A_55_305_ES
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A/55/305 A-55-305_e.pdf (English)A/55/305 A-55-305_s.pdf (Spanish)
United Nations A/55/305–S/2000/809 General Assembly Security Council Distr.: General 21 August 2000 Original: English 00-59470 (E) 180800 ````````` General Assembly Security Council Fifty-fifth session Fifty-fifth year Item 87 of the provisional agenda* Comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects Identical letters dated 21 August 2000 from the Secretary-General to the President of the General Assembly and the President of the Security Council On 7 March 2000, I convened a high-level Panel to undertake a thorough review of the United Nations peace and security activities, and to present a clear set of specific, concrete and practical recommendations to assist the United Nations in conducting such activities better in the future. I asked Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi, the former Foreign Minister of Algeria, to chair the Panel, which included the following eminent personalities from around the world, with a wide range of experience in the fields of peacekeeping, peace-building, development and humanitarian assistance: Mr. J. Brian Atwood, Ambassador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Mr. Richard Monk, General Klaus Naumann (retd.), Ms. Hisako Shimura, Ambassador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda and Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga. I would be grateful if the Panel’s report, which has been transmitted to me in the enclosed letter dated 17 August 2000 from the Chairman of the Panel, could be brought to the attention of Member States. The Panel’s analysis is frank yet fair; its recommendations are far-reaching yet sensible and practical. The expeditious implementation of the Panel’s recommendations, in my view, is essential to make the United Nations truly credible as a force for peace. Many of the Panel’s recommendations relate to matters fully within the purview of the Secretary-General, while others will need the approval and support of the legislative bodies of the United Nations. I urge all Member States to join me in considering, approving and supporting the implementation of those recommendations. In this connection, I am pleased to inform you that I have designated the Deputy Secretary-General to follow up on the report’s recommendations and to oversee the preparation of a detailed implementation plan, which I shall submit to the General Assembly and the Security Council. * A/55/150.ii A/55/305 S/2000/809 I very much hope that the report of the Panel, in particular its Executive Summary, will be brought to the attention of all the leaders who will be coming to New York in September 2000 to participate in the Millennium Summit. That highleeve and historic meeting presents a unique opportunity for us to commence the process of renewing the United Nations capacity to secure and build peace. I ask for the support of the General Assembly and Security Council in converting into reality the far-reaching agenda laid out in the report. (Signed) Kofi A. Annaniii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Letter dated 17 August 2000 from the Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations to the Secretary-General The Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, which you convened in March 2000, was privileged to have been asked by you to assess the United Nations ability to conduct peace operations effectively, and to offer frank, specific and realistic recommendations for ways in which to enhance that capacity. Mr. Brian Atwood, Ambassador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Mr. Richard Monk, General (ret.) Klaus Naumann, Ms. Hisako Shimura, Ambassador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda, Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga and I accepted this challenge out of deep respect for you and because each of us believes fervently that the United Nations system can do better in the cause of peace. We admired greatly your willingness to undertake past highly critical analyses of United Nations operations in Rwanda and Srebrenica. This degree of self-criticism is rare for any large organization and particularly rare for the United Nations. We also would like to pay tribute to Deputy Secretary-General Louise Fréchette and Chef de Cabinet S. Iqbal Riza, who remained with us throughout our meetings and who answered our many questions with unfailing patience and clarity. They have given us much of their time and we benefited immensely from their intimate knowledge of the United Nations present limitations and future requirements. Producing a review and recommendations for reform of a system with the scope and complexity of United Nations peace operations, in only four months, was a daunting task. It would have been impossible but for the dedication and hard work of Dr. William Durch (with support from staff at the Stimson Center), Mr. Salman Ahmed of the United Nations and the willingness of United Nations officials throughout the system, including serving heads of mission, to share their insights both in interviews and in often comprehensive critiques of their own organizations and experiences. Former heads of peace operations and force commanders, academics and representatives of non-governmental organizations were equally helpful. The Panel engaged in intense discussion and debate. Long hours were devoted to reviewing recommendations and supporting analysis that we knew would be subject to scrutiny and interpretation. Over three separate three-day meetings in New York, Geneva and then New York again, we forged the letter and the spirit of the attached report. Its analysis and recommendations reflect our consensus, which we convey to you with our hope that it serve the cause of systematic reform and renewal of this core function of the United Nations. As we say in the report, we are aware that you are engaged in conducting a comprehensive reform of the Secretariat. We thus hope that our recommendations fit within that wider process, with slight adjustments if necessary. We realize that not all of our recommendations can be implemented overnight, but many of them do require urgent action and the unequivocal support of Member States. Throughout these months, we have read and heard encouraging words from Member States, large and small, from the South and from the North, stressing the necessity for urgent improvement in the ways the United Nations addresses conflictiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 situations. We urge them to act decisively to translate into reality those of our recommendations that require formal action by them. The Panel has full confidence that the official we suggest you designate to oversee the implementation of our recommendations, both inside the Secretariat and with Member States, will have your full support, in line with your conviction to transform the United Nations into the type of twenty-first century institution it needs to be to effectively meet the current and future threats to world peace. Finally, if I may be allowed to add a personal note, I wish to express my deepest gratitude to each of my colleagues on this Panel. Together, they have contributed to the project an impressive sum of knowledge and experience. They have consistently shown the highest degree of commitment to the Organization and a deep understanding of its needs. During our meetings and our contacts from afar, they have all been extremely kind to me, invariably helpful, patient and generous, thus making the otherwise intimidating task as their Chairman relatively easier and truly enjoyable. (Signed) Lakhdar Brahimi Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operationsv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Contents Paragraphs Page Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii I. The need for change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 1 II. Doctrine, strategy and decision-making for peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–83 2 A. Defining the elements of peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 2 B. Experience of the past. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–28 3 C. Implications for preventive action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–34 5 Summary of key recommendations on preventive action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 6 D. Implications for peace-building strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–47 6 Summary of key recommendations on peace-building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 8 E. Implications for peacekeeping doctrine and strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48–55 9 Summary of key recommendation on peacekeeping doctrine and strategy. . . . 55 10 F. Clear, credible and achievable mandates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–64 10 Summary of key recommendations on clear, credible and achievable mandates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 11 G. Information-gathering, analysis and strategic planning capacities . . . . . . . . . . 65–75 12 Summary of key recommendation on information and strategic analysis. . . . . 75 13 H. The challenge of transitional civil administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–83 13 Summary of key recommendation on transitional civil administration. . . . . . . 83 14 III. United Nations capacities to deploy operations rapidly and effectively . . . . . . . . . . 84–169 14 A. Defining what “rapid and effective deployment” entails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–91 15 Summary of key recommendation on determining deployment timelines . . . . . 91 16 B. Effective mission leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–101 16 Summary of key recommendations on mission leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 17 C. Military personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–117 17 Summary of key recommendations on military personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 20 D. Civilian police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–126 20 Summary of key recommendations on civilian police personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 21 E. Civilian specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127–145 21 1. Lack of standby systems to respond to unexpected or high-volume surge demands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128–132 22vi A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. Difficulties in attracting and retaining the best external recruits . . . . . . . 133–135 23 3. Shortages in administrative and support functions at the mid-to-senior levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 23 4. Penalizing field deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–138 23 5. Obsolescence in the Field Service category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139–140 24 6. Lack of a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations. . . . . . . . 141–145 24 Summary of key recommendations on civilian specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 25 F. Public information capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146–150 25 Summary of key recommendation on rapidly deployable capacity for public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 26 G. Logistics support, the procurement process and expenditure management . . . 151–169 26 Summary of key recommendations on logistics support and expenditure management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 28 IV. Headquarters resources and structure for planning and supporting peacekeeping operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170–245 29 A. Staffing-levels and funding for Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172–197 29 Summary of key recommendations on funding Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 34 B. Need and proposal for the establishment of Integrated Mission Task Forces . 198–217 34 Summary of key recommendation on integrated mission planning and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 37 C. Other structural adjustments required in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218–233 37 1. Military and Civilian Police Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219–225 37 2. Field Administration and Logistics Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226–228 38 3. Lessons Learned Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229–230 39 4. Senior management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231–233 39 Summary of key recommendations on other structural adjustments in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 39 D. Structural adjustments needed outside the Department of Peacekeeping Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234–245 40 1. Operational support for public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235–238 40 Summary of key recommendation on structural adjustments in public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 40vii A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs . . . . . . . . . 239–243 40 Summary of key recommendations for peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 41 3. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244–245 41 Summary of key recommendation on strengthening the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 41 V. Peace operations and the information age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246–264 42 A. Information technology in peace operations: strategy and policy issues . . . . . 247–251 42 Summary of key recommendation on information technology strategy and policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 42 B. Tools for knowledge management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252–258 43 Summary of key recommendations on information technology tools in peace operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 43 C. Improving the timeliness of Internet-based public information . . . . . . . . . . . . 259–264 44 Summary of key recommendation on the timeliness of Internet-based public information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 44 VI. Challenges to implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265–280 44 Annexes I. Members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 II. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 III. Summary of recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54viii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Executive Summary The United Nations was founded, in the words of its Charter, in order “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Meeting this challenge is the most important function of the Organization, and to a very significant degree it is the yardstick with which the Organization is judged by the peoples it exists to serve. Over the last decade, the United Nations has repeatedly failed to meet the challenge, and it can do no better today. Without renewed commitment on the part of Member States, significant institutional change and increased financial support, the United Nations will not be capable of executing the critical peacekeeping and peacebuilldin tasks that the Member States assign to it in coming months and years. There are many tasks which United Nations peacekeeping forces should not be asked to undertake and many places they should not go. But when the United Nations does send its forces to uphold the peace, they must be prepared to confront the lingering forces of war and violence, with the ability and determination to defeat them.The Secretary-General has asked the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, composed of individuals experienced in various aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building, to assess the shortcomings of the existing system and to make frank, specific and realistic recommendations for change. Our recommendations focus not only on politics and strategy but also and perhaps even more so on operational and organizational areas of need. For preventive initiatives to succeed in reducing tension and averting conflict, the Secretary-General needs clear, strong and sustained political support from Member States. Furthermore, as the United Nations has bitterly and repeatedly discovered over the last decade, no amount of good intentions can substitute for the fundamental ability to project credible force if complex peacekeeping, in particular, is to succeed. But force alone cannot create peace; it can only create the space in which peace may be built. Moreover, the changes that the Panel recommends will have no lasting impact unless Member States summon the political will to support the United Nations politically, financially and operationally to enable the United Nations to be truly credible as a force for peace. Each of the recommendations contained in the present report is designed to remedy a serious problem in strategic direction, decision-making, rapid deployment, operational planning and support, and the use of modern information technology. Key assessments and recommendations are highlighted below, largely in the order in which they appear in the body of the text (the numbers of the relevant paragraphs in the main text are provided in parentheses). In addition, a summary of recommendations is contained in annex III. Experience of the past (paras. 15-28) It should have come as no surprise to anyone that some of the missions of the past decade would be particularly hard to accomplish: they tended to deploy where conflict had not resulted in victory for any side, where a military stalemate or international pressure or both had brought fighting to a halt but at least some of the parties to the conflict were not seriously committed to ending the confrontation. United Nations operations thus did not deploy into post-conflict situations but tried to create them. In such complex operations, peacekeepers work to maintain a secure local environment while peacebuilders work to make that environment self-sustaining.ix A/55/305 S/2000/809 Only such an environment offers a ready exit to peacekeeping forces, making peacekeepers and peacebuilders inseparable partners. Implications for preventive action and peace-building: the need for strategy and support (paras. 29-47) The United Nations and its members face a pressing need to establish more effective strategies for conflict prevention, in both the long and short terms. In this context, the Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report (A/54/2000) and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000. It also encourages the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension in support of short-term crisispreveentiv action. Furthermore, the Security Council and the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, conscious that the United Nations will continue to face the prospect of having to assist communities and nations in making the transition from war to peace, have each recognized and acknowledged the key role of peace-building in complex peace operations. This will require that the United Nations system address what has hitherto been a fundamental deficiency in the way it has conceived of, funded and implemented peace-building strategies and activities. Thus, the Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) present to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. Among the changes that the Panel supports are: a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police and related rule of law elements in peace operations that emphasizes a team approach to upholding the rule of law and respect for human rights and helping communities coming out of a conflict to achieve national reconciliation; consolidation of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations in their first phase; flexibility for heads of United Nations peace operations to fund “quick impact projects” that make a real difference in the lives of people in the mission area; and better integration of electoral assistance into a broader strategy for the support of governance institutions. Implications for peacekeeping: the need for robust doctrine and realistic mandates (paras. 48-64) The Panel concurs that consent of the local parties, impartiality and the use of force only in self-defence should remain the bedrock principles of peacekeeping. Experience shows, however, that in the context of intra-State/transnational conflicts, consent may be manipulated in many ways. Impartiality for United Nations operations must therefore mean adherence to the principles of the Charter: where one party to a peace agreement clearly and incontrovertibly is violating its terms, continued equal treatment of all parties by the United Nations can in the best case result in ineffectiveness and in the worst may amount to complicity with evil. No failure did more to damage the standing and credibility of United Nations peacekeeping in the 1990s than its reluctance to distinguish victim from aggressor.xA/55/305 S/2000/809 In the past, the United Nations has often found itself unable to respond effectively to such challenges. It is a fundamental premise of the present report, however, that it must be able to do so. Once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandate professionally and successfully. This means that United Nations military units must be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate. Rules of engagement should be sufficiently robust and not force United Nations contingents to cede the initiative to their attackers. This means, in turn, that the Secretariat must not apply best-case planning assumptions to situations where the local actors have historically exhibited worstcaas behaviour. It means that mandates should specify an operation’s authority to use force. It means bigger forces, better equipped and more costly but able to be a credible deterrent. In particular, United Nations forces for complex operations should be afforded the field intelligence and other capabilities needed to mount an effective defence against violent challengers. Moreover, United Nations peacekeepers — troops or police — who witness violence against civilians should be presumed to be authorized to stop it, within their means, in support of basic United Nations principles. However, operations given a broad and explicit mandate for civilian protection must be given the specific resources needed to carry out that mandate. The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when recommending force and other resource levels for a new mission, and it must set those levels according to realistic scenarios that take into account likely challenges to implementation. Security Council mandates, in turn, should reflect the clarity that peacekeeping operations require for unity of effort when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations. The current practice is for the Secretary-General to be given a Security Council resolution specifying troop levels on paper, not knowing whether he will be given the troops and other personnel that the mission needs to function effectively, or whether they will be properly equipped. The Panel is of the view that, once realistic mission requirements have been set and agreed to, the Council should leave its authorizing resolution in draft form until the Secretary-General confirms that he has received troop and other commitments from Member States sufficient to meet those requirements. Member States that do commit formed military units to an operation should be invited to consult with the members of the Security Council during mandate formulation; such advice might usefully be institutionalized via the establishment of ad hoc subsidiary organs of the Council, as provided for in Article 29 of the Charter. Troop contributors should also be invited to attend Secretariat briefings of the Security Council pertaining to crises that affect the safety and security of mission personnel or to a change or reinterpretation of the mandate regarding the use of force. New headquarters capacity for information management and strategic analysis (paras. 65-75) The Panel recommends that a new information-gathering and analysis entity be created to support the informational and analytical needs of the Secretary-Generalxi A/55/305 S/2000/809 and the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS). Without such capacity, the Secretariat will remain a reactive institution, unable to get ahead of daily events, and the ECPS will not be able to fulfil the role for which it was created. The Panel’s proposed ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS) would create and maintain integrated databases on peace and security issues, distribute that knowledge efficiently within the United Nations system, generate policy analyses, formulate long-term strategies for ECPS and bring budding crises to the attention of the ECPS leadership. It could also propose and manage the agenda of ECPS itself, helping to transform it into the decision-making body anticipated in the Secretary-General’s initial reforms. The Panel proposes that EISAS be created by consolidating the existing Situation Centre of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) with a number of small, scattered policy planning offices, and adding a small team of military analysts, experts in international criminal networks and information systems specialists. EISAS should serve the needs of all members of ECPS. Improved mission guidance and leadership (paras. 92-101) The Panel believes it is essential to assemble the leadership of a new mission as early as possible at United Nations Headquarters, to participate in shaping a mission’s concept of operations, support plan, budget, staffing and Headquarters mission guidance. To that end, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General compile, in a systematic fashion and with input from Member States, a comprehensive list of potential special representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs), force commanders, civilian police commissioners, their potential deputies and potential heads of other components of a mission, representing a broad geographic and equitable gender distribution. Rapid deployment standards and “on-call” expertise (paras. 86-91 and 102-169) The first 6 to 12 weeks following a ceasefire or peace accord are often the most critical ones for establishing both a stable peace and the credibility of a new operation. Opportunities lost during that period are hard to regain. The Panel recommends that the United Nations define “rapid and effective deployment capacity” as the ability to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing such an operation, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. The Panel recommends that the United Nations standby arrangements system (UNSAS) be developed further to include several coherent, multinational, brigadesiiz forces and the necessary enabling forces, created by Member States working in partnership, in order to better meet the need for the robust peacekeeping forces that the Panel has advocated. The Panel also recommends that the Secretariat send a team to confirm the readiness of each potential troop contributor to meet the requisite United Nations training and equipment requirements for peacekeeping operations, prior to deployment. Units that do not meet the requirements must not be deployed.xii A/55/305 S/2000/809 To support such rapid and effective deployment, the Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 experienced, well qualified military officers, carefully vetted and accepted by DPKO, be created within UNSAS. Teams drawn from this list and available for duty on seven days’ notice would translate broad, strategic-level mission concepts developed at Headquarters into concrete operational and tactical plans in advance of the deployment of troop contingents, and would augment a core element from DPKO to serve as part of a mission start-up team. Parallel on-call lists of civilian police, international judicial experts, penal experts and human rights specialists must be available in sufficient numbers to strengthen rule of law institutions, as needed, and should also be part of UNSAS. Pre-trained teams could then be drawn from this list to precede the main body of civilian police and related specialists into a new mission area, facilitating the rapid and effective deployment of the law and order component into the mission. The Panel also calls upon Member States to establish enhanced national “pools” of police officers and related experts, earmarked for deployment to United Nations peace operations, to help meet the high demand for civilian police and related criminal justice/rule of law expertise in peace operations dealing with intra-State conflict. The Panel also urges Member States to consider forming joint regional partnerships and programmes for the purpose of training members of the respective national pools to United Nations civilian police doctrine and standards. The Secretariat should also address, on an urgent basis, the needs: to put in place a transparent and decentralized recruitment mechanism for civilian field personnel; to improve the retention of the civilian specialists that are needed in every complex peace operation; and to create standby arrangements for their rapid deployment. Finally, the Panel recommends that the Secretariat radically alter the systems and procedures in place for peacekeeping procurement in order to facilitate rapid deployment. It recommends that responsibilities for peacekeeping budgeting and procurement be moved out of the Department of Management and placed in DPKO. The Panel proposes the creation of a new and distinct body of streamlined field procurement policies and procedures; increased delegation of procurement authority to the field; and greater flexibility for field missions in the management of their budgets. The Panel also urges that the Secretary-General formulate and submit to the General Assembly, for its approval, a global logistics support strategy governing the stockpiling of equipment reserves and standing contracts with the private sector for common goods and services. In the interim, the Panel recommends that additional “start-up kits” of essential equipment be maintained at the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) in Brindisi, Italy. The Panel also recommends that the Secretary-General be given authority, with the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) to commit up to $50 million well in advance of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a new operation once it becomes clear that an operation is likely to be established.xiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Enhance Headquarters capacity to plan and support peace operations (paras. 170-197) The Panel recommends that Headquarters support for peacekeeping be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements should be funded through the regular budget of the Organization. DPKO and other offices that plan and support peacekeeping are currently primarily funded by the Support Account, which is renewed each year and funds only temporary posts. That approach to funding and staff seems to confuse the temporary nature of specific operations with the evident permanence of peacekeeping and other peace operations activities as core functions of the United Nations, which is obviously an untenable state of affairs. The total cost of DPKO and related Headquarters support offices for peacekeeping does not exceed $50 million per annum, or roughly 2 per cent of total peacekeeping costs. Additional resources for those offices are urgently needed to ensure that more than $2 billion spent on peacekeeping in 2001 are well spent. The Panel therefore recommends that the Secretary-General submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining the Organization’s requirements in full. The Panel believes that a methodical management review of DPKO should be conducted but also believes that staff shortages in certain areas are plainly obvious. For example, it is clearly not enough to have 32 officers providing military planning and guidance to 27,000 troops in the field, nine civilian police staff to identify, vet and provide guidance for up to 8,600 police, and 15 political desk officers for 14 current operations and two new ones, or to allocate just 1.25 per cent of the total costs of peacekeeping to Headquarters administrative and logistics support. Establish Integrated Mission Task Forces for mission planning and support (paras. 198-245) The Panel recommends that Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs) be created, with staff from throughout the United Nations system seconded to them, to plan new missions and help them reach full deployment, significantly enhancing the support that Headquarters provides to the field. There is currently no integrated planning or support cell in the Secretariat that brings together those responsible for political analysis, military operations, civilian police, electoral assistance, human rights, development, humanitarian assistance, refugees and displaced persons, public information, logistics, finance and recruitment. Structural adjustments are also required in other elements of DPKO, in particular to the Military and Civilian Police Division, which should be reorganized into two separate divisions, and the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD), which should be split into two divisions. The Lessons Learned Unit should be strengthened and moved into the DPKO Office of Operations. Public information planning and support at Headquarters also needs strengthening, as do elements in the Department of Political Affairs (DPA), particularly the electoral unit. Outside the Secretariat, the ability of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to plan and support the human rights components of peace operations needs to be reinforced.xiv A/55/305 S/2000/809 Consideration should be given to allocating a third Assistant Secretary-General to DPKO and designating one of them as “Principal Assistant Secretary-General”, functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. Adapting peace operations to the information age (paras. 246-264) Modern, well utilized information technology (IT) is a key enabler of many of the above-mentioned objectives, but gaps in strategy, policy and practice impede its effective use. In particular, Headquarters lacks a sufficiently strong responsibility centre for user-level IT strategy and policy in peace operations. A senior official with such responsibility in the peace and security arena should be appointed and located within EISAS, with counterparts in the offices of the SRSG in every United Nations peace operation. Headquarters and the field missions alike also need a substantive, global, Peace Operations Extranet (POE), through which missions would have access to, among other things, EISAS databases and analyses and lessons learned. Challenges to implementation (paras. 265-280) The Panel believes that the above recommendations fall well within the bounds of what can be reasonably demanded of the Organization’s Member States. Implementing some of them will require additional resources for the Organization, but we do not mean to suggest that the best way to solve the problems of the United Nations is merely to throw additional resources at them. Indeed, no amount of money or resources can substitute for the significant changes that are urgently needed in the culture of the Organization. The Panel calls on the Secretariat to heed the Secretary-General’s initiatives to reach out to the institutions of civil society; to constantly keep in mind that the United Nations they serve is the universal organization. People everywhere are fully entitled to consider that it is their organization, and as such to pass judgement on its activities and the people who serve in it. Furthermore, wide disparities in staff quality exist and those in the system are the first to acknowledge it; better performers are given unreasonable workloads to compensate for those who are less capable. Unless the United Nations takes steps to become a true meritocracy, it will not be able to reverse the alarming trend of qualified personnel, the young among them in particular, leaving the Organization. Moreover, qualified people will have no incentive to join it. Unless managers at all levels, beginning with the Secretary-General and his senior staff, seriously address this problem on a priority basis, reward excellence and remove incompetence, additional resources will be wasted and lasting reform will become impossible. Member States also acknowledge that they need to reflect on their working culture and methods. It is incumbent upon Security Council members, for example, and the membership at large to breathe life into the words that they produce, as did, for instance, the Security Council delegation that flew to Jakarta and Dili in the wake of the East Timor crisis in 1999, an example of effective Council action at its best: res, non verba. We — the members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations — call on the leaders of the world assembled at the Millennium Summit, as they renew their commitment to the ideals of the United Nations, to commit as well toxv A/55/305 S/2000/809 strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to fully accomplish the mission which is, indeed, its very raison d’être: to help communities engulfed in strife and to maintain or restore peace. While building consensus for the recommendations in the present report, we have also come to a shared vision of a United Nations, extending a strong helping hand to a community, country or region to avert conflict or to end violence. We see an SRSG ending a mission well accomplished, having given the people of a country the opportunity to do for themselves what they could not do before: to build and hold onto peace, to find reconciliation, to strengthen democracy, to secure human rights. We see, above all, a United Nations that has not only the will but also the ability to fulfil its great promise, and to justify the confidence and trust placed in it by the overwhelming majority of humankind.1 A/55/305 S/2000/809 I. The need for change 1. The United Nations was founded, in the words of its Charter, in order “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Meeting this challenge is the most important function of the Organization, and, to a very significant degree, the yardstick by which it is judged by the peoples it exists to serve. Over the last decade, the United Nations has repeatedly failed to meet the challenge; and it can do no better today. Without significant institutional change, increased financial support, and renewed commitment on the part of Member States, the United Nations will not be capable of executing the critical peacekeeping and peace-building tasks that the Member States assign it in coming months and years. There are many tasks which the United Nations peacekeeping forces should not be asked to undertake, and many places they should not go. But when the United Nations does send its forces to uphold the peace, they must be prepared to confront the lingering forces of war and violence with the ability and determination to defeat them. 2. The Secretary-General has asked the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, composed of individuals experienced in various aspects of conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building (Panel members are listed in annex I), to assess the shortcomings of the existing system and to make frank, specific and realistic recommendations for change. Our recommendations focus not only on politics and strategy but also on operational and organizational areas of need. 3. For preventive initiatives to reduce tension and avert conflict, the Secretary-General needs clear, strong and sustained political support from Member States. For peacekeeping to accomplish its mission, as the United Nations has discovered repeatedly over the last decade, no amount of good intentions can substitute for the fundamental ability to project credible force. However, force alone cannot create peace; it can only create a space in which peace can be built. 4. In other words, the key conditions for the success of future complex operations are political support, rapid deployment with a robust force posture and a sound peace-building strategy. Every recommendation in the present report is meant, in one way or another, to help ensure that these three conditions are met. The need for change has been rendered even more urgent by recent events in Sierra Leone and by the daunting prospect of expanded United Nations operations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 5. These changes — while essential — will have no lasting impact unless the Member States of the Organization take seriously their responsibility to train and equip their own forces and to mandate and enable their collective instrument, so that together they may succeed in meeting threats to peace. They must summon the political will to support the United Nations politically, financially and operationally — once they have decided to act as the United Nations — if the Organization is to be credible as a force for peace. 6. The recommendations that the Panel presents balance principle and pragmatism, while honouring the spirit and letter of the Charter of the United Nations and the respective roles of the Organization’s legislative bodies. They are based on the following premises: (a) The essential responsibility of Member States for the maintenance of international peace and security, and the need to strengthen both the quality and quantity of support provided to the United Nations system to carry out that responsibility; (b) The pivotal importance of clear, credible and adequately resourced Security Council mandates; (c) A focus by the United Nations system on conflict prevention and its early engagement, wherever possible; (d) The need to have more effective collection and assessment of information at United Nations Headquarters, including an enhanced conflict early warning system that can detect and recognize the threat or risk of conflict or genocide; (e) The essential importance of the United Nations system adhering to and promoting international human rights instruments and standards and international humanitarian law in all aspects of its peace and security activities; (f) The need to build the United Nations capacity to contribute to peace-building, both preventive and post-conflict, in a genuinely integrated manner; (g) The critical need to improve Headquarters planning (including contingency planning) for peace operations;2A/55/305 S/2000/809 (h) The recognition that while the United Nations has acquired considerable expertise in planning, mounting and executing traditional peacekeeping operations, it has yet to acquire the capacity needed to deploy more complex operations rapidly and to sustain them effectively; (i) The necessity to provide field missions with high-quality leaders and managers who are granted greater flexibility and autonomy by Headquarters, within clear mandate parameters and with clear standards of accountability for both spending and results; (j) The imperative to set and adhere to a high standard of competence and integrity for both Headquarters and field personnel, who must be provided the training and support necessary to do their jobs and to progress in their careers, guided by modern management practices that reward meritorious performance and weed out incompetence; (k) The importance of holding individual officials at Headquarters and in the field accountable for their performance, recognizing that they need to be given commensurate responsibility, authority and resources to fulfil their assigned tasks. 7. In the present report, the Panel has addressed itself to many compelling needs for change within the United Nations system. The Panel views its recommendations as the minimum threshold of change needed to give the United Nations system the opportunity to be an effective, operational, twenty-first century institution. (Key recommendations are summarized in bold type throughout the text; they are also combined in a single summary in annex III.) 8. The blunt criticisms contained in the present report reflect the Panel’s collective experience as well as interviews conducted at every level of the system. More than 200 people were either interviewed or provided written input to the Panel. Sources included the Permanent Missions of Member States, including the Security Council members; the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations; and personnel in peace and security-related departments at United Nations Headquarters in New York, in the United Nations Office at Geneva, at the headquarters of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), at the headquarters of other United Nations funds and programmes; at the World Bank and in every current United Nations peace operation. (A list of references is contained in annex II.) II. Doctrine, strategy and decisionmakkin for peace operations 9. The United Nations system — namely the Member States, Security Council, General Assembly and Secretariat — must commit to peace operations carefully, reflecting honestly on the record of its performance over the past decade. It must adjust accordingly the doctrine upon which peace operations are established; fine-tune its analytical and decisionmakkin capacities to respond to existing realities and anticipate future requirements; and summon the creativity, imagination and will required to implement new and alternative solutions to those situations into which peacekeepers cannot or should not go. A. Defining the elements of peace operations 10. United Nations peace operations entail three principal activities: conflict prevention and peacemaking; peacekeeping; and peace-building. Longteer conflict prevention addresses the structural sources of conflict in order to build a solid foundation for peace. Where those foundations are crumbling, conflict prevention attempts to reinforce them, usually in the form of a diplomatic initiative. Such preventive action is, by definition, a low-profile activity; when successful, it may even go unnoticed altogether. 11. Peacemaking addresses conflicts in progress, attempting to bring them to a halt, using the tools of diplomacy and mediation. Peacemakers may be envoys of Governments, groups of States, regional organizations or the United Nations, or they may be unofficial and non-governmental groups, as was the case, for example, in the negotiations leading up to a peace accord for Mozambique. Peacemaking may even be the work of a prominent personality, working independently. 12. Peacekeeping is a 50-year-old enterprise that has evolved rapidly in the past decade from a traditional, primarily military model of observing ceasefires and force separations after inter-State wars, to incorporate a complex model of many elements, military and3 A/55/305 S/2000/809 civilian, working together to build peace in the dangerous aftermath of civil wars. 13. Peace-building is a term of more recent origin that, as used in the present report, defines activities undertaken on the far side of conflict to reassemble the foundations of peace and provide the tools for building on those foundations something that is more than just the absence of war. Thus, peace-building includes but is not limited to reintegrating former combatants into civilian society, strengthening the rule of law (for example, through training and restructuring of local police, and judicial and penal reform); improving respect for human rights through the monitoring, education and investigation of past and existing abuses; providing technical assistance for democratic development (including electoral assistance and support for free media); and promoting conflict resolution and reconciliation techniques. 14. Essential complements to effective peacebuilldin include support for the fight against corruption, the implementation of humanitarian demining programmes, emphasis on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education and control, and action against other infectious diseases. B. Experience of the past 15. The quiet successes of short-term conflict prevention and peacemaking are often, as noted, politically invisible. Personal envoys and representatives of the Secretary-General (RSGs) or special representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs) have at times complemented the diplomatic initiatives of Member States and, at other times, have taken initiatives that Member States could not readily duplicate. Examples of the latter initiatives (drawn from peacemaking as well as preventive diplomacy) include the achievement of a ceasefire in the Islamic Republic of Iran-Iraq war in 1988, the freeing of the last Western hostages in Lebanon in 1991, and avoidance of war between the Islamic Republic of Iran and Afghanistan in 1998. 16. Those who favour focusing on the underlying causes of conflicts argue that such crisis-related efforts often prove either too little or too late. Attempted earlier, however, diplomatic initiatives may be rebuffed by a government that does not see or will not acknowledge a looming problem, or that may itself be part of the problem. Thus, long-term preventive strategies are a necessary complement to short-term initiatives. 17. Until the end of the cold war, United Nations peacekeeping operations mostly had traditional ceasefire-monitoring mandates and no direct peacebuilldin responsibilities. The “entry strategy” or sequence of events and decisions leading to United Nations deployment was straightforward: war, ceasefire, invitation to monitor ceasefire compliance and deployment of military observers or units to do so, while efforts continued for a political settlement. Intelligence requirements were also fairly straightforward and risks to troops were relatively low. But traditional peacekeeping, which treats the symptoms rather than sources of conflict, has no builtii exit strategy and associated peacemaking was often slow to make progress. As a result, traditional peacekeepers have remained in place for 10, 20, 30 or even 50 years (as in Cyprus, the Middle East and India/Pakistan). By the standards of more complex operations, they are relatively low cost and politically easier to maintain than to remove. However, they are also difficult to justify unless accompanied by serious and sustained peacemaking efforts that seek to transform a ceasefire accord into a durable and lasting peace settlement. 18. Since the end of the cold war, United Nations peacekeeping has often combined with peace-building in complex peace operations deployed into settings of intra-State conflict. Those conflict settings, however, both affect and are affected by outside actors: political patrons; arms vendors; buyers of illicit commodity exports; regional powers that send their own forces into the fray; and neighbouring States that host refugees who are sometimes systematically forced to flee their homes. With such significant cross-border effects by state and non-state actors alike, these conflicts are often decidedly “transnational” in character. 19. Risks and costs for operations that must function in such circumstances are much greater than for traditional peacekeeping. Moreover, the complexity of the tasks assigned to these missions and the volatility of the situation on the ground tend to increase together. Since the end of the cold war, such complex and risky mandates have been the rule rather than the exception: United Nations operations have been given reliefesccor duties where the security situation was so4A/55/305 S/2000/809 dangerous that humanitarian operations could not continue without high risk for humanitarian personnel; they have been given mandates to protect civilian victims of conflict where potential victims were at greatest risk, and mandates to control heavy weapons in possession of local parties when those weapons were being used to threaten the mission and the local population alike. In two extreme situations, United Nations operations were given executive law enforcement and administrative authority where local authority did not exist or was not able to function. 20. It should have come as no surprise to anyone that these missions would be hard to accomplish. Initially, the 1990s offered more positive prospects: operations implementing peace accords were time-limited, rather than of indefinite duration, and successful conduct of national elections seemed to offer a ready exit strategy. However, United Nations operations since then have tended to deploy where conflict has not resulted in victory for any side: it may be that the conflict is stalemated militarily or that international pressure has brought fighting to a halt, but in any event the conflict is unfinished. United Nations operations thus do not deploy into post-conflict situations so much as they deploy to create such situations. That is, they work to divert the unfinished conflict, and the personal, political or other agendas that drove it, from the military to the political arena, and to make that diversion permanent. 21. As the United Nations soon discovered, local parties sign peace accords for a variety of reasons, not all of them favourable to peace. “Spoilers” — groups (including signatories) who renege on their commitments or otherwise seek to undermine a peace accord by violence — challenged peace implementation in Cambodia, threw Angola, Somalia and Sierra Leone back into civil war, and orchestrated the murder of no fewer than 800,000 people in Rwanda. The United Nations must be prepared to deal effectively with spoilers if it expects to achieve a consistent record of success in peacekeeping or peacebuilldin in situations of intrastate/transnational conflict. 22. A growing number of reports on such conflicts have highlighted the fact that would-be spoilers have the greatest incentive to defect from peace accords when they have an independent source of income that pays soldiers, buys guns, enriches faction leaders and may even have been the motive for war. Recent history indicates that, where such income streams from the export of illicit narcotics, gemstones or other highvaalu commodities cannot be pinched off, peace is unsustainable. 23. Neighbouring States can contribute to the problem by allowing passage of conflict-supporting contraband, serving as middlemen for it or providing base areas for fighters. To counter such conflictsuppoortin neighbours, a peace operation will require the active political, logistical and/or military support of one or more great powers, or of major regional powers. The tougher the operation, the more important such backing becomes. 24. Other variables that affect the difficulty of peace implementation include, first, the sources of the conflict. These can range from economics (e.g., issues of poverty, distribution, discrimination or corruption), politics (an unalloyed contest for power) and resource and other environmental issues (such as competition for scarce water) to issues of ethnicity, religion or gross violations of human rights. Political and economic objectives may be more fluid and open to compromise than objectives related to resource needs, ethnicity or religion. Second, the complexity of negotiating and implementing peace will tend to rise with the number of local parties and the divergence of their goals (e.g., some may seek unity, others separation). Third, the level of casualties, population displacement and infrastructure damage will affect the level of wargeneerate grievance, and thus the difficulty of reconciliation, which requires that past human rights violations be addressed, as well as the cost and complexity of reconstruction. 25. A relatively less dangerous environment — just two parties, committed to peace, with competitive but congruent aims, lacking illicit sources of income, with neighbours and patrons committed to peace — is a fairly forgiving one. In less forgiving, more dangerous environments — three or more parties, of varying commitment to peace, with divergent aims, with independent sources of income and arms, and with neighbours who are willing to buy, sell and transit illicit goods — United Nations missions put not only their own people but peace itself at risk unless they perform their tasks with the competence and efficiency that the situation requires and have serious great power backing.5 A/55/305 S/2000/809 26. It is vitally important that negotiators, the Security Council, Secretariat mission planners, and mission participants alike understand which of these political-military environments they are entering, how the environment may change under their feet once they arrive, and what they realistically plan to do if and when it does change. Each of these must be factored into an operation’s entry strategy and, indeed, into the basic decision about whether an operation is feasible and should even be attempted. 27. It is equally important, in this context, to judge the extent to which local authorities are willing and able to take difficult but necessary political and economic decisions and to participate in the establishment of processes and mechanisms to manage internal disputes and pre-empt violence or the reemerrgenc of conflict. These are factors over which a field mission and the United Nations have little control, yet such a cooperative environment is critical in determining the successful outcome of a peace operation. 