. Washington, D.C., United States Institute of Peace, forthcoming. Cousens, Elizabeth M., Donald Rothchild and Stephen John Stedman, eds. Ending Civil Wars, vol. II, Evaluating Peace Implementation. New York, Center for International Security and Cooperation of Stanford University and International Peace Academy, forthcoming. De Soto, Alvaro, and Graciana del Castillo. Implementation of comprehensive peace agreements: staying the course in El Salvador. Global Governance, vol. 1, No. 2 (May-June 1995). Doyle, Michael W., and Nicholas Sambanis. International Peacebuilding: a theoretical and quantitative analysis. Paper presented at a conference of the Center of International Studies and the World Bank, Princeton University, 17 and 18 March 2000. Fafo Programme for International Cooperation and Conflict Resolution. Command from the saddle: managing United Nations peacebuilding missions. Recommendations report of a forum on special representatives of the Secretary-General on the their “Shaping the United Nation role in peace implementations”. Oslo, Peace Implementation Network, 1999. Fainberg, Anthony, Alan Shaw, Dean Cheng, Xavier Maruyama and Donald Gallagher. Technology for international peace operations. Washington, D.C., Institute for Technology Assessment, March 1998. Forman, Shepard. Stewart Patrick and Dirk Salomons. Recovering from conflict: strategy for an international response. New York University, Center on International Cooperation, February 2000. Fowler, Robert R. Report of the Panel of Experts on Violations of Security Council sanctions UNITA. Government of Canada. Towards a Rapid Reaction Capability for the United Nations. Ottawa, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Department of National Defense, 1995. Griffin, Michèle and Bruce Jones. Building peace through transitional authority: new directions, major challenges. International Peacekeeping, vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 2000). Henkin, Alice H., ed. Honouring Human Rights and Keeping the Peace: Lessons from El Salvador, Cambodia and Haiti. Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1995. Honouring Human Rights, from Peace to Justice: Recommendations to the International Community. Summary edition of Henkin, op. cit, Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1999. Holm, Tor Tanke, and Espen Barth Eide, eds. Peacebuilding and Policy Reform. International Peacekeeping, vol. 6, No. 4 (Special issue, Winter 1999). Humanitarian Community Information Centre, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affair of the United Nations Secretariat. Kosovo atlas. Pristina, February 2000. Jett, Dennis C. Why Peacekeeping Fails. New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2000. Latter, Richard. Monitoring and verifying peace agreements. Report based on a Wilton Park conference 597 on the monitoring and verification of peace agreements, 24-26 March 2000, April 2000. Lehman, Ingrid A. Peacekeeping and Public Information: Caught in the Crossfire. London, Frank Cass, 1999. Lord, Christopher. Advisory note for Stimson Center/United Nations Panel on Peace Operations. Prague, Prague Project on Emergency Criminal Justice Principles, Institute of International Relations, 27 June 2000. Moore, Jonathan, ed. Hard Choices. Lanham, Maryland, Rowman and Littlefield for the International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva, 1998. Plunkett, Mark. Justice re-establishment in United Nations peacekeeping: methods and techniques for the re-establishment of the rule of law in United Nations peace operations. 18 April 2000. Salerno, Reynolds M., Michael G. Vannoni, David S. Barber, Randall R. Parish and Rebecca L. Frerichs. Enhanced peacekeeping with monitoring technologies.72 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Sandia report. Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratories, 2000. Smillie, Ian, Lansana Gberie and Ralph Hazleton. The heart of the matter: Sierra Leone, diamonds and human security. Ottawa, Partnership Africa Canada, January 2000. Stedman, Stephen John. Spoiler problems in peace processes. International Security, vol. 22, No. 2 (Fall 1997). Stewart, Frances, and A. Berry. The real causes of inequality. Challenge, vol. 43, No. 1 (2000). Stewart, Frances, Frank P. Humphreys and Nick Lee, Civil conflict in developing countries over the last quarter of a century: an empirical overview of economic and social consequences. Oxford Journal of Development Studies, vol. 25, No. 1 (February 1997). Thant, Myint-U, and Elizabeth Sellwood. Knowledge and Multilateral Interventions: The United Nations Experiences