28. When complex peace operations do go into the field, it is the task of the operation’s peacekeepers to maintain a secure local environment for peacebuillding and the peacebuilders’ task to support the political, social and economic changes that create a secure environment that is self-sustaining. Only such an environment offers a ready exit to peacekeeping forces, unless the international community is willing to tolerate recurrence of conflict when such forces depart. History has taught that peacekeepers and peacebuilders are inseparable partners in complex operations: while the peacebuilders may not be able to function without the peacekeepers’ support, the peacekeepers have no exit without the peacebuilders’ work. C. Implications for preventive action 29. United Nations peace operations addressed no more than one third of the conflict situations of the 1990s. Because even much-improved mechanisms for creation and support of United Nations peacekeeping operations will not enable the United Nations system to respond with such operations in the case of all conflict everywhere, there is a pressing need for the United Nations and its Member States to establish a more effective system for long-term conflict prevention. Prevention is clearly far more preferable for those who would otherwise suffer the consequences of war, and is a less costly option for the international community than military action, emergency humanitarian relief or reconstruction after a war has run its course. As the Secretary-General noted in his recent Millennium Report (A/54/2000), “every step taken towards reducing poverty and achieving broad-based economic growth is a step toward conflict prevention”. In many cases of internal conflict, “poverty is coupled with sharp ethnic or religious cleavages”, in which minority rights “are insufficiently respected [and] the institutions of government are insufficiently inclusive”. Long-term preventive strategies in such instances must therefore work “to promote human rights, to protect minority rights and to institute political arrangements in which all groups are represented. ... Every group needs to become convinced that the state belongs to all people”. 30. The Panel wishes to commend the United Nations ongoing internal Task Force on Peace and Security for its work in the area of long-term prevention, in particular the notion that development entities in the United Nations system should view humanitarian and development work through a “conflict prevention lens” and make long-term prevention a key focus of their work, adapting current tools, such as the common country assessment and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF), to that end. 31. To improve early United Nations focus on potential new complex emergencies and thus shortteer conflict prevention, about two years ago the Headquarters Departments that sit on the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) created the Inter-Agency/Interdepartmental Framework for Coordination, in which 10 departments, funds, programmes and agencies now participate. The active element, the Framework Team, meets at the Director level monthly to decide on areas at risk, schedule country (or situation) review meetings and identify preventive measures. The Framework mechanism has improved interdepartmental contacts but has not accumulated knowledge in a structured way, and does no strategic planning. This may have contributed to the Secretariat’s difficulty in persuading Member States of the advantages of backing their professed commitment to both long-and short-term conflict prevention measures with the requisite political and financial support. In the interim, the Secretary-General’s annual reports of 1997 and 1999 (A/52/1 and A/54/1) focused6A/55/305 S/2000/809 specifically on conflict prevention. The Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict and the United Nations Association of the United States of America, among others, also have contributed valuable studies on the subject. And more than 400 staff in the United Nations have undergone systematic training in “early warning” at the United Nations Staff College in Turin. 32. At the heart of the question of short-term prevention lies the use of fact-finding missions and other key initiatives by the Secretary-General. These have, however, usually met with two key impediments. First, there is the understandable and legitimate concern of Member States, especially the small and weak among them, about sovereignty. Such concerns are all the greater in the face of initiatives taken by another Member State, especially a stronger neighbour, or by a regional organization that is dominated by one of its members. A state facing internal difficulties would more readily accept overtures by the Secretary-General because of the recognized independence and moral high ground of his position and in view of the letter and spirit of the Charter, which requires that the Secretary-General offer his assistance and expects the Member States to give the United Nations “every assistance” as indicated, in particular, in Article 2 (5) of the Charter. Fact-finding missions are one tool by which the Secretary-General can facilitate the provision of his good offices. 33. The second impediment to effective crisispreveentiv action is the gap between verbal postures and financial and political support for prevention. The Millennium Assembly offers all concerned the opportunity to reassess their commitment to this area and consider the prevention-related recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s Millennium Report and in his recent remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention. There, the Secretary-General emphasized the need for closer collaboration between the Security Council and other principal organs of the United Nations on conflict prevention issues, and ways to interact more closely with non-state actors, including the corporate sector, in helping to defuse or avoid conflicts. 34. Summary of key recommendations on preventive action: (a) The Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000, in particular his appeal to “all who are engaged in conflict prevention and development — the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, Governments and civil society organizations — [to] address these challenges in a more integrated fashion”; (b) The Panel supports the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension, and stresses Member States’ obligations, under Article 2 (5) of the Charter, to give “every assistance” to such activities of the United Nations. D. Implications for peace-building strategy 35. The Security Council and the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peace-keeping Operations have each recognized and acknowledged the importance of peace-building as integral to the success of peacekeeping operations. In this regard, on 29 December 1998 the Security Council adopted a presidential statement that encouraged the Secretary-General to “explore the possibility of establishing postconfflic peace-building structures as part of efforts by the United Nations system to achieve a lasting peaceful solution to conflicts ...”. The Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, in its own report earlier in 2000, stressed the importance of defining and identifying elements of peace-building before they are incorporated into the mandates of complex peace operations, so as to facilitate later consideration by the General Assembly of continuing support for key elements of peace-building after a complex operation draws to a close. 36. Peace-building support offices or United Nations political offices may be established as follow-ons to other peace operations, as in Tajikistan or Haiti, or as independent initiatives, as in Guatemala or Guinea-Bissau. They help to support the consolidation of peace in post-conflict countries, working with both Governments and non-governmental parties and complementing what may be ongoing United Nations development activities, which strive to remain apart from politics while nonetheless targeting assistance at the sources of conflict.7 A/55/305 S/2000/809 37. Effective peace-building requires active engagement with the local parties, and that engagement should be multidimensional in nature. First, all peace operations should be given the capacity to make a demonstrable difference in the lives of the people in their mission area, relatively early in the life of the mission. The head of mission should have authority to apply a small percentage of mission funds to “quick impact projects” aimed at real improvements in quality of life, to help establish the credibility of a new mission. The resident coordinator/humanitarian coordinator of the pre-existing United Nations country team should serve as chief adviser for such projects in order to ensure efficient spending and to avoid conflict with other development or humanitarian assistance programmes. 38. Second, “free and fair” elections should be viewed as part of broader efforts to strengthen governance institutions. Elections will be successfully held only in an environment in which a population recovering from war comes to accept the ballot over the bullet as an appropriate and credible mechanism through which their views on government are represented. Elections need the support of a broader process of democratization and civil society building that includes effective civilian governance and a culture of respect for basic human rights, lest elections merely ratify a tyranny of the majority or be overturned by force after a peace operation leaves. 39. Third, United Nations civilian police monitors are not peacebuilders if they simply document or attempt to discourage by their presence abusive or other unacceptable behaviour of local police officers — a traditional and somewhat narrow perspective of civilian police capabilities. Today, missions may require civilian police to be tasked to reform, train and restructure local police forces according to international standards for democratic policing and human rights, as well as having the capacity to respond effectively to civil disorder and for self-defence. The courts, too, into which local police officers bring alleged criminals and the penal system to which the law commits prisoners also must be politically impartial and free from intimidation or duress. Where peace-building missions require it, international judicial experts, penal experts and human rights specialists, as well as civilian police, must be available in sufficient numbers to strengthen rule of law institutions. Where justice, reconciliation and the fight against impunity require it, the Security Council should authorize such experts, as well as relevant criminal investigators and forensic specialists, to further the work of apprehension and prosecution of persons indicted for war crimes in support of United Nations international criminal tribunals. 40. While this team approach may seem self-evident, the United Nations has faced situations in the past decade where the Security Council has authorized the deployment of several thousand police in a peacekeeping operation but has resisted the notion of providing the same operations with even 20 or 30 criminal justice experts. Further, the modern role of civilian police needs to be better understood and developed. In short, a doctrinal shift is required in how the Organization conceives of and utilizes civilian police in peace operations, as well as the need for an adequately resourced team approach to upholding the rule of law and respect for human rights, through judicial, penal, human rights and policing experts working together in a coordinated and collegial manner. 41. Fourth, the human rights component of a peace operation is indeed critical to effective peace-building. United Nations human rights personnel can play a leading role, for example, in helping to implement a comprehensive programme for national reconciliation. The human rights components within peace operations have not always received the political and administrative support that they require, however, nor are their functions always clearly understood by other components. Thus, the Panel stresses the importance of training military, police and other civilian personnel on human rights issues and on the relevant provisions of international humanitarian law. In this respect, the Panel commends the Secretary-General’s bulletin of 6 August 1999 entitled “Observance by United Nations forces of international humanitarian law” (ST/SGB/1999/13). 42. Fifth, the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants — key to immediate post-conflict stability and reduced likelihood of conflict recurrence — is an area in which peace-building makes a direct contribution to public security and law and order. But the basic objective of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is not met unless all three elements of the programme are implemented. Demobilized fighters (who almost never fully disarm) will tend to return to a life of violence if8A/55/305 S/2000/809 they find no legitimate livelihood, that is, if they are not “reintegrated” into the local economy. The reintegration element of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is voluntarily funded, however, and that funding has sometimes badly lagged behind requirements. 43. Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration has been a feature of at least 15 peacekeeping operations in the past 10 years. More than a dozen United Nations agencies and programmes as well as international and local NGOs, fund these programmes. Partly because so many actors are involved in planning or supporting disarmament, demobilization and reintegration, it lacks a designated focal point within the United Nations system. 44. Effective peace-building also requires a focal point to coordinate the many different activities that building peace entails. In the view of the Panel, the United Nations should be considered the focal point for peace-building activities by the donor community. To that end, there is great merit in creating a consolidated and permanent institutional capacity within the United Nations system. The Panel therefore believes that the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, in his/her capacity as Convener of ECPS, should serve as the focal point for peace-building. The Panel also supports efforts under way by the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to jointly strengthen United Nations capacity in this area, because effective peace-building is, in effect, a hybrid of political and development activities targeted at the sources of conflict. 45. DPA, the Department of Political Affairs, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Department of Disarmament Affairs (DDA), the Office of Legal Affairs (OLA), UNDP, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), OHCHR, UNHCR, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, and the United Nations Security Coordinator are represented in ECPS; the World Bank Group has been invited to participate as well. ECPS thus provides the ideal forum for the formulation of peace-building strategies. 46. Nonetheless, a distinction should be made between strategy formulation and the implementation of such strategies, based upon a rational division of labour among ECPS members. In the Panel's view, UNDP has untapped potential in this area, and UNDP, in cooperation with other United Nations agencies, funds and programmes and the World Bank, are best placed to take the lead in implementing peace-building activities. The Panel therefore recommends that ECPS propose to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to develop peacebuilldin strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. That plan should also indicate the criteria for determining when the appointment of a senior political envoy or representative of the Secretary-General may be warranted to raise the profile and sharpen the political focus of peace-building activities in a particular region or country recovering from conflict. 47. Summary of key recommendations on peacebuillding (a) A small percentage of a mission’s firstyeea budget should be made available to the representative or special representative of the Secretary-General leading the mission to fund quick impact projects in its area of operations, with the advice of the United Nations country team’s resident coordinator; (b) The Panel recommends a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police, other rule of law elements and human rights experts in complex peace operations to reflect an increased focus on strengthening rule of law institutions and improving respect for human rights in post-conflict environments; (c) The Panel recommends that the legislative bodies consider bringing demobilization and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations for the first phase of an operation in order to facilitate the rapid disassembly of fighting factions and reduce the likelihood of resumed conflict; (d) The Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security discuss and recommend to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies.9 A/55/305 S/2000/809 E. Implications for peacekeeping doctrine and strategy 48. The Panel concurs that consent of the local parties, impartiality and use of force only in selfdeffenc should remain the bedrock principles of peacekeeping. Experience shows, however, that in the context of modern peace operations dealing with intra-State/transnational conflicts, consent may be manipulated in many ways by the local parties. A party may give its consent to United Nations presence merely to gain time to retool its fighting forces and withdraw consent when the peacekeeping operation no longer serves its interests. A party may seek to limit an operation’s freedom of movement, adopt a policy of persistent non-compliance with the provisions of an agreement or withdraw its consent altogether. Moreover, regardless of faction leaders’ commitment to the peace, fighting forces may simply be under much looser control than the conventional armies with which traditional peacekeepers work, and such forces may split into factions whose existence and implications were not contemplated in the peace agreement under the colour of which the United Nations mission operates. 49. In the past, the United Nations has often found itself unable to respond effectively to such challenges. It is a fundamental premise of the present report, however, that it must be able to do so. Once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandate professionally and successfully. This means that United Nations military units must be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate. Rules of engagement should not limit contingents to stroke-forstrrok responses but should allow ripostes sufficient to silence a source of deadly fire that is directed at United Nations troops or at the people they are charged to protect and, in particularly dangerous situations, should not force United Nations contingents to cede the initiative to their attackers. 50. Impartiality for such operations must therefore mean adherence to the principles of the Charter and to the objectives of a mandate that is rooted in those Charter principles. Such impartiality is not the same as neutrality or equal treatment of all parties in all cases for all time, which can amount to a policy of appeasement. In some cases, local parties consist not of moral equals but of obvious aggressors and victims, and peacekeepers may not only be operationally justified in using force but morally compelled to do so. Genocide in Rwanda went as far as it did in part because the international community failed to use or to reinforce the operation then on the ground in that country to oppose obvious evil. The Security Council has since established, in its resolution 1296 (2000), that the targeting of civilians in armed conflict and the denial of humanitarian access to civilian populations afflicted by war may themselves constitute threats to international peace and security and thus be triggers for Security Council action. If a United Nations peace operation is already on the ground, carrying out those actions may become its responsibility, and it should be prepared. 51. This means, in turn, that the Secretariat must not apply best-case planning assumptions to situations where the local actors have historically exhibited worst-case behaviour. It means that mandates should specify an operation’s authority to use force. It means bigger forces, better equipped and more costly, but able to pose a credible deterrent threat, in contrast to the symbolic and non-threatening presence that characterizes traditional peacekeeping. United Nations forces for complex operations should be sized and configured so as to leave no doubt in the minds of would-be spoilers as to which of the two approaches the Organization has adopted. Such forces should be afforded the field intelligence and other capabilities needed to mount a defence against violent challengers. 52. Willingness of Member States to contribute troops to a credible operation of this sort also implies a willingness to accept the risk of casualties on behalf of the mandate. Reluctance to accept that risk has grown since the difficult missions of the mid-1990s, partly because Member States are not clear about how to define their national interests in taking such risks, and partly because they may be unclear about the risks themselves. In seeking contributions of forces, therefore, the Secretary-General must be able to make the case that troop contributors and indeed all Member States have a stake in the management and resolution of the conflict, if only as part of the larger enterprise of establishing peace that the United Nations represents. In so doing, the Secretary-General should be able to give would-be troop contributors an assessment of risk that describes what the conflict and the peace are about, evaluates the capabilities and objectives of the local parties, and assesses the independent financial10 A/55/305 S/2000/809 resources at their disposal and the implications of those resources for the maintenance of peace. The Security Council and the Secretariat also must be able to win the confidence of troop contributors that the strategy and concept of operations for a new mission are sound and that they will be sending troops or police to serve under a competent mission with effective leadership. 53. The Panel recognizes that the United Nations does not wage war. Where enforcement action is required, it has consistently been entrusted to coalitions of willing States, with the authorization of the Security Council, acting under Chapter VII of the Charter. 54. The Charter clearly encourages cooperation with regional and subregional organizations to resolve conflict and establish and maintain peace and security. The United Nations is actively and successfully engaged in many such cooperation programmes in the field of conflict prevention, peacemaking, elections and electoral assistance, human rights monitoring and humanitarian work and other peace-building activities in various parts of the world. Where peacekeeping operations are concerned, however, caution seems appropriate, because military resources and capability are unevenly distributed around the world, and troops in the most crisis-prone areas are often less prepared for the demands of modern peacekeeping than is the case elsewhere. Providing training, equipment, logistical support and other resources to regional and subregional organizations could enable peacekeepers from all regions to participate in a United Nations peacekeeping operation or to set up regional peacekeeping operations on the basis of a Security Council resolution. 55. Summary of key recommendation on peacekeeping doctrine and strategy: once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandates professionally and successfully and be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate, with robust rules of engagement, against those who renege on their commitments to a peace accord or otherwise seek to undermine it by violence. F. Clear, credible and achievable mandates 56. As a political body, the Security Council focuses on consensus-building, even though it can take decisions with less than unanimity. But the compromises required to build consensus can be made at the expense of specificity, and the resulting ambiguity can have serious consequences in the field if the mandate is then subject to varying interpretation by different elements of a peace operation, or if local actors perceive a less than complete Council commitment to peace implementation that offers encouragement to spoilers. Ambiguity may also paper over differences that emerge later, under pressure of a crisis, to prevent urgent Council action. While it acknowledges the utility of political compromise in many cases, the Panel comes down in this case on the side of clarity, especially for operations that will deploy into dangerous circumstances. Rather than send an operation into danger with unclear instructions, the Panel urges that the Council refrain from mandating such a mission. 57. The outlines of a possible United Nations peace operation often first appear when negotiators working toward a peace agreement contemplate United Nations implementation of that agreement. Although peace negotiators (peacemakers) may be skilled professionals in their craft, they are much less likely to know in detail the operational requirements of soldiers, police, relief providers or electoral advisers in United Nations field missions. Non-United Nations peacemakers may have even less knowledge of those requirements. Yet the Secretariat has, in recent years, found itself required to execute mandates that were developed elsewhere and delivered to it via the Security Council with but minor changes. 58. The Panel believes that the Secretariat must be able to make a strong case to the Security Council that requests for United Nations implementation of ceasefires or peace agreements need to meet certain minimum conditions before the Council commits United Nations-led forces to implement such accords, including the opportunity to have adviser-observers present at the peace negotiations; that any agreement be consistent with prevailing international human rights standards and humanitarian law; and that tasks to be undertaken by the United Nations are operationally achievable — with local responsibility for supporting11 A/55/305 S/2000/809 them specified — and either contribute to addressing the sources of conflict or provide the space required for others to do so. Since competent advice to negotiators may depend on detailed knowledge of the situation on the ground, the Secretary-General should be preauthoorize to commit funds from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund sufficient to conduct a preliminary site survey in the prospective mission area. 59. In advising the Council on mission requirements, the Secretariat must not set mission force and other resource levels according to what it presumes to be acceptable to the Council politically. By self-censoring in that manner, the Secretariat sets up itself and the mission not just to fail but to be the scapegoats for failure. Although presenting and justifying planning estimates according to high operational standards might reduce the likelihood of an operation going forward, Member States must not be led to believe that they are doing something useful for countries in trouble when — by under-resourcing missions — they are more likely agreeing to a waste of human resources, time and money. 60. Moreover, the Panel believes that until the Secretary-General is able to obtain solid commitments from Member States for the forces that he or she does believe necessary to carry out an operation, it should not go forward at all. To deploy a partial force incapable of solidifying a fragile peace would first raise and then dash the hopes of a population engulfed in conflict or recovering from war, and damage the credibility of the United Nations as a whole. In such circumstances, the Panel believes that the Security Council should leave in draft form a resolution that contemplated sizeable force levels for a new peacekeeping operation until such time as the Secretary-General could confirm that the necessary troop commitments had been received from Member States. 61. There are several ways to diminish the likelihood of such commitment gaps, including better coordination and consultation between potential troop contributors and the members of the Security Council during the mandate formulation process. Troop contributor advice to the Security Council might usefully be institutionalized via the establishment of ad hoc subsidiary organs of the Council, as provided for in Article 29 of the Charter. Member States contributing formed military units to an operation should as a matter of course be invited to attend Secretariat briefings of the Security Council pertaining to crises that affect the safety and security of the mission’s personnel or to a change or reinterpretation of a mission’s mandate with respect to the use of force. 62. Finally, the desire on the part of the Secretary-General to extend additional protection to civilians in armed conflicts and the actions of the Security Council to give United Nations peacekeepers explicit authority to protect civilians in conflict situations are positive developments. Indeed, peacekeepers — troops or police — who witness violence against civilians should be presumed to be authorized to stop it, within their means, in support of basic United Nations principles and, as stated in the report of the Independent Inquiry on Rwanda, consistent with “the perception and the expectation of protection created by [an operation’s] very presence” (see S/1999/1257, p. 51). 63. However, the Panel is concerned about the credibility and achievability of a blanket mandate in this area. There are hundreds of thousands of civilians in current United Nations mission areas who are exposed to potential risk of violence, and United Nations forces currently deployed could not protect more than a small fraction of them even if directed to do so. Promising to extend such protection establishes a very high threshold of expectation. The potentially large mismatch between desired objective and resources available to meet it raises the prospect of continuing disappointment with United Nations followthrroug in this area. If an operation is given a mandate to protect civilians, therefore, it also must be given the specific resources needed to carry out that mandate. 64. Summary of key recommendations on clear, credible and achievable mandates: (a) The Panel recommends that, before the Security Council agrees to implement a ceasefire or peace agreement with a United Nations-led peacekeeping operation, the Council assure itself that the agreement meets threshold conditions, such as consistency with international human rights standards and practicability of specified tasks and timelines; (b) The Security Council should leave in draft form resolutions authorizing missions with sizeable troop levels until such time as the Secretary-General has firm commitments of troops and other critical mission support elements,12 A/55/305 S/2000/809 including peace-building elements, from Member States; (c) Security Council resolutions should meet the requirements of peacekeeping operations when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations, especially the need for a clear chain of command and unity of effort; (d) The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when formulating or changing mission mandates, and countries that have committed military units to an operation should have access to Secretariat briefings to the Council on matters affecting the safety and security of their personnel, especially those meetings with implications for a mission’s use of force. G. Information-gathering, analysis, and strategic planning capacities 65. A strategic approach by the United Nations to conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peace-building will require that the Secretariat’s key implementing departments in peace and security work more closely together. To do so, they will need sharper tools to gather and analyse relevant information and to support ECPS, the nominal high-level decision-making forum for peace and security issues. 66. ECPS is one of four “sectoral” executive committees established in the Secretary-General’s initial reform package of early 1997 (see A/51/829, sect. A). The Committees for Economic and Social Affairs, Development Operations, and Humanitarian Affairs were also established. OHCHR is a member of all four. These committees were designed to “facilitate more concerted and coordinated management” across participating departments and were given “executive decision-making as well as coordinating powers.” Chaired by the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, ECPS has promoted greater exchange of information across and cooperation between departments, but it has not yet become the decisionmakkin body that the 1997 reforms envisioned, which its participants acknowledge. 67. Current Secretariat staffing levels and job demands in the peace and security sector more or less preclude departmental policy planning. Although most ECPS members have policy or planning units, they tend to be drawn into day-to-day issues. Yet without significant knowledge generating and analytic capacity, the Secretariat will remain a reactive institution unable to get ahead of daily events, and ECPS will not be able to fulfil the role for which it was created. 68. The Secretary-General and the members of ECPS need a professional system in the Secretariat for accumulating knowledge about conflict situations, distributing that knowledge efficiently to a wide user base, generating policy analyses and formulating longteer strategies. That system does not exist at present. The Panel proposes that it be created as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat, or EISAS. 69. The bulk of EISAS should be formed by consolidation of the various departmental units that are assigned policy and information analysis roles related to peace and security, including the Policy Analysis Unit and the Situation Centre of DPKO; the Policy Planning Unit of DPA; the Policy Development Unit (or elements thereof) of OCHA; and the Media Monitoring and Analysis Section of the Department of Public Information (DPI). 70. Additional staff would be required to give EISAS expertise that does not exist elsewhere in the system or that cannot be taken from existing structures. These additions would include a head of the staff (at Director level), a small team of military analysts, police experts and highly qualified information systems analysts who would be responsible for managing the design and maintenance of EISAS databases and their accessibility to both Headquarters and field offices and missions. 71. Close affiliates of EISAS should include the Strategic Planning Unit of the Office of the Secretary-General; the Emergency Response Division of UNDP; the Peace-building Unit (see paras. 239-243 below); the Information Analysis Unit of OCHA (which supports Relief Web); the New York liaison offices of OHCHR and UNHCR; the Office of the United Nations Security Coordinator; and the Monitoring, Database and Information Branch of DDA. The World Bank Group should be invited to maintain liaison, using appropriate elements, such as the Bank’s Post-Conflict Unit. 72. As a common service, EISAS would be of both short-term and long-term value to ECPS members. It would strengthen the daily reporting function of the DPKO Situation Centre, generating all-source updates13 A/55/305 S/2000/809 on mission activity and relevant global events. It could bring a budding crisis to the attention of ECPS leadership and brief them on that crisis using modern presentation techniques. It could serve as a focal point for timely analysis of cross-cutting thematic issues and preparation of reports for the Secretary-General on such issues. Finally, based on the prevailing mix of missions, crises, interests of the legislative bodies and inputs from ECPS members, EISAS could propose and manage the agenda of ECPS itself, support its deliberations and help to transform it into the decisionmakkin body anticipated in the Secretary-General’s initial reforms. 73. EISAS should be able to draw upon the best available expertise — inside and outside the United Nations system — to fine-tune its analyses with regard to particular places and circumstances. It should provide the Secretary-General and ECPS members with consolidated assessments of United Nations and other efforts to address the sources and symptoms of ongoing and looming conflicts, and should be able to assess the potential utility — and implications — of further United Nations involvement. It should provide the basic background information for the initial work of the Integrated Mission Task Forces (ITMFs) that the Panel recommends below (see paras. 198-217), be established to plan and support the set up of peace operations, and continue to provide analyses and manage the information flow between mission and Task Force once the mission has been established. 74. EISAS should create, maintain and draw upon shared, integrated, databases that would eventually replace the proliferated copies of code cables, daily situation reports, daily news feeds and informal connections with knowledgeable colleagues that desk officers and decision makers alike currently use to keep informed of events in their areas of responsibility. With appropriate safeguards, such databases could be made available to users of a peace operations Intranet (see paras. 255 and 256 below). Such databases, potentially available to Headquarters and field alike via increasingly cheap commercial broadband communications services, would help to revolutionize the manner in which the United Nations accumulates knowledge and analyses key peace and security issues. EISAS should also eventually supersede the Framework for Coordination mechanism. 75. Summary of key recommendation on information and strategic analysis: the Secretary-General should establish an entity, referred to here as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS), that would support the information and analysis needs of all members of ECPS; for management purposes, it should be administered by and report jointly to the heads of DPA and DPKO. H. The challenge of transitional civil administration 76. Until mid-1999, the United Nations had conducted just a small handful of field operations with elements of civil administration conduct or oversight. In June 1999, however, the Secretariat found itself directed to develop a transitional civil administration for Kosovo, and three months later for East Timor. The struggles of the United Nations to set up and manage those operations are part of the backdrop to the narratives on rapid deployment and on Headquarters staffing and structure in the present report. 77. These operations face challenges and responsibilities that are unique among United Nations field operations. No other operations must set and enforce the law, establish customs services and regulations, set and collect business and personal taxes, attract foreign investment, adjudicate property disputes and liabilities for war damage, reconstruct and operate all public utilities, create a banking system, run schools and pay teachers and collect the garbage — in a wardammage society, using voluntary contributions, because the assessed mission budget, even for such “transitional administration” missions, does not fund local administration itself. In addition to such tasks, these missions must also try to rebuild civil society and promote respect for human rights, in places where grievance is widespread and grudges run deep. 78. Beyond such challenges lies the larger question of whether the United Nations should be in this business at all, and if so whether it should be considered an element of peace operations or should be managed by some other structure. Although the Security Council may not again direct the United Nations to do transitional civil administration, no one expected it to do so with respect to Kosovo or East Timor either. Intra-State conflicts continue and future instability is hard to predict, so that despite evident ambivalence about civil administration among United Nations Member States and within the Secretariat, other such14 A/55/305 S/2000/809 missions may indeed be established in the future and on an equally urgent basis. Thus, the Secretariat faces an unpleasant dilemma: to assume that transitional administration is a transitory responsibility, not prepare for additional missions and do badly if it is once again flung into the breach, or to prepare well and be asked to undertake them more often because it is well prepared. Certainly, if the Secretariat anticipates future transitional administrations as the rule rather than the exception, then a dedicated and distinct responsibility centre for those tasks must be created somewhere within the United Nations system. In the interim, DPKO has to continue to support this function. 79. Meanwhile, there is a pressing issue in transitional civil administration that must be addressed, and that is the issue of “applicable law.” In the two locales where United Nations operations now have law enforcement responsibility, local judicial and legal capacity was found to be non-existent, out of practice or subject to intimidation by armed elements. Moreover, in both places, the law and legal systems prevailing prior to the conflict were questioned or rejected by key groups considered to be the victims of the conflicts. 80. Even if the choice of local legal code were clear, however, a mission’s justice team would face the prospect of learning that code and its associated procedures well enough to prosecute and adjudicate cases in court. Differences in language, culture, custom and experience mean that the learning process could easily take six months or longer. The United Nations currently has no answer to the question of what such an operation should do while its law and order team inches up such a learning curve. Powerful local political factions can and have taken advantage of the learning period to set up their own parallel administrations, and crime syndicates gladly exploit whatever legal or enforcement vacuums they can find. 81. These missions’ tasks would have been much easier if a common United Nations justice package had allowed them to apply an interim legal code to which mission personnel could have been pre-trained while the final answer to the “applicable law” question was being worked out. Although no work is currently under way within Secretariat legal offices on this issue, interviews with researchers indicate that some headway toward dealing with the problem has been made outside the United Nations system, emphasizing the principles, guidelines, codes and procedures contained in several dozen international conventions and declarations relating to human rights, humanitarian law, and guidelines for police, prosecutors and penal systems. 82. Such research aims at a code that contains the basics of both law and procedure to enable an operation to apply due process using international jurists and internationally agreed standards in the case of such crimes as murder, rape, arson, kidnapping and aggravated assault. Property law would probably remain beyond reach of such a “model code”, but at least an operation would be able to prosecute effectively those who burned their neighbours’ homes while the property law issue was being addressed. 83. Summary of key recommendation on transitional civil administration: the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General invite a panel of international legal experts, including individuals with experience in United Nations operations that have transitional administration mandates, to evaluate the feasibility and utility of developing an interim criminal code, including any regional adaptations potentially required, for use by such operations pending the re-establishment of local rule of law and local law enforcement capacity. III. United Nations capacities to deploy operations rapidly and effectively 84. Many observers have questioned why it takes so long for the United Nations to fully deploy operations following the adoption of a Security Council resolution. The reasons are several. The United Nations does not have a standing army, and it does not have a standing police force designed for field operations. There is no reserve corps of mission leadership: special representatives of the Secretary-General and heads of mission, force commanders, police commissioners, directors of administration and other leadership components are not sought until urgently needed. The Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS) currently in place for potential government-provided military, police and civilian expertise has yet to become a dependable supply of resources. The stockpile of essential equipment recycled from the large missions of the mid-1990s to the United Nations Logistics Base (UNLB) at Brindisi, Italy, has been depleted by the current surge in missions and there is as yet no budgetary vehicle for rebuilding it quickly. The15 A/55/305 S/2000/809 peacekeeping procurement process may not adequately balance its responsibilities for cost-effectiveness and financial responsibility against overriding operational needs for timely response and mission credibility. The need for standby arrangements for the recruitment of civilian personnel in substantive and support areas has long been recognized but not yet implemented. And finally, the Secretary-General lacks most of the authority to acquire, hire and preposition the goods and people needed to deploy an operation rapidly before the Security Council adopts the resolution to establish it, however likely such an operation may seem. 85. In short, few of the basic building blocks are in place for the United Nations to rapidly acquire and deploy the human and material resources required to mount any complex peace operation in the future. A. Defining what “rapid and effective deployment” entails 86. The proceedings of the Security Council, the reports of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and input provided to the Panel by the field missions, the Secretariat and the Member States all agree on the need for the United Nations to significantly strengthen capacity to deploy new field operations rapidly and effectively. In order to strengthen these capacities, the United Nations must first agree on basic parameters for defining what “rapidity” and “effectiveness” entail. 87. The first six to 12 weeks following a ceasefire or peace accord is often the most critical period for establishing both a stable peace and the credibility of the peacekeepers. Credibility and political momentum lost during this period can often be difficult to regain. Deployment timelines should thus be tailored accordingly. However, the speedy deployment of military, civilian police and civilian expertise will not help to solidify a fragile peace and establish the credibility of an operation if these personnel are not equipped to do their job. To be effective, the missions’ personnel need materiel (equipment and logistics support), finance (cash in hand to procure goods and services) information assets (training and briefing), an operational strategy and, for operations deploying into uncertain circumstances, a military and political “centre of gravity” sufficient to enable it to anticipate and overcome one or more of the parties’ second thoughts about taking a peace process forward. 88. Timelines for rapid and effective deployment will naturally vary in accordance with the politico-military situations that are unique to each post-conflict environment. Nevertheless, the first step in enhancing the United Nations capacity for rapid deployment must begin with agreeing upon a standard towards which the Organization should strive. No such standard yet exists. The Panel thus proposes that the United Nations develop the operational capabilities to fully deploy “traditional” peacekeeping operations within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and complex peacekeeping operations within 90 days. In the case of the latter, the mission headquarters should be fully installed and functioning within 15 days. 89. In order to meet these timelines, the Secretariat would need one or a combination of the following: (a) standing reserves of military, civilian police and civilian expertise, materiel and financing; (b) extremely reliable standby capacities to be called upon on short notice; or (c) sufficient lead-time to acquire these resources, which would require the ability to foresee, plan for and initiate spending for potential new missions several months ahead of time. A number of the Panel’s recommendations are directed at strengthening the Secretariat’s analytical capacities and aligning them with the mission planning process in order to help the United Nations be better prepared for potential new operations. However, neither the outbreak of war nor the conclusion of peace can always be predicted well in advance. In fact, experience has shown that this is often not the case. Thus, the Secretariat must be able to maintain a certain generic level of preparedness, through the establishment of new standing capacities and enhancement of existing standby capacities, so as to be prepared for unforeseen demands. 90. Many Member States have argued against the establishment of a standing United Nations army or police force, resisted entering into reliable standby arrangements, cautioned against the incursion of financial expenses for building a reserve of equipment or discouraged the Secretariat from undertaking planning for potential operations prior to the Secretary-General having been granted specific, crisis-driven legislative authority to do so. Under these circumstances, the United Nations cannot deploy operations “rapidly and effectively” within the timelines suggested. The analysis that follows argues16 A/55/305 S/2000/809 that at least some of these circumstances must change to make rapid and effective deployment possible. 91. Summary of key recommendation on determining deployment timelines: the United Nations should define “rapid and effective deployment capacities” as the ability, from an operational perspective, to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days after the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. B. Effective mission leadership 92. Effective, dynamic leadership can make the difference between a cohesive mission with high morale and effectiveness despite adverse circumstances, and one that struggles to maintain any of those attributes. That is, the tenor of an entire mission can be heavily influenced by the character and ability of those who lead it. 93. Given this critical role, the current United Nations approach to recruiting, selecting, training and supporting its mission leaders leaves major room for improvement. Lists of potential candidates are informally maintained. RSGs and SRSGs, heads of mission, force commanders, civilian police commissioners and their respective deputies may not be selected until close to or even after adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a new mission. They and other heads of substantive and administrative components may not meet one another until they reach the mission area, following a few days of introductory meetings with Headquarters officials. They will be given generic terms of reference that spell out their overall roles and responsibilities, but rarely will they leave Headquarters with mission-specific policy or operational guidance in hand. Initially, at least, they will determine on their own how to implement the Security Council’s mandate and how to deal with potential challenges to implementation. They must develop a strategy for implementing the mandate while trying to establish the mission’s political/military centre of gravity and sustain a potentially fragile peace process. 94. Factoring in the politics of selection makes the process somewhat more understandable. Political sensitivities about a new mission may preclude the Secretary-General’s canvassing potential candidates much before a mission has been established. In selecting SRSGs, RSGs or other heads of mission, the Secretary-General must consider the views of Security Council members, the States within the region and the local parties, the confidence of each of whom an RSG/SRSG needs in order to be effective. The choice of one or more deputy SRSGs may be influenced by the need to achieve geographic distribution within the mission’s leadership. The nationality of the force commander, the police commissioner and their deputies will need to reflect the composition of the military and police components, and will also need to consider the political sensitivities of the local parties. 95. Although political and geographic considerations are legitimate, in the Panel’s view managerial talent and experience must be accorded at least equal priority in choosing mission leadership. Based on the personal experiences of several of its members in leading field operations, the Panel endorses the need to assemble the leadership of a mission as early as possible, so that they can jointly help to shape a mission’s concept of operations, its support plan, its budget and its staffing arrangements. 96. To facilitate early selection, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General compile, in a systematic fashion, and with input from Member States, a comprehensive list of potential SRSGs, force commanders, police commissioners and potential deputies, as well as candidates to head other substantive components of a mission, representing a broad geographic and equitable gender distribution. Such a database would facilitate early identification and selection of the leadership group. 97. The Secretariat should, as a matter of standard practice, provide mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation and, whenever possible, formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. The leadership should also consult widely with the United Nations resident country team and with NGOs working in the mission area to broaden and deepen its local knowledge, which is critical to implementing a comprehensive strategy for transition from war to peace. The country team’s resident coordinator should be included more frequently in the formal mission planning process.17 A/55/305 S/2000/809 98. The Panel believes that there should always be at least one member of the senior management team of a mission with relevant United Nations experience, preferably both in a field mission and at Headquarters. Such an individual would facilitate the work of those members of the management team from outside the United Nations system, shortening the time they would otherwise need to become familiar with the Organization’s rules, regulations, policies and working methods, answering the sorts of questions that predeplooymen training cannot anticipate. 99. The Panel notes the precedent of appointing the resident coordinator/humanitarian coordinator of the team of United Nations agencies, funds and programmes engaged in development work and humanitarian assistance in a particular country as one of the deputies to the SRSG of a complex peace operation. In our view, this practice should be emulated wherever possible. 100. Conversely, it is critical that field representatives of United Nations agencies, funds and programmes facilitate the work of an SRSG or RSG in his or her role as the coordinator of all United Nations activities in the country concerned. On a number of occasions, attempts to perform this role have been hampered by overly bureaucratic resistance to coordination. Such tendencies do not do justice to the concept of the United Nations family that the Secretary-General has tried hard to encourage. 101. Summary of key recommendations on mission leadership: (a) The Secretary-General should systematize the method of selecting mission leaders, beginning with the compilation of a comprehensive list of potential representatives or special representatives of the Secretary-General, force commanders, civilian police commissioners and their deputies and other heads of substantive and administrative components, within a fair geographic and gender distribution and with input from Member States; (b) The entire leadership of a mission should be selected and assembled at Headquarters as early as possible in order to enable their participation in key aspects of the mission planning process, for briefings on the situation in the mission area and to meet and work with their colleagues in mission leadership; (c) The Secretariat should routinely provide the mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation and, whenever possible, should formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. C. Military personnel 102. The United Nations launched UNSAS in the mid-1990s in order to enhance its rapid deployment capabilities and to enable it to respond to the unpredictable and exponential growth in the establishment of the new generation of complex peacekeeping operations. UNSAS is a database of military, civilian police and civilian assets and expertise indicated by Governments to be available, in theory, for deployment to United Nations peacekeeping operations at seven, 15, 30, 60 or 90 days’ notice. The database currently includes 147,900 personnel from 87 Member States: 85,000 in military combat units; 56,700 in military support elements; 1,600 military observers; 2,150 civilian police; and 2,450 other civilian specialists. Of the 87 participating States, 31 have concluded memoranda of understanding with the United Nations enumerating their responsibilities for preparedness of the personnel concerned, but the same memoranda also codify the conditional nature of their commitment. In essence, the memorandum of understanding confirms that States maintain their sovereign right to “just say no” to a request from the Secretary-General to contribute those assets to an operation. 103. The absence of detailed statistics on responses notwithstanding, many Member States are saying “no” to deploying formed military units to United Nationslle peacekeeping operations, far more often than they are saying “yes”. In contrast to the long tradition of developed countries providing the bulk of the troops for United Nations peacekeeping operations during the Organization’s first 50 years, in the last few years 77 per cent of the troops in formed military units deployed in United Nations peacekeeping operations, as of end-June 2000, were contributed by developing countries. 104. The five Permanent Members of the Security Council are currently contributing far fewer troops to United Nations-led operations, but four of the five have contributed sizeable forces to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led operations in Bosnia and18 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Herzegovina and Kosovo that provide a secure environment in which the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH) and the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) can function. The United Kingdom also deployed troops to Sierra Leone at a critical point in the crisis (outside United Nations operational control), providing a valuable stabilizing influence, but no developed country currently contributes troops to the most difficult United Nations-led peacekeeping operations from a security perspective, namely the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) and the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC). 105. Memories of peacekeepers murdered in Mogadishu and Kigali and taken hostage in Sierra Leone help to explain the difficulties Member States are having in convincing their national legislatures and public that they should support the deployment of their troops to United Nations-led operations, particularly in Africa. Moreover, developed States tend not to see strategic national interests at stake. The downsizing of national military forces and the growth in European regional peacekeeping initiatives further depletes the pool of well-trained and well-equipped military contingents from developed countries to serve in United Nations-led operations. 106. Thus, the United Nations is facing a very serious dilemma. A mission such as UNAMSIL would probably not have faced the difficulties that it did in spring 2000 had it been provided with forces as strong as those currently keeping the peace as part of KFOR in Kosovo. The Panel is convinced that NATO military planners would not have agreed to deploy to Sierra Leone with only the 6,000 troops initially authorized. Yet, the likelihood of a KFOR-type operation being deployed in Africa in the near future seems remote given current trends. Even if the United Nations were to attempt to deploy a KFOR-type force, it is not clear, given current standby arrangements, where the troops and equipment would come from. 107. A number of developing countries do respond to requests for peacekeeping forces with troops who serve with distinction and dedication according to very high professional standards, and in accord with new contingent-owned equipment (COE) procedures (“wet lease” agreements) adopted by the General Assembly, which provide that national troop contingents are to bring with them almost all the equipment and supplies required to sustain their troops. The United Nations commits to reimburse troop contributors for use of their equipment and to provide those services and support not covered under the new COE procedures. In return, the troop contributing nations undertake to honour the memoranda of understanding on COE procedures that they sign. 108. Yet, the Secretary-General finds himself in an untenable position. He is given a Security Council resolution specifying troop levels on paper, but without knowing whether he will be given the troops to put on the ground. The troops that eventually arrive in theatre may still be underequipped: Some countries have provided soldiers without rifles, or with rifles but no helmets, or with helmets but no flak jackets, or with no organic transport capability (trucks or troops carriers). Troops may be untrained in peacekeeping operations, and in any case the various contingents in an operation are unlikely to have trained or worked together before. Some units may have no personnel who can speak the mission language. Even if language is not a problem, they may lack common operating procedures and have differing interpretations of key elements of command and control and of the mission’s rules of engagement, and may have differing expectations about mission requirements for the use of force. 109. This must stop. Troop-contributing countries that cannot meet the terms of their memoranda of understanding should so indicate to the United Nations, and must not deploy. To that end, the Secretary-General should be given the resources and support needed to assess potential troop contributors’ preparedness prior to deployment, and to confirm that the provisions of the memoranda will be met. 110. A further step towards improving the current situation would be to give the Secretary-General a capability for assembling, on short notice, military planners, staff officers and other military technical experts, preferably with prior United Nations mission experience, to liaise with mission planners at Headquarters and to then deploy to the field with a core element from DPKO to help establish a mission’s military headquarters, as authorized by the Security Council. Using the current Standby Arrangements System, an “on-call list” of such personnel, nominated by Member States within a fair geographic distribution and carefully vetted and accepted by DPKO, could be formed for this purpose and for strengthening ongoing missions in times of crisis. Personnel assigned to this19 A/55/305 S/2000/809 on-call list of about 100 officers would be at the rank of Major to Colonel and would be treated, upon their short-notice call-up, as United Nations military observers, with appropriate modifications. 111. Personnel selected for inclusion in the on-call list would be pre-qualified medically and administratively for deployment worldwide, would participate in advance training and would incur a commitment of up to two years for immediate deployment within 7-days notification. Every three months, the on-call list would be updated with some 10 to 15 new personnel, as nominated by Member States, to be trained during an initial three-month period. With continuous updating every three months, the on-call list would contain about five to seven teams ready for short-notice deployment. Initial team training would include at the outset a pre-qualification and education phase (brief one-week classroom and apprentice instruction in United Nations systems), followed by a hands-on professional development phase (deployment to an ongoing United Nations peacekeeping operation as a military observer team for about 10 weeks). After this initial three-month team training period, individual officers would then return to their countries and assume an on-call status. 112. Upon Security Council authorization, one or more of these teams could be called up for immediate duty. They would travel to United Nations Headquarters for refresher orientation and specific mission guidance, as necessary, and interaction with the planners of the Integrated Mission Task Force (see paras. 198-217 below) for that operation, before deploying to the field. The teams’ mission would be to translate the broad strategic-level concepts of the mission developed by IMTF into concrete operational and tactical plans, and to undertake immediate coordination and liaison tasks in advance of the deployment of troop contingents. Once deployed, an advance team would remain operational until replaced by deploying contingents (usually about 2 to 3 months, but longer if necessary, up to a six-month term). 113. Funding for a team's initial training would come from the budget of the ongoing mission in which the team is deployed for initial training, and funding for an on-call deployment would come from the prospective peacekeeping mission budget. The United Nations would incur no costs for such personnel while they were on on-call status in their home country as they would be performing normal duties in their national armed forces. The Panel recommends that the Secretary-General outline this proposal with implementing details to the Member States for immediate implementation within the parameters of the existing Standby Arrangements System. 114. Such an emergency military field planning and liaison staff capacity would not be enough, however, to ensure force coherence. In our view, in order to function as a coherent force the troop contingents themselves should at least have been trained and equipped according to a common standard, supplemented by joint planning at the contingents’ command level. Ideally, they will have had the opportunity to conduct joint training field exercises. 115. If United Nations military planners assess that a brigade (approximately 5,000 troops) is what is required to effectively deter or deal with violent challenges to the implementation of an operation’s mandate, then the military component of that United Nations operation ought to deploy as a brigade formation, not as a collection of battalions that are unfamiliar with one another’s doctrine, leadership and operational practices. That brigade would have to come from a group of countries that have been working together as suggested above to develop common training and equipment standards, common doctrine, and common arrangements for the operational control of the force. Ideally, UNSAS should contain several coherent such brigade-size forces, with the necessary enabling forces, available for full deployment to an operation within 30 days in the case of traditional peacekeeping operations and within 90 days in the case of complex operations. 116. To that end, the United Nations should establish the minimum training, equipment and other standards required for forces to participate in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Member States with the means to do so could form partnerships, within the context of UNSAS, to provide financial, equipment, training and other assistance to troop contributors from less developed countries to enable them to reach and maintain that minimum standard, with the goal that each of the brigades so established should be of comparably high quality and be able to call upon effective levels of operational support. Such a formation has been the objective of the Standing High-Readiness Brigade (SHIRBRIG) group of States, who have also established a command-level planning element that works together routinely. However, the20 A/55/305 S/2000/809 proposed arrangement is not intended as a mechanism for relieving some States from their responsibilities to participate actively in United Nations peacekeeping operations or for precluding the participation of smaller States in such operations. 117. Summary of key recommendations on military personnel: (a) Member States should be encouraged, where appropriate, to enter into partnerships with one another, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS), to form several coherent brigade-size forces, with necessary enabling forces, ready for effective deployment within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a traditional peacekeeping operation and within 90 days for complex peacekeeping operations; (b) The Secretary-General should be given the authority to formally canvass Member States participating in UNSAS regarding their willingness to contribute troops to a potential operation once it appeared likely that a ceasefire accord or agreement envisaging an implementing role for the United Nations might be reached; (c) The Secretariat should, as a standard practice, send a team to confirm the preparedness of each potential troop contributor to meet the provisions of the memoranda of understanding on the requisite training and equipment requirements, prior to deployment; those that do not meet the requirements must not deploy; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 military officers be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice to augment nuclei of DPKO planners with teams trained to create a mission headquarters for a new peacekeeping operation. D. Civilian police 118. Civilian police are second only to military forces in numbers of international personnel involved in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Demand for civilian police operations dealing with intra-State conflict is likely to remain high on any list of requirements for helping a war-torn society restore conditions for social, economic and political stability. The fairness and impartiality of the local police force, which civilian police monitor and train, is crucial to maintaining a safe and secure environment, and its effectiveness is vital where intimidation and criminal networks continue to obstruct progress on the political and economic fronts. 119. The Panel has accordingly argued (see paras. 39, 40 and 47 (b) above) for a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police in United Nations peace operations, to focus primarily on the reform and restructuring of local police forces in addition to traditional advisory, training and monitoring tasks. This shift will require Member States to provide the United Nations with even more well-trained and specialized police experts, at a time when they face difficulties meeting current requirements. As of 1 August 2000, 25 per cent of the 8,641 police positions authorized for United Nations operations remained vacant. 120. Whereas Member States may face domestic political difficulties in sending military units to United Nations peace operations, Governments tend to face fewer political constraints in contributing their civilian police to peace operations. However, Member States still have practical difficulties doing so, because the size and configuration of their police forces tend to be tailored to domestic needs alone. 121. Under the circumstances, the process of identifying, securing the release of and training police and related justice experts for mission service is often time-consuming, and prevents the United Nations from deploying a mission’s civilian police component rapidly and effectively. Moreover, the police component of a mission may comprise officers drawn from up to 40 countries who have never met one another before, have little or no United Nations experience, and have received little relevant training or mission-specific briefings, and whose policing practices and doctrines may vary widely. Moreover, civilian police generally rotate out of operations after six months to one year. All of those factors make it extremely difficult for missions’ civilian police commissioners to transform a disparate group of officers into a cohesive and effective force. 122. The Panel therefore calls upon Member States to establish national pools of serving police officers (augmented, if necessary, by recently retired police officers who meet the professional and physical requirements) who are administratively and medically21 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System. The size of the pool will naturally vary with each country’s size and capacity. The Civilian Police Unit of DPKO should assist Member States in determining the selection criteria and training requirements for police officers within these pools, by identifying the specialities and expertise required and issuing common guidelines on the professional standards to be met. Once deployed in a United Nations mission, civilian police officers should serve for at least one year to ensure a minimum level of continuity. 123. The Panel believes that the cohesion of police components would be further enhanced if policecontriibutin States were to develop joint training exercises, and therefore recommends that Member States, where appropriate, enter into new regional training partnerships and strengthen existing ones. The Panel also calls upon Member States in a position to do so to offer assistance (e.g., training and equipment) to smaller police-contributing States to maintain the requisite level of preparedness, according to guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards promulgated by the United Nations. 124. The Panel also recommends that Member States designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures to be responsible for coordinating and managing the provision of police personnel to United Nations peace operations. 125. The Panel believes that the Secretary-General should be given a capability for assembling, on short notice, senior civilian police planners and technical experts, preferably with prior United Nations mission experience, to liaise with mission planners at Headquarters and to then deploy to the field to help establish a mission’s civilian police headquarters, as authorized by the Security Council, in a standby arrangement that parallels the military headquarters oncaal list and its procedures. Upon call-up, members of the on-call list would have the same contractual and legal status as other civilian police in United Nations operations. The training and deployment arrangements for members of the on-call list also could be the same as those of its military counterpart. Furthermore, joint training and planning between the military and civilian police officers on the respective lists would further enhance mission cohesion and cooperation across components at the start-up of a new operation. 126. Summary of key recommendations on civilian police personnel: (a) Member States are encouraged to each establish a national pool of civilian police officers that would be ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations on short notice, within the context of the United Nations standby arrangements system; (b) Member States are encouraged to enter into regional training partnerships for civilian police in the respective national pools in order to promote a common level of preparedness in accordance with guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards to be promulgated by the United Nations; (c) Members States are encouraged to designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures for the provision of civilian police to United Nations peace operations; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving on-call list of about 100 police officers and related experts be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice with teams trained to create the civilian police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train incoming personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date; (e) The Panel recommends that parallel arrangements to recommendations (a), (b) and (c) above be established for judicial, penal, human rights and other relevant specialists, who with specialist civilian police will make up collegial “rule of law” teams. E. Civilian specialists 127. To date, the Secretariat has been unable to identify, recruit and deploy suitably qualified civilian personnel in substantive and support functions either at the right time or in the numbers required. Currently, about 50 per cent of field positions in substantive areas and up to 40 per cent of the positions in administrative and logistics areas are vacant, in missions that were established six months to one year ago and remain in desperate need of the requisite specialists. Some of those who have been deployed have found themselves in positions that do not match their previous experience, such as in the civil administration22 A/55/305 S/2000/809 components of the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and UNMIK. Furthermore, the rate of recruitment is nearly matched by the rate of departure by mission personnel fed up with the working conditions that they face, including the short-staffing itself. High vacancy and turnover rates foreshadow a disturbing scenario for the start-up and maintenance of the next complex peacekeeping operation, and hamper the full deployment of current missions. Those problems are compounded by several factors. 1. Lack of standby systems to respond to unexpected or high-volume surge demands 128. Each new complex task assigned to the new generation of peacekeeping operations creates demands that the United Nations system is not able to meet on short notice. This phenomenon first emerged in the early 1990s, with the establishment of the following operations to implement peace accords: the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC), the United Nations Observer Mission in El Salvador (ONUSAL), the United Nations Angola Verification Mission (UNAVEM) and the United Nations Operation in Mozambique (ONUMOZ). The system struggled to recruit experts on short notice in electoral assistance, economic reconstruction and rehabilitation, human rights monitoring, radio and television production, judicial affairs and institution-building. By middeccade the system had created a cadre of individuals, which had acquired on-the-job expertise in these areas, hitherto not present in the system. However, for reasons explained below, many of those individuals have since left the system. 129. The Secretariat was again taken by surprise in 1999, when it had to staff missions with responsibilities for governance in East Timor and Kosovo. Few staff within the Secretariat, or within United Nations agencies, funds or programmes possess the technical expertise and experience required to run a municipality or national ministry. Neither could Member States themselves fill the gap immediately, because they, too, had done no advance planning to identify qualified and available candidates within their national structures. Moreover, the understaffed transitional administration missions themselves took some time to even specify precisely what they required. Eventually, a few Member States offered to provide candidates (some at no cost to the United Nations) to satisfy substantial elements of the demand. However, the Secretariat did not fully avail itself of those offers, partly to avoid the resulting lopsided geographic distribution in the missions’ staffing. The idea of individual Member States taking over entire sectors of administration (sectoral responsibility) was also floated, apparently too late in the process to iron out the details. This idea is worth revisiting, at least for the provision of small teams of civil administrators with specialized expertise. 130. In order to respond quickly, ensure quality control and satisfy the volume of even foreseeable demands, the Secretariat would require the existence and maintenance of a roster of civilian candidates. The roster (which would be distinct from UNSAS) should include the names of individuals in a variety of fields, who have been actively sought out (on an individual basis or through partnerships with and/or the assistance of the members of the United Nations family, governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernnmenta organizations), pre-vetted, interviewed, pre-selected, medically cleared and provided with the basic orientation material applicable to field mission service in general, and who have indicated their availability on short notice. 131. No such roster currently exists. As a result, urgent phone calls have to be made to Member States, United Nations departments and agencies and the field missions themselves to identify suitable candidates at the last minute, and to then expect those candidates to be in a position to drop everything overnight. Through this method, the Secretariat has managed to recruit and deploy at least 1,500 new staff over the last year, not including the managed reassignments of existing staff within the United Nations system, but quality control has suffered. 132. A central Intranet-based roster should be created, along the lines proposed above, that is accessible to and maintained by the relevant members of ECPS. The roster should include the names of their own staff whom ECPS members would agree to release for mission service. Some additional resources would be required to maintain these rosters, but accepted external candidates could be reminded automatically to update their own records via the Internet, particularly as regards availability, and they should be able to access on-line briefing and training materials via the Internet, as well. Field missions should be granted access and delegated the authority to recruit candidates23 A/55/305 S/2000/809 from the roster, in accordance with guidelines to be promulgated by the Secretariat for ensuring fair geographic and gender distribution. 2. Difficulties in attracting and retaining the best external recruits 133. As ad hoc as the recruitment system has been, the United Nations has managed to recruit some very qualified and dedicated individuals for field assignments throughout the 1990s. They have managed ballots in Cambodia, dodged bullets in Somalia, evacuated just in time from Liberia and came to accept artillery fire in former Yugoslavia as a feature of their daily life. Yet, the United Nations system has not yet found a contractual mechanism to appropriately recognize and reward their service by offering them some job security. While it is true that mission recruits are explicitly told not to harbour false expectations about future employment because external recruits are brought in to fill a “temporary” demand, such conditions of service do not attract and retain the best performers for long. In general, there is a need to rethink the historically prevailing view of peacekeeping as a temporary aberration rather than a core function of the United Nations. 134. Thus, at least a percentage of the best external recruits should be offered longer-term career prospects beyond the limited-duration contracts that they are currently offered, and some of them should be actively recruited for positions in the Secretariat’s complex emergency departments in order to increase the number of Headquarters staff with field experience. A limited number of mission recruits have managed to secure positions at Headquarters, but apparently on an ad hoc and individual basis rather than according to a concerted and transparent strategy. 135. Proposals are currently being formulated to address this situation by enabling mission recruits who have served for four years in the field to be offered “continuing appointments”, whenever possible; unlike current contracts, these would not be restricted to the duration of a specific mission mandate. Such initiatives, if adopted, would help to address the problem for those who joined the field in mid-decade and remain in the system. They might not, however, go far enough to attract new recruits, who would generally have to take up six-month to one-year assignments at a time, without necessarily knowing if there would be a position for them once the assignment had been completed. The thought of having to live in limbo for four years might be inhibiting for some of the best candidates, particularly for those with families, who have ample alternative employment opportunities (often with more competitive conditions of service). Consideration should therefore be given to offering continuing appointments to those external recruits who have served with particular distinction for at least two years in a peace operation. 3. Shortages in administrative and support functions at the mid-to senior-levels 136. Critical shortfalls in key administrative areas (procurement, finance, budget, personnel) and in logistics support areas (contracts managers, engineers, information systems analysts, logistics planners) plagued United Nations peace operations throughout the 1990s. The unique and specific nature of the Organization’s administrative rules, regulations and internal procedures preclude new recruits from taking on these administrative and logistics functions in the dynamic conditions of mission start-up, without a substantial amount of training. While ad hoc training programmes for such personnel were initiated in 1995, they have yet to be institutionalized because the most experienced individuals, the would-be trainers, could not be spared from their full-time line responsibilities. In general, training and the production of user-friendly guidance documents are the first projects to be set aside when new missions have to be staffed on an urgent basis. Accordingly, the updated version of the 1992 field administration handbook still remains in draft form. 4. Penalizing field deployment 137. Headquarters staff who are familiar with the rules, regulations and procedures do not readily deploy to the field. Staff in both administrative and substantive areas must volunteer for field duty and their managers must agree to release them. Heads of departments often discourage, dissuade and/or refuse to release their best performers for field assignments because of shortages of competent staff in their own offices, which they fear temporary replacements cannot resolve. Potential volunteers are further discouraged because they know colleagues who were passed over for promotion because they were “out of sight, out of mind.” Most field operations are “non-family assignments” given security considerations, another factor which reduces24 A/55/305 S/2000/809 the numbers of volunteers. A number of the fieldorieente United Nations agencies, funds and programmes (UNHCR, the World Food Programme (WFP), UNICEF, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UNDP) do have a number of potentially well qualified candidates for peacekeeping service, but also face resource constraints, and the staffing needs of their own field operations generally take first priority. 138. The Office of Human Resources Management, supported by a number of interdepartmental task forces, has proposed a series of progressive reforms that address some of these problems. They require mobility within the Secretariat, and aim to encourage rotation between Headquarters and the field by rewarding mission service during promotion considerations. They seek to reduce recruitment delays and grant full recruitment authority to heads of departments. The Panel feels it is essential that these initiatives be approved expeditiously. 5. Obsolescence in the Field Service category 139. The Field Service is the only category of staff within the United Nations designed specifically for service in peacekeeping operations (and whose conditions of service and contracts are designed accordingly and whose salaries and benefits are paid for entirely from mission budgets). It has lost much of its value, however, because the Organization has not dedicated enough resources to career development for the Field Service Officers. This category was developed in the 1950s to provide a highly mobile cadre of technical specialists to support in particular the military contingents of peacekeeping operations. As the nature of the operations changed, so too did the functions the Field Service Officers were asked to perform. Eventually, some ascended through the ranks by the late 1980s and early 1990s to assume managerial functions in the administrative and logistics components of peacekeeping operations. 140. The most experienced and seasoned of the group are now in limited supply, deployed in current missions, and many are at or near retirement. Many of those who remain lack the managerial skills or training required to effectively run the key administrative components of complex peace operations. Others’ technical knowledge is dated. Thus, the Field Service’s composition no longer matches all or many of the administrative and logistics support needs of the newer generation of peacekeeping operations. The Panel therefore encourages the urgent revision of the Field Service’s composition and raison d’être, to better match the present and future demands of field operations, with particular emphasis on mid-to seniorleeve managers in key administrative and logistics areas. Staff development and training for this category of personnel, on a continual basis, should also be treated as a high priority, and the conditions of service should be revised to attract and retain the best candidates. 6. Lack of a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations 141. There is no comprehensive staffing strategy to ensure the right mix of civilian personnel in any operation. There are talents within the United Nations system that must be tapped, gaps to be filled through external recruitment and a range of other options that fall in between, such as the use of United Nations Volunteers, subcontracted personnel, commercial services, and nationally-recruited staff. The United Nations has turned to all of these sources of personnel throughout the past decade, but on a case-by-case basis rather than according to a global strategy. Such a strategy is required to ensure cost-effectiveness and efficiency, as well as to promote mission cohesion and staff morale. 142. This staffing strategy should address the use of United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations, on a priority basis. Since 1992, more than 4,000 United Nations Volunteers have served in 19 different peacekeeping operations. Approximately 1,500 United Nations Volunteers have been assigned to new missions in East Timor, Kosovo and Sierra Leone in the last 18 months alone, in civil administration, electoral affairs, human rights, administrative and logistics support roles. United Nations Volunteers have historically proven to be dedicated and competent in their fields of work. The legislative bodies have encouraged greater use of United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations based on their exemplary past performance, but using United Nations Volunteers as a form of cheap labour risks corrupting the programme and can be damaging to mission morale. Many United Nations Volunteers work alongside colleagues who are making three or four times their salary for similar functions. DPKO is currently in discussion with the United Nations Volunteers Programme on the conclusion of a global memorandum of understanding for the use of25 A/55/305 S/2000/809 United Nations Volunteers in peacekeeping operations. It is essential that such a memorandum be part of a broader comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations. 143. This strategy should also include, in particular, detailed proposals for the establishment of a Civilian Standby Arrangements System (CSAS). CSAS should contain a list of personnel within the United Nations system who have been pre-selected, medically cleared and committed by their parent offices to join a mission start-up team on 72 hours’ notice. The relevant members of the United Nations family should be delegated authority and responsibility, for occupational groups within their respective expertise, to initiate partnerships and memoranda of understanding with intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, for the provision of personnel to supplement mission start-up teams drawn from within the United Nations system. 144. The fact that responsibility for developing a global staffing strategy and civilian standby arrangements has rested solely within the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD), acting on its own initiative whenever there are a few moments to spare, is itself an indication that the Secretariat has not dedicated enough attention to this critical issue. The staffing of a mission, from the top down, is perhaps one of the most important building blocks for successful mission execution. This subject should therefore be accorded the highest priority by the Secretariat’s senior management. 145. Summary of key recommendations on civilian specialists: (a) The Secretariat should establish a central Internet/Intranet-based roster of pre-selected civilian candidates available to deploy to peace operations on short notice. The field missions should be granted access to and delegated authority to recruit candidates from it, in accordance with guidelines on fair geographic and gender distribution to be promulgated by the Secretariat; (b) The Field Service category of personnel should be reformed to mirror the recurrent demands faced by all peace operations, especially at the mid-to senior-levels in the administrative and logistics areas; (c) Conditions of service for externally recruited civilian staff should be revised to enable the United Nations to attract the most highly qualified candidates, and to then offer those who have served with distinction greater career prospects; (d) DPKO should formulate a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations, outlining, among other issues, the use of United Nations Volunteers, standby arrangements for the provision of civilian personnel on 72 hours’ notice to facilitate mission start-up, and the divisions of responsibility among the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security for implementing that strategy. F. Public information capacity 146. An effective public information and communications capacity in mission areas is an operational necessity for virtually all United Nations peace operations. Effective communication helps to dispel rumour, to counter disinformation and to secure the cooperation of local populations. It can provide leverage in dealing with leaders of rival groups, enhance security of United Nations personnel and serve as a force multiplier. It is thus essential that every peace operation formulate public information campaign strategies, particularly for key aspects of a mission’s mandate, and that such strategies and the personnel required to implement them be included in the very first elements deployed to help start up a new mission. 147. Field missions need competent spokespeople who are integrated into the senior management team and project its daily face to the world. To be effective, the spokesperson must have journalistic experience and instincts, and knowledge of how both the mission and United Nations Headquarters work. He or she must also enjoy the confidence of the SRSG and establish good relationship with other members of the mission leadership. The Secretariat must therefore increase its efforts to develop and retain a pool of such personnel. 148. United Nations field operations also need to be able to speak effectively to their own people, to keep staff informed of mission policy and developments and to build links between components and both up and down the chain of command. New information technology provides effective tools for such communications, and should be included in the start-up kits and equipment reserves at UNLB in Brindisi.26 A/55/305 S/2000/809 149. Resources devoted to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links, which now infrequently exceed one per cent of a mission’s operating budget, should be increased in accordance with a mission’s mandate, size and needs. 150. Summary of key recommendation on rapidly deployable capacity for public information: additional resources should be devoted in mission budgets to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links. G. Logistics support, the procurement process and expenditure management 151. The depletion of the United Nations reserve of equipment, long lead-times even for systems contracts, bottlenecks in the procurement process and delays in obtaining cash in hand to conduct procurement in the field further constrain the rapid deployment and effective functioning of missions that do actually manage to reach authorized staffing levels. Without effective logistics support, missions cannot function effectively. 152. The lead-times required for the United Nations to provide field missions with basic equipment and commercial services required for mission start-up and full deployment are dictated by the United Nations procurement process. That process is governed by the Financial Regulations and Rules promulgated by the General Assembly and the Secretariat’s interpretations of those regulations and rules (known as “policies and procedures” in United Nations parlance). The regulations, rules, policies and procedures have been translated into a roughly eight-step process that Headquarters must follow to provide field missions with the equipment and services it requires, as follows: 1. Identify the requirements and raise a requisition. 2. Certify that finances are available to procure the item. 3. Initiate an invitation to bid (ITB) or request for proposal (RFP). 4. Evaluate tenders. 5. Present cases to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts (HCC). 6. Award a contract and place an order for production. 7. Await production of the item. 8. Deliver the item to the mission. 153. Most governmental organizations and commercial companies follow similar processes, though not all of them take as long as that of the United Nations. For example, this entire process in the United Nations can take 20 weeks in the case of office furniture, 17 to 21 weeks for generators, 23 to 27 weeks for prefabricated buildings, 27 weeks for heavy vehicles and 17 to 21 weeks for communications equipment. Naturally, none of these lead-times enable full mission deployment within the timelines suggested if the majority of the processes are commencing only after an operation has been established. 154. The United Nations launched the “start-up kit” concept during the boom in peacekeeping operations in the mid-1990s to partially address this problem. The start-up kits contain the basic equipment required to establish and sustain a 100-person mission headquarters for the first 100 days of deployment, prepurchhased packaged and waiting and ready to deploy at a moment’s notice at Brindisi. Assessed contributions from the mission to which the kits are deployed are then used to reconstitute new start-up kits, and once liquidated a mission’s non-disposable and durable equipment is returned to Brindisi and held in reserve, in addition to the start-up kits. 155. However, the wear and tear on light vehicles and other items in post-war environments may sometimes render the shipping and servicing costs more expensive than selling off the item or cannibalizing it for parts and then purchasing a new item altogether. Thus, the United Nations has moved towards auctioning such items in situ more frequently, although the Secretariat is not authorized to use the funds acquired through this process to purchase new equipment but must return it to Member States. Consideration should be given to enabling the Secretariat to use the funds acquired through these means to purchase new equipment to be held in reserve at Brindisi. Furthermore, consideration should also be given to a general authorization for field missions to donate, in consultation with the United Nations resident coordinator, at least a percentage of27 A/55/305 S/2000/809 such equipment to reputable local non-governmental organizations as a means of assisting the development of nascent civil society. 156. Nonetheless, the existence of these start-up kits and reserves of equipment appears to have greatly facilitated the rapid deployment of the smaller operations mounted in the mid-to-late 1990s. However, the establishment and expansion of new missions has now outpaced the closure of existing operations, so that UNLB has been virtually depleted of the long lead-time items required for full mission deployment. Unless one of the large operations currently in place closes down today and its equipment is all shipped to UNLB in good condition, the United Nations will not have in hand the equipment required to support the start-up and rapid full deployment of a large mission in the near future. 157. There are, of course, limits to how much equipment the United Nations can and should keep in reserve at UNLB or elsewhere. Mechanical equipment in storage needs to be maintained, which can be an expensive proposition, and if not addressed properly can result in missions receiving long awaited items that are inoperable. Furthermore, the commercial and public sectors at the national level have moved increasingly towards “just-in-time” inventory and/or “just-in-time delivery” because of the high opportunity costs of keeping funds tied up in equipment that may not be deployed for some time. Furthermore, the current pace of technological advancements renders certain items, such as communications equipment and information systems hardware, obsolete within a matter of months, let alone years. 158. The United Nations has accordingly also moved in that direction over the past few years, and has concluded some 20 standing commercial systems contracts for the provision of common equipment for peace operations, particularly those required for mission start-up and expansion. Under the systems contracts, the United Nations has been able to cut down lead-times considerably by selecting the vendors ahead of time, and keeping them on standby for production requests. Nevertheless, the production of light vehicles under the current systems contract takes 14 weeks and requires an additional four weeks for delivery. 159. The General Assembly has taken a number of steps to address this lead-time issue. The establishment of the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, which when fully capitalized amounts to $150 million, provided a standing pool of money from which to draw quickly. The Secretary-General can seek the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) to draw up to $50 million from the Fund to facilitate the start-up of a new mission or for unforeseen expansion of an existing one. The Fund is then replenished from the mission budgets once it has been approved or increased. For commitment requests in excess of $50 million, the General Assembly’s approval is required. 160. In exceptional cases, the General Assembly, on the advice of ACABQ, has granted the Secretary-General authority to commit up to $200 million in spending to facilitate the start-up of larger missions (UNTAET, UNMIK and MONUC), pending submission of the necessary detailed budget proposals, which can take months of preparation. These are all welcome developments and are indicative of the Member States’ support for enhancing the Organization’s rapid deployment capacities. 161. At the same time, all of these developments are only applicable after a Security Council resolution has been adopted authorizing the establishment of a mission or its advance elements. Unless some of these measures are applied well in advance of the desired date of mission deployment or are modified to help and maintain a minimum reserve of equipment requiring long lead-times to procure, the suggested targets for rapid and effective deployment cannot be met. 162. The Secretariat should thus formulate a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the deployment timelines proposed. That strategy should be formulated based on a cost-benefit analysis of the appropriate level of long lead-time items that should be kept in reserve and those best acquired through standing contracts, factoring in the cost of compressed delivery times, as required, to support such a strategy. The substantive elements of the peace and security departments would need to give logistics planners an estimate of the number and types of operations that might need to be established over 12 to 18 months. The Secretary-General should submit periodically to the General Assembly, for its review and approval, a detailed proposal for implementing that strategy, which could entail considerable financial implications.28 A/55/305 S/2000/809 163. In the interim, the General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure for the creation of three new start-up kits at Brindisi (for a total of five), which would then automatically be replenished from the budgets of the missions that drew upon the kits. 164. The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to $50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution authorizing a mission’s establishment but with the approval of ACABQ, to facilitate the rapid and effective deployment of operations within the proposed timelines. The Fund should be automatically replenished from assessed contributions to the missions that used it. The Secretary-General should request that the General Assembly consider augmenting the size of the Fund, should he determine that it had been depleted due to the establishment of a number of missions in rapid succession. 165. Well beyond mission start-up, the field missions often wait for months to receive items that they need, particularly when initial planning assumptions prove to be inaccurate or mission requirements change in response to new developments. Even if such items are available locally, there are several constraints on local procurement. First, field missions have limited flexibility and authority, for example, to quickly transfer savings from one line item in a budget to another to meet unforeseen demands. Second, missions are generally delegated procurement authority for no more than $200,000 per purchase order. Purchases above that amount must be referred to Headquarters and its eight-step decision process (see para. 152 above). 166. The Panel supports measures that reduce Headquarters micro-management of the field missions and provide them with the authority and flexibility required to maintain mission credibility and effectiveness, while at the same time holding them accountable. Where Headquarters’ involvement adds real value, however, as with respect to standing contracts, Headquarters should retain procurement responsibility. 167. Statistics from the Procurement Division indicate that of the 184 purchase orders raised by Headquarters in 1999 in support of peacekeeping operations, for values of goods and services between US$ 200,000 and US$ 500,000, 93 per cent related to aircraft and shipping services, motor vehicles and computers, which were either handled through international tenders or are currently covered under systems contracts. Provided that systems contracts are activated quickly and result in the timely provision of goods and services, it appears that the Headquarters’ involvement in those instances makes good sense. The systems contracts and international tenders presumably enable bulk purchases of items and services more cheaply than would be possible locally, and in many instances involve goods and services not available in the mission areas at all. 168. However, it is not entirely clear what real value Headquarters involvement adds to the procurement process for those goods and services that are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts and are more readily available locally at cheaper prices. In such instances, it would make sense to delegate the authority to the field to procure those items, and to monitor the process and its financial controls through the audit mechanism. Accordingly, the Secretariat should assign priority to building capacity in the field to assume a higher level of procurement authority as quickly as possible (e.g., through recruitment and training of the appropriate field personnel and the production of user-friendly guidance documents) for all goods and services that are available locally and not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts (up to US$ 1 million, depending on mission size and needs). 169. Summary of key recommendations on logistics support and expenditure management: (a) The Secretariat should prepare a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the timelines proposed and corresponding to planning assumptions established by the substantive offices of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations; (b) The General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure to maintain at least five mission start-up kits in Brindisi, which should include rapidly deployable communications equipment. The start-up kits should then be routinely replenished with funding from the assessed contributions to the operations that drew on them;29 A/55/305 S/2000/809 (c) The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to US$ 50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund once it became clear that an operation was likely to be established, with the approval of ACABQ but prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution; (d) The Secretariat should undertake a review of the entire procurement policies and procedures (with proposals to the General Assembly for amendments to the Financial Rules and Regulations, as required), to facilitate in particular the rapid and full deployment of an operation within the proposed timelines; (e) The Secretariat should conduct a review of the policies and procedures governing the management of financial resources in the field missions with a view to providing field missions with much greater flexibility in the management of their budgets; (f) The Secretariat should increase the level of procurement authority delegated to the field missions (from $200,000 to as high as $1 million, depending on mission size and needs) for all goods and services that are available locally and are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts. IV. Headquarters resources and structure for planning and supporting peacekeeping operations 170. Creating effective Headquarters support capacity for peace operations means addressing the three issues of quantity, structure and quality, that is, the number of staff needed to get the job done; the organizational structures and procedures that facilitate effective support; and quality people and methods of work within those structures. In the present section, the Panel examines and makes recommendations on primarily the first two issues; in section VI below, it addresses the issue of personnel quality and organizational culture. 171. The Panel sees a clear need for increased resources in support of peacekeeping operations. There is particular need for increased resources in DPKO, the primary department responsible for the planning and support of the United Nations’ most complex and highproofil field operations. A. Staffing-levels and funding for Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations 172. Expenditures for Headquarters staffing and related costs to plan and support all peacekeeping operations in the field can be considered the United Nations direct, non-field support costs for peacekeeping operations. They have not exceeded 6 per cent of the total cost of peacekeeping operations in the last half decade (see table 4.1). They are currently closer to three per cent and will fall below two per cent in the current peacekeeping budget year, based on existing plans for expansion of some missions, such as MONUC in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the full deployment of others, such as UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone, and the establishment of a new operation in Eritrea and Ethiopia. A management analyst familiar with the operational requirements of large organizations, public or private, that operate substantial field-deployed elements might well conclude that an organization trying to run a field-oriented enterprise on two per cent central support costs was undersupporting its field people and very likely burning out its support structures in the process. 173. Table 4.1 lists the total budgets for peacekeeping operations from mid-1996 through mid-2001 (peacekeeping budget cycles run from July to June, offset six months from the United Nations regular budget cycle). It also lists total Headquarters costs in support of peacekeeping, whether inside or outside of DPKO, and whether funded from the regular budget or the Support Account for Peacekeeping Operations (the regular budget covers two years and its costs are apportioned among Member States according to the regular scale of assessment; the Support Account covers one year — the intent being that Secretariat staffing levels should ebb and flow with the level of field operations — and its costs are apportioned according to the peacekeeping scale of assessment).30 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Table 4.1 Ratio of total Headquarters support costs to total peacekeeping operations budgets, 1996-2001 (Millions of United States dollars) July 1996-June 1997 July 1997-June 1998 July 1998-June 1999 July 1999-June 2000 July 2000-June 2001a Peacekeeping budgets 1 260 911.7 812.9 1 417 2 582b Related Headquarters support costsc 49.2 52.8 41.0 41.7 50.2 Headquarters: field cost ratio 3.90% 5.79% 5.05% 2.95% 1.94% a Based on financing reports of the Secretary-General; excluding missions completed by 30 June 2000; including rough estimate for full deployment of MONUC, for which a budget has not yet been prepared. b Estimated. c Figures obtained from the Financial Controller of the United Nations, including all posts in the Secretariat (primarily in DPKO) funded through the regular biennium budget and the Support Account; figures also factor in what the costs would have been for in-kind contributions or “gratis personnel” had they been fully funded. 174. The Support Account funds 85 per cent of the DPKO budget, or about $40 million annually. Another $6 million for DPKO comes from the regular biennium budget. This $46 million combined largely funds the salaries and associated costs of DPKO’s 231 civilian, military and police Professionals and 173 General Service staff (but does not include the Mine Action Service, which is funded through voluntary contributions). The Support Account also funds posts in other parts of the Secretariat engaged in peacekeeping support, such as the Peacekeeping Financing Division and parts of the Procurement Division in the Department of Management, the Office of Legal Affairs and DPI. 175. Until mid-decade, the Support Account was calculated as 8.5 per cent of the total civilian staff costs of peacekeeping operations, but it did not take into consideration the costs of supporting civilian police personnel and United Nations Volunteers, or the costs of supporting private contractors or military troops. The fixed-percentage approach was replaced by the annual justification of every post funded by the Support Account. DPKO staffing levels grew little under the new system, however, partly because the Secretariat seems to have tailored its submissions to what it thought the political market would bear. 176. Clearly, DPKO and the other Secretariat offices supporting peacekeeping should expand and contract to some degree in relation to the level of activity in the field, but to require DPKO to rejustify, every year, seven out of eight posts in the Department is to treat it as though it were a temporary creation and peacekeeping a temporary responsibility of the Organization. Fifty-two years of operations would argue otherwise and recent history would argue further that continuing preparedness is essential, even during downturns in field activity, because events are only marginally predictable and staff capacity and experience, once lost, can take a long time to rebuild, as DPKO has painfully learned in the past two years. 177. Because the Support Account funds virtually all of DPKO on a year-by-year basis, that Department and the other offices funded by the Support Account have no predictable baseline level of funding and posts against which they can recruit and retain staff. Personnel brought in from the field on Support Account-funded posts do not know if those posts will exist for them one year later. Given current working conditions and the career uncertainty that Support Account funding entails, it is impressive that DPKO has managed to hold together at all. 178. Member States and the Secretariat have long recognized the need to define a baseline staffing/funding level and a separate mechanism to enable growth and retrenchment in DPKO in response to changing needs. However, without a review of DPKO staffing needs based on some objective management and productivity criteria, an appropriate baseline is difficult to define. While it is not in a position to conduct such a methodical management review of DPKO, the Panel believes that such a review should be conducted. In the meantime, the Panel believes that certain current staff shortages are plainly obvious and merit highlighting. 