in Cambodia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Royal Institute of International Affairs Discussions Paper, Number 83. London, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2000. Wallensteen, Peter, and Margareta Sollenberg. Armed conflict and regional conflict complexes, 1989-1997. Journal of Peace Research, vol. 35, No. 5 (1998). World Bank Institute and Interworks. The Transition from War to Peace: An Overview. Washington, D.C., 1999.73 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Приложение III Резюме рекомендаций 1. Превентивные действия: a) Группа одобряет рекомендации Генерального секретаря в отношении предотвращения конфликтов, содержащиеся в его докладе для Ассамблеи тысячелетия и в его выступлениях на втором открытом заседании Совета Безопасности по предотвращению конфликтов в июле 2000 года, и, в частности, его призыв в отношении того, что «все, кто занимается предотвращением конфликтов и вопросами развития — Организация Объединенных Наций, бреттон-вудские учреждения, правительства и организации гражданского общества, — должны решать все эти проблемы в комплексе»; b) Группа поддерживает более частое использование Генеральным секретарем миссии по установлению фактов в районах с напряженной обстановкой и подчеркивает обязательства государств-членов, согласно статье 2(5) Устава, оказывать «всемерную помощь» такой деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций. 2. Стратегия миростроительства: a) небольшая часть бюджета миссии на первый год должна выделяться в распоряжение Представителя или Специального представителя Генерального секретаря, возглавляющего миссию, для финансирования проектов, дающих быструю отдачу, в районе деятельности миссии с учетом рекомендаций координатора-резидента страновой группы Организации Объединенных Наций; b) Группа рекомендует внести изменение в доктрину использования гражданской полиции, других правоохранительных элементов и экспертов по вопросам прав человека в составе комплексных операций в пользу мира, с тем чтобы отразить возросшее внимание, уделяемое укреплению правозащитных институтов и обеспечению большего уважения прав человека в постконфликтных ситуациях; c) Группа рекомендует законодательным органам рассмотреть вопрос о том, чтобы включать программы демобилизации и реинтеграции в бюджеты с разверсткой взносов комплексных операций в пользу мира на первом этапе операции, с тем чтобы таким образом содействовать быстрому распаду воюющих группировок и уменьшению опасности возобновления конфликта; d) Группа рекомендует Исполнительному комитету по вопросам мира и безопасности (ИКМБ) обсудить и рекомендовать Генеральному секретарю план укрепления постоянного потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций по разработке стратегий миростроительства и осуществлению программ в поддержку таких стратегий. 3. Доктрина и стратегия поддержания мира: после своего развертывания миротворцы Организации Объединенных Наций должны быть в состоянии профессионально и успешно выполнять свои мандаты и должны быть способны защищать себя, другие компоненты миссии и мандат миссии с использованием ясных правил применения вооруженной силы против тех, кто отказывается от своих обязательств по мирному соглашению или кто каким-либо иным образом стремится подорвать его с помощью насилия. 4. Четкие, пользующиеся доверием и осуществимые мандаты: a) Группа рекомендует, чтобы до того, как соглашаться на осуществление соглашения о прекращении огня или о мире с помощью возглавляемой Организацией Объединенных Наций операции по поддержанию мира, Совет Безопасности был уверен в том, что соглашение отвечает таким пороговым условиям, как соответствие международным стандартам в области прав человека и осуществимость конкретно поставленных задач и установленных сроков; b) Совет Безопасности должен оставлять в виде проекта резолюции, санкционирующие развертывание миссий со значительными воинскими контингентами, до тех пор, пока Генеральный секретарь не получит от государств-членов твердых обещаний в отношении выделения войск и других крайне важных для поддержки миссии элементов, включая элементы миростроительства; c) резолюции Совета Безопасности должны удовлетворять требованиям операций по поддержанию мира, когда они развертываются в потенциально опасных ситуациях, особенно в том,74 A/55/305 S/2000/809 что касается четкого порядка подчинения и единства действий; d) Секретариат должен говорить Совету Безопасности то, что ему нужно знать, а не то, что он хотел бы услышать, при разработке и изменении мандатов миссий, и страны, обязавшиеся выделить воинские подразделения в состав той или иной операции, должны иметь доступ к проводимым Секретариатом для Совета брифингам по вопросам, сказывающимся на безопасности их персонала, и особенно к заседаниям, влекущим за собой определенные последствия с точки зрения использования силы в рамках миссии. 