179. The Military and Civilian Police Division in DPKO, headed by the United Nations Military Adviser, has an authorized strength of 32 military officers and nine civilian police officers. The Civilian Police Unit has been assigned to support all aspects of United Nations international police operations, from doctrinal development through selection and deployment of31 A/55/305 S/2000/809 officers into field operations. It can, at present, do little more than identify personnel, attempt to pre-screen them with visiting selection assistance teams (an effort that occupies roughly half of the staff) and then see that they get to the field. Moreover, there is no unit within DPKO (or any other part of the United Nations system) that is responsible for planning and supporting the rule of law elements of an operation that in turn support effective police work, whether advisory or executive. 180. Eleven officers in the Military Adviser’s office support the identification and rotation of military units for all peacekeeping operations, and provide military advice to the political officers in DPKO. DPKO’s military officers are also supposed to find time to “train the trainers” at the Member State level, to draft guidelines, manuals and other briefing material, and to work with FALD to identify the logistics and other operational requirements of the military and police components of field missions. However, under existing staffing levels, the Training Unit consists of only five military officers in total. Ten officers in the Military Planning Service are the principal operational-level military mission planners within DPKO; six more posts have been authorized but have not yet all been filled. These 16 planning officers combined represent the full complement of military staff available to determine force requirements for mission start-up and expansion, participate in technical surveys and assess the preparedness of potential troop contributors. Of the 10 military planners originally authorized, one was assigned to draft the rules of engagement and directives to force commanders for all operations. Only one officer is available, part time, to manage the UNSAS database. 181. Table 4.2 contrasts the deployed strength of military and police contingents with the authorized strength of their respective Headquarters support staffs. No national Government would send 27,000 troops into the field with just 32 officers back home to provide them with substantive and operational military guidance. No police organization would deploy 8,000 police officers with only nine headquarters staff to provide them with substantive and operational policing support. Table 4.2 Ratio of military and civilian police staff at Headquarters to military and civilian police personnel in the fielda Military personnel Civilian police Peacekeeping operations 27 365 8 641 Headquarters 32 9 Headquarters: field ratio 0.1% 0.1% a Authorized military strength as of 15 June 2000 and civilian police as of 1 August 2000. 182. The Office of Operations in DPKO, in which the political Desk Officers or substantive focal points for particular peacekeeping operations reside, is another area that seems considerably understaffed. It currently has 15 Professionals serving as the focal points for 14 current and two potential new peace operations, or less than one officer per mission on average. While one officer may be able to handle the needs of one or even two smaller missions, this seems untenable in the case of the larger missions, such as UNTAET in East Timor, UNMIK in Kosovo, UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone and MONUC in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Similar circumstances apply to the logistics and personnel officers in DPKO’s Field Administration and Logistics Division, and to related support personnel in the Department of Management, the Office of Legal Affairs, the Department of Public Information and other offices which support their work. Table 4.3 depicts the total number of staff in DPKO and elsewhere in the Secretariat dedicated, full-time, to supporting the larger missions, along with their annual mission budgets and authorized staffing levels. 183. The general shortage of staff means that in many instances key personnel have no back-up, no way to cover more than one shift in a day when a crisis occurs six to 12 time zones away except by covering two shifts themselves, and no way to take a vacation, get sick or visit the mission without leaving their32 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Table 4.3 Total staff assigned on a full-time basis to support complex peacekeeping operations established in 1999 UNMIK (Kosovo) UNAMSIL (Sierra Leone) UNTAET (East Timor) MONUC (Democratic Republic of the Congo) Budget (estimated) July 2000-June 2001 $410 million $465 million $540 million $535 million Current authorized strength of key components 4 718 police 1 000-plus international civilians 13 000 military 8 950 military 1 640 police 1 185 international civilians 5 537 military 500 military observers Professional staff at Headquarters assigned full-time to support the operation Total Headquarters support staff 1 political officer 2 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 6 1 political officer 2 military 1 logistics coord. 1 finance specialist _______ 5 1 political officer 2 military 1 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 7 1 political officer 3 military 1 civilian police 1 logistics coord. 1 civilian recruitment specialist 1 finance specialist _______ 8 backstopping duties largely uncovered. In the current arrangements, compromises among competing demands are inevitable and support for the field may suffer as a result. In New York, Headquarters-related tasks, such as reporting obligations to the legislative bodies, tend to get priority because Member States’ representatives press for action, often in person. The field, by contrast, is represented in New York by an emaail a cable or the jotted notes of a phone conversation. Thus, in the war for a desk officer’s time, field operations often lose out and are left to solve problems on their own. Yet they should be accorded first priority. People in the field face difficult circumstances, sometimes life-threatening. They deserve better, as do the staff at Headquarters who wish to support them more effectively. 184. Although there appears to be some duplication in the functions performed by desk officers in DPKO and their counterparts in the regional divisions of DPA, closer examination suggests otherwise. The UNMIK desk officer’s counterpart in DPA, for example, follows developments in all of Southeastern Europe and the counterpart in OCHA covers all of the Balkans plus parts of the Commonwealth of Independent States. While it is essential that the officers in DPA and OCHA be given the opportunity to contribute what they can, their efforts combined yield less than one additional full-time-equivalent officer to support UNMIK. 185. The three Regional Directors in the Office of Operations should be visiting the missions regularly and engaging in a constant policy dialogue with the SRSGs and heads of components on the obstacles that Headquarters could help them overcome. Instead, they are drawn into the processes that occupy their desk officers’ time because the latter need the back-up. 186. These competing demands are even more pronounced for the Under-Secretary-General and Assistant Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations. The Under-Secretary-General and Assistant Secretary-General provide advice to the Secretary-General, liaise with Member State delegations and capitals, and one or the other vets every report on peacekeeping operations (40 in the first half of 2000) submitted to the Secretary-General for his approval and signature, prior to submission to the legislative bodies. Since January 2000, the two have briefed the Council in person over 50 times, in sessions lasting up to three hours and requiring several hours of staff preparation in the field and at Headquarters. Coordination meetings take further time away from substantive dialogue with the field missions, from field visits, from reflection on ways to improve the United Nations conduct of peacekeeping and from attentive management.33 A/55/305 S/2000/809 187. The staff shortages faced by the substantive side of DPKO may be exceeded by those in the administrative and logistics support areas, particularly in FALD. At this juncture, FALD provides support not only to peacekeeping operations but also to other field offices, such as the Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator in the Occupied Territories (UNSCO) in Gaza, the United Nations Verification Mission in Guatemala (MINUGUA) and a dozen other small offices, not to mention continuing involvement in managing and reconciling the liquidation of terminated missions. All of FALD adds approximately 1.25 per cent to the total cost of peacekeeping and other field operations. If the United Nations were to subcontract the administrative and logistics support functions performed by FALD, the Panel is convinced that it would be hard pressed to find a commercial company to take on the equivalent task for the equivalent fee. 188. A few examples will illustrate FALD’s pronounced staff shortages: the Staffing Section in FALD’s Personnel Management and Support Service (PMSS), which handles recruitment and travel for all civilian personnel as well as travel for civilian police and military observers, has just 10 professional recruitment officers, four of whom have been assigned to review and acknowledge the 150 unsolicited employment applications that the office now receives every day. The other six officers handle the actual selection process: one full-time and one half-time for Kosovo, one full-time and one half-time for East Timor, and three to cover all other field missions combined. Three recruitment officers are trying to identify suitable candidates to staff two civil administration missions that need hundreds of experienced administrators across a multitude of fields and disciplines. Nine to 12 months after they got under way, neither UNMIK nor UNTAET is fully deployed. 189. The Member States must give the Secretary-General some flexibility and the financial resources to bring in the staff he needs to ensure that the credibility of the Organization is not tarnished by its failure to respond to emergencies as a professional organization should. The Secretary-General must be given the resources to increase the capacity of the Secretariat to react immediately to unforeseen demands. 190. The responsibility for providing the people in the field the goods and services they need to do their jobs falls primarily on FALD’s Logistics and Communications Service (LCS). The job description of one of the 14 logistics coordinators in LCS might help to illustrate the workload that the entire Service currently endures. This individual is the lead logistics planner for the expansion of both the mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) and for the expansion of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) in Lebanon. The same individual is also responsible for drafting the logistics policies and procedures for the critical United Nations Logistics Base in Brindisi and for coordinating the preparation of the entire Service’s annual budget submissions. 191. Based on this cursory review alone and bearing in mind that the total support cost for DPKO and related Headquarters peacekeeping support offices does not even exceed $50 million per annum, the Panel is convinced that additional resources for that Department and the others which support it would be an essential investment to ensure that the over $2 billion the Member States will spend on peacekeeping operations in 2001 will be well spent. The Panel therefore recommends a substantial increase in resources for this purpose, and urge the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining the Organization’s requirements in full. 192. The Panel also believes that peacekeeping should cease to be treated as a temporary requirement and DPKO a temporary organizational structure. It requires a consistent and predictable baseline of funding to do more than keep existing missions afloat. It should have resources to plan for potential contingencies six months to a year down the road; to develop managerial tools to help missions perform better in the future; to study the potential impact of modern technology on different aspects of peacekeeping; to implement the lessons learned from previous operations; and to implement recommendations contained in the evaluation reports of the Office of Internal Oversight Services over the past five years. Staff should be given the opportunity to design and conduct training programmes for newly recruited staff at Headquarters and in the field. They should finish the guidelines and handbooks that could help new mission personnel do their jobs more professionally and in accordance with United Nations rules, regulations and procedures, but that now sit half finished in a dozen offices all around DPKO, because their authors are busy meeting other needs. 193. The Panel therefore recommends that Headquarters support for peacekeeping be treated as a34 A/55/305 S/2000/809 core activity of the United Nations, and as such that the majority of its resource requirements be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennial programme budget of the Organization. Pending the preparation of the next regular budget, it recommends that the Secretary-General approach the General Assembly as soon as possible with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the last Support Account submission. 194. The specific allocation of resources should be determined according to a professional and objective review of requirements, but gross levels should reflect historical experience of peacekeeping. One approach would be to calculate the regular budget baseline for Headquarters support of peacekeeping as a percentage of the average cost of peacekeeping over the preceding five years. The resulting baseline budget would reflect the expected level of activity for which the Secretariat should be prepared. Based on the figures provided by the Controller (see table 4.1), the average for the last five years (including the current budget year) is $1.4 billion. Pegging the baseline at five per cent of the average cost would yield, for example, a baseline budget of $70 million, roughly $20 million more than the current annual Headquarters support budget for peacekeeping. 195. To fund above-average or “surge” activity levels, consideration should be given to a simple percentage charge against missions whose budgets carry peacekeeping operations spending above the baseline level. For example, the roughly $2.6 billion in peacekeeping activity estimated for the current budget year exceeds the $1.4 billion hypothetical baseline by $1.2 billion. A one per cent surcharge on that $1.2 billion would yield an additional $12 million to enable Headquarters to deal effectively with that increase. A two per cent surcharge would yield $24 million. 196. Such a direct method of providing for surge capacity should replace the current, annual, post-bypoos justification required for the Support Account submissions. The Secretary-General should be given the flexibility to determine how such funds should best be utilized to meet a surge in activity, and emergency recruitment measures should apply in such instances so that temporary posts associated with surge requirements could be filled immediately. 197. Summary of key recommendations on funding headquarters support for peacekeeping operations: (a) The Panel recommends a substantial increase in resources for Headquarters support of peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining his requirements in full; (b) Headquarters support for peacekeeping should be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements for that purpose should be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennium programme budget of the Organization; (c) Pending the preparation of the next regular budget submission, the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General approach the General Assembly with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the Support Account to allow immediate recruitment of additional personnel, particularly in DPKO. B. Need and proposal for the establishment of Integrated Mission Task Forces 198. There is currently no integrated planning or support cell in DPKO in which those responsible for political analysis, military operations, civilian police, electoral assistance, human rights, development, humanitarian assistance, refugees and displaced persons, public information, logistics, finance and personnel recruitment, among others, are represented. On the contrary, as described above, DPKO has no more than a handful of officers dedicated full-time to planning and supporting even the large complex operations, such as those in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL), Kosovo (UNMIK) and East Timor (UNTAET). In the case of a political peace mission or peace-building office, these functions are discharged within DPA, with equally limited human resources. 199. DPKO’s Office of Operations is responsible for pulling together an overall concept of operations for new peacekeeping missions. In this regard, it bears a heavy dual burden for political analysis and for internal coordination with the other elements of DPKO that are responsible for military and civilian police matters, logistics, finance and personnel. But each of these other elements has a separate organizational reporting chain, and many of them, in fact, are physically scattered across several different buildings. Moreover,35 A/55/305 S/2000/809 DPA, UNDP, OCHA, UNHCR, OHCHR, DPI, and several other departments, agencies, funds and programmes have an increasingly important role to play in planning for any future operation, especially complex operations, and need to be formally included in the planning process. 200. Collaboration across divisions, departments and agencies does occur, but relies too heavily on personal networks and ad hoc support. There are task forces convened for planning major peacekeeping operations, pulling together various parts of the system, but they function more as sounding boards than executive bodies. Moreover, current task forces tend to meet infrequently or even disperse once an operation has begun to deploy, and well before it has fully deployed. 201. Reversing the perspective, once an operation has been deployed, SRSGs in the field have overall coordinating authority for United Nations activities in their mission area but have no single working-level focal point at Headquarters that can address all of their concerns quickly. For example, the desk officer or his/her regional director in DPKO fields political questions for peacekeeping operations but usually cannot directly respond to queries about military, police, humanitarian, human rights, electoral, legal or other elements of an operation, and they do not necessarily have a ready counterpart in each of those areas. A mission impatient for answers will eventually find the right primary contacts themselves and may do so in dozens of instances, building its own networks with different parts of the Secretariat and relevant agencies. 202. The missions should not feel the need to build their own contact networks. They should know exactly who to turn to for the answers and support that they need, especially in the critical early months when a mission is working towards full deployment and coping with daily crises. Moreover, they should be able to contact just one place for those answers, an entity that includes all of the backstopping people and expertise for the mission, drawn from an array of Headquarters elements that mirrors the functions of the mission itself. The Panel would call that entity an Integrated Mission Task Force (IMTF). 203. This concept builds upon but considerably extends the cooperative measures contained in the guidelines for implementing the “lead” department concept that DPKO and DPA agreed to in June 2000, in a joint departmental meeting chaired by the Secretary-General. The Panel would recommend, for example, that DPKO and DPA jointly determine the leader of each new Task Force but not necessarily limit their choice to the current staff of either Department. There may be occasions when the existing workloads of the regional directors or political officers in either department preclude them from taking on the role fulltiime In those instances, it might be best to bring in someone from the field for this purpose. Such flexibility, including the flexibility to assign the task to the most qualified person for the job, would require the approval of funding mechanisms to respond to surge demands, as recommended above. 204. ECPS or a designated subgroup thereof should collectively determine the general composition of an IMTF, which the Panel envisages forming quite early in a process of conflict prevention, peacemaking, prospective peacekeeping or prospective deployment of a peace-building support office. That is, the notion of integrated, one-stop support for United Nations peaceanndsecurity field activities should extend across the whole range of peace operations, with the size, substantive composition, meeting venue and leadership matching the needs of the operation. 205. Leadership and the lead department concept have posed some problems in the past when the principal focus of United Nations presence on the ground has changed from political to peacekeeping or vice versa, causing not only a shift in the field’s primary Headquarters contact but a shift in the whole Headquarters supporting cast. As the Panel sees the IMTF working, the supporting cast would remain substantially the same during and after such transitions, with additions or subtractions as the nature of the operation changed but with no changes in core Task Force personnel for those functions that bridge the transition. IMTF leadership would pass from one member of the group to another (e.g., from a DPKO regional director or political officer to his or her DPA counterpart). 206. Size and composition would match the nature and the phase of the field activity being supported. Crisisrellate preventive action would require well informed political support that would keep a United Nations envoy apprised of political evolution within the region and other factors key to the success of his or her effort. Peacemakers working to end a conflict would need to know more about peacekeeping and peace-building36 A/55/305 S/2000/809 options, so that their potential and their limitations are both reflected in any peace accord that would involve United Nations implementation. Adviser-observers from the Secretariat working with the peacemaker would be affiliated with the IMTF that supports the negotiations, and keep it posted on progress. The IMTF leader could, in turn, serve as the peacemaker’s routine contact point at Headquarters, with rapid access to higher echelons of the Secretariat for answers to sensitive political queries. 207. An IMTF of the sort just described could be a “virtual” body, meeting periodically but not physically co-located, its members operating from their workday offices and tied together by modern information technology. To support their work, each should feed as well as have access to the data and analyses created and placed on the United Nations Intranet by EISAS, the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat proposed in paragraphs 65 to 75 above. 208. IMTFs created to plan potential peace operations could also begin as virtual bodies. As an operation seemed more likely to go forward, the Task Force should assume physical form, with all of its members co-located in one space, prepared to work together as a team on a continuing basis for as long as needed to bring a new mission to full deployment. That period may be up to six months, assuming that the rapid deployment reforms recommended in paragraphs 84-169 above have been implemented. 209. Task Force members should be formally seconded to IMTF for such duration by their home division, department, agency, fund or programme. That is, an IMTF should be much more than a coordinating committee or task force of the type now set up at Headquarters. It should be a temporary but coherent staff created for a specific purpose, able to be increased or decreased in size or composition in response to mission needs. 210. Each Task Force member should be authorized to serve not only as a liaison between the Task Force and his or her home base but as its key working-level decision maker for the mission in question. The leader of the IMTF — reporting to the Assistant Secretary-General for Operations of DPKO in the case of peacekeeping operations, and the relevant Assistant Secretary-General of DPA in the case of peacemaking efforts, peace-building support offices and special political missions — should in turn have line authority over his or her Task Force members for the period of their secondment, and should serve as the first level of contact for the peace operations for all aspects of their work. Matters related to long-term policy and strategy should be dealt with at the Assistant Secretary-General/Under-Secretary-General level in ECPS, supported by EISAS. 211. For the United Nations system to be prepared to contribute staff to an IMTF, responsibility centres for each major substantive component of peace operations need to be established. Departments and agencies need to agree in advance on procedures for secondment and on their support for the IMTF concept, in writing if necessary. 212. The Panel is not in a position to suggest “lead” offices for each potential component of a peace operation but believes that ECPS should think through this issue collectively and assign one of its members responsibility for maintaining a level of preparedness for each potential component of a peace operation other than the military, police and judicial, and logistics/administration areas, which should remain DPKO’s responsibility. The designated lead agency should be responsible for devising generic concepts of operations, job descriptions, staffing and equipment requirements, critical path/deployment timetables, standard databases, civilian standby arrangements and rosters of other potential candidates for that component, as well as for participation in the IMTFs. 213. IMTFs offer a flexible approach to dealing with time-critical, resource-intensive but ultimately temporary requirements to support mission planning, start-up and initial sustainment. The concept borrows heavily from the notion of “matrix management”, used extensively by large organizations that need to be able to assign the necessary talent to specific projects without reorganizing themselves every time a project arises. Used by such diverse entities as the RAND Corporation and the World Bank, it gives each staff member a permanent “home” or “parent” department but allows — indeed, expects — staff to function in support of projects as the need arises. A matrix management approach to Headquarters planning and support of peace operations would allow departments, agencies, funds and programmes — internally organized as suits their overall needs — to contribute staff to coherent, interdepartmental/inter-agency task forces built to provide that support.37 A/55/305 S/2000/809 214. The IMTF structure could have significant implications for how DPKO’s Office of Operations is currently structured, and in effect would supplant the Regional Divisions structure. For example, the larger operations, such as those in Sierra Leone, East Timor and Kosovo, each would warrant separate IMTFs, headed by Director-level officers. Other missions, such as the long-established “traditional” peacekeeping operations in Asia and the Middle East, might be grouped into another IMTF. The number of IMTFs that could be formed would largely depend on the amount of additional resources allocated to DPKO, DPA and related departments, agencies, funds and programmes. As the number of IMTFs increased, the organizational structure of the Office of Operations would become flatter. There could be similar implications for the Assistant Secretaries-General of DPA, to whom the heads of the IMTFs would report during the peacemaking phase or when setting up a large peacebuilldin support operation either as a follow-on presence to a peacekeeping operation or as a separate initiative. 215. While the regional directors of DPKO (and DPA in those cases where they were appointed as IMTF heads) would be in charge of overseeing fewer missions than at present, they would actually be managing a larger number of staff, such as those seconded full-time from the Military and Civilian Police Advisers’ Offices, FALD (or its successor divisions) and other departments, agencies, funds and programmes, as required. The size of the IMTFs will also depend on the amount of additional resources provided, without which participating entities would not be in a position to second their staff on a full-time basis. 216. It should also be noted that in order for the IMTF concept to work effectively, its members must be physically co-located during the planning and initial deployment phases. This will not be possible at present without major adjustments to current office space allocations in the Secretariat. 217. Summary of key recommendation on integrated mission planning and support: Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs), with members seconded from throughout the United Nations system, as necessary, should be the standard vehicle for mission-specific planning and support. IMTFs should serve as the first point of contact for all such support, and IMTF leaders should have temporary line authority over seconded personnel, in accordance with agreements between DPKO, DPA and other contributing departments, programmes, funds and agencies. C. Other structural adjustments required in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations 218. The IMTF concept would strengthen the capacity of DPKO’s Office of Operations to function as a real focal point for all aspects of a peacekeeping operation. However, structural adjustments are also required in other elements of DPKO, in particular to the Military and Civilian Police Division, FALD and the Lessons Learned Unit. 1. Military and Civilian Police Division 219. All civilian police officials interviewed at Headquarters and in the field expressed frustration with having police functions in DPKO included in a military reporting chain. The Panel agrees that there seems to be little administrative or substantive value added in this arrangement. 220. Military and civilian police officers in DPKO serve for three years because the United Nations requires that they be on active duty. If they wish to remain longer and would even leave their national military or police services to do so, United Nations personnel policy precludes their being hired into their previous position. Hence the turnover rate in the military and police offices of DPKO is high. Since lessons learned in Headquarters practice are not routinely captured, since comprehensive training programmes for new arrivals are non-existent and since user-friendly manuals and standard operating procedures remain half-complete, high turnover means routine loss of institutional memory that takes months of on-the-job learning to replace. Current staff shortages also mean that military and civilian police officers find themselves assigned to functions that do not necessarily match their expertise. Those who have specialized in operations (J3) or plans (J5) might find themselves engaged in quasi-diplomatic work or functioning as personnel and administration officers (J1), managing the continual turnover of people and units in the field, to the detriment of their ability to monitor operational activity in the field.38 A/55/305 S/2000/809 221. DPKO’s lack of continuity in these areas may also explain why, after over 50 years of deploying military observers to monitor ceasefire violations, DPKO still does not have a standard database that could be provided to military observers in the field to document ceasefire violations and generate statistics. At present, if one wanted to know how many violations had occurred over a six-month period in a particular country where an operation is deployed, someone would have to physically count each one in the paper copies of the daily situation reports for that period. Where such databases do exist, they have been created by the missions themselves on an ad hoc basis. The same applies to the variety of crime statistics and other information common to most civilian police missions. Technological advances have also revolutionized the way in which ceasefire violations and movements in demilitarized zones and removal of weapons from storage sites can be monitored. However, there is no one in DPKO’s Military and Civilian Police Division currently assigned to addressing these issues. 222. The Panel recommends that the Military and Police Division be separated into two separate entities, one for the military and the other for the civilian police. The Military Adviser’s Office of DPKO should be enlarged and restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured, so as to provide more effective support to the field and better informed military advice to senior officials in the Secretariat. The Civilian Police Unit should also be provided with substantial additional resources, and consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser. 223. To ensure a minimum of continuity of DPKO’s military and civilian police capacity, the Panel recommends that a percentage of the added positions in these two units be reserved for military and civilian police personnel who have prior United Nations experience and have recently left their national services, to be appointed as regular staff members. This would follow the precedent set in the Logistics and Communications Service of FALD, which includes a number of former military officers. 224. Civilian police in the field are increasingly involved in the restructuring and reform of local police forces, and the Panel has recommended a doctrinal shift that would make such activities a primary focus for civilian police in future peace operations (see paras. 39, 40 and 47 (b) above). However, to date, the Civilian Police Unit formulates plans and requirements for the police components of peace operations without the benefit of the requisite legal advice on local judicial structures, criminal laws, codes and procedures in effect in the country concerned. This is vital information for civilian police planners, yet it is not a function for which resources have hitherto been allocated from the Support Account, either to OLA, DPKO or any other department in the Secretariat. 225. The Panel therefore recommends that a new, separate unit be established in DPKO, staffed with the requisite experts in criminal law, specifically for the purpose of providing advice to the Civilian Police Adviser’s Office on those rule of law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in peace operations. This unit should also work closely with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva, the Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention in Vienna, and other parts of the United Nations system that focus on the reform of rule of law institutions and respect for human rights. 2. Field Administration and Logistics Division 226. FALD does not have the authority to finalize and present the budgets for the field operations that it plans, nor to actually procure the goods and services they need. That authority rests with the Peacekeeping Financing and Procurement Divisions of DM. All Headquarters-based procurement requests are processed by the 16 Support Account-funded procurement officers in the Procurement Division, who prepare the larger contracts (roughly 300 in 1999) for presentation to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts, negotiate and award contracts for goods and services not procured locally by the field missions, and formulate United Nations policies and procedures for both global and local mission procurement. The combination of staffing constraints and the extra steps entailed in this process appears to contribute to the procurement delays reported by field missions. 227. Procurement efficiency could be enhanced by delegating peacekeeping budgeting and presentation, allotment issuance and procurement authority to DPKO for a two-year trial period, with the corresponding transfer of posts and staff. In order to ensure accountability and transparency, DM should retain authority for accounts, assessment of Member States and treasury functions. It should also retain its overall39 A/55/305 S/2000/809 policy setting and monitoring role, as it has in the case of recruitment and administration of field personnel, authority and responsibility, which are already delegated to DPKO. 228. Furthermore, to avoid allegations of impropriety that may arise from having those responsible for budgeting and procurement working in the same division as those identifying the requirements, the Panel recommends that FALD be separated into two divisions: one for Administrative Services, in which the personnel, budget/finance and procurement functions would reside, and the other for Integrated Support Services (e.g., logistics, transport, communications). 3. Lessons Learned Unit 229. All are agreed on the need to exploit cumulating field experience but not enough has been done to improve the system’s ability to tap that experience or to feed it back into the development of operational doctrine, plans, procedures or mandates. The work of DPKO’s existing Lessons Learned Unit does not seem to have had a great deal of impact on peace operations practice, and the compilation of lessons learned seems to occur mostly after a mission has ended. This is unfortunate because the peacekeeping system is generating new experience — new lessons — on a daily basis. That experience should be captured and retained for the benefit of other current operators and future operations. Lessons learned should be thought of as a facet of information management that contributes to improving operations on a daily basis. Post-action reports would then be just one part of a larger learning process, the capstone summary rather than the principal objective of the entire process. 230. The Panel feels that this function is in urgent need of enhancement and recommends that it be located where it can work closely with and contribute effectively to ongoing operations as well as mission planning and doctrine/guidelines development. The Panel suggests that this might best be in the Office of Operations, which will oversee the functions of the Integrated Mission Task Forces that the Panel has proposed to integrate Headquarters planning and support for peace operations (see paras. 198-217 above). Located in an element of DPKO that will routinely incorporate representatives from many departments and agencies, the unit could serve as the peace operations “learning manager” for all of those entities, maintaining and updating the institutional memory that missions and task forces alike could draw upon for problem solving, best practices and practices to avoid. 4. Senior management 231. There are currently two Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO: one for the Office of Operations and the other for the Office of Logistics, Management and Mine Action (FALD and the Mine Action Service). The Military Adviser, who concurrently serves as the Director of the Military and Civilian Police Division, currently reports to the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations through one of the two Assistant Secretaries-General or directly to the Under-Secretary-General, depending on the nature of the issue concerned. 232. In the light of the various staff increases and structural adjustments proposed in the preceding sections, the Panel believes that there is a strong case to be made for the Department to be provided with a third Assistant Secretary-General. The Panel further believes that one of the three Assistant Secretaries-General should be designated as a “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and function as deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. 233. Summary of key recommendations on other structural adjustments in DPKO: (a) The current Military and Civilian Police Division should be restructured, moving the Civilian Police Unit out of the military reporting chain. Consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser; (b) The Military Adviser’s Office in DPKO should be restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military field headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured; (c) A new unit should be established in DPKO and staffed with the relevant expertise for the provision of advice on criminal law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in United Nations peace operations; (d) The Under-Secretary-General for Management should delegate authority and responsibility for peacekeeping-related budgeting and procurement functions to the Under-Secretary40 A/55/305 S/2000/809 General for Peacekeeping Operations for a two-year trial period; (e) The Lessons Learned Unit should be substantially enhanced and moved into a revamped DPKO Office of Operations; (f) Consideration should be given to increasing the number of Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO from two to three, with one of the three designated as the “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. D. Structural adjustments needed outside the Department of Peacekeeping Operations 234. Public information planning and support at Headquarters needs strengthening, as do elements in DPA that support and coordinate peace-building activities and provide electoral support. Outside the Secretariat, the ability of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to plan and support the human rights components of peace operations needs to be reinforced. 1. Operational support for public information 235. Unlike military, civilian police, mine action, logistics, telecommunications and other mission components, no unit at Headquarters has specific line responsibility for the operational requirements of public information components in peace operations. The most concentrated responsibility for missionrellate public information rests with the Office of the Spokesman of the Secretary General and the respective spokespersons and public information offices in the missions themselves. At Headquarters, four professional officers in the Peace and Security Section, nested within the Promotion and Planning Service of the Public Affairs Division in DPI, are responsible for producing publications, developing and updating web site content on peace operations, and dealing with other issues ranging from disarmament to humanitarian assistance. While the Section produces and manages information about peacekeeping, it has had little capacity to create doctrine, strategy or standard operating procedures for public information functions in the field, other than on a sporadic and ad hoc basis. 236. The DPI Peace and Security Section is being expanded somewhat through internal DPI redeployment of staff, but it should either be substantially expanded and made operational or the support function should be moved into DPKO, with some of its officers perhaps seconded from DPI. 237. Wherever the function is located, it should anticipate public information needs and the technology and people to meet them, set priorities and standard field operating procedures, provide support in the startuu phase of new missions, and provide continuing support and guidance through participation in the Integrated Mission Task Forces. 238. Summary of key recommendation on structural adjustments in public information: a unit for operational planning and support of public information in peace operations should be established, either within DPKO or within a new Peace and Security Information Service in DPI reporting directly to the Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information. 2. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs 239. The Department of Political Affairs (DPA) is the designated focal point for United Nations peacebuilldin efforts and currently has responsibility for setting up, supporting and/or advising peace-building offices and special political missions in a dozen countries, plus the activities of five envoys and representatives of the Secretary-General who have been given peacemaking or conflict prevention assignments. Regular budget funds that support these activities through the next calendar year are expected to fall $31 million or 25 per cent below need. Such assessed funding is in fact relatively rare in peace-building, where most activities are funded by voluntary donations. 240. DPA’s nascent Peace-building Support Unit is one such activity. In his capacity as Convener of ECPS and focal point for peace-building strategies, the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs must be able to coordinate the formulation of such strategies with the members of ECPS and other elements of the United Nations system, particularly those in the development and humanitarian fields given the cross-cutting nature of peace-building itself. To do so, the Secretariat is assembling voluntary funds from a number of donors41 A/55/305 S/2000/809 for a three-year pilot project in support of the unit. As the planning for this pilot unit evolves, the Panel urges DPA to consult with all stakeholders in the United Nations system that can contribute to its success, in particular UNDP, which is placing renewed emphasis on democracy/governance and other transition-related areas. 241. DPA’s executive office supports some of the operational efforts for which it is responsible, but it is neither designed nor equipped to be a field support office. FALD also provides support to some of the field missions managed by DPA, but neither those missions’ budgets nor DPA’s budget allocate additional resources to FALD for this purpose. FALD attempts to meet the demands of the smaller peace-building operations but acknowledges that the larger operations make severe, high-priority demands on its current staffing. Thus the needs of smaller missions tend to suffer. DPA has had satisfactory experience with support from the United Nations Office of Project Services (UNOPS), a fiveyeearold spin-off from UNDP that manages programmes and funds for many clients within the United Nations system, using modern management practices and drawing all of its core funding from a management charge of up to 13 per cent. UNOPS can provide logistics, management and recruitment support for smaller missions fairly quickly. 242. DPA’s Electoral Assistance Division (EAD) also relies on voluntary money to meet growing demand for its technical advice, needs assessment missions and other activities not directly involving electoral observation. As of June 2000, 41 requests for assistance were pending from Member States but the trust fund supporting such “non-earmarked” activities held just 8 per cent of the funding required to meet current requests through the end of calendar year 2001. So, as demand surges for a key element of democratic institution-building endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 46/137, EAD staff must first raise the programme funds needed to do their jobs. 243. Summary of key recommendations for peacebuilldin support in the Department of Political Affairs: (a) The Panel supports the Secretariat’s effort to create a pilot Peace-building Unit within DPA in cooperation with other integral United Nations elements, and suggests that regular budgetary support for the unit be revisited by the membership if the pilot programme works well. The programme should be evaluated in the context of guidance the Panel has provided in paragraph 46 above, and if considered the best available option for strengthening United Nations peace-building capacity it should be presented to the Secretary-General as per the recommendation contained in paragraph 47 (d) above; (b) The Panel recommends that regular budget resources for Electoral Assistance Division programmatic expenses be substantially increased to meet the rapidly growing demand for its services, in lieu of voluntary contributions; (c) To relieve demand on FALD and the executive office of DPA, and to improve support services rendered to smaller political and peacebuilldin field offices, the Panel recommends that procurement, logistics, staff recruitment and other support services for all such smaller, non-military field missions be provided by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). 3. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 244. OHCHR needs to be more closely involved in planning and executing the elements of peace operations that address human rights, especially complex operations. At present, OHCHR has inadequate resources to be so involved or to provide personnel for service in the field. If United Nations operations are to have effective human rights components, OHCHR should be able to coordinate and institutionalize human rights field work in peace operations; second personnel to Integrated Mission Task Forces in New York; recruit human rights field personnel; organize human rights training for all personnel in peace operations, including the law and order components; and create model databases for human rights field work. 245. Summary of key recommendation on strengthening the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: the Panel recommends substantially enhancing the field mission planning and preparation capacity of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with funding partly from the42 A/55/305 S/2000/809 regular budget and partly from peace operations mission budgets. V. Peace operations and the information age 246. Threaded through many parts of the present report are references to the need to better link the peace and security system together; to facilitate communications and data sharing; to give staff the tools that they need to do their work; and ultimately to allow the United Nations to be more effective at preventing conflict and helping societies find their way back from war. Modern, well utilized information technology (IT) is a key enabler of many of these objectives. The present section notes the gaps in strategy, policy and practice that impede the United Nations effective use of IT, and offers recommendations to bridge them. A. Information technology in peace operations: strategy and policy issues 247. The problem of IT strategy and policy is bigger than peace operations and extends to the entire United Nations system. That larger IT context is generally beyond the Panel’s mandate, but the larger issues should not preclude the adoption of common IT user standards for peace operations and for the Headquarters units that give support to them. FALD’s Communications Service can provide the satellite links and the local connectivity upon which missions can build effective IT networks and databases, but a better strategy and policy needs to be developed for the user community to help it take advantage of the technology foundations that are now being laid. 248. When the United Nations deploys a mission into the field, it is critical that its elements be able to exchange data easily. All complex peace operations bring together many different actors: agencies, funds, and programmes from throughout the United Nations system, as well as the Departments of the Secretariat; mission recruits who are new to the United Nations system; on occasion, regional organizations; frequently, bilateral aid agencies; and always, dozens to hundreds of humanitarian and development NGOs. All of them need a mechanism that makes it easier to share information and ideas efficiently, the more so because each is but the small tip of a very large bureaucratic iceberg with its own culture, working methods and objectives. 249. Poorly planned and poorly integrated IT can pose obstacles to such cooperation. When there are no agreed standards for data structure and interchange at the application level, the “interface” between the two is laborious manual recoding, which tends to defeat the purposes of investing in a networked and computerheeav working environment. The consequences can also be more serious than wasted labour, ranging from miscommunication of policy to a failure to “get the word” on security threats or other major changes in the operational environment. 250. The irony of distributed and decentralized data systems is that they need such common standards to function. Common solutions to common IT problems are difficult to produce at higher levels — between substantive components of an operation, between substantive offices at Headquarters, or between Headquarters and the rest of the United Nations system — in part because existing operational information systems policy formulation is scattered. Headquarters lacks a sufficiently strong responsibility centre for user-level IT strategy and policy in peace operations, in particular. In government or industry, such responsibility would rest with a “Chief Information Officer”. The Panel believes the United Nations needs someone at Headquarters, most usefully in EISAS, to play such a role, supervising development and implementation of IT strategy and user standards. He or she should also develop and oversee IT training programmes, both field manuals and hands-on training — the need for which is substantial and not to be underestimated. Counterparts in the SRSG’s office in each field mission should oversee implementation of the common IT strategy and supervise field training, both complementing and building on the work of FALD and the Information Technology Services Division (ITSD) in the Department of Management in providing basic IT structures and services. 251. Summary of key recommendation on information technology strategy and policy: Headquarters peace and security departments need a responsibility centre to devise and oversee the implementation of common information technology strategy and training for peace operations, residing in EISAS. Mission counterparts to that responsibility centre should also be appointed to43 A/55/305 S/2000/809 serve in the offices of the SRSGs in complex peace operations to oversee the implementation of that strategy. B. Tools for knowledge management 252. Technology can help to capture as well as disseminate information and experience. It could be much better utilized to help a wide variety of actors working in a United Nations mission’s area of operation to acquire and share data in a systematic and mutually supportive manner. United Nations development and humanitarian relief communities, for example, work in most of the places where the United Nations has deployed peace operations. These United Nations country teams, plus the NGOs that do complementary work at the grass-roots level, will have been in the region long before a complex peace operation arrives and will remain after it has left. Together, they hold a wealth of local knowledge and experience that could be helpful to peace operations planning and implementation. An electronic data clearing house, managed by EISAS to share this data, could assist mission planning and execution and also aid conflict prevention and assessment. Proper melding of these data and data gathered subsequent to deployment by the various components of a peace operation and their use with geographic information systems (GIS) could create powerful tools for tracking needs and problems in the mission area and for tracking the impact of action plans. GIS specialists should be assigned to every mission team, together with GIS training resources. 253. Current examples of GIS applications can be seen in the humanitarian and reconstruction work done in Kosovo since 1998. The Humanitarian Community Information Centre has pooled GIS data produced by such sources as the Western European Satellite Centre, the Geneva Centre for Humanitarian Demining, KFOR, the Yugoslav Institute of Statistics and the International Management Group. Those data have been combined to create an atlas that is available publicly on their web site, on CD-ROMs for those with slow or non-existent Internet access and in hard copy. 254. Computer simulations can be powerful learning tools for mission personnel and for the local parties. Simulations can, in principle, be created for any component of an operation. They can facilitate group problem-solving and reveal to local parties the sometimes unintended consequences of their policy choices. With appropriate broadband Internet links, simulations can be part of distance learning packages tailored to a new operation and used to pre-train new mission recruits. 255. An enhanced peace and security area on the United Nations Intranet (the Organization’s information network that is open to a specified set of users) would be a valuable addition to peace operations planning, analysis, and execution. A subset of the larger network, it would focus on drawing together issues and information that directly pertain to peace and security, including EISAS analyses, situation reports, GIS maps and linkages to lessons learned. Varying levels of security access could facilitate the sharing of sensitive information among restricted groups. 256. The data in the Intranet should be linked to a Peace Operations Extranet (POE) that would use existing and planned wide area network communications to link Headquarters databases in EISAS and the substantive offices with the field, and field missions with one another. POE could easily contain all administrative, procedural and legal information for peace operations, and could provide single-point access to information generated by many sources, give planners the ability to produce comprehensive reports more quickly and improve response time to emergency situations. 257. Some mission components, such as civilian police and related criminal justice units and human rights investigators, require added network security, as well as the hardware and software that can support the required levels of data storage, transmission and analysis. Two key technologies for civilian police are GIS and crime mapping software, used to convert raw data into geographical representations that illustrate crime trends and other key information, facilitate recognition of patterns of events, or highlight special features of problem areas, improving the ability of civilian police to fight crime or to advise their local counterparts. 258. Summary of key recommendations on information technology tools in peace operations: (a) EISAS, in cooperation with ITSD, should implement an enhanced peace operations element on the current United Nations Intranet and link it44 A/55/305 S/2000/809 to the missions through a Peace Operations Extranet (POE); (b) Peace operations could benefit greatly from more extensive use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, which quickly integrates operational information with electronic maps of the mission area, for applications as diverse as demobilization, civilian policing, voter registration, human rights monitoring and reconstruction; (c) The IT needs of mission components with unique information technology needs, such as civilian police and human rights, should be anticipated and met more consistently in mission planning and implementation. C. Improving the timeliness of Internetbaase public information 259. As the Panel noted in section III above, effectively communicating the work of United Nations peace operations to the public is essential to creating and maintaining support for current and future missions. Not only is it essential to develop a positive image early on to promote a conducive working environment but it is also important to maintain a solid public information campaign to garner and retain support from the international community. 260. The body now officially responsible for communicating the work of United Nations peace operations is the Peace and Security Section of DPI in Headquarters, as discussed in section IV above. One person in DPI is responsible for the actual posting of all peace and security content on the web site, as well as for posting all mission inputs to the web, to ensure that information posted is consistent and compatible with Headquarters web standards. 261. The Panel endorses the application of standards but standardized need not mean centralized. The current process of news production and posting of data to the United Nations web site slows down the cycle of updates, yet daily updates could be important to a mission in a fast-moving situation. It also limits the amount of information that can be presented on each mission. 262. DPI and field staff have expressed interest in relieving this bottleneck through the development of a “web site co-management” model. This seems to the Panel to be an appropriate solution to this particular information bottleneck. 263. Summary of key recommendation on timeliness of Internet-based public information: the Panel encourages the development of web site comanaggemen by Headquarters and the field missions, in which Headquarters would maintain oversight but individual missions would have staff authorized to produce and post web content that conforms to basic presentational standards and policy. * * * 264. In the present report, the Panel has emphasized the need to change the structure and practices of the Organization in order to enable it to pursue more effectively its responsibilities in support of international peace and security and respect for human rights. Some of those changes would not be feasible without the new capacities that networked information technologies provide. The report itself would have been impossible to produce without the technologies already in place at United Nations Headquarters and accessible to members of the Panel in every region of the world. People use effective tools, and effective information technology could be much better utilized in the service of peace. VI. Challenges to implementation 265. The present report targets two groups in presenting its recommendations for reform: the Member States and the Secretariat. We recognize that reform will not occur unless Member States genuinely pursue it. At the same time, we believe that the changes we recommend for the Secretariat must be actively advanced by the Secretary-General and implemented by his senior staff. 266. Member States must recognize that the United Nations is the sum of its parts and accept that the primary responsibility for reform lies with them. The failures of the United Nations are not those of the Secretariat alone, or troop commanders or the leaders of field missions. Most occurred because the Security Council and the Member States crafted and supported ambiguous, inconsistent and under-funded mandates and then stood back and watched as they failed, sometimes even adding critical public commentary as45 A/55/305 S/2000/809 the credibility of the United Nations underwent its severest tests. 267. The problems of command and control that recently arose in Sierra Leone are the most recent illustration of what cannot be tolerated any longer. Troop contributors must ensure that the troops they provide fully understand the importance of an integrated chain of command, the operational control of the Secretary-General and the standard operating procedures and rules of engagement of the mission. It is essential that the chain of command in an operation be understood and respected, and the onus is on national capitals to refrain from instructing their contingent commanders on operational matters. 268. We are aware that the Secretary-General is implementing a comprehensive reform programme and realize that our recommendations may need to be adjusted to fit within this bigger picture. Furthermore, the reforms we have recommended for the Secretariat and the United Nations system in general will not be accomplished overnight, though some require urgent action. We recognize that there is a normal resistance to change in any bureaucracy, and are encouraged that some of the changes we have embraced as recommendations originate from within the system. We are also encouraged by the commitment of the Secretary-General to lead the Secretariat toward reform even if it means that long-standing organizational and procedural lines will have to be breached, and that aspects of the Secretariat’s priorities and culture will need to be challenged and changed. In this connection, we urge the Secretary-General to appoint a senior official with responsibility for overseeing the implementation of the recommendations contained in the present report. 269. The Secretary-General has consistently emphasized the need for the United Nations to reach out to civil society and to strengthen relations with non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and the media, who can be useful partners in the promotion of peace and security for all. We call on the Secretariat to take heed of the Secretary-General’s approach and implement it in its work in peace and security. We call on them to constantly keep in mind that the United Nations they serve is the universal organization. People everywhere are fully entitled to consider that it is their organization, and as such to pass judgement on its activities and the people who serve in it. 270. There is wide variation in quality among Secretariat staff supporting the peace and security functions in DPKO, DPA and the other departments concerned. This observation applies to the civilians recruited by the Secretariat as well as to the military and civilian police personnel proposed by Member States. These disparities are widely recognized by those in the system. Better performers are given unreasonable workloads to compensate for those who are less capable. Naturally, this can be bad for morale and can create resentment, particularly among those who rightly point out that the United Nations has not dedicated enough attention over the years to career development, training and mentoring or the institution of modern management practices. Put simply, the United Nations is far from being a meritocracy today, and unless it takes steps to become one it will not be able to reverse the alarming trend of qualified personnel, the young among them in particular, leaving the Organization. If the hiring, promotion and delegation of responsibility rely heavily on seniority or personal or political connections, qualified people will have no incentive to join the Organization or stay with it. Unless managers at all levels, beginning with the Secretary-General and his senior staff, seriously address this problem on a priority basis, reward excellence and remove incompetent staff, additional resources will be wasted and lasting reform will become impossible. 271. The same level of scrutiny should apply to United Nations personnel in the field missions. The majority of them embody the spirit of what it means to be an international civil servant, travelling to war-torn lands and dangerous environments to help improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable communities. They do so with considerable personal sacrifice, and at times with great risks to their own physical safety and mental health. They deserve the world’s recognition and appreciation. Over the years, many of them have given their lives in the service of peace and we take this opportunity to honour their memory. 272. United Nations personnel in the field, perhaps more than any others, are obliged to respect local norms, culture and practices. They must go out of their way to demonstrate that respect, as a start, by getting to know their host environment and trying to learn as much of the local culture and language as they can. They must behave with the understanding that they are guests in someone else’s home, however destroyed that46 A/55/305 S/2000/809 home might be, particularly when the United Nations takes on a transitional administration role. And they must also treat one another with respect and dignity, with particular sensitivity towards gender and cultural differences. 273. In short, we believe that a very high standard should be maintained for the selection and conduct of personnel at Headquarters and in the field. When United Nations personnel fail to meet such standards, they should be held accountable. In the past, the Secretariat has had difficulty in holding senior officials in the field accountable for their performance because those officials could point to insufficient resources, unclear instructions or lack of appropriate command and control arrangements as the main impediments to successful implementation of a mission’s mandate. These deficiencies should be addressed but should not be allowed to offer cover to poor performers. The future of nations, the lives of those whom the United Nations has come to help and protect, the success of a mission and the credibility of the Organization can all hinge on what a few individuals do or fail to do. Anyone who turns out to be unsuited to the task that he or she has agreed to perform must be removed from a mission, no matter how high or how low they may be on the ladder. 274. Member States themselves acknowledge that they, too, need to reflect on their working culture and methods, at least as concerns the conduct of United Nations peace and security activities. The tradition of the recitation of statements, followed by a painstaking process of achieving consensus, places considerable emphasis on the diplomatic process over operational product. While one of the United Nations main virtues is that it provides a forum for 189 Member States to exchange views on pressing global issues, sometimes dialogue alone is not enough to ensure that billiondollla peacekeeping operations, vital conflict prevention measures or critical peacemaking efforts succeed in the face of great odds. Expressions of general support in the form of statements and resolutions must be followed up with tangible action. 275. Moreover, Member States may send conflicting messages regarding the actions they advocate, with their representatives voicing political support in one body but denying financial support in another. Such inconsistencies have appeared between the Fifth Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Matters on the one hand, and the Security Council and the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations on the other. 276. On the political level, many of the local parties with whom peacekeepers and peacemakers are dealing on a daily basis may neither respect nor fear verbal condemnation by the Security Council. It is therefore incumbent that Council members and the membership at large breathe life into the words that they produce, as did the Security Council delegation that flew to Jakarta and Dili in the wake of the East Timor crisis last year, an example of effective Council action at its best: res, non verba. 277. Meanwhile, the financial constraints under which the United Nations labours continue to cause serious damage to its ability to conduct peace operations in a credible and professional manner. We therefore urge that Member States uphold their treaty obligations and pay their dues in full, on time and without condition. 278. We are also aware that there are other issues which, directly or indirectly, hamper effective United Nations action in the field of peace and security, including two unresolved issues that are beyond the scope of the Panel’s mandate but critical to peace operations and that only the Member States can address. They are the disagreements about how assessments in support of peacekeeping operations are apportioned and about equitable representation on the Security Council. We can only hope that the Member States will find a way to resolve their differences on these issues in the interests of upholding their collective international responsibility as prescribed in the Charter. 279. We call on the leaders of the world assembled at the Millennium Summit, as they renew their commitment to the ideals of the United Nations, to commit as well to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations to fully accomplish the mission which is, indeed, its very raison d’être: to help communities engulfed in strife and to maintain or restore peace. 280. While building consensus for the recommendations in the present report, we — the members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations — have also come to a shared vision of a United Nations, extending a strong helping hand to a community, country or region to avert conflict or to end violence. We see an SRSG ending a mission well accomplished, having given the people of a country the opportunity to do for themselves what they could not47 A/55/305 S/2000/809 do before: to build and hold onto peace, to find reconciliation, to strengthen democracy, to secure human rights. We see, above all, a United Nations that has not only the will but also the ability to fulfil its great promise and to justify the confidence and trust placed in it by the overwhelming majority of humankind.48 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex I Members of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Mr. J. Brian Atwood (United States), President, Citizens International; former President, National Democratic Institute; former Administrator, United States Agency for International Development. Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi (Algeria), former Foreign Minister; Chairman of the Panel. Ambassador Colin Granderson (Trinidad and Tobago), Executive Director of Organization of American States (OAS)/United Nations International Civilian Mission in Haiti, 1993-2000; head of OAS election observation missions in Haiti (1995 and 1997) and Suriname (2000). Dame Ann Hercus (New Zealand), former Cabinet Minister and Permanent Representative of New Zealand to the United Nations; Head of Mission of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), 1998-1999. Mr. Richard Monk (United Kingdom), former member of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Government adviser on international policing matters; Commissioner of the United Nations International Police Task Force in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1998-1999. General (ret.) Klaus Naumann (Germany), Chief of Defence, 1991-1996; Chairman of the Military Committee of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), 1996-1999, with oversight responsibility for NATO Implementation Force/Stabilization Force operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the NATO Kosovo air campaign. Ms. Hisako Shimura (Japan), President of Tsuda College, Tokyo; served for 24 years in the United Nations Secretariat, retiring from United Nations service in 1995 as Director, Europe and Latin America Division of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations. Ambassador Vladimir Shustov (Russian Federation), Ambassador at large, with 30 years association with the United Nations; former Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York; former representative of the Russian Federation to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. General Philip Sibanda (Zimbabwe), Chief of Staff, Operations and Training, Zimbabwe Army Headquarters, Harare; former Force Commander of the United Nations Angola Verification Mission (UNAVEM III) and the United Nations Observer Mission in Angola (MONUA), 1995-1998. Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga (Switzerland), President of the Foundation of Moral Rearmament, Caux, and of the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining; former President of the International Committee of the Red Cross, 1987-1999. * * *49 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Office of the Chairman of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations Dr. William Durch, Senior Associate, Henry L. Stimson Center; Project Director Mr. Salman Ahmed, Political Affairs Officer, United Nations Secretariat Ms. Clare Kane, Personal Assistant, United Nations Secretariat Ms. Caroline Earle, Research Associate, Stimson Center Mr. J. Edward Palmisano, Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellow, Stimson Center50 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex II References United Nations documents Annan, Kofi A. Preventing war and disaster: a growing global challenge. Annual report on the work of the Organization, 1999. (A/54/1) ________ Partnerships for global community. Annual report on the work of the Organization, 1998. (A/53/1) ________ Facing the humanitarian challenge: towards a culture of prevention. (ST/DPI/2070) ________ We the peoples: the role of the United Nations in the twenty-first century. The Millennium Report. (A/54/2000) Economic and Social Council: Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “In-depth evaluation of peacekeeping operations: start-up phase”. (E/AC.51/1995/2 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “In-depth evaluation of peacekeeping operations: termination phase”. (E/AC.51/1996/3 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “Triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its thirty-fifth session on the evaluation of peacekeeping operations: start-up phase”. (E/AC.51/1998/4 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services entitled “Triennial review of the implementation of the recommendations made by the Committee for Programme and Coordination at its thirty-sixth session on the evaluation of peacekeeping operations: termination phase”. (E/AC.51/1999/5) General Assembly. Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on the review of the Field Administration and Logistics Division, Department of Peacekeeping Operations. (A/49/959) ________ Report of the Secretary-General entitled “Renewing the United Nations: A Programme for Reform”. (A/51/950) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa. (A/52/871) ________ Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/87 and Corr.1) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services on the audit of the management of service and ration contracts in peacekeeping missions. (A/54/335) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the annual report of the Office of Internal Oversight Services for the period 1 July 1998 to 30 June 1999. (A/54/393) ________ Note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict entitled “Protection of children affected by armed conflict”. (A/54/430) ________ Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to General Assembly resolution 53/55, entitled “The fall of Srebrenica”. (A/54/549) ________ Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/839) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of the recommendations of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations. (A/54/670) General Assembly and Security Council. Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to the statement adopted by the Summit Meeting of the Security Council on 31 January 1992, entitled “An Agenda for Peace: preventive diplomacy, peacemaking and peace-keeping”. (A/47/277-S/24111)51 A/55/305 S/2000/809 ________ Position paper of the Secretary-General on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the United Nations, entitled “Supplement to an Agenda for Peace”. (A/50/60-S/1995/1) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict. (A/55/163-S/2000/712) Security Council. Report of the Secretary-General on protection for humanitarian assistance to refugees and others in conflict situations. (S/1998/883) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the enhancement of African peacekeeping capacity. (S/1999/171) ________ Progress report of the Secretary-General on standby arrangements for peacekeeping. (S/1999/361) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the protection of civilians in armed conflict. (S/1999/957) ________ Letter dated 15 December 1999 from the Secretary-General addressed to the President of the Security Council, enclosing the report of the Independent Inquiry into the actions of the United Nations during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. (S/1999/1257) ________ Report of the Secretary-General on the role of United Nations peacekeeping in disarmament, demobilization and reintegration. (S/2000/101) Letter dated 10 March 2000 from the Chairman of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 864 (1993) concerning the situation in Angola addressed to the President of the Security Council, enclosing the report of the Panel of Experts on Violations of Security Council Sanctions against UNITA. (S/2000/203) Secretary-General’s press release. Statement made by the Secretary-General at Georgetown University. (SG/SM/6901) Secretary-General’s Bulletin. Observance by United Nations forces of international humanitarian law. (ST/SGB/1999/13) United Nations Development Programme. Governance foundations for post-conflict situations: UNDP’s experience. Discussion paper prepared by the UNDP Management Development and Governance Division, January 2000. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Annual appeal 2000: overview of activities and financial requirements. Geneva. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Catalogue of emergency response tools. Document prepared by the Emergency Preparedness and Response Section. Geneva, 2000. United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), Institute of Policy Studies of Singapore (IPS) and National Institute for Research Advancement of Japan. Report of the 1997 Singapore Conference: humanitarian action and peacekeeping operations. New York, 1997. UNITAR, IPS and Japan Institute of International Affairs. The nexus between peacekeeping and peace-building: debriefing and lessons. Draft report of the 1999 Singapore Conference. New York, 2000. Goulding, Marrack. Practical measures to enhance the United Nations effectiveness in the field of peace and security. Report submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. New York, 30 June 1997. Other sources Berdal, Mats, and David M. Malone, eds. Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000. Berman, Eric G., and Katie E. Sams. Peacekeeping in Africa: capabilities and culpabilities. (UNIDIR/2000/3) Bigombe, Betty, Paul Collier and Nicholas Sambanis. Policies for building post-conflict peace. Paper presented at an ad hoc expert group meeting on the economics of civil conflicts in Africa, 7 and 8 April 2000, organized by the Economic Commission for Africa. Blechman, Barry M., William J. Durch, Wendy Eaton and Julie Werbel. Effective transitions from peace operations to sustainable peace: final report. DFI International, Washington, D.C., September 1997. Childers, Erskine, and Brian Urquhart. Towards a More Effective United Nations: Two Studies. Uppsala, Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, 1992.52 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Collier, Paul. Economic causes of civil conflict and their implications for policy. In Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall, Managing Global Chaos. Washington, D.C., United States Institute of Peace, forthcoming. Cousens, Elizabeth M., Donald Rothchild and Stephen John Stedman, eds. Ending Civil Wars, vol. II, Evaluating Peace Implementation. New York, Center for International Security and Cooperation of Stanford University and International Peace Academy, forthcoming. DeSoto, Alvaro, and Graciana del Castillo. Implementation of comprehensive peace agreements: staying the course in El Salvador. Global Governance, vol. 1, No. 2 (May-June 1995). Doyle, Michael W., and Nicholas Sambanis. International peace-building: a theoretical and quantitative analysis. Paper presented at a conference of the Center of International Studies and the World Bank, Princeton University, 17 and 18 March 2000. Fafo Programme for International Cooperation and Conflict Resolution. Command from the saddle: managing United Nations peace-building missions. Recommendations report of a forum on special representatives of the Secretary-General on the theme “Shaping the United Nations role in peace implementation”. Oslo, Peace Implementation Network, 1999. Fainberg, Anthony, Alan Shaw, Dean Cheng, Xavier Maruyama and Donald Gallagher. Technology for international peace operations. Washington, D.C., Institute for Technology Assessment, March 1998. Forman, Shepard, Stewart Patrick and Dirk Salomons. Recovering from conflict: strategy for an international response. New York University, Center on International Cooperation, February 2000. Government of Canada. Towards a Rapid Reaction Capability for the United Nations. Ottawa, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Department of National Defence, 1995. Griffin, Michèle and Bruce Jones. Building peace through transitional authority: new directions, major challenges. International Peacekeeping, vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 2000). Henkin, Alice H., ed. Honouring Human Rights and Keeping the Peace: Lessons from El Salvador, Cambodia and Haiti. Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1995. ________ Honouring Human Rights, from Peace to Justice: Recommendations to the International Community. Summary edition of Henkin, op. cit., Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1999. Holm, Tor Tanke, and Espen Barth Eide, eds. Peacebuilding and Police Reform. International Peacekeeping, vol. 6, No. 4 (Special issue, Winter 1999). Humanitarian Community Information Centre, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat. Kosovo atlas. Pristina, February 2000. Jett, Dennis C. Why Peacekeeping Fails. New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2000. Latter, Richard. Monitoring and verifying peace agreements. Report based on a Wilton Park conference 597 on the monitoring and verification of peace agreements, 24-26 March 2000, April 2000. Lehman, Ingrid A. Peacekeeping and Public Information: Caught in the Crossfire. London, Frank Cass, 1999. Lord Christopher. Advisory note for Stimson Center/United Nations Panel on Peace Operations. Prague, Prague Project on Emergency Criminal Justice Principles, Institute of International Relations, 27 June 2000. Moore, Jonathan, ed. Hard Choices. Lanham, Maryland, Rowman and Littlefield for the International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva, 1998. Plunkett, Mark. Justice re-establishment in United Nations peacekeeping: methods and techniques for the re-establishment of the rule of law in United Nations peace operations. 18 April 2000. Salerno, Reynolds M., Michael G. Vannoni, David S. Barber, Randall R. Parish and Rebecca L.53 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Frerichs. Enhanced peacekeeping with monitoring technologies. Sandia report. Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratories, 2000. Smillie, Ian, Lansana Gberie and Ralph Hazleton. The heart of the matter: Sierra Leone, diamonds and human security. Ottawa, Partnership Africa Canada, January 2000. Stedman, Stephen John. Spoiler problems in peace processes. International Security, vol. 22, No. 2 (Fall 1997). Stewart, Frances and A. Berry. The real causes of inequality. Challenge, vol. 43, No. 1 (2000). Stewart, Frances, Frank P. Humphreys and Nick Lee. Civil conflict in developing countries over the last quarter of a century: an empirical overview of economic and social consequences. Oxford Journal of Development Studies, vol. 25, No. 1 (February 1997). Thant, Myint-U and Elizabeth Sellwood. Knowledge and Multilateral Interventions: The United Nations Experiences in Cambodia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Royal Institute of International Affairs Discussion Paper, No. 83. London, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2000. Wallensteen, Peter, and Margareta Sollenberg. Armed conflict and regional conflict complexes, 1989-1997. Journal of Peace Research, vol. 35, No. 5 (1998). World Bank Institute and Interworks. The Transition from War to Peace: An Overview. Washington, D.C., 1999.54 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Annex III Summary of recommendations 1. Preventive action: (a) The Panel endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General with respect to conflict prevention contained in the Millennium Report and in his remarks before the Security Council’s second open meeting on conflict prevention in July 2000, in particular his appeal to “all who are engaged in conflict prevention and development — the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, Governments and civil society organizations — [to] address these challenges in a more integrated fashion”; (b) The Panel supports the Secretary-General’s more frequent use of fact-finding missions to areas of tension, and stresses Member States’ obligations, under Article 2(5) of the Charter, to give “every assistance” to such activities of the United Nations. 2. Peace-building strategy: (a) A small percentage of a mission’s first-year budget should be made available to the representative or special representative of the Secretary-General leading the mission to fund quick impact projects in its area of operations, with the advice of the United Nations country team’s resident coordinator; (b) The Panel recommends a doctrinal shift in the use of civilian police, other rule of law elements and human rights experts in complex peace operations to reflect an increased focus on strengthening rule of law institutions and improving respect for human rights in post-conflict environments; (c) The Panel recommends that the legislative bodies consider bringing demobilization and reintegration programmes into the assessed budgets of complex peace operations for the first phase of an operation in order to facilitate the rapid disassembly of fighting factions and reduce the likelihood of resumed conflict; (d) The Panel recommends that the Executive Committee on Peace and Security (ECPS) discuss and recommend to the Secretary-General a plan to strengthen the permanent capacity of the United Nations to develop peace-building strategies and to implement programmes in support of those strategies. 3. Peacekeeping doctrine and strategy: once deployed, United Nations peacekeepers must be able to carry out their mandates professionally and successfully and be capable of defending themselves, other mission components and the mission’s mandate, with robust rules of engagement, against those who renege on their commitments to a peace accord or otherwise seek to undermine it by violence. 4. Clear, credible and achievable mandates: (a) The Panel recommends that, before the Security Council agrees to implement a ceasefire or peace agreement with a United Nations-led peacekeeping operation, the Council assure itself that the agreement meets threshold conditions, such as consistency with international human rights standards and practicability of specified tasks and timelines; (b) The Security Council should leave in draft form resolutions authorizing missions with sizeable troop levels until such time as the Secretary-General has firm commitments of troops and other critical mission support elements, including peace-building elements, from Member States; (c) Security Council resolutions should meet the requirements of peacekeeping operations when they deploy into potentially dangerous situations, especially the need for a clear chain of command and unity of effort;(d) The Secretariat must tell the Security Council what it needs to know, not what it wants to hear, when formulating or changing mission mandates, and countries that have committed military units to an operation should have access to Secretariat briefings to the Council on matters affecting the safety and security of their personnel, especially those meetings with implications for a mission’s use of force. 5. Information and strategic analysis: the Secretary-General should establish an entity, referred to here as the ECPS Information and Strategic Analysis Secretariat (EISAS), which would support the information and analysis needs of all members of ECPS; for management purposes, it should be administered by and report jointly to the heads of the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO).55 A/55/305 S/2000/809 6. Transitional civil administration: the Panel recommends that the Secretary-General invite a panel of international legal experts, including individuals with experience in United Nations operations that have transitional administration mandates, to evaluate the feasibility and utility of developing an interim criminal code, including any regional adaptations potentially required, for use by such operations pending the reestabllishmen of local rule of law and local law enforcement capacity. 7. Determining deployment timelines: the United Nations should define “rapid and effective deployment capacities” as the ability, from an operational perspective, to fully deploy traditional peacekeeping operations within 30 days after the adoption of a Security Council resolution, and within 90 days in the case of complex peacekeeping operations. 8. Mission leadership: (a) The Secretary-General should systematize the method of selecting mission leaders, beginning with the compilation of a comprehensive list of potential representatives or special representatives of the Secretary-General, force commanders, civilian police commissioners, and their deputies and other heads of substantive and administrative components, within a fair geographic and gender distribution and with input from Member States; (b) The entire leadership of a mission should be selected and assembled at Headquarters as early as possible in order to enable their participation in key aspects of the mission planning process, for briefings on the situation in the mission area and to meet and work with their colleagues in mission leadership; (c) The Secretariat should routinely provide the mission leadership with strategic guidance and plans for anticipating and overcoming challenges to mandate implementation, and whenever possible should formulate such guidance and plans together with the mission leadership. 9. Military personnel: (a) Member States should be encouraged, where appropriate, to enter into partnerships with one another, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System (UNSAS), to form several coherent brigade-size forces, with necessary enabling forces, ready for effective deployment within 30 days of the adoption of a Security Council resolution establishing a traditional peacekeeping operation and within 90 days for complex peacekeeping operations; (b) The Secretary-General should be given the authority to formally canvass Member States participating in UNSAS regarding their willingness to contribute troops to a potential operation, once it appeared likely that a ceasefire accord or agreement envisaging an implementing role for the United Nations, might be reached; (c) The Secretariat should, as a standard practice, send a team to confirm the preparedness of each potential troop contributor to meet the provisions of the memoranda of understanding on the requisite training and equipment requirements, prior to deployment; those that do not meet the requirements must not deploy; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving “on-call list” of about 100 military officers be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice to augment nuclei of DPKO planners with teams trained to create a mission headquarters for a new peacekeeping operation. 10. Civilian police personnel: (a) Member States are encouraged to each establish a national pool of civilian police officers that would be ready for deployment to United Nations peace operations on short notice, within the context of the United Nations Standby Arrangements System; (b) Member States are encouraged to enter into regional training partnerships for civilian police in the respective national pools, to promote a common level of preparedness in accordance with guidelines, standard operating procedures and performance standards to be promulgated by the United Nations; (c) Members States are encouraged to designate a single point of contact within their governmental structures for the provision of civilian police to United Nations peace operations; (d) The Panel recommends that a revolving on-call list of about 100 police officers and related experts be created in UNSAS to be available on seven days’ notice with teams trained to create the civilian police component of a new peacekeeping operation, train incoming personnel and give the component greater coherence at an early date;56 A/55/305 S/2000/809 (e) The Panel recommends that parallel arrangements to recommendations (a), (b) and (c) above be established for judicial, penal, human rights and other relevant specialists, who with specialist civilian police will make up collegial “rule of law” teams. 11. Civilian specialists: (a) The Secretariat should establish a central Internet/Intranet-based roster of pre-selected civilian candidates available to deploy to peace operations on short notice. The field missions should be granted access to and delegated authority to recruit candidates from it, in accordance with guidelines on fair geographic and gender distribution to be promulgated by the Secretariat; (b) The Field Service category of personnel should be reformed to mirror the recurrent demands faced by all peace operations, especially at the mid-to senior-levels in the administrative and logistics areas; (c) Conditions of service for externally recruited civilian staff should be revised to enable the United Nations to attract the most highly qualified candidates, and to then offer those who have served with distinction greater career prospects; (d) DPKO should formulate a comprehensive staffing strategy for peace operations, outlining, among other issues, the use of United Nations Volunteers, standby arrangements for the provision of civilian personnel on 72 hours' notice to facilitate mission startuup and the divisions of responsibility among the members of the Executive Committee on Peace and Security for implementing that strategy. 12. Rapidly deployable capacity for public information: additional resources should be devoted in mission budgets to public information and the associated personnel and information technology required to get an operation’s message out and build effective internal communications links. 13. Logistics support and expenditure management: (a) The Secretariat should prepare a global logistics support strategy to enable rapid and effective mission deployment within the timelines proposed and corresponding to planning assumptions established by the substantive offices of DPKO; (b) The General Assembly should authorize and approve a one-time expenditure to maintain at least five mission start-up kits in Brindisi, which should include rapidly deployable communications equipment. These start-up kits should then be routinely replenished with funding from the assessed contributions to the operations that drew on them; (c) The Secretary-General should be given authority to draw up to US$50 million from the Peacekeeping Reserve Fund, once it became clear that an operation was likely to be established, with the approval of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) but prior to the adoption of a Security Council resolution; (d) The Secretariat should undertake a review of the entire procurement policies and procedures (with proposals to the General Assembly for amendments to the Financial Rules and Regulations, as required), to facilitate in particular the rapid and full deployment of an operation within the proposed timelines; (e) The Secretariat should conduct a review of the policies and procedures governing the management of financial resources in the field missions with a view to providing field missions with much greater flexibility in the management of their budgets; (f) The Secretariat should increase the level of procurement authority delegated to the field missions (from $200,000 to as high as $1 million, depending on mission size and needs) for all goods and services that are available locally and are not covered under systems contracts or standing commercial services contracts. 14. Funding Headquarters support for peacekeeping operations: (a) The Panel recommends a substantial increase in resources for Headquarters support of peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to submit a proposal to the General Assembly outlining his requirements in full; (b) Headquarters support for peacekeeping should be treated as a core activity of the United Nations, and as such the majority of its resource requirements for this purpose should be funded through the mechanism of the regular biennial programme budget of the Organization; (c) Pending the preparation of the next regular budget submission, the Panel recommends that the57 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Secretary-General approach the General Assembly with a request for an emergency supplemental increase to the Support Account to allow immediate recruitment of additional personnel, particularly in DPKO. 15. Integrated mission planning and support: Integrated Mission Task Forces (IMTFs), with members seconded from throughout the United Nations system, as necessary, should be the standard vehicle for mission-specific planning and support. IMTFs should serve as the first point of contact for all such support, and IMTF leaders should have temporary line authority over seconded personnel, in accordance with agreements between DPKO, DPA and other contributing departments, programmes, funds and agencies. 16. Other structural adjustments in DPKO: (a) The current Military and Civilian Police Division should be restructured, moving the Civilian Police Unit out of the military reporting chain. Consideration should be given to upgrading the rank and level of the Civilian Police Adviser; (b) The Military Adviser’s Office in DPKO should be restructured to correspond more closely to the way in which the military field headquarters in United Nations peacekeeping operations are structured; (c) A new unit should be established in DPKO and staffed with the relevant expertise for the provision of advice on criminal law issues that are critical to the effective use of civilian police in the United Nations peace operations; (d) The Under-Secretary-General for Management should delegate authority and responsibility for peacekeeping-related budgeting and procurement functions to the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations for a two-year trial period; (e) The Lessons Learned Unit should be substantially enhanced and moved into a revamped DPKO Office of Operations; (f) Consideration should be given to increasing the number of Assistant Secretaries-General in DPKO from two to three, with one of the three designated as the “Principal Assistant Secretary-General” and functioning as the deputy to the Under-Secretary-General. 17. Operational support for public information: a unit for operational planning and support of public information in peace operations should be established, either within DPKO or within a new Peace and Security Information Service in the Department of Public Information (DPI) reporting directly to the Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information. 18. Peace-building support in the Department of Political Affairs: (a) The Panel supports the Secretariat’s effort to create a pilot Peace-building Unit within DPA, in cooperation with other integral United Nations elements, and suggests that regular budgetary support for this unit be revisited by the membership if the pilot programme works well. This programme should be evaluated in the context of guidance the Panel has provided in paragraph 46 above, and if considered the best available option for strengthening United Nations peace-building capacity it should be presented to the Secretary-General within the context of the Panel’s recommendation contained in paragraph 47 (d) above; (b) The Panel recommends that regular budget resources for Electoral Assistance Division programmatic expenses be substantially increased to meet the rapidly growing demand for its services, in lieu of voluntary contributions; (c) To relieve demand on the Field Administration and Logistics Division (FALD) and the executive office of DPA, and to improve support services rendered to smaller political and peacebuilldin field offices, the Panel recommends that procurement, logistics, staff recruitment and other support services for all such smaller, non-military field missions be provided by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS). 19. Peace operations support in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: the Panel recommends substantially enhancing the field mission planning and preparation capacity of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with funding partly from the regular budget and partly from peace operations mission budgets. 20. Peace operations and the information age: (a) Headquarters peace and security departments need a responsibility centre to devise and58 A/55/305 S/2000/809 oversee the implementation of common information technology strategy and training for peace operations, residing in EISAS. Mission counterparts to the responsibility centre should also be appointed to serve in the offices of the special representatives of the Secretary-General in complex peace operations to oversee the implementation of that strategy; (b) EISAS, in cooperation with the Information Technology Services Division (ITSD), should implement an enhanced peace operations element on the current United Nations Intranet and link it to the missions through a Peace Operations Extranet (POE); (c) Peace operations could benefit greatly from more extensive use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, which quickly integrates operational information with electronic maps of the mission area, for applications as diverse as demobilization, civilian policing, voter registration, human rights monitoring and reconstruction; (d) The IT needs of mission components with unique information technology needs, such as civilian police and human rights, should be anticipated and met more consistently in mission planning and implementation; (e) The Panel encourages the development of web site co-management by Headquarters and the field missions, in which Headquarters would maintain oversight but individual missions would have staff authorized to produce and post web content that conforms to basic presentational standards and policy.Naciones Unidas A/55/305–S/2000/809 Asamblea General Consejo de Seguridad Distr. general 21 de agosto de 2000 Español Original: inglés 00-59473 (S) 190800 190800 ````````` Asamblea General Quincuagésimo quinto período de sesiones Tema 87 del programa provisional* Examen amplio de toda la cuestión de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en todos sus aspectos Consejo de Seguridad Quincuagésimo quinto año Cartas idénticas de fecha 21 de agosto de 2000 dirigidas al Presidente de la Asamblea General y al Presidente del Consejo de Seguridad por el Secretario General El 7 de marzo de 2000 convoqué a un Grupo de alto nivel para que realizara un examen a fondo de las actividades de las Naciones Unidas relativas a la paz y la seguridad y formulara un conjunto claro de recomendaciones específicas, concretas y prácticas para ayudar a las Naciones Unidas a llevar a cabo esas actividades en el futuro. Pedí al Sr. Lakhdar Brahimi, ex Ministro de Relaciones Exteriores de Argelia, que presidiera el Grupo, que estaba integrado por las siguientes personalidades eminentes de todo el mundo, con amplia experiencia en las esferas del mantenimiento de la paz, la consolidación de la paz, el desarrollo y la asistencia humanitaria: Sr. Brian Atwood, Embajador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, Sr. Richard Monk, General retirado Klaus Naumann, Sra. Hisako Shimura, Embajador Vladimir Shustov, General Philip Sibanda y Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga. Le agradecería que el informe del Grupo, que el Presidente del Grupo me transmitió mediante la carta adjunta de fecha 17 de agosto de 2000, se señalara a la atención de los Estados Miembros. El análisis del Grupo es franco pero equilibrado; sus recomendaciones son de vasto alcance, pero sensatas y prácticas. A mi juicio, la pronta aplicación de las recomendaciones del Grupo es indispensable para hacer que las Naciones Unidas sean una fuerza para la paz verdaderamente digna de crédito. Muchas de las recomendaciones del Grupo se refieren a cuestiones que son plenamente de la competencia del Secretario General, en tanto que otras requerirán la aprobación y el apoyo de los órganos legislativos de las Naciones Unidas. Exhorto a todos los Estados Miembros a que me acompañen en el examen, la aprobación y el apoyo de la aplicación de dichas recomendaciones. Al respecto, me complace informarle que he designado al Vicesecretario General para que se ocupe del seguimiento de las recomendaciones del informe y supervise la preparación de un plan de aplicación detallado, que presentaré a la Asamblea General y al Consejo de Seguridad. * A/55/150.ii n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Confío en que el informe del Grupo, y en particular su resumen ejecutivo, se señalará a la atención de todos los dirigentes que vengan a Nueva York en septiembre de 2000 para participar en la Cumbre del Milenio. Esa reunión histórica de alto nivel brinda una oportunidad excepcional para que comencemos el proceso de renovar la capacidad de las Naciones Unidas para asegurar y consolidar la paz. Solicito el apoyo de la Asamblea General y del Consejo de Seguridad para convertir en realidad el programa de vasto alcance contenido en el informe. (Firmado) Kofi A. Annann0059473.doc iii A/55/305 S/2000/809 Carta de fecha 17 de agosto de 2000 dirigida al Secretario General por el Presidente del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas El Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas, que usted convocó en marzo del 2000, considera un honor que le haya encomendado la tarea de evaluar la capacidad de las Naciones Unidas para realizar con eficacia operaciones de paz y presentar recomendaciones francas, concretas y realistas para mejorarla. Sr. Brian Atwood, el Embajador Colin Granderson, Dame Ann Hercus, el Sr. Richard Monk, el General retirado Klaus Naumann, la Sra. Hisako Shimura, el Embajador Vladimir Shustov, el General Philip Sibanda, el Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga y yo aceptamos esta tarea por el profundo respeto que usted nos merece y porque todos creemos fervientemente que el sistema de las Naciones Unidas puede hacer más por la causa de la paz. Admiramos enormemente su voluntad de realizar análisis muy críticos de las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas en Rwanda y Srebrenica. Este nivel de autocrítica es raro en una organización grande y particularmente raro en las Naciones Unidas. También desearíamos agradecer a la Vicesecretaria General Louise Fréchette y al Jefe de Gabinete Sr. Iqbal Riza, que nos dedicaron mucho tiempo, nos acompañaron en todas nuestras reuniones y contestaron a nuestras muchas preguntas con incansable paciencia y claridad. Su conocimiento íntimo de las limitaciones actuales y las necesidades futuras de las Naciones Unidas nos resultaron de inmensa utilidad. Examinar un sistema de la magnitud y complejidad de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas y proponer recomendaciones para reformarlo en sólo cuatro meses es una tarea ímproba que habría sido imposible realizar sin la dedicación y el esfuerzo del Dr. William Durch (con el apoyo del personal del Centro Stimson) y el Sr. Salman Ahmed de las Naciones Unidas y sin la colaboración de los funcionarios de todo el sistema de las Naciones Unidas, incluidos los jefes de misión, que estuvieron dispuestos a ofrecer sus opiniones en entrevistas y en a menudo detalladas críticas de sus propias organizaciones y experiencias. Igualmente útiles fueron las aportaciones de ex jefes de operaciones de paz y comandantes de fuerzas, académicos y representantes de organizaciones no gubernamentales. En el Grupo se debatió intensamente y se dedicaron largas horas a examinar las recomendaciones y conclusiones del análisis que sabíamos serían objeto de escrutinio e interpretación. En tres reuniones sucesivas de tres días de duración celebradas en Nueva York, Ginebra y nuevamente Nueva York, acordamos la letra y el espíritu del informe adjunto. Sus análisis y recomendaciones reflejan nuestro consenso, que le transmitimos en la esperanza de que servirá a la causa de una reforma y renovación sistemáticas de esta función básica de las Naciones Unidas. Como decimos en el informe, somos conscientes de que usted está empeñado en una amplia reforma de la Secretaría. Esperamos, pues, que nuestras recomendaciones, con leves ajustes, de ser necesario, encajen en ese proceso general. Comprendemos que no todas las recomendaciones podrán aplicarse de la noche a la mañana, pero muchas exigen actuar con urgencia y requieren el apoyo inequívoco de los Estados Miembros.iv n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Todos estos meses, hemos recibido, verbalmente y por escrito palabras de aliento de Estados Miembros, grandes y pequeños, del Sur y del Norte, que insistían en la necesidad urgente de mejorar la forma en que las Naciones Unidas enfrentan las situaciones de conflicto. Los instamos a que actúen con determinación para hacer realidad las recomendaciones que requieren de ellos una decisión oficial. Tenemos plena confianza en que el funcionario que le sugerimos que designe para supervisar la aplicación de nuestras recomendaciones, tanto dentro de la Secretaría como por parte de los Estados Miembros, contará con su pleno apoyo, en consonancia con su convicción de que es preciso transformar a las Naciones Unidas en la institución del siglo XXI que deben ser para hacer frente con eficacia a las amenazas actuales y futuras a la paz mundial. Por último, deseo expresar a título personal mi más profundo agradecimiento a todos mis colegas del Grupo que han aportado colectivamente al proyecto un impresionante caudal de conocimientos y experiencia. Han demostrado además invariablemente el más alto grado de compromiso con la Organización y una profunda comprensión de sus necesidades. En nuestras reuniones y nuestros contactos a distancia han sido todos sumamente amables e invariablemente, pacientes y generosos, con lo que la intimidante tarea de Presidente resultó relativamente más fácil y se convirtió en un verdadero placer. (Firmado) Lakhdar Brahimi Presidente del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidasn0059473.doc v A/55/305 S/2000/809 Índice Párrafos Página I. Un cambio necesario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 1 II. Doctrina, estrategia y adopción de decisiones de las operaciones de paz . . . . . . . 9–83 2 A. Definición de los elementos de las operaciones de paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 2 B. Experiencia anterior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–28 3 C. Consecuencias para las medidas preventivas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–34 5 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre medidas preventivas . . 34 7 D. Consecuencias para la estrategia de consolidación de la paz. . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–47 7 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre la consolidación de la paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 9 E. Consecuencias para la teoría y la estrategia del mantenimiento de la paz . . 48–55 9 Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre la teoría y la estrategia del mantenimiento de la paz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 11 F. Mandatos claros, convincentes y viables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–64 11 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales para establecer mandatos claros, convincentes y viables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 13 G. Reunión de información, análisis y planificación estratégica . . . . . . . . . . . . 65–75 13 Resumen de las principales recomendaciones sobre información y análisis estratégico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 15 H. El reto que plantea la administración civil de transición . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–83 15 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre la administración civil de transición . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 16 III. Capacidad de las Naciones Unidas para desplegar operaciones rápida y eficazmente . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84–169 16 A. Definición de “despliegue rápido y eficaz”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86–91 17 Resumen de las principales recomendaciones sobre determinación de los plazos para el despliegue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 18 B. Dirección efectiva de la misión . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92–101 18 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre la plana mayor de la misión . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 19 C. Personal Militar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102–117 20 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales relativas al personal militar 117 23 D. Policía civil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118–126 23 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales relativas al personal de la policía civil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 24 E. Especialistas civiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127–145 25vi n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 1. Falta de sistemas relativos a las fuerzas de reserva para atender las necesidades imprevistas o los aumentos súbitos de la demanda . . . . . . 128–132 25 2. Dificultades para atraer y retener a los mejores candidatos externos 133–135 26 3. Escasez de personal de las categorías intermedia y superior para encargarse de las funciones administrativas y de apoyo . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 27 4. Castigo por trabajar sobre el terreno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–138 27 5. Caída en desuso de la categoría del Servicio Móvil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139–140 28 6. Falta de una estrategia amplia de dotación de personal para las operaciones de paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141–145 28 Resumen de las principales recomendaciones sobre especialistas civiles . . 145 29 F. Capacidad de información pública. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146–150 29 Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre la capacidad de despliegue rápido para información pública . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 30 G. Apoyo logístico, proceso de adquisición y gestión de los gastos . . . . . . . . . 151–169 30 Resumen de las recomendaciones esenciales sobre apoyo logístico y gestión de los gastos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 33 IV. Los recursos de la Sede y la estructura de planificación y apoyo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170–245 34 A. Niveles de dotación de personal y financiación del apoyo en la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172–197 34 Resumen de las principales recomendaciones para financiar el apoyo que presta la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 40 B. Necesidad de contar con equipos de tareas integrados para las misiones y propuestas de que se establezcan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198–217 40 Resumen de las principales recomendaciones en materia de planificación y apoyo integrados para las misiones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 44 C. Otros ajustes estructurales necesarios en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz 218–233 44 1. División de Actividades Militares y Policía civil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219–225 44 2. División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226–228 46 3. Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y Resultados . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229–230 46 4. Personal directivo superior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231–232 47 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre otros ajustes estructurales en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 47 D. Ajustes estructurales que son necesarios fuera del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234–245 47n0059473.doc vii A/55/305 S/2000/809 1. Apoyo operacional a la información pública . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235–238 47 Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre ajustes estructurales en materia de información pública . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 48 2. Apoyo a la consolidación de la paz en el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239–243 48 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre apoyo a la consolidación de la paz en el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos . . . . . . . . 243 49 3. Apoyo a las operaciones de paz en la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244–245 49 Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre el fortalecimiento de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 49 V. Operaciones de la paz y la era de la información . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246–264 50 A. Tecnología de la información en las operaciones de paz: cuestiones de estrategia y de política . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247–251 50 Resumen de la recomendación sobre la estrategia y la política de la tecnología de la información . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 51 B. Instrumentos para la gestión de los conocimientos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252–258 51 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales para los instrumentos de tecnología de la información en las operaciones de paz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 52 C. Aumento de la puntualidad de la pública basada en Internet. . . . . . . . . . . . . 259–264 52 Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre puntualidad de la información pública con base en Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 53 VI. Dificultades para la aplicación de las recomendaciones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265–280 53 Anexos I. Miembros del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 II. Bibliografía . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 III. Resumen de las recomendaciones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62viii n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Informe del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas Resumen ejecutivo Las Naciones Unidas fueron fundadas, como se declara en la Carta, para “preservar a las generaciones venideras del flagelo de la guerra”. Tal es la función más importante de la Organización y, en considerable medida, el criterio con que la juzgan los pueblos a cuyo servicio está dedicada. En el último decenio, en reiteradas oportunidades, las Naciones Unidas no han estado a la altura de este desafío, ni pueden estarlo hoy en día. Sin un compromiso renovado de los Estados Miembros, un cambio institucional significativo y un mayor apoyo financiero, las Naciones Unidas no podrán ejecutar las tareas críticas de mantenimiento y consolidación de la paz que los Estados Miembros les asignen en los meses y años venideros. Hay muchas tareas que no deberían encomendarse a las fuerzas de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas y muchos lugares adonde no deberían ir. Pero cuando las Naciones Unidas envían sus fuerzas para defender la paz, deben estar preparadas para hacer frente a las fuerzas de la guerra y la violencia que aún persistan con la capacidad y la determinación necesarias para vencerlas. El Secretario General ha pedido al Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas, integrado por personas con experiencia en diversos aspectos de la prevención de conflictos, el mantenimiento de la paz y la consolidación de la paz que evaluara las deficiencias del sistema actual y formulara recomendaciones francas, concretas y realistas para cambiarlo. Nuestras recomendaciones se centran no sólo en cuestiones de política y estrategia, sino también, y tal vez aún más, en aspectos operacionales e institucionales que requieren atención. Para que las iniciativas preventivas reduzcan la tensión y eviten los conflictos, el Secretario General necesita un apoyo político claro, firme y sostenido de los Estados Miembros. Además, como las Naciones Unidas han comprobado triste y reiteradamente el último decenio, las mejores intenciones del mundo no bastan para reemplazar la capacidad fundamental de demostrar una fuerza convincente, sobre todo cuando se trata de una operación compleja de mantenimiento de la paz. Sin embargo, la fuerza por sí sola no puede crear la paz, sólo puede crear un espacio para construirla. Por otra parte, los cambios que recomienda el Grupo no tendrán efecto duradero a menos que los Estados Miembros se armen de la voluntad política necesaria para apoyar política, financiera y operacionalmente a las Naciones Unidas de modo que puedan ser realmente convincentes como fuerza de paz. Cada una de las recomendaciones del presente informe tiene por objeto remediar un problema grave en materia de dirección estratégica, adopción de decisiones, despliegue rápido, planificación y apoyo operacional y empleo de la tecnología moderna de la información. A continuación se resumen las conclusiones y recomendaciones principales, en general en el orden en que aparecen en el cuerpo del texto (los números de los párrafos correspondientes se indican entre paréntesis). Además en el anexo III figura un resumen de las recomendaciones. Experiencia pasada (párrs. 15 a 28) No sorprenderá a nadie que algunas de las misiones del último decenio hayan sido particularmente difíciles: tendían a desplegarse en situaciones en las que el conflicto no había terminado con la victoria de ninguna de las partes, o en las que, sin0059473.doc ix A/55/305 S/2000/809 bien un callejón sin salida desde el punto de vista militar o la presión internacional habían impuesto una suspensión de las hostilidades, por lo menos algunas de las partes en el conflicto no estaban seriamente decididas a ponerle fin. Las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas, por lo tanto, no se desplegaron en situaciones posteriores a los conflictos, sino que trataron de crearlas. En esas operaciones complejas, el personal de mantenimiento de la paz procura mantener un medio seguro mientras que los encargados de consolidar la paz procuran que ese medio pueda autoperpetuarse. Sólo estas condiciones ofrecen una salida fácil a las fuerzas de mantenimiento de la paz, por lo cual el personal de mantenimiento de la paz y el de consolidación de la paz son aliados inseparables. Consecuencias para la acción preventiva y la consolidación de la paz: necesidad de una estrategia y de apoyo (párrs. 29 a 47) Las Naciones Unidas y sus miembros enfrentan una necesidad imperiosa de establecer estrategias más eficaces de prevención de conflictos, a largo y a corto plazo. En este contexto, el Grupo hace suyas las recomendaciones del Secretario General relativas a la prevención de los conflictos que figuran en el Informe del Milenio (A/54/2000) y las observaciones que formuló ante el Consejo de Seguridad en su segunda sesión pública sobre la prevención de conflictos, celebrada en julio del 2000. Alienta también al Secretario General a que emplee con mayor frecuencia misiones de determinación de los hechos en las zonas de tirantez en apoyo de la prevención de crisis a corto plazo. Además, el Consejo de Seguridad y el Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz de la Asamblea General, conscientes de que las Naciones Unidas seguirán enfrentándose a la perspectiva de ayudar a las comunidades y naciones a hacer la transición de la guerra a la paz, han reconocido el papel fundamental de la consolidación de la paz en operaciones de paz complejas. El sistema de las Naciones Unidas deberá, pues, atender a lo que hasta ahora ha sido una deficiencia fundamental en la forma en que se han concebido, financiado y puesto en práctica las estrategias y actividades de consolidación de la paz. Por lo tanto, el Grupo recomienda que el Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad (CEPS) presente al Secretario General un plan para fortalecer la capacidad permanente de las Naciones Unidas de elaborar estrategias de consolidación de la paz y aplicar programas en apoyo de esas estrategias. Entre los cambios que propone el Grupo figuran: un cambio en la doctrina del uso de la policía civil y los aspectos conexos del imperio de la ley en las operaciones de paz en que se insiste en un enfoque de equipo en la promoción del imperio de la ley y el respeto de los derechos humanos y en la necesidad de ayudar a las comunidades que salen de un conflicto a lograr la reconciliación nacional; la incorporación de los programas de desarme, desmovilización y reintegración en los presupuestos de las operaciones de paz complejas desde la primera etapa; flexibilidad para que los jefes de las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas puedan financiar proyectos de efecto rápido que mejoren efectivamente las condiciones de la vida de la población de la zona de la misión; y una mejor integración de la asistencia electoral en una estrategia más amplia de apoyo de las instituciones de gobierno.x n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Consecuencias para el mantenimiento de la paz: necesidad de una doctrina sólida y de mandatos realistas (párrs. 48 a 64) El Grupo está de acuerdo en que el consentimiento de las partes locales, la imparcialidad y el uso de la fuerza sólo en legítima defensa deben ser los principios básicos del mantenimiento de la paz. Sin embargo, la experiencia demuestra que en el contexto de conflictos intraestatales/transnacionales, el consentimiento puede manipularse de muchas maneras. La imparcialidad de las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas debe significar por lo tanto adhesión a los principios de la Carta: cuando una parte en un acuerdo de paz viola sus condiciones en forma clara e indiscutible, de seguir tratando a todas las partes de la misma manera, las Naciones Unidas, en el mejor de los casos, caerán en la inoperancia y, en el peor, incurrirán en complicidad. Nada perjudicó más el prestigio y la credibilidad de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas en los años 90 que su renuencia a distinguir las víctimas de los agresores. En el pasado, las Naciones Unidas a menudo han sido incapaces de responder con eficacia a estos desafíos. Una premisa fundamental del presente informe es que deben poder hacerlo. Una vez desplegado, el personal de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas debe poder desempeñar su mandato efectivamente y con profesionalismo. Esto significa que las unidades militares de las Naciones Unidas deben ser capaces de defenderse a sí mismas, y de defender a los demás componentes de la misión y a su mandato. Las normas para trabar combate deben ser suficientemente sólidas y no deben forzar a los contingentes de las Naciones Unidas a ceder la iniciativa a sus atacantes. Ello significa, a su vez, que la Secretaría no debe aplicar las hipótesis más optimistas a las situaciones en que las partes locales han demostrado históricamente el peor de los comportamientos. Significa que en los mandatos se deben especificar las facultades de una operación para usar la fuerza. Significa fuerzas más grandes, mejor equipadas y más caras, pero con un poder de disuasión convincente. En particular, las fuerzas de las Naciones Unidas empleadas en operaciones complejas deberán contar con la inteligencia sobre el terreno y otros recursos necesarios para montar una defensa eficaz contra una oposición violenta. Además, se deberá suponer que el personal militar o policial de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas que sea testigo de actos de violencia contra civiles está autorizado a intervenir, con los medios a su disposición, en apoyo de los principios básicos de las Naciones Unidas. Sin embargo, las operaciones que tengan un mandato amplio y expreso de protección de los civiles deben tener también los recursos específicos que necesitan para desempeñar ese mandato. Al recomendar el número de efectivos y otros recursos para una nueva misión, recomendaciones que deberán basarse en hipótesis realistas que tengan en cuenta las dificultades con que probablemente se tropiece en la ejecución, la Secretaría ha de decirle al Consejo de Seguridad lo que debe saber y no lo que quiere oír. Los mandatos del Consejo de Seguridad, a su vez, deberán tener la claridad que exigen las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz para que haya una unidad de propósito cuando se despliegan en situaciones potencialmente difíciles. Según la práctica actual, el Secretario General recibe una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad en que se especifica el número de efectivos en el papel y no sabe si dispondrá de los contingentes y demás personal que la misión necesita paran0059473.doc xi A/55/305 S/2000/809 funcionar eficazmente, ni si estarán debidamente equipados. El Grupo considera que, una vez que se han establecido y convenido las necesidades de la misión en forma realista, el Consejo debe dejar la resolución por la que los autoriza en borrador hasta que el Secretario General confirme que los Estados Miembros le han prometido contingentes y otros recursos en cantidad suficiente para cubrir esas necesidades.A los Estados Miembros que prometen unidades militares constituidas para una operación habría que invitarlos a celebrar consultas con los miembros del Consejo de Seguridad en el curso de la formulación del mandato; sería conveniente institucionalizar este asesoramiento a través de la creación de órganos subsidiarios especiales del Consejo como se dispone en el Artículo 29 de la Carta. También habría que invitar a los países que aportan contingentes a que asistieran a las reuniones en que la secretaría informa al Consejo de Seguridad sobre las crisis que afectan la seguridad del personal de la misión o sobre cambios o reinterpretaciones del mandato relativo al uso de la fuerza. Nueva capacidad de gestión de información y análisis estratégico en la Sede (párrs. 65 a 75) El Grupo recomienda que se cree una nueva entidad de reunión y análisis de información para atender a las necesidades de información y análisis del Secretario General y los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad (CEPS). Sin esa capacidad, la Secretaría se limitaría a reaccionar a los acontecimientos, sin poder anticiparse a ellos, y el CEPS no podría desempeñar la función para la que fue creado. La Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico (SIAE) del CEPS que propone el Grupo crearía y mantendría bases de datos integradas sobre cuestiones de paz y seguridad, distribuiría esa información eficientemente dentro del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, haría análisis de política, formularía estrategias a largo plazo para el CEPS y señalaría las crisis en ciernes a la atención de sus directivos. También propondría y administraría el programa del propio CEPS, contribuyendo así a transformarlo en el órgano de adopción de decisiones previsto en las reformas iniciales del Secretario General. El Grupo propone que la SIAE se cree mediante una consolidación del actual Centro de Situación del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz (DOMP) con varias pequeñas oficinas de planificación de política que están dispersas y con el agregado de un pequeño equipo de analistas militares, expertos en redes delictivas internacionales y especialistas en sistemas de información. La SIAE atendería a las necesidades de todos los miembros del CEPS. Mejoramiento de la orientación y dirección de las misiones (párrs. 92 a 101) El Grupo considera fundamental reunir a la plana mayor de una nueva misión lo antes posible en la Sede de las Naciones Unidas, para que participe en la determinación del concepto de operaciones de la misión, el plan de apoyo, el presupuesto y la dotación y reciba orientación. Para ello, el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General recopile, en forma sistemática, y con aportaciones de los Estados Miembros, una lista completa de posibles representantes especiales del Secretario General, comandantes de la fuerza, comisionados de policía civil, sus posibles adjuntos yxii n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 posibles jefes de otros componentes de una misión, que representen una distribución geográfica amplia y una distribución equitativa entre los géneros. Normas relativas al despliegue rápido y a la lista de reserva de oficiales con experiencia (párrs. 86 a 91 y 102 a 169) Las primeras seis a 12 semanas que siguen a la firma de un acuerdo de cesación del fuego o de paz suelen ser las más críticas a los efectos de establecer una paz duradera y dar crédito a una operación nueva. Es difícil que se repitan las oportunidades que se desaprovechen en este período. El Grupo recomienda que las Naciones Unidas definan la “capacidad de despliegue rápido y eficaz” como la capacidad de desplegar plenamente una operación tradicional de mantenimiento de la paz dentro de los 30 días siguientes a la aprobación de la resolución del Consejo de Seguridad por la cual se establece o dentro de los 90 días siguientes en el caso de operaciones complejas. El Grupo recomienda que se amplíe el sistema relativo a las fuerzas de defensa de las Naciones Unidas (UNSAS) de manera que incluya varias fuerzas multinacionales que tengan cohesión y sean del tamaño de brigadas, además de las necesarias para instalarse, creadas en colaboración por los Estados Miembros a fin de contar con las vigorosas fuerzas de mantenimiento de la paz en cuya necesidad ha insistido el Grupo. El Grupo recomienda también que la Secretaría envíe un equipo para confirmar que cada uno de los posibles países que han de aportar contingentes está listo para atender las necesidades de adiestramiento y equipo para operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz antes del despliegue. No deben desplegarse unidades en que no se cumplan esos requisitos. Para apoyar el despliegue rápido y eficaz, el Grupo recomienda que se establezca en el marco del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas una lista renovable de unos 100 oficiales militares cualificados y con experiencia, aceptados por el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz de las Naciones Unidas tras estudiar minuciosamente su hoja de servicios. Los equipos establecidos sobre la base de esa lista estarían disponibles para entrar en servicio en un plazo de siete días y su cometido consistiría en convertir los conceptos generales en el plano estratégico de la misión que se enuncien en la Sede en planes tácticos y operacionales concretos con antelación al despliegue de los contingentes; esos equipos complementarían un componente básico del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz como parte de la avanzada de una misión. Simultáneamente, habría que mantener listas de reservas de funcionarios de policía civil, expertos judiciales internacionales, expertos en derecho penal y especialistas en derechos humanos en número suficiente para consolidar, según sea necesario, las instituciones del estado de derecho y esa lista debería formar parte también del sistema de fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas. Luego, se formarían sobre la base de esa lista equipos que habrían recibido capacitación previa y se dirigirían a la zona de una nueva misión antes que el resto de los funcionarios de policía civil y especialistas conexos a fin de facilitar el despliegue rápido y eficaz del componente de la misión encargado del orden público. El Grupo insta también a los Estados Miembros a que asignen contingentes nacionales de oficiales de policía y expertos en la materia que hayan de ser destinados a operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas a fin de atender la gran demanda de personal especializado en cuestiones relativas al imperio de la ley y la justician0059473.doc xiii A/55/305 S/2000/809 penal que existe en operaciones de paz en casos de conflictos internos. El Grupo insta también a los Estados Miembros a que consideren la posibilidad de establecer programas y asociaciones regionales conjuntos a fin de impartir capacitación en los principios y las normas de la policía civil de las Naciones Unidas a las respectivas fuerzas nacionales de reserva. La Secretaría debería atender con urgencia la necesidad de establecer un mecanismo transparente y descentralizado para la contratación de personal civil sobre el terreno, de retener el mayor número de los especialistas civiles necesarios en las operaciones complejas de paz y de establecer acuerdos de reserva que permitan desplegarlo con rapidez. Por último, el Grupo recomienda que la Secretaría modifique radicalmente los sistemas y los procedimientos que rigen las adquisiciones para operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz a fin de facilitar el despliegue rápido. El Grupo recomienda que las funciones de presupuestación y adquisiciones para mantenimiento de la paz pasen del Departamento de Gestión al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y propone que se establezca un sistema distinto y separado de procedimientos y normas simplificadas para las adquisiciones sobre el terreno, haya una mayor delegación fuera de la Sede de la autoridad para hacer adquisiciones y se dé a las misiones mayor flexibilidad para administrar su presupuesto. El Grupo insta también al Secretario General a que prepare y presente a la Asamblea General, para su aprobación, una estrategia general de apoyo logístico que rija las reservas de equipo y los contratos con el sector privado para la obtención de bienes y servicios comunes. En el ínterin, el Grupo recomienda que se mantengan en la Base Logística de las Naciones Unidas en Brindisi (Italia) existencias adicionales del equipo esencial para comenzar una misión. El Grupo recomienda también que, previa autorización de la Comisión Consultiva en Asuntos Administrativos y de Presupuesto (CCAAP), se faculte al Secretario General para comprometer una suma de hasta 50 millones de dólares con bastante antelación a la fecha en que el Consejo de Seguridad apruebe una resolución por la que establezca una operación nueva, una vez que quede de manifiesto la probabilidad de que ello ocurra. Mayor capacidad de la Sede para planificar operaciones de paz y prestarles apoyo (párrs. 170 a 197) El Grupo recomienda que el apoyo de la Sede para operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz se considere una actividad central de las Naciones Unidas y, por lo tanto, sea financiada en su mayor parte por conducto del presupuesto ordinario de la Organización. En la actualidad, el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y las demás oficinas encargados de funciones de planificación y apoyo de esas operaciones se financian primordialmente mediante la cuenta de apoyo, que se repone cada año y sólo sufraga puestos temporarios. Este sistema parece confundir la índole temporal de cada operación con el evidente carácter permanente del mantenimiento de la paz y otras actividades de operaciones de paz como funciones básicas de las Naciones Unidas y, evidentemente, configura una situación insostenible. El costo total del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y las correspondientes oficinas de apoyo en la Sede no excede los 50 millones de dólares por año, aproximadamente un 2% del costo total por concepto de mantenimiento de la paz. Esas oficinas necesitan con urgencia recursos adicionales a fin de que losxiv n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 más de 2.000 millones de dólares que se han de destinar al mantenimiento de la paz en el año 2001 se gasten bien. Por lo tanto, el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General presente a la Asamblea General una propuesta en la que indique el monto íntegro de las necesidades de la Organización por este concepto. El Grupo, si bien considera que habría que proceder a un examen metódico de la gestión del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, cree también que la escasez de personal en algunos ámbitos es absolutamente evidente. Por ejemplo, claramente no basta con que haya 32 oficiales encargados de la orientación y planificación militar para 27.000 efectivos en campaña; nueve oficiales de policía civil para identificar hasta 8.600 policías, revisar su hoja de servicio e impartirles orientación a 15 oficiales de asuntos políticos encargados de 14 operaciones en curso y dos nuevas ni tampoco basta con asignar simplemente el 1,25% del costo total por concepto de mantenimiento de la paz a la partida de apoyo logístico y administrativo de la Sede. Establecimiento de equipos de trabajo integrados para la planificación de misiones y la prestación de apoyo (párrs. 198 a 245) El Grupo recomienda que se establezcan equipos de trabajo integrados, con personal adscrito de todo el sistema de las Naciones Unidas, para planificar nuevas misiones y ayudarles a desplegarse plenamente, de manera de aumentar considerablemente el apoyo de la Sede a las operaciones sobre el terreno. En la actualidad, no hay una dependencia integrada de planificación o apoyo en la Secretaría que reúna a encargados de actividades de análisis político, operaciones militares, policía civil, asistencia electoral, derechos humanos, desarrollo, asistencia humanitaria, refugiados y personas desplazadas, información pública, logística, finanzas y contratación. También hay que introducir ajustes estructurales en otros elementos del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, en particular la División de Policía Militar y Civil, que debería ser reorganizada en dos divisiones separadas, y la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno, que debería ser dividida en dos. Habría que reforzar la Dependencia de Análisis de los Resultados y trasladarla a la Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. También hay que reforzar los componentes de planificación y apoyo en la Sede respecto de la información pública, al igual que ciertos elementos del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, en particular la dependencia electoral. Fuera de la Secretaría, hay que poner a la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos en mejores condiciones para planificar y apoyar los componentes de derechos humanos de operaciones de paz. Habría que considerar la posibilidad de asignar al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz un tercer puesto de Subsecretario General y designar a uno de los tres Subsecretario Principal para que funcionara como adjunto del Secretario General Adjunto. La tarea de adaptar las operaciones de paz a la era de la información (párrs. 246 a 264) La tecnología de la información, moderna y bien utilizada, es fundamental para alcanzar muchos de estos objetivos; sin embargo, existen problemas de estrategia, política y práctica que obstan a su utilización efectiva. En particular, no hay en la Sede un centro con funciones suficientemente sólidas en materia de estrategia yn0059473.doc xv A/55/305 S/2000/809 política de tecnología de la información a nivel de usuario para operaciones de paz. Habría que designar un alto funcionario encargado de esas cuestiones en el contexto de la paz y la seguridad y asignarlo a la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad (EISAS), con homólogos en las oficinas del Representante Especial del Secretario General en cada una de las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas. Tanto en la Sede como en las misiones sobre el terreno se necesita un sistema de Extranet para operaciones de paz por conducto del cual las misiones tengan acceso, entre otras cosas, a las bases de datos, los análisis generales y los análisis de los resultados de EISAS. Dificultades para la aplicación de las recomendaciones ( párrs. 265 a 280) A juicio del Grupo, las recomendaciones que anteceden están perfectamente dentro de lo que cabe razonablemente exigir a los Estados Miembros de la Organización. Para ponerlas en práctica se necesitarán recursos adicionales, pero ello no significa que queramos decir que la mejor manera de resolver los problemas de las Naciones Unidas es simplemente darles más recursos. De hecho, ni el dinero ni los recursos, cualquiera que sea su monto, pueden reemplazar los importantes cambios que se necesitan con urgencia en la mentalidad de la Organización. El Grupo insta a la Secretaría a que tenga presentes las iniciativas del Secretario General para llegar a las instituciones de la sociedad civil y recuerde en todo momento que las Naciones Unidas son la Organización universal y todos, en todas partes, tienen pleno derecho a considerar que es su Organización y emitir juicios acerca de sus actividades y de quienes trabajan en ella. Existen además, grandes disparidades en cuanto a la calidad del personal y quienes trabajan en el sistema son los primeros en reconocerlo; quienes trabajan mejor tienen que absorber un volumen excesivo de trabajo para compensar el que no hacen los menos capaces. A menos que las Naciones Unidas tomen medidas para convertirse en una verdadera meritocracia, no podrán invertir la alarmante tendencia a que el personal calificado, especialmente los jóvenes, dejen la Organización. Además, el personal calificado no tendría incentivos para ingresar a ella. A menos que la administración superior en todos los niveles, comenzando por el Secretario General y la plana mayor, haga frente a este problema en forma prioritaria y seria, recompense la excelencia y ponga término a la incompetencia, los recursos adicionales serán malgastados y será imposible una reforma duradera. Los Estados Miembros también reconocen que tienen que reflexionar acerca de sus métodos y su mentalidad de trabajo. Incumbe a los miembros del Consejo de Seguridad, por ejemplo, y a los miembros en general, insuflar vida a lo que dicen, como hizo por ejemplo la delegación del Consejo de Seguridad que se traslado a Yakarta y Dili al comenzar la crisis en Timor Oriental en 1999, un excelente ejemplo de res, non verba, de acción efectiva del Consejo. Los miembros del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas instamos a las autoridades del mundo reunidas en la Cumbre del Milenio a que, al renovar su compromiso con los ideales de las Naciones Unidas, se comprometan también a incrementar la capacidad de las Naciones Unidas para cumplir plenamente su cometido, en realidad su razón de ser, de ayudar a las comunidades sumidas en un conflicto y de mantener o restablecer la paz.xvi n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 En la búsqueda de un consenso para las recomendaciones que formulamos en el presente informe, hemos llegado también a una idea común de unas Naciones Unidas que extiendan una firme mano de ayuda a una comunidad, a un país o una región para prevenir un conflicto o poner término a la violencia. Creemos que un representante especial del Secretario General habrá cumplido bien su cometido si ha dado al pueblo de un país la oportunidad de hacer por sí mismo lo que no podía hacer antes, construir la paz, mantenerla, lograr la reconciliación, reforzar la democracia y asegurar la vigencia de los derechos humanos. Por sobre todas las cosas, tenemos la idea de unas Naciones Unidas que no sólo tengan la voluntad sino también la capacidad de cumplir su promesa y justificar la confianza que la enorme mayoría de la humanidad ha depositado en ellas.n0059473.doc 1 A/55/305 S/2000/809 I. Un cambio necesario 1. Las Naciones Unidas fueron fundadas, como se declara en la Carta, para “preservar a las generaciones venideras del flagelo de la guerra”. Tal es la función más importante de la Organización y, en considerable medida, el criterio con que la juzgan los pueblos a cuyo servicio está dedicada. En el último decenio, en reiteradas oportunidades, las Naciones Unidas no han estado a la altura de este desafío, ni pueden estarlo hoy en día. Sin un cambio institucional significativo, mayor apoyo financiero y un compromiso renovado de los Estados Miembros, las Naciones Unidas no podrán ejecutar las tareas críticas de mantenimiento y consolidación de la paz que los Estados Miembros les asignen en los meses y años venideros. Hay muchas tareas que no deberían encomendarse a las fuerzas de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas y muchos lugares a donde no deberían ir. Pero cuando las Naciones Unidas envían a sus fuerzas para defender la paz, deben estar preparadas para hacer frente a las fuerzas de la guerra y la violencia que aún persistan con la capacidad y la determinación necesarias para vencerlas. 2. El Secretario General ha pedido a este Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas, integrado por personas con experiencia en diversos aspectos de la prevención de conflictos, mantenimiento de la paz y consolidación de la paz (los miembros del Grupo se enumeran en el anexo I), que evaluara las deficiencias del sistema actual y formulara recomendaciones francas, concretas y realistas para cambiarlo. Nuestras recomendaciones se centran no sólo en cuestiones de política y estrategia, sino también en aspectos operacionales e institucionales que requieren atención. 3. Para que las iniciativas preventivas reduzcan la tensión y eviten los conflictos, el Secretario General necesita un apoyo político, claro, firme y sostenido de los Estados Miembros. Para que el mantenimiento de la paz logre su cometido, como las Naciones Unidas han comprobado reiteradamente el último decenio, las mejores intenciones del mundo no bastan para reemplazar la capacidad fundamental de demostrar una fuerza convincente. Sin embargo, la fuerza por sí sola no puede crear la paz, sólo puede crear un espacio para construirla. 4. En otras palabras, la clave del éxito de futuras operaciones complejas reside en el apoyo político, el rápido despliegue con una clara demostración de fuerza y una buena estrategia de consolidación de la paz. De una manera u otra, todas las recomendaciones de este informe tienden a asegurar que se cumplan estas condiciones. Los acontecimientos recientes de Sierra Leona y la inquietante perspectiva de una ampliación de las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas en la República Democrática del Congo imponen con aún más urgencia la necesidad de cambios. 5. Estos cambios, aunque fundamentales, no tendrán un efecto duradero a menos que los Estados Miembros de la Organización asuman seriamente su responsabilidad de entrenar y equipar a sus propias fuerzas y de dar a su instrumento colectivo el mandato y los recursos necesarios para poder hacer frente juntos a las amenazas a la paz. Una vez que hayan decidido actuar como las Naciones Unidas, deben armarse de la voluntad política para apoyarlas política, financiera y operacionalmente de modo que la Organización resulte convincente como fuerza de paz. 6. Las recomendaciones del Grupo, que concilian la posición de principio y el pragmatismo, respetando al mismo tiempo el espíritu y la letra de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y las respectivas funciones de los órganos legislativos de la Organización, se basan en las siguientes premisas: a) La responsabilidad esencial de los Estados Miembros en el mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y la necesidad de reforzar cualitativa y cuantitativamente el apoyo que se presta al sistema de las Naciones Unidas para que cumpla esa función; b) La importancia crucial de que los mandatos del Consejo de Seguridad sean claros y convincentes y cuenten con los recursos adecuados; c) Un énfasis del sistema de las Naciones Unidas en la prevención de conflictos y una intervención temprana cuandoquiera que sea posible; d) La necesidad de una función más eficaz de reunión y evaluación de la información en la Sede de las Naciones Unidas, incluido un mejor sistema de alerta temprana que pueda detectar y reconocer la amenaza o el riesgo de conflicto y genocidio; e) La importancia esencial de que el sistema de las Naciones Unidas promueva y se atenga a los instrumentos y normas internacionales de derechos humanos y el derecho internacional humanitario en todos los aspectos de sus actividades relativas a la paz y la seguridad;2 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 f) La necesidad de dotar a las Naciones Unidas de la capacidad de contribuir a la consolidación de la paz, a título preventivo y después de los conflictos, en una forma realmente integrada; g) La necesidad crítica de mejorar la planificación en la Sede de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz (incluida la planificación para contingencias); h) El reconocimiento de que, si bien las Naciones Unidas tienen considerable experiencia en la planificación, organización y ejecución de operaciones tradicionales de mantenimiento de la paz, todavía no han adquirido la capacidad necesaria para desplegar rápidamente operaciones más complejas y mantenerlas efectivamente; i) La necesidad de asignar a las misiones sobre el terreno líderes y administradores de la mayor competencia, a los que la Sede dé mayor flexibilidad y autonomía dentro de un mandato claro y con criterios claros de responsabilidad en cuanto a los gastos y los resultados; j) El imperativo de exigir un alto grado de competencia e integridad del personal de la Sede y el terreno, al que se deberá proporcionar la capacitación y el apoyo necesarios para que desempeñen sus funciones y avancen en su carrera, aplicando las prácticas modernas de gestión que recompensan el desempeño meritorio y permiten desembarazarse de los incompetentes; k) La importancia de que los funcionarios de la Sede y del terreno respondan por su desempeño, reconociendo que se les deben dar facultades, recursos y un grado de responsabilidad acordes con las tareas que se les asignen. 7. En el presente informe, el Grupo ha tratado muchos cambios que es imperioso hacer en el sistema de las Naciones Unidas. El Grupo considera que sus recomendaciones proponen los cambios mínimos necesarios para que el sistema de las Naciones Unidas pueda ser una institución eficaz y operativa del siglo XXI. (Las recomendaciones principales se resumen en negrita en todo el texto: también se han combinado en un único resumen en el anexo III.) 8. La crítica franca que se hace en este informe refleja la experiencia colectiva del Grupo y las entrevistas realizadas en todos los niveles del sistema. El Grupo entrevistó directamente o recibió observaciones escritas de más de 200 personas. Las fuentes consultadas fueron las misiones permanentes de los Estados Miembros, incluidos los miembros del Consejo de Seguridad; el Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz; y personal de los departamentos que se ocupan de cuestiones de paz y seguridad en la Sede las Naciones Unidas en Nueva York, la Oficina de las Naciones Unidas en Ginebra, las sedes de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos y la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (ACNUR), las sedes de otros fondos y programas de las Naciones Unidas, el Banco Mundial y todas las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas en curso. (En el anexo II figura una lista de referencias.) II. Doctrina, estrategia y adopción de decisiones de las operaciones de paz 9. El sistema de las Naciones Unidas, es decir, los Estados Miembros, el Consejo de Seguridad, la Asamblea General y la Secretaría, debe embarcarse cautelosamente en las operaciones de paz, reflexionando con honestidad sobre lo que ha hecho en el último decenio. Debe ajustar en consecuencia la doctrina en que se basa el establecimiento de operaciones de paz, afinar su capacidad de análisis y de adopción de decisiones para responder a las realidades presentes y anticiparse a las futuras, y armarse de la creatividad, la imaginación y la voluntad necesarias para aplicar soluciones nuevas y alternativas a las situaciones en que no se puede o no se debe mandar personal de mantenimiento de la paz. A. Definición de los elementos de las operaciones de paz 10. Las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas entrañan tres actividades principales: prevención de conflictos y establecimiento de la paz, mantenimiento de la paz, y consolidación de la paz. La prevención de conflictos a largo plazo ataca a las causas estructurales del conflicto a fin de sentar una base sólida para la paz. Cuando esa base se desintegra, se intenta reforzarla mediante medidas de prevención del conflicto, que generalmente consisten en iniciativas diplomáticas. Esta acción preventiva es por definición una actividad discreta: cuando resulta, puede pasar totalmente desapercibida.n0059473.doc 3 A/55/305 S/2000/809 11. El establecimiento de la paz intenta poner coto a los conflictos en curso, mediante los instrumentos de la diplomacia y la mediación. En el establecimiento de la paz pueden intervenir enviados de gobiernos, grupos de Estados, organizaciones regionales o las Naciones Unidas, o bien grupos extraoficiales y no gubernamentales, como ocurrió, por ejemplo, en las negociaciones que culminaron en un acuerdo de paz para Mozambique. El establecimiento de la paz puede incluso ser obra de una personalidad destacada, que actúa en forma independiente. 12. El mantenimiento de la paz es una empresa que ya tiene 50 años y ha evolucionado rápidamente en el último decenio de un modelo tradicional y principalmente militar de observar las cesaciones del fuego y las separaciones de las fuerzas después de guerras entre Estados a un modelo complejo que incorpora muchos elementos, militares y civiles, que cooperan para establecer la paz en el peligroso interregno que sigue a las guerras civiles. 13. La consolidación de la paz es un término más reciente que, como se usa en este informe, se refiere a las actividades realizadas al final del conflicto para restablecer las bases de la paz y ofrecer los instrumentos para construir sobre ellas algo más que la mera ausencia de la guerra. Por lo tanto, la consolidación de la paz incluye, entre otras cosas, la reincorporación de los excombatientes a la sociedad civil, el fortalecimiento del imperio de la ley (por ejemplo, mediante el adiestramiento y la reestructuración de la policía local y la reforma judicial y penal); el fortalecimiento del respeto de los derechos humanos mediante la vigilancia, la educación y la investigación de los atropellos pasados y presentes; la prestación de asistencia técnica para el desarrollo democrático (incluida la asistencia electoral y el apoyo a la libertad de prensa); y la promoción del empleo de técnicas de solución de conflictos y reconciliación. 14. Complementos esenciales de una efectiva consolidación de la paz son el apoyo a la lucha contra la corrupción, la ejecución de programas humanitarios de remoción de minas, los programas de lucha contra el virus de inmunodeficiencia humana/síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (VIH/SIDA), incluidos los de información y la lucha contra otras enfermedades infecciosas. B. Experiencia anterior 15. Como se ha observado, el éxito discreto de la prevención de conflictos y el establecimiento de la paz a corto plazo suele ser políticamente invisible. Los enviados personales y los representantes del Secretario General o los representantes especiales del Secretario General a veces han complementado las iniciativas diplomáticas de los Estados Miembros y otras han tomado iniciativas que éstos no podrían haber tomado fácilmente. El logro de una cesación del fuego en la guerra entre la República Islámica del Irán y el Iraq de 1988, la liberación de los últimos rehenes occidentales en el Líbano en 1991 y el haber evitado la guerra entre la República Islámica del Irán y el Afganistán en 1998 son ejemplos de iniciativas de este tipo en el ámbito del establecimiento de la paz y de la diplomacia preventiva. 16. Los partidarios de centrarse en las causas subyacentes de los conflictos aducen que estas gestiones en el momento de crisis suelen ser insuficientes o llegan muy tarde. Sin embargo, si se intentan más temprano, las iniciativas diplomáticas pueden ser rechazadas por un gobierno que no ve o no quiere reconocer el problema en ciernes, o que puede ser él mismo parte del problema. Por lo tanto, las estrategias preventivas a largo plazo son un complemento necesario de las iniciativas a corto plazo. 17. Hasta el fin de la guerra fría, las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas en su mayoría tenían mandatos tradicionales relativos a la vigilancia de la cesación del fuego y no tenían responsabilidades directas de consolidación de la paz. La estrategia de entrada, o sea la secuencia de acontecimientos y decisiones que determinaba el despliegue de las Naciones Unidas, era clara: una guerra, una cesación del fuego, una invitación a vigilar el cumplimiento de la cesación del fuego y el despliegue de observadores o unidades militares para hacerlo, mientras seguían las tratativas para llegar a una solución política. Las necesidades en materia de inteligencia eran también bastante simples y los riesgos para los contingentes, relativamente bajos. Sin embargo, el mantenimiento de la paz en su forma tradicional, que apunta más a tratar los síntomas que a atacar las fuentes del conflicto, no preveía una estrategia de salida y la consolidación de la paz asociada a la operación solía avanzar con lentitud. Como consecuencia de ello, en las operaciones tradicionales el personal ha permanecido en el lugar 10, 20,4 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 30 e incluso 50 años (como en Chipre, el Oriente Medio y la India y el Pakistán). Comparadas con las operaciones más complejas, éstas cuestan relativamente poco y políticamente es más fácil mantenerlas que darlas por terminadas. Sin embargo, también son difíciles de justificar a menos de que vayan acompañadas de tratativas serias y sostenidas de establecimiento de la paz encaminadas a transformar la cesación del fuego en una solución de paz duradera. 18. Desde el fin de la guerra fría, las Naciones Unidas han combinado a menudo el mantenimiento de la paz con la consolidación de la paz en operaciones complejas desplegadas en situaciones de conflicto intraestatal. Sin embargo, esas situaciones afectan a actores externos y son afectadas por ellos: los protectores políticos, los vendedores de armas, los compradores de productos ilícitos de exportación, las potencias regionales que envían sus propias fuerzas al conflicto y los Estados vecinos que reciben a los refugiados que a veces son obligados sistemáticamente a dejar sus hogares. Puesto que sus efectos en Estados y otros actores que no son Estados trascienden las fronteras, estos conflictos suelen tener un carácter decididamente “transnacional”. 19. Los riesgos y los costos de las operaciones que deben funcionar en esas circunstancias son mucho mayores que los del mantenimiento de la paz tradicional. Además, la complejidad de las tareas asignadas a estas misiones y la volatilidad de la situación en el terreno tienden a aumentar paralelamente. Desde el fin de la guerra fría, estos mandatos complejos y riesgosos han sido más la regla que la excepción: las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas han tenido que escoltar la distribución del socorro cuando la situación era tan peligrosa que las operaciones humanitarias no podían continuar sin riesgo para su personal, han tenido que proteger a las víctimas y posibles víctimas del conflicto cuando se encontraban en mayor peligro y han tenido que controlar las armas pesadas en poder de las partes locales cuando éstas se utilizaban para amenazar por igual al personal de la misión y la población local. En dos situaciones extremas se dieron a las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas facultades policiales y administrativas en ausencia de autoridad local o porque ésta era incapaz de funcionar. 20. No es ninguna novedad que estas misiones son difíciles de llevar a buen término. Inicialmente, los años 90 ofrecían perspectivas más positivas: las operaciones en aplicación de acuerdos de paz tenían plazos establecidos en lugar de ser de duración indefinida y la celebración de elecciones nacionales parecía ofrecer una fácil estrategia de salida. Sin embargo, desde entonces, las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas han tendido a desplegarse en situaciones en que el conflicto no ha terminado en la victoria de ninguna de las partes: se puede haber llegado a un callejón sin salida desde el punto de vista militar, o la presión internacional puede haber detenido las hostilidades. Pero en todo caso, los conflictos no están terminados. Así, pues, las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas en realidad no se despliegan en la situación posterior a los conflictos sino que más bien se despliegan para crear esa situación, es decir, procuran trasladar el conflicto no resuelto, junto con las agendas personales, políticas y de otro tipo que lo impulsaron, del terreno militar al terreno político y mantenerlo ahí definitivamente. 21. Como descubrieron pronto las Naciones Unidas, las partes locales firman acuerdos de paz por diversas razones, no todas ellas favorables para la paz. Hubo “saboteadores”—grupos (incluidos los signatarios) que reniegan de sus compromisos o tratan de dejar sin efecto el acuerdo de paz mediante la violencia— que se opusieron al establecimiento de la paz en Camboya, volvieron a sumir a Angola, Somalia y Sierra Leona en la guerra civil y orquestaron el asesinato de nada menos que 800.000 personas en Rwanda. Para conseguir sistemáticamente los resultados deseados en las operaciones de mantenimiento o consolidación de la paz en situaciones de conflicto intraestatal/transnacional, las Naciones Unidas deben estar preparadas para vérselas con los saboteadores. 22. Un creciente número de informes sobre conflictos de ese tipo ha demostrado que los posibles saboteadores tienen mayores incentivos para renegar de los acuerdos de paz cuando disponen de una fuente de ingresos independiente que sirve para pagar soldados, comprar armas y enriquecer a los líderes de las facciones y que incluso puede ser el motivo de la guerra. La historia reciente indica que cuando no se pueden eliminar estas fuentes de ingresos, como la exportación de narcóticos ilícitos, piedras preciosas u otros productos de alto valor, la paz es insostenible. 23. Los Estados vecinos pueden contribuir al problema permitiendo el paso de contrabando que alimenta el conflicto, sirviéndole de intermediarios o proporcionando bases a los combatientes. Para contrarrestar a estos vecinos que apoyan el conflicto, una operación de paz necesita el apoyo político, logístico y/o militar activo de una o más grandes potencias o de potenciasn0059473.doc 5 A/55/305 S/2000/809 regionales importantes. Cuanto más ardua la operación más importante es este apoyo. 24. Entre otras variables de las que depende la dificultad del establecimiento de la paz están, en primer lugar, las fuentes del conflicto. Estas pueden ser de carácter económico (por ejemplo problemas de pobreza, distribución, discriminación o corrupción), político (una lucha desembozada por el poder), referirse a los recursos u otras cuestiones ambientales (como la competencia por escasos recursos hídricos), o pueden ser cuestiones étnicas, religiosas o relacionadas con graves atropellos de los derechos humanos. Los objetivos políticos y económicos pueden ser más fluidos y estar más abiertos al compromiso que los objetivos relacionados con la necesidad de recursos, las cuestiones étnicas o la religión. En segundo lugar, la complejidad de la tarea de negociar y establecer la paz tenderá a aumentar con el número de partes locales y la divergencia entre sus objetivos (por ejemplo, algunas pueden querer la unidad y otras, la separación). En tercer lugar, el número de víctimas y la magnitud de los desplazamientos de población y los daños de la infraestructura incidirán en el grado de resentimiento provocado por la guerra y, por lo tanto, en la dificultad de la reconciliación, que exige enfrentar las pasadas violaciones de los derechos humanos y el costo y la complejidad de la reconstrucción. 25. Una situación relativamente menos peligrosa — sólo dos partes decididas a lograr la paz, con objetivos en competencia pero congruentes, sin fuentes ilícitas de ingresos, con vecinos y protectores decididos también a lograr la paz— es bastante más propicia a la reconciliación. En situaciones menos propicias y más peligrosas —tres o más partes no todas igualmente empeñadas en lograr la paz, con distintos objetivos, fuentes independientes de ingresos y armas, y vecinos dispuestos a comprar, vender o permitir el tránsito de productos ilícitos— a menos que desempeñen su cometido con la competencia y eficiencia que la situación exige y estén firmemente respaldadas por las grandes potencias, las misiones de las Naciones Unidas no sólo ponen en peligro a su propia gente, sino también a la paz misma. 26. Es de vital importancia que los negociadores, el Consejo de Seguridad, quienes planifican la misión en la Secretaría y quienes participan en ella comprendan con cuál de estas situaciones políticomilitares se están enfrentando, cómo puede cambiar la situación bajo sus pies una vez que lleguen y qué es realista que se propongan hacer en caso de que cambie. Todas estas consideraciones deben tenerse en cuenta en la estrategia de entrada de una operación y al decidir la cuestión básica de si una operación es viable y si tiene sentido intentarla. 