5. Информационно-стратегический анализ: Генеральному секретарю следует создать подразделение, которое в настоящем докладе именуется секретариатом ИКМБ по информационно-стратегическому анализу (ИСИСА) и которое будет удовлетворять информационно-аналитические потребности всех членов ИКМБ; что касается аспекта подчинения, то им должны руководить главы Департамента по политическим вопросам (ДПВ) и Департамента операций по поддержанию мира (ДОПМ), и он должен отчитываться непосредственно перед ними. 6. Временная гражданская администрация: Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю пригласить международных экспертов по правовым вопросам, включая лиц, имеющих опыт работы в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций, наделенных мандатами в отношении временной администрации, для оценки осуществимости и полезности разработки временного уголовного кодекса, включая и любые региональные варианты, которые могут понадобиться, для использования такими операциями до восстановления правопорядка на местах и воссоздания местных правоохранительных органов. 7. Определение сроков развертывания: Организация Объединенных Наций должна определить «потенциал быстрого и эффективного развертывания» как способность, с оперативной точки зрения, полностью развертывать традиционные операции по поддержанию мира в течение 30 дней после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности и комплексные операции по поддержанию мира — в течение 90 дней. 8. Руководство миссиями: a) Генеральному секретарю следует систематизировать метод отбора руководителей миссии, начиная с составления всеобъемлющего перечня потенциальных представителей или специальных представителей Генерального секретаря, командующих силами, комиссаров гражданской полиции и их заместителей, а также других руководителей основных и административных компонентов с учетом справедливого географического представительства и справедливой представленности мужчин и женщин и при содействии государств-членов; b) всех руководителей миссии следует отбирать и собирать в Центральных учреждениях как можно раньше, с тем чтобы они могли принять участие в основных аспектах процесса планирования миссии и в брифингах о положении в районе действия миссии и с тем чтобы они могли встретиться и поработать со своими коллегами по руководству миссии; c) Секретариату следует регулярно предоставлять руководителям миссии стратегические установки и планы, позволяющие им предвосхищать и преодолевать трудности на пути осуществления мандата, и, по мере возможности, формулировать такие руководящие указания и планы совместно с руководством миссии. 9. Военный персонал: a) государства-члены следует призывать, в соответствующих случаях, к тому, чтобы они налаживали партнерские отношения друг с другом — в контексте системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций — с целью формирования нескольких взаимослаженных групп бригадного состава с необходимыми элементами поддержки, готовых к эффективному развертыванию в течение 30 дней после принятия резолюции Совета Безопасности об учреждении традиционной операции по поддержанию мира и в течение 90 дней в случае комплексных миротворческих операций; b) Генерального секретаря следует уполномочить провести официальный опрос государств-членов, участвующих в системе резервных соглашений, на предмет их готовности выделять войска в состав потенциальной операции, когда возникает вероятность заключения75 A/55/305 S/2000/809 соглашения или договоренности о прекращении огня, предусматривающих определенную роль для Организации Объединенных Наций в деле их выполнения; c) Секретариату следует ввести в практику направление группы для подтверждения степени готовности каждой страны, которая может предоставить войска, с точки зрения выполнения положений меморандумов о взаимопонимании, касающихся требований по боевой подготовке и оснащению, до развертывания; те страны, которые не удовлетворяют таким требованиям, не должны развертывать свои войска; d) Группа рекомендует подготовить в рамках системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций постоянно обновляемый «дежурный список» из примерно 100 офицеров, с тем чтобы иметь возможность — с уведомлением за семь дней — усиливать ядро планировщиков из состава Департамента операций по поддержанию мира группами, прошедшими подготовку по вопросам организации штаба миссии для новой миротворческой операции. 10. Сотрудники гражданской полиции: a) государствам-членам рекомендуется создать национальную резервную группу сотрудников гражданской полиции, готовых к быстрому развертыванию в составе операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира, в контексте системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций; b) государствам-членам рекомендуется заключать региональные партнерские договоренности о подготовке сотрудников гражданской полиции, включенных в их соответствующие национальные резервные группы, в целях обеспечения общего уровня готовности в соответствии с руководящими принципами, постоянно действующими инструкциями и нормативами профессиональной деятельности, которые будут выработаны Организацией Объединенных Наций; c) государствам-членам рекомендуется назначить в рамках их правительственных структур единый координационный орган для целей предоставления гражданской полиции в состав операций Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира; d) Группа рекомендует подготовить в рамках системы резервных соглашений Организации Объединенных Наций постоянно обновляемый «дежурный список» из примерно 100 сотрудников полиции и соответствующих экспертов, с тем чтобы иметь возможность — с уведомлением за семь дней — развертывать группы, прошедшие подготовку по вопросам создания компонента гражданской полиции в составе новой миротворческой операции, обучения прибывающих сотрудников и обеспечения большей взаимослаженности компонента на раннем этапе; e) Группа рекомендует создать, с учетом рекомендаций, содержащихся в подпунктах (a), (b) и (c) выше, параллельные механизмы для специалистов по вопросам судопроизводства, пенитенциарной системе, вопросам прав человека и других соответствующих специалистов, которые вместе со специалистами из гражданской полиции будут составлять коллегиальные группы по вопросам правопорядка. 11. Гражданские специалисты: а) Секретариату следует подготовить централизованный список заранее отобранных гражданских кандидатов, которые могут быть оперативно направлены в операции в пользу мира, и разместить его в Интернете/внутриорганизационной сети. Полевым миссиям должен быть предоставлен доступ к этому списку и делегированы полномочия по набору указанных в нем кандидатов в соответствии с руководящими принципами в отношении справедливого географического распределения и соотношения женщин и мужчин, которые должны быть промульгированы Секретариатом; b) следует реорганизовать категорию персонала полевой службы, с тем чтобы она соответствовала потребностям, которые постоянно возникают у всех операций в пользу мира, особенно в отношении сотрудников среднего и высшего уровня в областях административного управления и материально-технического обеспечения; с) следует пересмотреть условия службы гражданских сотрудников, набираемых из числа внешних кандидатов, с тем чтобы Организация76 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Объединенных Наций могла привлекать наиболее квалифицированных кандидатов, а затем обеспечивать сотрудникам, продемонстрировавшим отличную работу, более широкие возможности для развития карьеры; d) ДОПМ следует разработать всеобъемлющую кадровую стратегию для операций в пользу мира, которая, среди прочего, регулировала бы использование добровольцев Организации Объединенных Наций, вопросы резервных соглашений для выделения гражданских сотрудников с уведомлением за 72 часа для облегчения начального этапа миссии и распределение обязанностей между членами Исполнительного комитета по вопросам мира и безопасности за реализацию этой стратегии. 12. Потенциал быстрого развертывания в области общественной информации: в бюджетах миссий следует предусмотреть выделение дополнительных ресурсов на деятельность в области общественной информации и связанные с нею персонал и информационные технологии, необходимые для распространения информации об операции, и на установление эффективных внутренних коммуникационных связей. 13. Материально-техническое обеспечение и управление расходами: a) Секретариату следует сформулировать глобальную стратегию материально-технического обеспечения, с тем чтобы дать возможность оперативно и эффективно производить развертывание миссии в предлагаемые сроки и в соответствии с предположениями в области планирования, устанавливаемыми основными подразделениями ДОПМ; b) Генеральной Ассамблее следует санкционировать и утвердить единовременное расходование средств для доведения общего числа комплектов снаряжения первой необходимости в Бриндизи, которые должны включать быстро развертываемую аппаратуру связи, до пяти штук. Эти комплекты снаряжения первой необходимости должны затем постоянно пополняться в обычном