27. En este contexto, es igualmente importante determinar hasta qué punto las autoridades locales quieren y pueden adoptar las decisiones políticas y económicas necesarias, aunque sean difíciles, y participar en el establecimiento de procesos y mecanismos para manejar las controversias internas y evitar la violencia o la reanudación del conflicto. Aunque una misión sobre el terreno y las Naciones Unidas tienen poco control sobre estos factores, este ambiente de cooperación es de importancia crítica para determinar el éxito de una operación de paz. 28. Cuando las operaciones de paz complejas se despliegan en el terreno, incumbe a su personal mantener un clima local de seguridad para la consolidación de la paz e incumbe al personal de consolidación de la paz la tarea de apoyar los cambios políticos, sociales y económicos que crean un ambiente seguro que pueda autoperpetuarse. Sólo si se crea este ambiente podrán las fuerzas de mantenimiento de la paz retirarse fácilmente, a menos que la comunidad internacional esté dispuesta a tolerar la reanudación del conflicto cuando lo hagan. La historia ha demostrado que el personal de mantenimiento de la paz y el personal de consolidación de la paz son aliados inseparables en las operaciones complejas: mientras que los encargados de la consolidación de la paz tal vez no puedan funcionar sin el apoyo del personal de mantenimiento de la paz, éste no tiene posibilidades de retirarse si los primeros no ejecutan su labor. C. Consecuencias para las medidas preventivas 29. Las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas cubrieron no más de un tercio de las situaciones de conflicto del decenio de 1990. Dado que ni siquiera mejorando mucho los mecanismos de creación y apoyo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas podrá el sistema de las Naciones Unidas responder con operaciones de este tipo en todos los casos de conflicto en todos los lugares, hay una necesidad acuciante de que las Naciones Unidas y sus Estados Miembros establezcan un sistema más eficaz para la prevención de conflictos a largo plazo. Claramente, la prevención es muy preferible para quienes, a falta de6 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 ella, padecerían las consecuencias de la guerra, y es una opción menos costosa para la comunidad internacional que las acciones militares, el socorro humanitario de emergencia o la reconstrucción después de una guerra. Como observó el Secretario General en su reciente informe del Milenio (A/54/2000) “cada una de las medidas adoptadas para reducir la pobreza y lograr un crecimiento económico de base amplia es un paso adelante en pos de la prevención de los conflictos”. En muchos casos de conflicto interno, “la pobreza corre pareja con profundas diferencias étnicas o religiosas” cuando los derechos de las minorías “no se respetan lo suficiente [y] las instituciones de gobierno no incluyen debidamente a todos los grupos de la población”. Por consiguiente, en tales casos hay que adoptar estrategias de prevención a largo plazo “para promover los derechos humanos, proteger los derechos de las minorías e instituir mecanismos políticos en que estén representados todos los grupos ... Es necesario que cada grupo se convenza de que el Estado pertenece a todos”. 30. El Grupo desea encomiar al Grupo de Tareas sobre Paz y Seguridad de las Naciones Unidas por su labor en la esfera de la prevención a largo plazo, y en particular el concepto de que las entidades de desarrollo del sistema de las Naciones Unidas deben observar los trabajos de desarrollo a través de una “lente de prevención de conflictos” y hacer de la prevención a largo plazo el punto de mira de su labor, adaptando a tal fin instrumentos tales como el Marco de Evaluación Común para los países y el Marco de Asistencia de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo. 31. Para aumentar las posibilidades de que las Naciones Unidas se concentren cuanto antes en las posibles nuevas emergencias de carácter complejo, y por consiguiente en la prevención de conflictos a corto plazo, hace aproximadamente dos años los departamentos de la Sede que integran el Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Desarrollo crearon el Marco Interinstitucional/Interdepartamental de Coordinación en el que ahora participan 10 departamentos, fondos, programas y organismos. El elemento activo, el Equipo del Marco se reúne mensualmente a nivel de directores para tomar decisiones relativas a las zonas de riesgo, programar reuniones de examen de países (o de situaciones) y determinar medidas preventivas. El mecanismo del Marco ha mejorado los contactos entre los departamentos, pero no ha acumulado conocimientos de manera más estructurada, y no hace planificaciones estratégicas. Esto puede haber contribuido a la dificultad que tiene la Secretaría para convencer a los Estados Miembros de las ventajas de respaldar el compromiso que profesan con las medidas de prevención de conflictos a largo y corto plazo con el apoyo político y financiero necesario. Mientras tanto, las memorias anuales del Secretario General de 1997 y 1999 (A/52/1 y A/54/1) se concentraron concretamente en la prevención de conflictos. La Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict y la Asociación pro Naciones Unidas de los Estados Unidos de América, entre otras, también han aportado valiosos estudios sobre el tema. Además, más de 400 funcionarios de las Naciones Unidas han recibido formación sistemática en “alarma temprana” en la Escuela Superior del Personal de las Naciones Unidas en Turín. 32. El fondo de la cuestión de la prevención a corto plazo está en el recurso a misiones de determinación de los hechos y otras iniciativas clave del Secretario General. Éstas, sin embargo, suelen tropezarse con dos impedimentos fundamentales. En primer lugar, está la preocupación comprensible y legítima de los Estados Miembros, especialmente los más pequeños y débiles de ellos, por la soberanía. Estas preocupaciones aumentan ante las iniciativas tomadas por otro Estado Miembro, especialmente un vecino más fuerte, o una organización regional dominada por uno de sus miembros. Un Estado que tropiece con dificultades internas suele estar dispuesto a aceptar sugerencias del Secretario General dada la independencia reconocida y la sólida base moral de su posición y en vista de la letra y el espíritu de la Carta que requiere que el Secretario General ofrezca su asistencia y espera del Estado Miembro que preste a las Naciones Unidas “toda clase de ayuda” tal como se indica, en particular, en el apartado 5) del Artículo 2 de la Carta. Las misiones de determinación de los hechos son un primer instrumento mediante el cual el Secretario General puede facilitar sus buenos oficios. 33. El segundo impedimento para las medidas eficaces de prevención de las crisis es la distancia entre las posiciones verbales y el apoyo financiero y político prestado a la prevención. La Asamblea del Milenio ofrece a todos los interesados la oportunidad de reevaluar su compromiso en este asunto y considerar las recomendaciones relativas a la prevención que figuran en el Informe del Milenio del Secretario General y en sus recientes observaciones ante la segunda sesión pública del Consejo de Seguridad sobre prevención de los conflictos. En ella, el Secretario General subrayó la necesidad de una colaboración más estrecha entre eln0059473.doc 7 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Consejo de Seguridad y otros órganos principales de las Naciones Unidas sobre cuestiones de prevención de conflictos, y maneras para colaborar más estrechamente con los participantes no estatales, incluido el sector empresarial, para contribuir a diluir o evitar conflictos. 34. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre medidas preventivas: a) El Grupo hace suyas las recomendaciones del Secretario General con respecto a la prevención de conflictos que figuran en el Informe del Milenio y las observaciones que hizo ante el Consejo de Seguridad en su segunda sesión pública sobre prevención de conflictos, en julio de 2000, y en particular su llamamiento a “todos los participantes en las actividades de prevención de conflictos y de desarrollo —las Naciones Unidas, las instituciones de Bretton Woods, los gobiernos y las organizaciones de la sociedad civil— [a que enfrenten] esos retos de una manera más integrada”; b) El Grupo apoya que el Secretario General recurra con mayor frecuencia a enviar misiones de determinación de los hechos a zonas de tensión y hace hincapié en las obligaciones que tienen los Estados Miembros, en virtud del apartado 5) del Artículo 2 de la Carta, de prestar “toda clase de ayuda” a estas actividades de las Naciones Unidas. D. Consecuencias para la estrategia de consolidación de la paz 35. El Consejo de Seguridad y el Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz de las Naciones Unidas han reconocido la importancia de la consolidación de la paz como parte integrante del éxito de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. A este respecto, el 29 de diciembre de 1998 el Consejo de Seguridad adoptó una declaración presidencial en la que alentó al Secretario General a que “estudiara la posibilidad de establecer estructuras para consolidar la paz después de los conflictos como parte de la labor que lleva a cabo el sistema de las Naciones Unidas para lograr una solución duradera y pacífica de los conflictos ...”. El Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, en su propio informe de principios de 2000, subrayó la importancia de definir y determinar elementos relativos a la consolidación de la paz antes de incorporarlos en los mandatos de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz complejas, para facilitar el posterior examen por la Asamblea General del mantenimiento de su apoyo a elementos clave de la consolidación de la paz después de terminada una operación compleja. 36. Se puede establecer oficinas de apoyo a la consolidación de la paz u oficinas políticas de las Naciones Unidas a modo de medidas de seguimiento de otras operaciones de paz, como sucedió en Tayikistán o Haití, o a modo de iniciativas independientes, como en los casos de Guatemala o Guinea–Bissau. Estas oficinas contribuyen a apoyar la consolidación de la paz en los países después de los conflictos, trabajando con los gobiernos y con organizaciones no gubernamentales y complementando actividades ya en curso de desarrollo de las Naciones Unidas que se esfuerzan por permanecer independientes de las actividades políticas aun dirigiendo la asistencia a la fuente del conflicto. 37. Una consolidación de la paz eficaz requiere la participación activa de las partes locales, y esa participación debe ser de carácter multidimensional. En primer lugar, a todas las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz se les debe dar la capacidad de mejorar claramente las vidas de las personas que se encuentran en su zona de misión, en un momento relativamente temprano de la vida de la misión. El jefe de la misión debe tener autoridad para aplicar un pequeño porcentaje de los fondos de la misión en “proyectos de efecto inmediato” dirigidos a producir mejoras reales en la calidad de la vida, a fin de contribuir a establecer la credibilidad de una nueva misión. El coordinador residente o el coordinador de asuntos humanitarios del equipo de las Naciones Unidas que existiera anteriormente en el país debe actuar de asesor principal en estos proyectos a fin de garantizar que los gastos sean eficaces y evitar los conflictos con otros programas de asistencia humanitaria o al desarrollo. 38. En segundo lugar, unas elecciones “libres e imparciales” deben considerarse parte de esfuerzos más amplios para fortalecer las instituciones de gobierno. Las elecciones sólo tendrán éxito en un ambiente en que una población que se recupera de la guerra acepta el resultado de la votación como mecanismo pertinente y creíble mediante el cual se representan sus opiniones sobre el gobierno. Las elecciones necesitan el apoyo de un proceso más amplio de democratización y consolidación de la sociedad civil que incluya una administración civil eficaz y una cultura de respeto a los derechos8 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 humanos fundamentales, sin lo cual las elecciones se limitan a ratificar una tiranía de la mayoría o a derrocarla por la fuerza una vez que se haya marchado la operación de paz. 39. En tercer lugar, los instructores de policía civil de las Naciones Unidas no son consolidadores de la paz si se limitan a documentar —o a intentar desalentar con su presencia— comportamientos abusivos o inaceptables en cualquier otro sentido de los oficiales de la policía civil: es ésta una perspectiva tradicional y limitada de las capacidades de la policía civil. En la actualidad, las misiones pueden requerir que la policía civil se encargue de reformar, capacitar y reestructurar las fuerzas locales de policía de conformidad con normas internacionales de actividad policial democrática y respetuosa de los derechos humanos, y además tener la capacidad de responder con eficacia a situaciones de desorden civil, y tener capacidades de autodefensa. También los tribunales, a los que los oficiales de la policía local llevan a los presuntos criminales, y el sistema penal al que la ley entrega a los presos, deben ser políticamente imparciales y abstenerse de ejercer intimidaciones y presiones. Cuando las misiones de consolidación de la paz lo requieran, es necesario disponer de suficientes expertos judiciales internacionales, expertos penales, especialistas en derechos humanos y policías civiles para fortalecer las instituciones jurídicas. Cuando la justicia, la reconciliación y la lucha contra la impunidad lo requieran, el Consejo de Seguridad debe autorizar a estos expertos, así como a los investigadores penales y especialistas forenses pertinentes, a que prosigan la labor de detención y enjuiciamiento de las personas acusadas de crímenes de guerra en apoyo de los tribunales penales internacionales de las Naciones Unidas. 40. Aunque este planteamiento de equipo puede parecer evidente, en el pasado decenio las Naciones Unidas han tropezado con situaciones en que el Consejo de Seguridad ha autorizado el despliegue de varios millares de policías en una operación de mantenimiento de la paz pero se ha resistido al concepto de proporcionar a las mismas operaciones 20 ó 30 expertos en justicia penal. Además, la función moderna de la policía civil tiene que entenderse y desarrollarse mejor. En resumen, se requiere un cambio doctrinal en lo relativo a cómo concibe y utiliza la Organización a la policía civil en las operaciones de paz, así como en cuanto a la necesidad de un planteamiento de equipo dotado de los recursos necesarios para apoyar el imperio de la ley y respetar los derechos humanos mediante expertos judiciales, penales, en derechos humanos y de policía que trabajen juntos de manera coordinada y colegiada. 41. En cuarto lugar, el componente de derechos humanos de una operación de paz es crítico para una consolidación de la paz eficaz. El personal de derechos humanos de las Naciones Unidas puede desempeñar un papel rector, por ejemplo, ayudando a aplicar un programa amplio de reconciliación nacional. Los componentes de derechos humanos de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz no siempre han recibido el apoyo político y administrativo que requieren, sin embargo, ni otros componentes han entendido siempre sus funciones claramente. Por consiguiente, el grupo hace hincapié en la importancia de impartir formación al personal militar, de policía y al personal civil en cuestiones de derechos humanos y en las disposiciones pertinentes del derecho humanitario internacional. A este respecto, el Grupo encomia el Boletín del Secretario General de 6 de agosto de 1999, titulado “Respeto del derecho humanitario internacional por las fuerzas de las Naciones Unidas” (ST/SGB/1999/13). 42. En quinto lugar, el desarme, la desmovilización y la reintegración de los excombatientes —fundamental para la estabilidad inmediata después de los conflictos y para reducir la probabilidad de que se reanuden los conflictos— es una esfera en la que la consolidación de la paz hace una contribución directa a la seguridad pública y al orden público. Sin embargo, el objetivo básico del desarme, la desmovilización y la reintegración no se cumple a menos que se apliquen los tres elementos del programa. Los luchadores desmovilizados (que casi nunca se desarman por completo) tenderán a volver a una vida de violencia si no encuentran un medio de vida legítimo, es decir, si no se les “reintegra” a la economía local. El elemento de reintegración del desarme, la desmovilización y la reintegración se financia con recursos voluntarios, sin embargo, y muchas veces esta financiación ha estado muy por debajo de las necesidades. 43. El desarme, la desmovilización y la reintegración han sido una característica de las últimas 15 operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de los pasados 10 años. Más de una docena de organismos y programas de las Naciones Unidas y de organizaciones no gubernamentales internacionales y locales financian estos programas. En parte debido a que son tantos los que participan en la planificación o en el apoyo al desarme, la desmovilización y la reintegración, ésta carece de unn0059473.doc 9 A/55/305 S/2000/809 centro de coordinación designado en el sistema de las Naciones Unidas. 44. Para que la consolidación de la paz sea eficaz también se requiere un centro de coordinación para coordinar las muchas actividades distintas que entraña la consolidación de la paz. A juicio del Grupo, la comunidad de donantes debe considerar a las Naciones Unidas el centro de coordinación de las actividades de consolidación de la paz. Para ello, es muy conveniente crear una capacidad institucional permanente y consolidada en el ámbito del sistema de las Naciones Unidas. Por lo tanto, el Grupo considera que el Secretario General Adjunto de Asuntos Políticos, en su calidad de convocador del CEPS, debe actuar como centro de coordinación para la consolidación de la paz. El Grupo también apoya los esfuerzos realizados por el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD) para fortalecer conjuntamente la capacidad de las Naciones Unidas en esta esfera, dado que, en efecto, la consolidación de la paz eficaz es un híbrido de actividades políticas y de desarrollo dirigidas a las fuentes del conflicto. 45. El Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, la Oficina de Coordinación de Asuntos Humanitarios (OCAH), el Departamento de Asuntos de Desarme, la Oficina de Asuntos Jurídicos, el PNUD, el Fondo de las Naciones Unidas para la Infancia (UNICEF), la Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos (ACNUR), el Representante Especial del Secretario General para la cuestión de los niños y los conflictos armados y el Coordinador de Seguridad de las Naciones Unidas están representados en el CEPS; también ha sido invitado a participar el Grupo del Banco Mundial. El CEPS es el foro ideal para la formulación de estrategias de consolidación de la paz. 46. No obstante, hay que diferenciar entre formulación de estrategias y aplicación de tales estrategias, sobre la base de una división racional del trabajo entre los miembros del CEPS. A juicio del Grupo, el PNUD tiene posibilidades aún no aprovechadas en esta esfera y, en colaboración con otros organismos, fondos y programas de las Naciones Unidas, y el Banco Mundial, ese Programa está bien situado para tomar la iniciativa en la aplicación de actividades de consolidación de la paz. Por consiguiente, el Grupo recomienda que el CEPS proponga al Secretario General un plan para fortalecer la capacidad de las Naciones Unidas de desarrollar estrategias de consolidación de la paz y aplicar programas en apoyo de esas estrategias. Ese plan también debe indicar los criterios para determinar en qué casos está justificado nombrar un enviado político superior o representante del Secretario General para aumentar la visibilidad y agudizar la orientación política de las actividades de consolidación de la paz en una región o país en particular que se recupera de un conflicto. 47. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre la consolidación de la paz: a) Un pequeño porcentaje del presupuesto para el primer año de una misión debe estar a disposición del representante o del representante especial del Secretario General para que la misión pueda financiar proyectos de efecto inmediato en su zona de operaciones, con el asesoramiento del coordinador residente del equipo de las Naciones Unidas en el país; b) El Grupo recomienda un cambio doctrinal en el uso de la policía civil, otros elementos del imperio de la ley y los expertos en derechos humanos en operaciones complejas de paz a fin de reflejar un mayor enfoque en el fortalecimiento de las instituciones del imperio de la ley y el mejoramiento del respeto de los derechos humanos en los ambientes posteriores a los conflictos; c) El Grupo recomienda que los órganos legislativos consideren incluir los programas de desmovilización y reintegración en los presupuestos prorrateados de las operaciones de la paz complejas para la primera etapa de una operación, a fin de facilitar la disolución rápida de las facciones combatientes y reducir la probabilidad de que se reanuden los conflictos; d) El Grupo recomienda que el Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad delibere con el Secretario General y le recomiende un plan para fortalecer la capacidad permanente de las Naciones Unidas para desarrollar estrategias de consolidación de la paz y aplicar programas en apoyo de esas estrategias. E. Consecuencias para la teoría y la estrategia del mantenimiento de la paz 48. El Grupo coincide en que el consentimiento de las partes locales, la imparcialidad y el uso de la fuerza10 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 únicamente en legítima defensa deben seguir siendo los principios fundamentales del mantenimiento de la paz. No obstante, la experiencia demuestra que en el contexto de las operaciones modernas de paz relacionadas con conflictos intraestatales o transnacionales, las partes locales pueden manipular el consentimiento de diversas maneras. Una parte puede dar su consentimiento a la presencia de las Naciones Unidas simplemente con el fin de ganar tiempo para reorganizar sus fuerzas y retirarlo cuando la operación de mantenimiento de la paz deje de servir para sus propósitos, o puede tratar de restringir la libertad de circulación de los integrantes de la operación, adoptar una política de incumplimiento sistemático de las disposiciones de un acuerdo o retirar por completo el consentimiento. Además, independientemente del empeño que demuestran los líderes de las partes en conseguir la paz, las fuerzas combatientes pueden estar sometidas a un control mucho menor que los ejércitos convencionales que participan en el mantenimiento de la paz y dividirse en facciones cuya existencia e incidencia no se previeran en el acuerdo de paz con arreglo al cual funciona la misión de las Naciones Unidas. 49. A lo largo del tiempo, han sido numerosas las ocasiones en que las Naciones Unidas no han podido resolver eficazmente esos problemas. No obstante, una de las premisas fundamentales del presente informe es que deben poder hacerlo. Una vez desplegado, el personal de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas debe estar en condiciones de cumplir su mandato de forma profesional y con éxito. Ello quiere decir que las unidades militares de las Naciones Unidas deben poder defenderse, defender a otros componentes de la misión y al mandato de ésta. Las normas para entablar combate no deben limitar la acción de los contingentes a respuestas proporcionales sino que deben prever réplicas que sirvan para silenciar una fuente de fuego mortífero dirigida contra los contingentes de las Naciones Unidas o contra la población que éstos deben proteger y, en situaciones particularmente peligrosas, no deben obligar a los contingentes de las Naciones Unidas a ceder la iniciativa a sus atacantes. 50. Así pues, en esas operaciones, imparcialidad debe significar cumplimiento de los principios de la Carta y de los objetivos de un mandato basado en esos principios. Ese tipo de imparcialidad no equivale a neutralidad ni a igualdad de tratamiento de todas las partes, en todos los casos, en todo momento, lo cual puede llegar a equivaler a una política de contemporización. En ocasiones, las partes locales no están constituidas por elementos moralmente equiparables sino por un componente evidentemente agresor y otro evidentemente agredido, y el personal de mantenimiento de la paz puede no sólo tener una justificación operacional para utilizar la fuerza sino también verse moralmente obligado a hacerlo. El genocidio ocurrido en Rwanda alcanzó esas dimensiones en parte porque la comunidad internacional no utilizó la operación que ya existía sobre el terreno en ese país para hacer frente al obvio agente maléfico. Posteriormente, el Consejo de Seguridad, en su resolución 1296 (2000), estableció que los ataques dirigidos deliberadamente contra la población civil en los conflictos armados y la denegación del acceso del personal humanitario a la población civil afectada por la guerra pueden constituir en sí mismos amenazas para la paz y la seguridad internacionales, y por lo tanto provocar la acción del Consejo de Seguridad. Si ya hay sobre el terreno una operación de las Naciones Unidas para el mantenimiento de la paz, puede corresponderle a ella función de llevar a cabo esas acciones y debe estar preparada. 51. Por otra parte, ello significa que la Secretaría no debe aplicar las hipótesis de planificación más favorables a situaciones en que históricamente los agentes locales hayan demostrado el peor comportamiento. Significa también que en los mandatos debe especificarse que la operación está facultada para utilizar la fuerza. Y significa además que las fuerzas deben ser más numerosas, estar mejor equipadas y resultar más costosas, pero al mismo tiempo deben representar una verdadera amenaza disuasiva, en lugar de una presencia simbólica y que no supone peligro alguno, características tradicionales del mantenimiento de la paz. Las fuerzas de las Naciones Unidas que intervinieran en operaciones complejas deberían tener un tamaño y una configuración que no dejaran lugar a dudas en la mente de posibles partes en el conflicto sobre cuál de los dos enfoques había adoptado la Organización. Y debería proporcionarse a esas fuerzas la información local y demás condiciones necesarias para construir una defensa contra los oponentes violentos. 52. La disposición de los Estados Miembros a aportar contingentes a una operación convincente de este tipo lleva aparejada también la disposición a aceptar el riesgo de que se produzcan víctimas en cumplimiento del mandato. Desde las misiones difíciles de mediados de los años 90, ha aumentado la resistencia a aceptar ese riesgo, en parte porque los Estados Miembros sonn0059473.doc 11 A/55/305 S/2000/809 capaces de determinar en qué los beneficiaría asumir el riesgo y en parte porque pueden no conocer bien los propios riesgos. Así pues, al pedir que los Estados aporten contingentes, el Secretario General debe poder transmitir qué redunda en beneficio de los países que aportan contingentes y, ciertamente, de todos los Estados Miembros que se haga frente y se resuelva el conflicto en cuestión, aunque sólo sea como parte de la labor amplia de establecer la paz que incumbe a las Naciones Unidas. Al hacerlo, el Secretario General debería facilitar a los países que pudieran aportar contingentes una evaluación de los riesgos en que se expusiera en qué consiste el conflicto y cuáles serían los requisitos de la paz, se describiera la capacidad y los objetivos de las partes locales y se indicaran los recursos financieros independientes de que dispondrían, así como las consecuencias de esa capacidad financiera para el mantenimiento de la paz. El Consejo de Seguridad y la Secretaría deberían también convencer a los países que aportan contingentes de que la estrategia y el planteamiento de las operaciones de las misiones nuevas son sólidos y que enviarán contingentes o policía a una misión eficaz encabezada por dirigentes competentes. 53. El Grupo reconoce que las Naciones Unidas no se dedican a la guerra. Cuando ha hecho falta intervenir activamente, siempre se ha confiado esa acción a coaliciones de Estados dispuestos a hacerlo, con la autorización del Consejo de Seguridad, en cumplimiento del Capítulo VII de la Carta. 54. En la Carta se promueve claramente la cooperación con organizaciones regionales y subregionales para resolver los conflictos y establecer y mantener la paz y la seguridad. Las Naciones Unidas participan activamente y con éxito en numerosos programas de cooperación para la prevención de conflictos, el establecimiento de la paz, la organización de elecciones y la asistencia electoral, la vigilancia de los derechos humanos y la realización de labores humanitarias sobre el terreno, así como otras actividades de consolidación de la paz en diversas partes del planeta. No obstante, en lo que se refiere a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, parece oportuno actuar con cautela porque los recursos y la capacidad militar están distribuidos de manera desigual en el mundo y los contingentes que se encuentran en las zonas más propensas a las crisis suelen estar menos preparados para hacer frente a las demandas del mantenimiento de la paz moderno que los de otros lugares. Si se proporcionara capacidad, equipo, apoyo logístico y otros recursos a las organizaciones regionales y subregionales, se podría habilitar a personal de mantenimiento de la paz de todas las regiones para que participara en las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas o estableciera operaciones regionales sobre la base de resoluciones del Consejo de Seguridad. 55. Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre la teoría y la estrategia del mantenimiento de la paz: una vez desplegado, el personal de las Naciones Unidas para el mantenimiento de la paz debe estar en condiciones de cumplir su mandato de forma profesional y con éxito, así como de defenderse, defender a otros componentes de la misión y al mandato de ésta, sobre la base de unas normas para entablar combate sólidas, de quienes incumplan los compromisos adquiridos en virtud de un acuerdo de paz o traten de menoscabarlo por medio de la violencia. F. Mandatos claros, convincentes y viables 56. Como órgano político, el Consejo de Seguridad procura lograr el consenso, aunque puede adoptar decisiones sin que exista unanimidad. Pero las concesiones necesarias para llegar al consenso pueden ir en detrimento de la especificación, y la ambigüedad resultante puede tener consecuencias graves sobre el terreno si el mandato es objeto de interpretaciones diversas por los distintos elementos de una operación de paz, o si los agentes locales perciben que el empeño del Consejo en lograr la paz no es total y los contendientes se ven así alentados. La ambigüedad puede también disimular diferencias que se manifiesten más adelante, bajo la presión de la crisis, e impidan una actuación urgente del Consejo. Si bien el Grupo reconoce que en muchas ocasiones hacer concesiones políticas resulta útil, en este caso se decanta por la claridad, en especial cuando se trate de operaciones que se desplieguen en circunstancias peligrosas. El Grupo insta al Consejo a que, en lugar de enviar una operación a una situación peligrosa con instrucciones poco claras, se abstenga de establecer esa misión. 57. Con frecuencia las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas empiezan a cobrar forma cuando los negociadores de un acuerdo de paz contemplan la posibilidad de que la Organización haga cumplir ese acuerdo Aunque los negociadores de la paz (encargados de su establecimiento) pueden ser profesionales12 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 competentes en su ámbito, es mucho menos probable que conozcan en detalle las necesidades operacionales de los soldados, los policías, el personal de socorro o los asesores electorales de las misiones de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno. Y los negociadores no relacionados con las Naciones Unidas pueden tener incluso menos conocimientos de esas necesidades. Sin embargo, en los últimos años, la Secretaría se ha visto obligada a ejecutar mandatos que se elaboraron en otro lugar y que le llegaron por conducto del Consejo de Seguridad con cambios menores. 58. El Grupo considera que la Secretaría debe hacer entender al Consejo de Seguridad que, antes de que el Consejo encargue a fuerzas dirigidas por las Naciones Unidas la aplicación de acuerdos de cesación del fuego o de paz, deben cumplirse ciertas condiciones mínimas entre ellas la posibilidad de que en las negociaciones de paz haya presentes asesores–observadores; que todo acuerdo se ajuste a las normas internacionales vigentes en materia de derechos humanos y al derecho humanitario; y que las labores que desempeñen las Naciones Unidas sean viables operacionalmente —con el requisito explícito de que reciban apoyo local— y contribuyan a resolver las causas del conflicto o a instaurar las condiciones necesarias para que lo hagan otros. Puesto que los negociadores sólo pueden contar con asesoramiento adecuado si se conoce detalladamente la situación imperante sobre el terreno, el Secretario General debería estar facultado para consignar los recursos del Fondo de Reserva para el Mantenimiento de la Paz necesarios para realizar un estudio preliminar en la zona de la posible misión. 59. Al informar al Consejo sobre las necesidades de las misiones, la Secretaría no debe indicar el tamaño de la fuerza ni los niveles de recursos que suponga serán políticamente aceptables para el Consejo. Ejerciendo una autocensura de ese tipo, la Secretaría se expone a sí misma y a la misión no sólo al fracaso sino a convertirse en chivo expiatorio del fracaso. Aunque presentar y justificar unas estimaciones de planificación que se ajusten a normas operacionales elevadas puede reducir la probabilidad de que se lleve a cabo una operación, no debe hacerse creer a los Estados Miembros que están haciendo algo útil para los países en dificultades cuando, dotando a las misiones de recursos insuficientes, en realidad pueden estar dando su consentimiento a un desperdicio de recursos humanos, tiempo y dinero. 60. Además, el Grupo considera que, hasta que el Secretario General no obtenga compromisos firmes de los Estados Miembros de que aportarán los contingentes que considere necesarios para llevar a cabo la operación, ésta no debe iniciarse. Desplegar parcialmente unas fuerzas incapaces de consolidar una paz frágil, primero haría aumentar las esperanzas de una población sumida en un conflicto o que se está recuperando de una guerra, para luego defraudar esas esperanzas y socavar la credibilidad de las Naciones Unidas en su conjunto. En esas circunstancias, el Grupo considera que el Consejo de Seguridad debe mantener en forma de proyecto toda resolución que prevea el despliegue de un número elevado de contingentes en una operación nueva de mantenimiento de la paz hasta que el Secretario General esté en condiciones de confirmar que ha obtenido de los Estados Miembros el compromiso de aportar los contingentes necesarios. 61. Las posibilidades de que ocurran esos desajustes, pueden reducirse por varios medios, entre ellos aumentando la coordinación y las consultas entre los países que puedan aportar contingentes y los miembros del Consejo de Seguridad durante el proceso de formulación del mandato. El asesoramiento de los países que aportan contingentes al Consejo de Seguridad podría institucionalizarse creando órganos subsidiarios especiales del Consejo, tal como se prevé en el Artículo 29 de la Carta. Como norma, debería invitarse a los Estados Miembros que aportan unidades militares constituidas a una operación determinada a asistir a las sesiones informativas que ofrece la Secretaría al Consejo de Seguridad referentes a crisis que afecten a la seguridad y protección del personal de la misión o a algún cambio o nueva interpretación del mandato de la misión en relación con el uso de la fuerza. 62. Por último, el deseo del Secretario General de ampliar la protección de los civiles afectados por conflictos armados y las medidas adoptadas por el Consejo de Seguridad con el fin de facultar explícitamente al personal de las Naciones Unidas para el mantenimiento de la paz para proteger a los civiles que se encuentren en situaciones de conflicto son novedades positivas. Sin duda, el personal de mantenimiento de la paz — contingentes o policía— que presencia actos de violencia contra civiles debería estar autorizado para poner fin a esos actos, de acuerdo con sus medios, en aplicación de los principios básicos de las Naciones Unidas y, como se indica en el informe de la Comisión Independiente de Investigación sobre Rwanda, en consonancia con “la percepción y la expectativa den0059473.doc 13 A/55/305 S/2000/809 percepción y la expectativa de protección creada por la presencia misma [de la operación]” (véase S/1999/1257, pág. 54). 63. No obstante, el Grupo duda de que un mandato general en este ámbito sea convincente y viable. Actualmente, en las zonas donde las Naciones Unidas tienen establecidas misiones hay centenares de millares de civiles susceptibles de convertirse en víctimas de actos de violencia, y las fuerzas de las Naciones Unidas desplegadas en este momento no podrían proteger más que a una parte pequeña de ellos, aunque se les ordenara que lo hicieran. Prometer una ampliación de esa protección crea unas expectativas muy elevadas. La enorme diferencia que puede existir entre el objetivo deseado y los recursos disponibles para alcanzarlo, aumenta las posibilidades de que persista la decepción respecto de la actuación de las Naciones Unidas en este ámbito. Si una operación recibe el mandato de proteger a los civiles, debe también recibir los recursos específicos necesarios para cumplir ese mandato. 64. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales para establecer mandatos claros, convincentes y viables: a) El Grupo recomienda que, antes de que el Consejo de Seguridad convenga en aplicar una cesación del fuego o un acuerdo de paz mediante una operación de mantenimiento de la paz dirigida por las Naciones Unidas, se asegure de que el acuerdo reúna unas condiciones mínimas, como que cumpla las normas internacionales de derechos humanos y que las tareas y calendarios establecidos sean viables; b) El Consejo de Seguridad debe mantener en forma de proyecto toda resolución por la que se autoricen misiones con niveles elevados de contingentes hasta que el Secretario General haya obtenido de los Estados Miembros compromisos firmes sobre contingentes y otros elementos esenciales de apoyo de la misión, incluso para la consolidación de la paz; c) Las resoluciones del Consejo de Seguridad deben permitir que se cumplan los requisitos de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz que se desplieguen en situaciones potencialmente peligrosas, en especial que se atienda la necesidad de que exista una línea de mando clara y una unidad de acción; d) Al formular o modificar los mandatos de las misiones, la Secretaría debe informar al Consejo de Seguridad de lo que éste necesita saber, no de lo que desea saber, y los países que hayan destinado unidades militares a una operación deben tener acceso a las sesiones informativas que ofrezca la Secretaría al Consejo sobre cuestiones que afecten a la seguridad y protección de su personal, en especial a las referentes a cuestiones que tengan consecuencias para el uso de la fuerza en una misión. G. Reunión de información, análisis y planificación estratégica 65. Si se adopta un enfoque estratégico de la prevención de conflictos y del mantenimiento de la paz y su consolidación por las Naciones Unidas, los principales departamentos de ejecución en materia de paz y seguridad de la Secretaría habrán de colaborar más estrechamente. Con tal fin, necesitarán instrumentos más eficaces para reunir y analizar la información pertinente y proporcionar apoyo al Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad, el supuesto órgano de adopción de decisiones de alto nivel en cuestiones de paz y seguridad. 66. Ese Comité es uno de los cuatro comités ejecutivos “sectoriales” establecidos en el plan inicial de reforma que formuló el Secretario General a principios de 1997 (véase A/51/829, secc. A). También se establecieron los Comités de Asuntos Económicos y Sociales, Operaciones para el Desarrollo y Asuntos Humanitarios. La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos forma parte de los cuatro comités. La función de esos comités es “facilitar una gestión más concertada y coordinada” entre los departamentos competentes, para lo cual se les otorgaron “facultades tanto ejecutivas como de coordinación”. El Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad, presidido por el Secretario General Adjunto de Asuntos Políticos, ha promovido el intercambio de información y la cooperación entre departamentos, pero todavía no se ha convertido en el órgano de adopción de decisiones que se preveía en las reformas de 1997, y así lo reconocen sus integrantes. 67. El actual tamaño de la plantilla y las exigencias del trabajo en el ámbito de la paz y la seguridad prácticamente impiden a los departamentos planificar sus políticas. Aunque la mayoría de los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo cuentan con dependencias de políticas o de planificación, tienden a verse obligados a dedicarse14 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 a cuestiones inmediatas. Sin embargo, si la Secretaría carece de capacidad de generación de conocimientos y analítica, seguirá siendo una institución de respuesta, incapaz de adelantarse a los acontecimientos, y el Comité Ejecutivo no podrá desempeñar la función para la cual fue creado. 68. El Secretario General y los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad necesitan que en la Secretaría haya un sistema profesional para acumular conocimientos sobre las situaciones de conflicto, difundir esos conocimientos a un número amplio de usuarios, realizar análisis de políticas y formular estrategias a largo plazo. En este momento no existe ese sistema. El Grupo propone que se cree con el nombre de Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad. 69. La mayor parte de esa Secretaría debería constituirse consolidando las diversas dependencias departamentales encargadas de realizar análisis de políticas y de información en materia de paz y seguridad, como la Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y el Centro de Situación del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, la Dependencia de Planificación de Políticas del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, la Dependencia de Formulación de Políticas (o partes de ésta) de la Oficina de Coordinación de Asuntos Humanitarios (OCAH), y la Sección de Supervisión y Análisis de los Medios de Información del Departamento de Información Pública. 70. Sin embargo, haría falta personal adicional que aportara a esa Secretaría los conocimientos inexistentes en el sistema o que no pueden obtenerse mediante las estructuras actuales. El personal nuevo incluiría un jefe (con categoría de director), un equipo reducido de analistas militares, expertos en policía y analistas de sistemas de información muy calificados, que se encargarían de gestionar el diseño y mantenimiento de las bases de datos de la Secretaría y de hacerlas accesibles tanto a la Sede como a las oficinas y misiones sobre el terreno. 71. Con la Secretaría deberían colaborar estrechamente la Dependencia de Planificación Estratégica de la Oficina del Secretario General, la División de Respuesta de Emergencia del PNUD, la Dependencia de Consolidación de la Paz (véanse párrs. 239 a 243 infra), la Dependencia de Análisis de la Información de la OCAH (que se encarga del sitio Relief Web de Internet), las oficinas de enlace de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos y la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados en Nueva York, la Oficina del Coordinador de Asuntos de Seguridad de las Naciones Unidas, y la Subdivisión de Análisis, Bases de Datos e Información del Departamento de Asuntos de Desarme. Se debería invitar el Grupo del Banco Mundial a mantenerse en contacto por conducto de los elementos adecuados, como la Unidad de Situaciones Posteriores a los Conflictos del propio Banco. 72. En cuanto servicio común, la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico sería de utilidad, tanto a corto como a largo plazo, para los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad. Facilitaría la función cotidiana de presentación de informes del Centro de Situación del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz generando actualizaciones de las actividades de las misiones y de los acontecimientos mundiales pertinentes sobre la base de todo tipo de fuentes. Podría señalar a la atención del Comité Ejecutivo una crisis en gestación e informarle al respecto mediante técnicas modernas de presentación. Podría actuar como centro de coordinación de análisis oportunos de cuestiones temáticas intersectoriales y de preparación de informes sobre esas cuestiones destinados al Secretario General. Por último, teniendo en cuenta la combinación de misiones, crisis, intereses de los órganos legislativos y aportaciones de los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de cada momento, la Secretaría podría proponer y gestionar el programa de trabajo del propio Comité Ejecutivo, proporcionar apoyo a sus deliberaciones y contribuir a transformarlo en el órgano de adopción de decisiones que se había previsto en las reformas iniciales del Secretario General. 73. La Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico podría aprovechar los conocimientos disponibles dentro y fuera del sistema de las Naciones Unidas para ajustar sus análisis de lugares y circunstancias concretos. Podría proporcionar al Secretario General y a los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo evaluaciones unificadas de las iniciativas de las Naciones Unidas y de otras entidades encaminadas a hacer frente a las causas y las manifestaciones de conflictos ya desencadenados o inminentes, y debería estar en condiciones de evaluar la utilidad potencial —y las consecuencias— de un aumento de la participación de las Naciones Unidas. Podría proporcionar la información básica de referencia para la labor inicial de los equipos de tareas integrados de misión que recomienda el Grupo (véanse párrs. 198n0059473.doc 15 A/55/305 S/2000/809 a 217), para que se ocupen de planear y proporcionar apoyo al establecimiento de operaciones de paz, y seguir facilitando análisis y gestionando la corriente de información entre las misiones y el Equipo de Tareas una vez se haya establecido la misión. 74. La Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico debería crear, mantener y utilizar bases de datos compartidas e integradas que con el tiempo sustituyeran a los numerosos telegramas codificados, los informes diarios sobre la situación, las transmisiones diarias de noticias y las conexiones oficiosas con colegas bien informados que actualmente utilizan los funcionarios encargados y los responsables de la adopción de decisiones para mantenerse al corriente de los sucesos que van ocurriendo en sus ámbitos de actuación. Con las salvaguardias adecuadas, esas bases de datos podrían ponerse a disposición de los usuarios de una intranet de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz (véanse párrs. 255 y 256 infra), tanto de la Sede como de las operaciones sobre el terreno, utilizando unos servicios comerciales de comunicaciones de banda ancha cada vez más económicos. Además, contribuirían a revolucionar el modo en que las Naciones Unidas acumulan conocimientos y analizan cuestiones vitales de paz y seguridad. Con el tiempo, la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico debería también sustituir al mecanismo del marco de coordinación. 75. Resumen de las principales recomendaciones sobre información y análisis estratégico: el Secretario General debe crear una entidad, que se denominará la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad, para satisfacer las necesidades de información y análisis de todos los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo; la entidad será administrada por los jefes del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, a quienes presentará sus informes. H. El reto que plantea la administración civil de transición 76. Hasta mediados de 1999, las Naciones Unidas habían realizado apenas unas pocas operaciones sobre el terreno con elementos de dirección y supervisión de la administración civil. En junio de 1999, sin embargo, se encomendó a la Secretaría el establecimiento de una administración civil de transición en Kosovo, y tres meses más tarde en Timor Oriental. Los esfuerzos de las Naciones Unidas por establecer y dirigir esas operaciones forman parte del telón de fondo del presente informe sobre el que se presentan las descripciones relativas al despliegue rápido y a la estructura y dotación de personal de la Sede. 77. Estas operaciones tienen problemas y responsabilidades que no son comunes de las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno. Ningún otro tipo de operación debe establecer y hacer cumplir la ley, crear servicios y reglamentos de aduana, fijar y recaudar impuestos comerciales y personales, atraer inversiones extranjeras, resolver controversias relativas a derechos de propiedad e indemnizaciones por daños de guerra, reconstruir y prestar todos los servicios públicos, crear un sistema bancario, administrar escuelas y pagar los sueldos a los maestros, y recoger la basura, todo ello en una sociedad dañada por la guerra y utilizando contribuciones voluntarias, ya que los presupuestos prorrateados, aun para esas misiones de “administración de transición”, no prevén la financiación de los gastos de la administración local. Además de realizar esas tareas, estas misiones deben también tratar de reconstruir la sociedad civil y promover el respeto de los derechos humanos en lugares donde el dolor es generalizado y los rencores son profundos. 78. Además de esos problemas, se plantea también la cuestión más importante de si las Naciones Unidas deben inmiscuirse en esos asuntos y, en caso afirmativo, si éstos se deben considerar como un elemento de las operaciones de paz o si deben estar a cargo de alguna otra entidad. Si bien es posible que el Consejo de Seguridad no vuelva a encargar a las Naciones Unidas una administración civil de transición, tampoco se esperaba que lo hiciera respecto de Kosovo o Timor Oriental. Los conflictos internos de los Estados continúan y es difícil saber si habrá inestabilidad en el futuro, de modo que, pese a una evidente ambivalencia en cuanto a la administración civil entre los Estados Miembros de las Naciones Unidas y dentro de la Secretaría, es posible que en el futuro haya que establecer otras misiones de ese tipo, y también con carácter urgente. Así pues, la Secretaría se ve enfrentada a un dilema desagradable: partir del supuesto de que toda administración de transición es una responsabilidad transitoria, no prepararse para otras misiones de este tipo, y arriesgarse a que su desempeño no sea satisfactorio si se ve involucrada otra vez en estas actividades, o prepararse como corresponde y esperar que se le encarguen misiones de ese tipo con más frecuencia precisamente porque está16 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 preparada para ello. Por cierto, si la Secretaría prevé que tendrá que establecer administraciones de transición en el futuro como actividad ordinaria más que de excepción, habrá que establecer un centro especializado y con responsabilidades bien definidas para realizar esas tareas en alguna parte del sistema de las Naciones Unidas. Mientras tanto, el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz debe continuar apoyando esta función. 79. Entretanto, hay que resolver una cuestión apremiante en la esfera de la administración civil de transición, que es la cuestión de la “ley aplicable”. En los dos lugares en donde las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas comprenden actualmente actividades para hacer cumplir la ley, se determinó que no había sistemas jurídicos y judiciales locales, o que éstos no estaban actualizados o que eran objeto de intimidación por elementos armados. Además, en ambos lugares los grupos clave considerados como las víctimas de los conflictos habían puesto en tela de juicio o rechazado los sistemas jurídico y legislativo existentes antes del conflicto. 80. Aun en los casos en que la elección del código jurídico local resulta clara, sin embargo, el equipo de justicia de una misión debe primero estudiar ese código y sus procedimientos conexos lo suficientemente bien como para enjuiciar y sentenciar casos en los tribunales. En razón de las diferencias de idioma, cultura, costumbres y experiencia, el proceso de aprendizaje puede fácilmente tomar seis meses o más. Por el momento, las Naciones Unidas no tienen respuesta al problema de qué debe hacer una operación de administración transitoria mientras su equipo de derecho y orden público avanza lentamente en el camino del aprendizaje. Las facciones políticas locales poderosas pueden aprovechar el período de aprendizaje para establecer sus propias administraciones paralelas, y de hecho lo han aprovechado, y los sindicatos de delincuentes explotan con placer todas las debilidades que encuentran en los sistemas jurídico o de represión. 81. La labor de estas misiones hubiera sido mucho más sencilla si hubieran contado con un modelo común de justicia de las Naciones Unidas que les hubiese permitido aplicar un código jurídico interino con el que el personal de la misión estuviese familiarizado, mientras se resolvía la cuestión de la “ley aplicable”. Actualmente no hay actividades en curso en las oficinas jurídicas de la Secretaría en relación con esta cuestión, pero las entrevistas realizadas con investigadores indican que se están logrando algunos avances en este sentido fuera del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, haciendo hincapié en los principios, las directrices, los códigos y los procedimientos contenidos en varias docenas de convenciones y declaraciones internacionales relativas a los derechos humanos y al derecho humanitario, así como en directrices para la policía, los fiscales y los sistemas penales. 82. Esas investigaciones apuntan al establecimiento de un código que contenga los elementos básicos del derecho y de los procedimientos para que una operación de administración de transición pueda aplicar las garantías procesales utilizando juristas internacionales y normas internacionalmente acordadas cuando se trate de delitos como asesinatos, violación, incendio premeditado, secuestro y agresión grave. Es probable que las leyes sobre la propiedad queden fuera de un “código modelo” de ese tipo, pero una operación de administración de transición podría por lo menos enjuiciar a los que incendian las casas de sus vecinos mientras se resuelve el problema de los derechos sobre la propiedad. 83. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre la administración civil de transición: el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General invite a un grupo de expertos jurídicos internacionales, entre los que figuren individuos con experiencia en operaciones de las Naciones Unidas que hayan estado encargadas de establecer una administración de transición, para que evalúe la viabilidad y conveniencia de elaborar un código penal provisional, incluidas todas las adaptaciones regionales que puedan requerirse, para que se utilice en esas operaciones mientras se restablece el estado de derecho local y la capacidad local para hacer cumplir la ley. III. Capacidad de las Naciones Unidas para desplegar operaciones rápida y eficazmente 84. Muchos observadores han preguntado por qué las Naciones Unidas demoran tanto en desplegar plenamente las operaciones después que el Consejo de Seguridad las aprueba por una resolución. Esta situación obedece a varias causas. Las Naciones Unidas no tienen un ejército permanente, y no cuentan con una fuerza de policía permanente concebida para actuar sobre el terreno. No hay ninguna plana mayor de reserva; mientras la situación no reviste carácter urgente no inicia la selección de candidatos a representantesn0059473.doc 17 A/55/305 S/2000/809 especiales del Secretario General y jefes de misión, comandantes de fuerzas, comisionados de policía, directores de administración y otros directores. El sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas existente para facilitar la posible aportación por los gobiernos de expertos militares, de policía y civiles todavía no constituye una fuente fiable de recursos. Las existencias de equipo esencial reciclado de las grandes misiones de mediados del decenio de 1990 almacenadas en la Base Logística de las Naciones Unidas en Brindisi (Italia) se han agotado debido al gran aumento del número de misiones, y todavía no se cuenta con un instrumento presupuestario que permita reconstituirlo rápidamente. El proceso de adquisición para operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz no siempre puede conciliar sus responsabilidades financieras y el logro de la eficacia en función del costo con las necesidades apremiantes de la operación en cuanto a oportunidad y credibilidad. Se ha reconocido hace ya mucho tiempo la necesidad de contar con arreglos permanentes para la contratación del personal civil necesario en los sectores sustantivos y de apoyo, pero todavía no se ha hecho nada por satisfacerla. Por último, el Secretario General carece de gran parte de la autoridad que se necesita para adquirir, contratar y ubicar los bienes y las personas necesarios para desplegar una operación rápidamente antes de que el Consejo de Seguridad apruebe la resolución de establecerla, por más probable que pueda parecer esa operación. 85. En resumen, hay actualmente muy pocos elementos básicos para que las Naciones Unidas puedan adquirir y desplegar rápidamente los recursos humanos y materiales necesarios para montar una operación de paz compleja en el futuro. A. Definición de “despliegue rápido y eficaz” 86. Las deliberaciones del Consejo de Seguridad, los informes del Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y los insumos aportados al Grupo por las misiones sobre el terreno, la Secretaría y los Estados Miembros concuerdan en la necesidad de que las Naciones Unidas refuercen significativamente la capacidad para desplegar nuevas operaciones sobre el terreno en forma rápida y eficaz. Para fortalecer estas capacidades, las Naciones Unidas deben acordar primero los parámetros básicos para definir qué se entiende por “rapidez” y “eficacia”. 