порядке за счет средств, поступающих по линии начисленных взносов на финансирование операций, в рамках которых эти комплекты были использованы; c) Генерального секретаря следует наделить полномочиями согласия Консультативного комитета по административным и бюджетным вопросам (ККАБВ), но до принятия соответствующей резолюции Совета Безопасности ассигновать из Резервного фонда для операций по поддержанию мира до 50 млн. долл. США, как только становится очевидным, что та или иная операция, вероятно, будет учреждена; d) Секретариату следует полностью пересмотреть политику и процедуры закупочной деятельности (обратившись, при необходимости, к Генеральной Ассамблее с предложениями внести изменения в Финансовые правила и положения для облегчения, в частности, оперативного и полного развертывания операции в предлагаемые сроки; e) Секретариату следует провести обзор политики и процедур, регулирующих управление финансовыми ресурсами в полевых миссиях, в целях наделения полевых миссий гораздо большей гибкостью в управлении их бюджетами; f) Секретариату следует увеличить предельную сумму, на которую полевые миссии в соответствии с делегированными полномочиями могут производить закупки (с 200 000 долл. США вплоть до 1 млн. долл. США в зависимости от размера и потребностей миссии) в отношении всех товаров и услуг, имеющихся на местном рынке и не охватываемых системными контрактами или резервными соглашениями об оказании коммерческих услуг. 14. Финансирование поддержки операций по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениях: a) Группа рекомендует существенно увеличить объем ресурсов для поддержки операций по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениях и настоятельно призывает Генерального секретаря представить Генеральной Ассамблее предложение с изложением всех своих потребностей; b) поддержка деятельности по поддержанию мира в Центральных учреждениях должна рассматриваться в качестве ключевой деятельности Организации Объединенных Наций, и поэтому большинство потребностей Организации в ресурсах для указанной цели должно покрываться в77 A/55/305 S/2000/809 рамках механизма составления ее регулярного бюджета по программам на двухгодичный период; с) до подготовки следующего регулярного бюджета Группа рекомендует Генеральному секретарю обратиться к Генеральной Ассамблее с просьбой о внеочередном дополнительном увеличении средств на вспомогательном счете, с тем чтобы можно было безотлагательно набрать дополнительный персонал, в частности ДОПМ. 15. Комплексное планирование и поддержка миссий: комплексные целевые группы по планированию миссий (КЦГМ), члены которых откомандировываются, при необходимости, из различных подразделений системы Организации Объединенных Наций, должны быть стандартным механизмом осуществления планирования и поддержки конкретных миссий. КЦГМ должны выступать в качестве первой инстанции для контакта по всем вопросам такой поддержки, и руководители КЦГМ должны временно являться непосредственными руководителями откомандированных сотрудников в соответствии с соглашениями между ДОПМ, ДПВ и другими участвующими департаментами, программами, фондами и учреждениями. 16. Прочие структурные изменения в ДОПМ: a) структуру нынешнего Отдела военной и гражданской полиции следует изменить, выведя Группу гражданской полиции из военной цепочки управления. Следует рассмотреть вопрос о повышении ранга и уровня советника по вопросам гражданской полиции; b) структуру Канцелярии военного советника в ДОПМ следует изменить, с тем чтобы она ближе соответствовала структуре полевых военных штабов операций Организации Объединенных Наций по поддержанию мира; c) в ДОПМ следует создать новое подразделение и укомплектовать его соответствующими специалистами для предоставления консультаций по вопросам уголовного права, которые исключительно важны для эффективного использования гражданской полиции в операциях Организации Объединенных Наций в пользу мира; d) заместителю Генерального секретаря по вопросам управления следует делегировать заместителю Генерального секретаря по вопросам операций по поддержанию мира на пробный двухлетний период полномочия и ответственность в области составления бюджета и осуществления закупок в связи с деятельностью по поддержанию мираж; e) Группу обобщения опыта следует значительно укрепить и перевести в состав Управления операций ДОПМ; f) следует рассмотреть вопрос о том, чтобы увеличить число должностей уровня помощника Генерального секретаря в ДОПМ с двух до трех и назначить одного из трех «главным помощником Генерального секретаря», который выполнял бы функции заместителя заместителя Генерального секретаря. 17. Оперативная поддержка деятельности в области общественной информации: либо в рамках ДОПМ, либо в рамках новой информационной службы по вопросам мира и безопасности в составе Департамента общественной информации (ДОИ), подчиняющейся непосредственно заместителю Генерального секретаря по коммуникации и общественной информации, следует создать подразделение по оперативному планированию и поддержке деятельности в области общественной информации в рамках операций в пользу мира. 18. Поддержка миростроительства в Департаменте по политическим вопросам: a) Группа поддерживает усилия, предпринимаемые Секретариатом по созданию в рамках ДПВ в сотрудничестве с другими элементами Организации Объединенных Наций экспериментального подразделения по миростроительству, и предлагает государствам-членам вернуться к вопросу о финансировании этого подразделения по линии регулярного бюджета в том случае, если результаты экспериментальной программы окажутся успешными. Эту программу следует оценить в контексте рекомендации Группы в пункте 46 выше и, в том случае, если ее сочтут наиболее оптимальным вариантом укрепления потенциала Организации Объединенных Наций в области миростроительства, ее следует представить Генеральному секретарю, как это рекомендовано в пункте 47(d) выше;78 A/55/305 S/2000/809 b) Группа рекомендует вместо добровольных взносов значительно увеличить объем средств, выделяемых по линии регулярного бюджета на программы Отдела по оказанию помощи в проведении выборов, с тем чтобы он мог оперативно удовлетворять потребности в его услугах; c) в целях уменьшения нагрузки на Отдел управления полевыми операциями и материально-технического обеспечения (ОУПОМТО) и исполнительную канцелярию ДПВ и повышения качества обслуживания менее крупных полевых отделений, занимающихся политическими аспектами и аспектами миростроительства, Группа рекомендует, чтобы вопросами закупок, материально-технического обеспечения, набора персонала и другими вопросами обслуживания всех таких менее крупных полевых миссий, не связанных с решением военных задач, занималось Управление Организации Объединенных Наций по обслуживанию проектов (ЮНОПС). 19. Поддержка операций в пользу мира в Управлении Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека: Группа рекомендует значительно укрепить потенциал Управления Верховного комиссара Организации Объединенных Наций по правам человека в области планирования и подготовки полевых миссий, при этом финансирование должно осуществляться частично по линии регулярного бюджета, а частично по линии бюджета операций в пользу мира. 20. Операции в пользу мира и информационный век: a) департаментам Центральных учреждений, занимающимся вопросами мира и безопасности, нужен центр, который организационно входил бы в состав Секретариата по информационно-стратегическому анализу и функции которого заключались бы в разработке и контроле за осуществлением единой стратегии в области информационных технологий и подготовки соответствующих кадров для операций в пользу мира. Кроме того, для контроля за осуществлением такой стратегии в состав канцелярий специальных представителей Генерального секретаря в рамках комплексных операций в пользу мира следует назначать соответствующих сотрудников, круг ведения которых соответствовал бы кругу ведения этого функционального центра; b) в сотрудничестве с Отделом информационно-технического обслуживания (ОИТО) Секретариату по информационно-стратегическому анализу следует разместить во внутриорганизационной сети Организации Объединенных Наций расширенный раздел, посвященный операциям в пользу мира, и установить гиперсвязь с миссиями через международную сесть операций в пользу мира; c) операции в пользу мира могли бы очень выиграть от более широкого использования географической информационной системы ГИС, которая обеспечивает быстрое интегрирование оперативных сведений с электронными картами района осуществления миссии в таких целях, как демобилизация, деятельность гражданской полиции, регистрация избирателей, наблюдение за соблюдением прав человека и реконструкция; d) следует прогнозировать и более последовательно учитывать при планировании и проведении миссии информационные потребности компонентов миссии, обладающих уникальными информационными потребностями, таких, как гражданская полиция и компонент по правам человека; e) Группа поддерживает идею разработки модели совместного управления Web-сайтом Центральными учреждениями и полевыми миссиями, в рамках которой Центральные учреждения осуществляли бы общий надзор, а отдельные миссии поручали бы конкретным сотрудникам готовить и размещать на Web-сайте материалы, отвечающие стандартам и политике в отношении изложения материалов.