87. Las primeras seis a 12 semanas que siguen a la firma de un acuerdo de cesación del fuego o de paz suelen ser las más críticas a los efectos de establecer una paz duradera y dar crédito a la entidad encargada de mantener la paz. La credibilidad y el impulso político que se pierden durante este período suelen ser difíciles de recuperar. Por consiguiente, los calendarios del despliegue se deben ajustar a esta situación. Ahora bien, el despliegue rápido de expertos militares, civiles y de policía civil no ayudará a solidificar una paz frágil y establecer la credibilidad de una operación si ese personal no está equipado para cumplir su función. Para actuar con eficacia, el personal de las misiones necesita pertrechos (apoyo logístico y equipo), financiación (efectivo para adquirir bienes y servicios) información (capacitación y orientación), una estrategia operacional y, para operaciones desplegadas en circunstancias inciertas, un “centro de gravedad” militar y político que permita prever y superar las duda de una o más partes en cuanto a asumir el riesgo de embarcarse en un proceso de paz. 88. Los plazos para el despliegue rápido y eficaz naturalmente habrán de variar en función del entorno político–militar, que es distinto en cada situación posterior a un conflicto. No obstante, el primer paso para mejorar la capacidad de las Naciones Unidas de efectuar despliegues rápidos debe ser un acuerdo sobre las normas a las que debe apuntar la Organización. Dado que todavía no existen esas normas, el Grupo propone que las Naciones Unidas desarrollen las capacidades operacionales para desplegar plenamente operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz “tradicionales” dentro de los 30 días de la aprobación de una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad, y operaciones complejas de mantenimiento de la paz dentro de los 90 días. En este último caso, la sede de la misión debe estar totalmente instalada y funcionando dentro de los 15 días. 89. Para poder cumplir estos plazos, la Secretaría necesitaría contar con uno de los siguientes elementos, o con una combinación de ellos: a) reservas permanentes de expertos militares, civiles y de policía civil, equipo y financiación; b) capacidades extremadamente fiables de reserva que se puedan utilizar inmediatamente; o c) un plazo suficiente para adquirir estos recursos, lo que implica la capacidad para prever, planificar y asumir obligaciones respecto de posibles nuevas misiones con varios meses de antelación. Unas cuantas de las recomendaciones del Grupo tienen por objeto reforzar las capacidades analíticas de la Secretaría y ajustarlas al18 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 proceso de planificación de la misión a fin de ayudar a las Naciones Unidas a prepararse mejor para posibles nuevas operaciones. Ahora bien, ni el estallido de la guerra ni la concertación de la paz se pueden predecir siempre con mucha antelación. De hecho, la experiencia ha mostrado que este no suele ser el caso. Así pues, la Secretaría debe estar en condiciones de mantener un cierto nivel genérico de preparación, mediante el establecimiento de nuevas capacidades de reserva y el mejoramiento de las capacidades existentes, a fin de estar preparada para situaciones imprevistas. 90. Muchos Estados Miembros se han manifestado en contra de establecer un ejército o una fuerza de policía permanentes de las Naciones Unidas, han rechazado la idea de concertar acuerdos permanentes fiables, han advertido del peligro de incurrir en gastos financieros para establecer una reserva de equipo o han desalentado a la Secretaría de iniciar la planificación de cualquier operación potencial antes de que el Secretario General haya recibido la autoridad legislativa específica para hacerlo a raíz de una crisis. En estas circunstancias, las Naciones Unidas no pueden desplegar operaciones “rápida y eficazmente” en los plazos sugeridos. El análisis que sigue apoya la idea de que por lo menos algunas de estas circunstancias deben cambiar para que sea posible efectuar despliegues rápidos y efectivos. 91. Resumen de las principales recomendaciones sobre determinación de los plazos para el despliegue: por “capacidad de despliegue rápido y eficaz” las Naciones Unidas deben entender la capacidad, desde una perspectiva operacional, para desplegar plenamente operaciones tradicionales de mantenimiento de la paz dentro de los 30 días de la aprobación de una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad, y dentro de los 90 días cuando se trate de operaciones complejas de mantenimiento de la paz. B. Dirección efectiva de la misión 92. Una dirección efectiva y dinámica puede representar la diferencia entre una misión coherente con una gran eficacia y motivación aun en circunstancias adversas, y una que lucha por mantener cualquiera de esos atributos. Es decir, el resultado de toda la misión puede depender mucho del carácter y la habilidad de los que la dirigen. 93. Desde el punto de vista de esta función crítica, hay mucho margen para mejorar el criterio utilizado actualmente por las Naciones Unidas para seleccionar, designar, capacitar y apoyar a la plana mayor de sus misiones. Se mantienen listas oficiosas de posibles candidatos. Los representantes y representantes especiales del Secretario General, jefes de misión, los comandantes de las fuerzas, los comisionados de policía civil y sus respectivos adjuntos pueden no ser seleccionados hasta poco antes de la aprobación de una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad por la que se establece una nueva misión, o hasta después de aprobada. Estos y otros jefes de los componentes sustantivos y administrativos quizá no se conozcan antes de llegar a la zona de la misión, tras unos pocos días de reuniones introductorias con funcionarios de la Sede. Estos dirigentes reciben mandatos genéricos en los que se describen sus funciones y responsabilidades generales, pero rara vez parten de la Sede con orientaciones operacionales o de política específicas de la misión. Inicialmente, al menos, deben determinar ellos mismos la forma en que ejecutarán el mandato del Consejo de Seguridad y harán frente a los posibles obstáculos a su ejecución. Deben desarrollar una estrategia para ejecutar el mandato y al mismo tiempo tratar de establecer el centro de gravedad político y militar de la misión y sostener un proceso de paz potencialmente frágil. 94. El examen de los aspectos políticos que influyen en la selección pueden hacer un poco más comprensible este proceso. Las consideraciones políticas delicadas que suelen plantearse en una nueva misión pueden impedir al Secretario General el escrutinio de posibles candidatos con mucha antelación al establecimiento de la misión. Al seleccionar a sus representantes o representante especial u otros jefes de misión, el Secretario General debe tener en cuenta las opiniones de los miembros del Consejo de Seguridad, los Estados de la región y las partes locales, ya que un representante o representante especial debe contar con la confianza de cada una de estas partes para poder actuar con eficacia. La elección de uno o más representantes especiales adjuntos del Secretario General puede verse influenciada por la necesidad de lograr una distribución geográfica en la plana mayor de la misión. Las nacionalidades del comandante de la fuerza, el comisionado de policía y sus adjuntos deben reflejar la composición de los contingentes militares y de policía, y deben también tener en cuenta las sensibilidades políticas de las partes locales.n0059473.doc 19 A/55/305 S/2000/809 95. Aunque las consideraciones políticas y geográficas son legítimas, a juicio del Grupo en la elección de la plana mayor de la misión se debe dar por lo menos igual prioridad a la experiencia y las aptitudes administrativas. Sobre la base de las experiencias personales de varios de sus miembros en dirección de operaciones sobre el terreno, el Grupo aceptó la necesidad de reunir a los miembros del grupo de dirección de una misión lo más pronto posible, de modo que juntos puedan ayudar a establecer el concepto de las operaciones, y determinar su plan de apoyo, su presupuesto y sus necesidades de personal. 96. A fin de que el proceso de selección comience lo antes posible, el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General compile, de manera sistemática y con aportaciones de los Estados Miembros, una lista amplia de posibles representantes especiales del Secretario General, comandantes de fuerzas, comisionados de policía y posibles adjuntos, así como candidatos a jefes de otros componentes sustantivos de una misión, que represente una distribución geográfica amplia y equitativa desde el punto de vista del género. Esa base de datos facilitaría la pronta identificación del grupo de dirección. 97. La Secretaría debería, como práctica normal, proporcionar a la plana mayor de la misión orientación estratégica y planes para prever y superar los obstáculos que se opongan a la ejecución del mandato y, cuando sea posible, formular esas orientaciones y esos planes junto con el grupo de dirección de la misión. El grupo de dirección debe también celebrar amplias consultas con los equipos en los países residentes de las Naciones Unidas y con las organizaciones no gubernamentales que trabajan en la zona de la misión a fin de ampliar y profundizar sus conocimientos sobre la localidad, que son fundamentales para aplicar una estrategia amplia de transición entre la guerra y la paz. El coordinador residente del equipo del país debe ser incluido con más frecuencia en el proceso oficial de planificación de misiones. 98. El Grupo entiende que siempre debe haber por lo menos un miembro del equipo de gestión superior de una misión con experiencia pertinente en las Naciones Unidas, de preferencia en una misión sobre el terreno y en la Sede. Esta persona facilitaría la labor de los miembros del equipo de gestión de fuera del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, lo que permitiría acortar el tiempo necesario para que se familiarizaran con las normas, los reglamentos, las políticas y los métodos de trabajo de la Organización, y pudieran resolver el tipo de cuestiones que no se pueden prever en la capacitación previa al despliegue. 99. El Grupo toma nota del precedente de nombrar al coordinador residente o al coordinador de la asistencia humanitaria del equipo de los organismos, los fondos y los programas de las Naciones Unidas que realizan labor de desarrollo y de asistencia humanitaria en un país determinado como uno de los adjuntos del representante especial del Secretario General en una operación de paz compleja. A juicio del Grupo, esta práctica debe seguirse siempre que sea posible. 100. Por otro lado, es fundamental que los representantes de los organismos, fondos y programas de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno faciliten la labor de un representante o un representante especial del Secretario General en su calidad de coordinador de todas las actividades de las Naciones Unidas en el país de que se trate. En varias ocasiones, los intentos por cumplir esta función se vieron obstaculizados por una manifiesta resistencia burocrática a la coordinación. Esas tendencias no condicen con el concepto de sistema de las Naciones Unidas que el Secretario General ha procurado alentar. 101. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre la plana mayor de la misión: a) El Secretario General debe sistematizar el método para seleccionar a los miembros de la plana mayor de una misión, comenzando por la compilación de una lista amplia de candidatos a representantes o representantes especiales del Secretario General, comandantes de fuerzas, comisionados de policía civil y sus adjuntos y otros jefes de los componentes sustantivos y administrativos, en el marco de una distribución geográfica y de género equitativa y con los insumos de los Estados Miembros; b) Todos los miembros del equipo de dirección de una misión deben ser seleccionados y reunirse en la Sede, lo antes posible a fin de que puedan participar en todos los aspectos fundamentales del proceso de planificación de la misión, recibir información sobre la situación en la zona de la misión y reunirse y trabajar con sus colegas del grupo de dirección; c) La Secretaría debe proporcionar normalmente a la plana mayor de la misión planes y orientación estratégica para prever y superar los20 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 problemas que puedan plantearse en la ejecución del mandato y, cuando sea posible, debe formular esas orientaciones y planes junto con los miembros del grupo de dirección de la misión. C. Personal militar 102. Las Naciones Unidas pusieron en marcha su sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas a mediados del decenio de 1990 para aumentar su capacidad de despliegue rápido y de responder al aumento exponencial imprevisible de una nueva generación de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz complejas. El sistema es una base de datos sobre las dotaciones y los recursos técnicos de los componentes militar, de policía civil y civil que, según los gobiernos, pueden, en teoría, desplegarse en operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas con un preaviso de 7, 15, 30, 60 ó 90 días. En la actualidad, la base de datos comprende 147.900 personas de 87 Estados Miembros: 85.000 pertenecientes a unidades militares de combate; 56.700, a elementos militares de apoyo; 1.600 observadores militares; 2.150 policías civiles y 2.450 especialistas civiles de otra índole. De los 87 Estados participantes, 31 han concertado un memorando de entendimiento con las Naciones Unidas en el que se enuncian sus obligaciones en lo que respecta a tener preparado el personal necesario, pero en el propio memorando se especifica también que el compromiso de esos Estados está sujeto a condiciones. En esencia, en el memorando se ratifica que los Estados conservan su derecho soberano de “decir que no” cuando el Secretario General les pida que aporten esas dotaciones a una operación. 103. Pese a la falta de estadísticas detalladas sobre la respuesta de los Estados Miembros, muchos de ellos se han negado, con más frecuencia de aquella con la que han accedido, a desplegar unidades militares constituidas en operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz dirigidas por las Naciones Unidas. En contraste con la larga tradición según la cual los países desarrollados han proporcionado el grueso de los contingentes de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas en los primeros 50 años de la Organización, a finales de junio de 2000 el 77% de los contingentes de unidades militares constituidas desplegados en esas operaciones los habían aportado los países en desarrollo, siguiendo la tendencia de los últimos años. 104. Los cinco miembros permanentes del Consejo de Seguridad aportan, en la actualidad, mucho menos contingentes para operaciones dirigidas por las Naciones Unidas, pero cuatro de ellos han aportado tropas considerables a las operaciones en Bosnia y Kosovo dirigidas por la Organización del Tratado del Atlántico del Norte (OTAN), que ofrecen unas condiciones de seguridad que permiten funcionar a la Misión de las Naciones Unidas en Bosnia y Herzegovina (UNMIBH) y a la Misión de Administración Provisional de las Naciones Unidas en Kosovo (UNMIK). Asimismo, el Reino Unido desplegó contingentes en Sierra Leona en un momento decisivo de la crisis (sin que estuvieran bajo el control operacional de las Naciones Unidas), con lo que ejerció una influencia estabilizadora valiosa; pero, en la actualidad, ningún país desarrollado aporta contingentes a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz dirigidas por las Naciones Unidas que plantean más dificultades desde el punto de vista de la seguridad, a saber, la Misión de las Naciones Unidas en Sierra Leona (UNAMSIL) y la Misión de las Naciones Unidas en la República Democrática del Congo (MONUC). 105. Los recuerdos de los efectivos de mantenimiento de la paz asesinados en Mogadishu y Kigaly y tomados como rehenes en Sierra Leona ayudan a explicar las dificultades que tienen los Estados Miembros para convencer a su poder legislativo y a su opinión pública nacionales de que deben respaldar el despliegue de contingentes suyos en operaciones dirigidas por las Naciones Unidas, sobre todo en África. Además, los Estados desarrollados tienden a desentenderse cuando no están en juego sus intereses estratégicos nacionales. Con el recorte de los ejércitos nacionales y el crecimiento de las misiones regionales de mantenimiento de la paz europeas se reducen aún más las reservas de contingentes adiestrados y equipados debidamente a que pueden recurrir los países desarrollados para dotar las operaciones que dirigen las Naciones Unidas. 106. Así pues, las Naciones Unidas se ven ante un dilema muy grave. Probablemente, una misión como la UNAMSIL no hubiera tenido las dificultades que tuvo en la primavera del presente año, si se le hubieran proporcionado efectivos tan fuertes como los que se ocupan de mantener la paz actualmente como parte de la KFOR. El Grupo está convencido de que los planificadores militares de la OTAN no hubieran accedido a desplegar contingentes en Sierra Leona si hubieran contado sólo con los 6.000 efectivos autorizados inicialmente. Sin embargo, la probabilidad de que sen0059473.doc 21 A/55/305 S/2000/809 despliegue en África, en un futuro próximo, una operación del tipo de la KFOR parece remota, habida cuenta de las tendencias actuales. Aun si las Naciones Unidas intentaran desplegar una fuerza del tipo de la KFOR, no está claro, dados los acuerdos de fuerzas de reserva vigentes, de donde provendrían los contingentes y el equipo. 107. Varios países en desarrollo sí responden a las peticiones de envío de contingentes de mantenimiento de la paz enviando efectivos que prestan servicio con distinción y entrega y se rigen por criterios profesionales muy elevados, de acuerdo con los nuevos procedimientos de reembolso del equipo de propiedad de los contingentes (acuerdos de arrendamiento con servicios de conservación) aprobados por la Asamblea General, en los que se estipula que los contingentes nacionales deberán ir provistos de casi todo el equipo y los suministros que necesitan para mantener a sus integrantes. Las Naciones Unidas se comprometen a reembolsar a los países que hayan aportado contingentes los gastos por concepto de utilización de su equipo y a prestar los servicios y el apoyo que no estén previstos en los nuevos procedimientos de reembolso del equipo de propiedad de los contingentes. A cambio de ello, los países que aportan contingentes prometen cumplir el memorando de entendimiento sobre procedimientos de reembolso del equipo de propiedad de los contingentes que hayan firmado. 108. Pese a lo anterior, el Secretario General se halla en una posición insostenible. Cuenta con una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad en la que se especifica, sobre el papel, la dotación de los contingentes, pero no sabe si recibirá efectivos para enviarlos al teatro de operaciones. Los efectivos que lleguen finalmente al teatro de operaciones pueden estar, todavía, insuficientemente equipados: algunos países han proporcionado soldados sin fusiles, o con fusiles pero sin casco, o con casco pero sin chaleco antibalas, o sin capacidad de transporte (camiones o vehículos de transporte de tropas). Es posible que los efectivos no estén adiestrados en operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz y, en todo caso, es improbable que los diversos contingentes de una operación se hayan entrenado o hayan trabajado juntos antes. Es posible que algunas unidades no tengan ninguna persona que hable el idioma de la zona de la misión. Y, aun cuando el idioma no constituya problema, pueden carecer de procedimientos operativos comunes y tener interpretaciones divergentes de elementos fundamentales del mando y el control y de las normas que tenga la misión para entablar combate, y también pueden tener distintas expectativas por lo que respecta al grado en que la misión requiera recurrir a la fuerza. 109. Esto debe acabar. Los países que hayan aportado contingentes y no puedan cumplir las condiciones de su memorando de entendimiento deben notificárselo a las Naciones Unidas y no desplegar esos contingentes. Así pues, el Secretario General debe recibir los recursos y el apoyo que necesita para determinar el grado de preparación de los posibles aportadores de contingentes antes de que estos se desplieguen y para cerciorarse de que se cumplirán las disposiciones del memorando. 110. Otra medida para mejorar la situación actual sería la de otorgar al Secretario General la capacidad de reunir, avisando con breve antelación, a planificadores militares, oficiales asignados a funciones de dirección y otros especialistas técnicos militares, preferiblemente con experiencia previa en misiones de las Naciones Unidas, para que se pongan en contacto con los planificadores de misiones de la Sede y se desplieguen luego sobre el terreno con un núcleo de funcionarios del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz para ayudar a montar el cuartel general de la misión de que se trate, conforme a lo que haya autorizado el Consejo de Seguridad. Recurriendo al sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva vigente, podría confeccionarse una “lista de personal de guardia”, con personas nombradas por los Estados Miembros con arreglo a una distribución geográfica equitativa y previa investigación cuidadosa y aceptación por parte del citado departamento, tanto para lograr el fin que se ha expuesto como para fortalecer las misiones existentes en tiempo de crisis. Las personas que se incluyeran en esa lista de guardia, que comprendería alrededor de 100, tendrían un rango militar de Comandante a Coronel y, una vez que se las hubiera avisado con breve antelación, se las trataría como observadores militares de las Naciones Unidas, con las debidas modificaciones. 111. El personal que se hubiera seleccionado para la lista de guardia tendría que cumplir los requisitos médicos y administrativas previas para desplegarse en todo el mundo, participaría en cursos de adiestramiento anticipado y se comprometería por un máximo de dos años para desplegarse de manera urgente con un plazo de notificación de siete días. Cada tres meses, se actualizaría la lista con unas 10 ó 15 personas nuevas, nombradas por los Estados Miembros, que recibirían una formación inicial de tres meses. Si se la actualizara22 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 constantemente cada tres meses, la lista contendría alrededor de cinco a siete equipos preparados para desplegarse con breve plazo de aviso. El adiestramiento inicial de los equipos constaría, primero, de una etapa de iniciación y educación (instrucción teórica y práctica en sistemas de las Naciones Unidas, de una semana de duración), seguida de una etapa de perfeccionamiento profesional sobre el terreno (despliegue en una operación de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas que esté en curso en calidad de equipo de observadores militares durante alrededor de 10 semanas). Después de ese período inicial de adiestramiento en equipo, de tres meses, cada oficial regresaría a su país y pasaría a estar de guardia. 112. Previa autorización del Consejo de Seguridad, podría llamarse a uno o varios de esos equipos para que se incorporaran inmediatamente a su destino. Viajarían a la Sede de las Naciones Unidas para repasar conocimientos y recibir instrucciones concretas con respecto a la misión, según fuera necesario, y para entrar en contacto con los planificadores del Equipo de Trabajo Integrado para Misiones (véanse los párrafos 198 a 217 infra) que se encargarán de aquella, antes de desplegarse en el terreno. La misión de equipo consistiría en plasmar en planes operativos y tácticos concretos las ideas estratégicas generales de la operación que hubiera definido el Equipo de Trabajo y en ejercer labores de coordinación y enlace urgentes antes de que se desplegaran los contingentes. Una vez desplegado, el equipo de avanzada seguiría funcionando hasta que lo reemplazaran los contingentes (período que sería, normalmente, de dos o tres meses, pero que podría durar más, si fuera necesario; hasta un máximo de seis meses). 113. El adiestramiento inicial del equipo se sufragaría con cargo al presupuesto de la misión en curso en que se desplegara para recibir ese adiestramiento y el despliegue de personas de la lista de guardia se sufragaría con cargo al presupuesto de la misión de mantenimiento de la paz a la que fueran destinadas. Las Naciones Unidas no sufragarían ningún gasto mientras esas personas mientras estuvieran de guardia en su país, ya que ejercerían sus funciones normales en las fuerzas armadas nacionales. El Grupo recomienda al Secretario General que defina esta propuesta, junto con los detalles para que los Estados Miembros puedan aplicarla inmediatamente dentro de los parámetros del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva vigente. 114. Sin embargo, para garantizar que la fuerza así constituida sea coherente, no bastará con tener esa capacidad de reclutar personal militar de planificación y enlace sobre el terreno que cumpla funciones de emergencia. A nuestro juicio, para que funcione de manera coherente, los propios contingentes tienen que haber sido adiestrados y equipados, al menos, con arreglo a una norma común y tiene que haber una planificación conjunta por parte de los mandos de los contingentes. Lo ideal sería que esas personas hubieran tenido oportunidad de hacer ejercicios conjuntos de adiestramiento sobre el terreno. 115. Si los planificadores militares de las Naciones Unidas determinaran que se necesita una brigada (aproximadamente 5.000 soldados), a fin de evitar efectivamente que haya problemas violentos para aplicar el mandato de una operación o a fin de resolver efectivamente esos problemas, el componente militar de esa operación de las Naciones Unidas debería desplegarse en formación de brigada, no como una colección de batallones que desconocen la doctrina, los mandos y los métodos operativos de los demás. Esa brigada debería proceder de un grupo de países que hubieran colaborado, tal como se ha propuesto anteriormente, en la fijación de unas normas comunes de adiestramiento y equipamiento, una doctrina común y unas disposiciones comunes de control operacional de la fuerza. Lo ideal sería que el sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva contara con varias fuerzas coherentes de las dimensiones de una brigada, junto con las fuerzas de base necesarias, que pudieran desplegarse totalmente en una operación en el plazo de 30 días, en el caso de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz tradicionales, y en el plazo de 90 días, en el caso de las operaciones complejas. 116. A tal fin, las Naciones Unidas deberían fijar unas normas mínimas relativas al adiestramiento, el equipo y otros aspectos que fueran necesarios para que esas fuerzas participaran en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas. Los Estados Miembros que tuvieran los medios requeridos podrían entablar relaciones de colaboración, en el ámbito del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva, para proporcionar ayuda económica, equipo, adiestramiento y ayuda de otra índole a Estados menos desarrollados que aportaran contingentes, para permitirles llegar a cumplir esas normas mínimas y mantenerlas, con el fin de que todas las brigadas así constituidas fueran de una calidad superior equiparable y se pudiera recabar unn0059473.doc 23 A/55/305 S/2000/809 apoyo operacional efectivo. La formación de estas brigadas ha sido el objetivo del grupo de Estados que han constituido la Brigada Multinacional de Despliegue Rápido de las Fuerzas de Reserva de las Naciones Unidas (SHIRBRIG), y también han creado un mecanismo de planificación compuesto por mandos militares que colaboran habitualmente. Sin embargo, esta propuesta no pretende crear un mecanismo que exima a algunos Estados de su responsabilidad de participar activamente en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas o que impida que los Estados más pequeños participen en esas operaciones. 117. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales relativas al personal militar: a) Debería alentarse a los Estados Miembros, cuando procediera, a que entablaran relaciones de colaboración entre sí, en el ámbito del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas, para formar varias fuerzas coherentes de las dimensiones de una brigada, que contaran con las fuerzas de base necesarias y estuvieran preparadas para desplegarse de manera efectiva, en el plazo de 30 días a contar desde la aprobación de la resolución del Consejo de Seguridad en la que se hubiera establecido una operación de mantenimiento de la paz tradicional, o en el plazo de 90 días, en el caso de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz complejas; b) Debería otorgarse al Secretario General la autoridad de sondear oficialmente a los Estados Miembros que participaran en el sistema para averiguar si estarían dispuestos a aportar contingentes a una posible operación, una vez que pareciera probable que se llegaría a un acuerdo de cesación del fuego o a un acuerdo en que se encomendara alguna función práctica a las Naciones Unidas; c) La Secretaría debería tener por costumbre enviar un equipo que se encargara de confirmar que todos los países que pudieran aportar contingentes estuvieran preparados para cumplir las disposiciones del memorando de entendimiento relativas a las necesidades de adiestramiento y equipo, antes del despliegue; los Estados que no cumplieran los requisitos no deberían desplegar contingentes; d) El Grupo recomienda que se cree una “lista de personal de guardia” rotatoria de alrededor de 100 oficiales militares dentro del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva, que pudieran incorporarse con un aviso previo de siete días para engrosar el núcleo de planificadores del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz con equipos adiestrados para montar los cuarteles generales de las nuevas operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. D. Policía civil 118. Sólo las fuerzas militares superan a la policía civil en términos del número de funcionarios internacionales que participan en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas. Es probable que la demanda de oficiales de la policía civil para participar en operaciones relacionadas con conflictos entre Estados siga ocupando un lugar importante en toda lista de las necesidades para ayudar a restablecer las condiciones que propicien la estabilidad social, económica y política en las sociedades asoladas por la guerra. La justicia e imparcialidad de la fuerza de policía local, que la policía civil supervisa y capacita, es fundamental para mantener un entorno seguro, y su eficacia es vital cuando las redes de intimidación y delincuencia siguen obstruyendo los progresos en los frentes político y económico. 119. En consecuencia, el Grupo ha propugnado (véanse los párrafos 39 y 40 y el apartado b) del párrafo 47 supra) un cambio doctrinal en la utilización de la policía civil en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, con insistencia especial en la reforma y reestructuración de las fuerzas de policía local, además de las funciones tradicionales de asesoramiento, capacitación y vigilancia. Como parte del cambio, los Estados Miembros tendrán que proporcionar a las Naciones Unidas expertos en policía incluso más calificados y especializados, en una época en que ya les resulta difícil atender las necesidades actuales. Al 1° de agosto de 2000, seguía vacante el 25% de los 8.641 puestos para el personal de policía autorizados para las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas. 120. Si bien puede ocurrir que los Estados Miembros tropiezan con dificultades políticas internas para enviar a sus unidades militares a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, los gobiernos tienden a encontrar menos obstáculos políticos para aportar policía civil a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. No obstante, los Estados Miembros sí tropiezan con dificultades prácticas debido a que el tamaño y la configuración de sus fuerzas de policía24 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 suelen corresponder exclusivamente a las necesidades internas. 121. Dadas las circunstancias, el proceso de seleccionar, liberar y capacitar a la policía y a los expertos en administración de justicia conexos para prestar servicios en las misiones a menudo toma mucho tiempo e impide que las Naciones Unidas puedan desplegar con rapidez y eficacia el componente de policía civil de las misiones. Asimismo, el componente de policía de la misión puede incluir a funcionarios procedentes de hasta 40 países, quienes no se han conocido nunca, tienen escasa o ninguna experiencia relacionada con las Naciones Unidas y han recibido poca capacitación pertinente e información relacionada con la misión y cuyas prácticas y doctrinas policiales varían notablemente. Además, por lo general se rota a la policía civil después de seis meses o un año. Debido a todos esos factores, resulta sumamente difícil para los comisionados de la policía civil de las misiones transformar a un grupo desigual de oficiales en una fuerza coherente y eficaz. 122. Por consiguiente, el Grupo exhorta a los Estados Miembros a crear listas nacionales de los oficiales de policía en actividad (con inclusión, de ser necesario, de los oficiales de policía recién retirados que reúnan con los requisitos profesionales y físicos necesarios) que estén en condiciones desde el punto de vista administrativo y médico para el despliegue a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas en el contexto del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas. Naturalmente que las listas han de variar de acuerdo con el tamaño y la capacidad de cada país. La Dependencia de Policía Civil del DOMP deberá ayudar a los Estados Miembros a determinar los criterios de selección y las necesidades de capacitación para los oficiales de la policía que figuren en las listas, indicar las especialidades y experiencia necesarias y formular directrices comunes sobre las normas profesionales que se requieran. Una vez desplegados en una misión de las Naciones Unidas, los oficiales de la policía civil deberán prestar servicios por lo menos durante un año a fin de garantizar un nivel mínimo de continuidad. 123. El Grupo estima que la coherencia de los componentes de policía aumentaría aún más si los Estados que aportan oficiales de policía organizaran ejercicios de instrucción conjuntos y, por lo tanto, recomienda a los Estados Miembros que, cuando proceda, establezcan asociaciones regionales nuevas para la capacitación o refuercen las existentes. Asimismo, el Grupo insta a los Estados Miembros que estén en condiciones de hacerlo a que ofrezcan asistencia (por ejemplo, en materia de capacitación y equipo) a los Estados más pequeños que aporten oficiales de policía, a fin de mantener el nivel necesario de preparación, de acuerdo con las directrices, procedimientos normalizados para las operaciones y normas de rendimiento que promulguen las Naciones Unidas. 124. El Grupo también recomienda a los Estados Miembros que designen un centro único de contacto en sus estructuras gubernamentales para encargarse de coordinar y administrar la aportación de los oficiales de la policía a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas. 125. El Grupo estima que debe dotarse al Secretario General de los medios para reunir en un plazo breve de tiempo a funcionarios superiores que sean especialistas en planificación de la policía civil y expertos técnicos, de preferencia que hayan participado anteriormente en misiones de las Naciones Unidas, para ocuparse del enlace con los encargados de la planificación de la misión en la Sede y trasladarse luego sobre el terreno con el propósito de ayudar a establecer el cuartel general de la policía civil de la misión, según lo autorizado por el Consejo de Seguridad, en el marco de un sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva semejante a la lista de reserva del cuartel general militar y sus procedimientos. Al comenzar a prestar servicios, los miembros de la lista de reserva tendrían el mismo estatuto contractual y jurídico de otros oficiales de la policía civil de las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas. Además, las disposiciones relativas al adiestramiento y despliegue de los miembros de la lista de reserva podrían ser idénticas a las de su contraparte militar. Asimismo, la capacitación y planificación conjunta relacionada con los oficiales militares y de la policía civil que figuraran en las respectivas listas reforzaría la coherencia de la misión y la cooperación entre los componentes durante la puesta en marcha de las operaciones nuevas. 126. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales relativas al personal de la policía civil: a) Se alienta a los Estados Miembros a crear listas nacionales de los oficiales de la policía civil que puedan estar en condiciones para el despliegue rápido a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, en el contexto del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas;n0059473.doc 25 A/55/305 S/2000/809 b) Se alienta a los Estados Miembros a establecer asociaciones regionales para la capacitación de los oficiales de la policía civil que figuren en sus respectivas listas nacionales a fin de promover un nivel común de preparación de conformidad con las directrices, los procedimientos normalizados para las operaciones y las normas de rendimiento que promulguen las Naciones Unidas; c) Se alienta a los Estados Miembros a designar un centro único de contacto en sus estructuras gubernamentales para encargarse de la aportación de los oficiales de la policía civil a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas; d) El Grupo recomienda que se establezca una lista de reserva rotatoria de unos 100 oficiales de policía y expertos conexos en el marco del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas, que pueda estar disponible en un período de siete días, con equipos calificados para formar al componente de la policía civil de operaciones nuevas de mantenimiento de la paz, capacitar al personal nuevo y dotar de mayor coherencia al componente en la etapa inicial; e) El Grupo recomienda que se adopten medidas análogas a las que figuran en las recomendaciones a), b), c), supra en relación con los especialistas judiciales, penales y de derechos humanos y otros especialistas pertinentes, a fin de que integren, junto con la policía civil especializada, los equipos organizados de apoyo al imperio de la ley. E. Especialistas civiles 127. Hasta la fecha, la Secretaría no ha logrado seleccionar, contratar y desplegar al personal civil debidamente calificado que hace falta para las funciones sustantivas y de apoyo, ni en el momento ni en las cantidades que se precisan. En la actualidad se encuentra vacante aproximadamente el 50% de los puestos sobre el terreno en las esferas sustantivas y hasta el 40% de los puestos en las esferas administrativa y logística en las misiones que se establecieron hace seis meses o un año y que siguen sin contar con los especialistas que necesitan desesperadamente. Algunas de las personas desplegadas se han encontrado en puestos que no corresponden a su experiencia anterior, como los componentes de administración civil de la Administración de Transición de las Naciones Unidas en Timor Oriental (UNTAET) y la Misión de Administración Provisional de las Naciones Unidas en Kosovo (UNMIK). Además, la tasa de contratación es casi la misma que la tasa de salida del personal de la misión que se cansa de las condiciones de trabajo, incluida la propia escasez de personal. Dadas las numerosas vacantes y la alta tasa de rotación se pueden prever graves dificultades para la puesta en marcha y continuación de la próxima operación compleja de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz y obstáculos al despliegue total de las misiones actuales. Diversos factores complican tales problemas. 1. Falta de sistemas relativos a las fuerzas de reserva para atender las necesidades imprevistas o los aumentos súbitos de la demanda 128. Cada nueva tarea compleja que se asigna a la nueva generación de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz crea exigencias que el sistema de las Naciones Unidas no puede atender con poco tiempo de aviso. El fenómeno surgió por primera vez a principios del decenio de 1990 con el establecimiento de las siguientes operaciones de aplicación de acuerdos de paz: la Autoridad Provisional de las Naciones Unidas en Camboya (APRONUC), la Misión de Observadores de las Naciones Unidas en el Salvador (ONUSAL), la Misión de Verificación de las Naciones Unidas en Angola (UNAVEM) y la Operación de las Naciones Unidas en Mozambique (ONUMOZ). El sistema se esforzó por contratar rápidamente a expertos en asistencia electoral, reconstrucción económica y rehabilitación, vigilancia de los derechos humanos, producción para radio y televisión, asuntos judiciales y creación de instituciones. A mediados del decenio, el sistema había preparado a un grupo de personas, inexistente hasta entonces en el sistema, que habían adquirido experiencia práctica en las distintas esferas. No obstante, por los motivos que se explican a continuación, muchas de esas personas salieron del sistema posteriormente. 129. En 1999, la Secretaría fue sorprendida una vez más cuando se vio obligada a dotar de personal a las misiones encargadas de la gestión de los asuntos públicos en Timor Oriental y Kosovo. Había pocos funcionarios en la Secretaría y en los organismos, fondos o programas de las Naciones Unidas que tuviesen los conocimientos y la experiencia técnica que se necesitaban para administrar una municipalidad o ministerio nacional. Los propios Estados Miembros no pudieron suplir26 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 la deficiencia de inmediato porque ellos tampoco habían realizado una planificación previa para seleccionar a candidatos calificados y disponibles en sus estructuras nacionales. Además, a las propias misiones de administración provisional que adolecían de escasez de personal les tomó algún tiempo poder especificar claramente cuáles eran sus necesidades. Ulteriormente, unos pocos Estados Miembros ofrecieron proporcionar candidatos (algunos de ellos sin costo alguno para las Naciones Unidas) a fin de hacer frente a elementos importantes de la demanda. No obstante, la Secretaría no aprovechó plenamente los ofrecimientos, en parte por evitar la consiguiente distribución geográfica desigual en el personal de las misiones. Se planteó también la idea de que determinados Estados Miembros se encargaran de sectores íntegros de la administración (responsabilidad sectorial), aunque al parecer demasiado tarde en el proceso para aclarar los detalles. Convendría volver a examinar ese concepto, por lo menos en lo que respecta al suministro de equipos pequeños de administradores civiles con conocimientos especializados. 130. Con miras a reaccionar rápidamente, velar por el control de la calidad y atender el volumen de la demanda previsible, la Secretaría tendrá que crear y mantener una lista de candidatos civiles. La lista, que sería independiente del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas, incluiría los nombres de personas en diversas esferas a quienes se hubiera seleccionado activamente (a título individual o mediante asociaciones o colaboración con miembros del sistema de las Naciones Unidas u organizaciones gubernamentales, intergubernamentales y no gubernamentales), examinado, entrevistado, preseleccionado, concedido certificado médico y proporcionado el material de orientación básico aplicable a la prestación de servicios en las misiones sobre el terreno en general, y que hubieran indicado que estarían disponibles con poco tiempo de aviso. 131. En la actualidad no se dispone de lista alguna de candidatos civiles. En consecuencia, es preciso realizar llamadas telefónicas de urgencia a los Estados Miembros, los departamentos y organismos de las Naciones Unidas y las propias misiones sobre el terreno para seleccionar candidatos idóneos a último momento y luego esperar que éstos se encuentren en condiciones de abandonar todas sus actividades súbitamente. Con ese método, la Secretaría logró contratar y desplegar el año pasado por lo menos a 1.500 funcionarios nuevos y reasignar a otros funcionarios dentro del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, pero el control de la calidad sufrió en consecuencia. 132. De acuerdo con lo anterior, debe crearse una lista central basada en la Intranet que esté a disposición de los miembros pertinentes del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad y que éstos mantengan al día. La lista debe incluir los nombres de funcionarios de los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad que podrían quedar libres para prestar servicios a las misiones. Se necesitarían algunos recursos adicionales para mantener la lista, pero se podría recordar a los candidatos externos que actualizaran automáticamente sus propios datos por conducto de la Internet, sobre todo en lo tocante a su disponibilidad. También debería permitirse el acceso en línea a material de información y capacitación por medio de la Internet. Se debería dar acceso a las misiones sobre el terreno y delegar en ellas la autoridad para contratar a candidatos de la lista de conformidad con las directrices que promulgara la Secretaría para velar por una distribución geográfica y de género equitativa. 2. Dificultades para atraer y retener a los mejores candidatos externos 133. Si bien el sistema de contratación fue bastante improvisado, a lo largo del decenio de 1990 las Naciones Unidas lograron contratar a algunas personas sumamente calificadas y dedicadas para misiones sobre el terreno. El personal contratado administró la votación en Camboya, esquivó disparos en Somalia, fue evacuado muy a tiempo de Liberia y llegó a aceptar el fuego de artillería en la ex Yugoslavia como algo de la vida diaria. No obstante, el sistema de las Naciones Unidas no ha encontrado aún un mecanismo de contratación que permita reconocer y recompensar debidamente por sus servicios al personal mediante cierta estabilidad en el empleo. Es cierto que a los candidatos contratados para las misiones se les advierte explícitamente que no deben albergar expectativas falsas sobre empleo en el futuro puesto que la contratación externa tiene por objeto atender una demanda “temporal”, pero tales condiciones de servicio no atraen ni retienen a las personas más eficientes por mucho tiempo. En términos generales, será preciso volver a analizar la opinión que ha prevalecido siempre sobre el mantenimiento de la paz como una actividad extraordinaria más que como una función básica de las Naciones Unidas.n0059473.doc 27 A/55/305 S/2000/809 134. Así pues, se debería ofrecer a por lo menos cierto porcentaje de los mejores funcionarios externos contratados unas perspectivas de carrera a más largo plazo que los contratos de duración limitada que se les ofrecen actualmente; a algunos de ellos se les debería contratar expresamente para ocupar puestos en los complejos departamentos de emergencia de la Secretaría con el propósito de aumentar el número de funcionarios de la Sede que tienen experiencia sobre el terreno. Unos pocos funcionarios contratados para misiones han logrado obtener puestos en la Sede, aunque aparentemente de forma especial e individual y no de acuerdo con una estrategia concertada y transparente. 135. Se están formulando propuestas encaminadas a resolver esta situación al permitir que las personas contratadas para misiones que hayan prestado servicios durante cuatro años sobre el terreno reciban ofrecimientos de “nombramientos continuos” cuando sea posible; a diferencia de los contratos actuales, tales nombramientos no estarían limitados a la duración del mandato de una misión en concreto. De ser aprobados tales proyectos, se ayudaría a resolver el problema de quienes ingresaron al servicio sobre el terreno a mediados del decenio y permanecen dentro del sistema. No obstante, quizá no sea suficiente para atraer a nuevos candidatos, quienes tendrían que aceptar en términos generales nombramientos por seis meses a un año cada vez sin saber necesariamente si contarían con un puesto cuando cumplieran su contrato. La idea de tener que vivir en la incertidumbre durante cuatro años podrá inhibir a algunos de los mejores candidatos, sobre todo los que tienen familia, que cuentan con amplias oportunidades de empleo y a menudo en condiciones más competitivas de servicio. Así pues, conviene que se examine la posibilidad de ofrecer nombramientos continuos a los funcionarios externos que hayan prestado servicios especialmente distinguidos durante por lo menos dos años en una operación de mantenimiento de la paz. 3. Escasez de personal de las categorías intermedia y superior para encargarse de las funciones administrativas y de apoyo 136. Las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas se vieron afectadas a lo largo del decenio de 1990 por una escasez crítica de funcionarios en esferas administrativas clave (adquisiciones, finanzas, presupuesto, personal) y en esferas de apoyo logístico (administradores de contratos, ingenieros, analistas de sistemas de información, planificadores de logística). La índole única y específica de las normas administrativas, los reglamentos y los procedimientos internos de la Organización impiden que las personas recién contratadas se encarguen de tales funciones administrativas y logísticas en las condiciones dinámicas de la puesta en marcha de una misión sin que reciban una capacitación sustancial. Si bien en 1995 se iniciaron programas especiales de capacitación para tales funcionarios, todavía no tienen carácter oficial porque no se puede liberar de sus responsabilidades a tiempo completo a las personas con más experiencia, que serían los instructores. En términos generales, cuando se dota de personal a una misión nueva con carácter urgente, los primeros proyectos que se tienen que abandonar son la capacitación y la preparación de documentos de orientación de fácil utilización. Así pues, el manual de administración de actividades sobre el terreno, actualizado en 1992, sigue en su versión preliminar. 4. Castigo por trabajar sobre el terreno 137. No es fácil que el personal de la Sede que está familiarizado con el Reglamento Financiero y la Reglamentación Financiera Detallada así como con los procedimientos conexos participe en operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. El personal administrativos y sustantivo debe presentarse como voluntario para trabajar sobre el terreno y el personal directivo debe convenir en liberarlo de sus obligaciones. Los Jefes de departamento a menudo desalientan o disuaden a sus mejores funcionarios de presentarse para cumplir funciones sobre el terreno o se niegan a autorizarlos debido a la escasez de personal competente en sus propias oficinas, que, según temen, no se puede resolver con reemplazos temporales. Además, los posibles voluntarios se sienten desalentados porque conocen el caso de otros colegas que han sido pasados por alto para el ascenso porque si no se los veía quedaban relegados. La mayoría de las operaciones sobre el terreno son misiones a las que no se puede ir acompañados de familiares por razones de seguridad, factor que también reduce el número de voluntarios. Varios organismos, fondos y programas de las Naciones Unidas orientados hacia el terreno (el ACNUR, el Programa Mundial de Alimentos (PMA), el UNICEF, Fondo de Población de las Naciones Unidas (FNUAP), el PNUD) tienen varios candidatos potencialmente bien calificados para el servicio de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, pero también hacen frente a restricciones en materia de recursos y por lo general las necesidades de personal en sus28 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 propias operaciones sobre el terreno tienen prioridad al respecto. 138. La Oficina de Gestión de Recursos Humanos, apoyada por varios grupos de trabajo interdepartamentales, ha propuesto una serie de reformas progresivas para abordar algunos de esos problemas. Esas reformas requieren que haya movilidad dentro de la Secretaría y están encaminadas a alentar la rotación entre la Sede y el terreno recompensando el servicio en misiones a la hora de considerar a los candidatos al ascenso. Tratan de reducir las demoras en la contratación y de otorgar plena autoridad de contratación a los jefes de departamento. El Grupo considera que es esencial que esas iniciativas se aprueben con rapidez. 5. Caída en desuso de la categoría del Servicio Móvil 139. El Servicio Móvil es la única categoría de personal dentro de las Naciones Unidas encaminada concretamente al servicio en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz (y cuyas condiciones de servicio y contratos se han redactado en consecuencia, a la vez que sus sueldos y beneficios se sufragan enteramente con cargo a los presupuestos de las misiones). No obstante, ha perdido mucho de su valor debido a que la Organización no ha dedicado suficientes recursos a la promoción de las perspectivas de carrera para los oficiales de Servicio Móvil. Esta categoría se creó en el decenio de 1950 para proporcionar un cuadro de especialistas técnicos de gran movilidad en apoyo, en particular, de los contingentes militares de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. A medida que cambió el carácter de las operaciones, cambiaron también las funciones de los oficiales del Servicio Móvil. Con el tiempo, hacia fines del decenio de 1980 y principios del de 1990 algunos de ellos ascendieron y se hicieron cargo de las funciones de gestión en los componentes administrativo y logístico de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. 140. En la actualidad no quedan muchos funcionarios experimentados de ese grupo, ya que están participando en misiones y muchos están jubilados o cerca de la jubilación. Gran parte de los que quedan carecen de los conocimientos y la capacitación en materia de gestión que se necesitan para administrar con eficacia los principales componentes de la gestión de complejas operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. Los conocimientos técnicos de otros son obsoletos. Por consiguiente, la composición del Servicio Móvil ya no está de acuerdo con muchas de las necesidades administrativas y de apoyo logístico de la nueva generación de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. El Grupo exhorta pues a que se revise con urgencia la composición y la razón de ser del Servicio Móvil con objeto de atender las demandas actuales y futuras de las operaciones sobre el terreno, haciendo especial hincapié en el personal directivo de nivel medio y superior en esferas administrativas y logísticas fundamentales. También debe considerarse una alta prioridad el perfeccionamiento y la capacitación del personal de esta categoría, en forma permanente, y las condiciones de servicio deben revisarse para atraer y retener a los mejores candidatos. 6. Falta de una estrategia amplia de dotación de personal para las operaciones de paz 141. No existe una estrategia amplia de dotación de personal que asegure la adecuada combinación de personal civil en cualquiera de sus operaciones. Hay capacidades dentro del sistema de las Naciones Unidas que deben aprovecharse, lagunas que deben llenarse mediante la contratación externa, y toda una gama de otras opciones intermedias, tales como la utilización de Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas, personal subcontratado, servicios comerciales, y personal de contratación nacional. Las Naciones Unidas han considerado todas esas fuentes de personal a través del último decenio, pero lo han hecho caso por caso sin valerse de una estrategia global. Ese tipo de estrategia se requiere ahora para asegurar la eficacia en función de los costos y la eficiencia, así como para promover la cohesión dentro de las misiones y el espíritu de equipo del personal. 142. Esa estrategia de dotación de personal debe tener en cuenta la utilización de Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en forma prioritaria. Desde 1992, más de 4.000 Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas han prestado servicios en 19 operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz diferentes. Aproximadamente 1.500 han sido asignados a nuevas misiones en Timor Oriental, Kosovo y Sierra Leona en los últimos 18 meses solamente, en funciones de administración civil, asuntos electorales, derechos humanos, y apoyo administrativo y logístico. A través del tiempo los Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas han demostrado su dedicación y competencia en sus respectivas esferas de trabajo. Los órganos legislativos han promovido una mayor utilización de los Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, habida cuenta de su ejemplar rendimiento en el pasado,n0059473.doc 29 A/55/305 S/2000/809 pero su utilización como mano de obra barata corrompe el programa y puede ser perjudicial para el espíritu de la misión. Muchos Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas trabajan junto con colegas que tienen un sueldo tres o cuatro veces superior por cumplir funciones similares. El Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz está manteniendo conversaciones en la actualidad con el Programa de Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas acerca de la concertación de un memorando de entendimiento mundial para el uso de los Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas en operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. Es esencial que dicho memorando de entendimiento sea parte de una estrategia más amplia de dotación de personal para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. 143. Esa estrategia debe incluir también, en particular, propuestas detalladas para el establecimiento de un sistema de fuerzas civiles de reserva. Dicho sistema debe contener una lista de personal dentro del sistema de las Naciones Unidas que haya sido seleccionado con antelación, que haya recibido certificación médica y cuyas oficinas matrices se hayan comprometido a dejarlo participar en una misión con un aviso previo de 72 horas. A los miembros pertinentes del sistema de las Naciones Unidas se les debe delegar autoridad y responsabilidad en lo que hace a los grupos ocupacionales dentro de sus respectivas esferas de competencia, para iniciar asociaciones y memorados de entendimiento con organizaciones intergubernamentales y no gubernamentales para el suministro de personal con objeto de complementar los grupos de puesta en marcha de misiones extraídas del sistema de las Naciones Unidas. 144. El hecho de que la responsabilidad para elaborar una estrategia global en materia de dotación de personal y de fuerzas civiles de reserva haya residido exclusivamente en la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno, que actúa por iniciativa propia siempre que disponga de algún tiempo para ello, es en sí mismo indicación de que la Secretaría no ha dedicado suficiente atención a esta cuestión de importancia crítica. La dotación de personal de una misión, de arriba a abajo, es tal vez uno de los fundamentos más importantes para que la ejecución de la misión tenga éxito. Por consiguiente, los funcionarios superiores de la Secretaría deberían otorgar la más alta prioridad al tema. 145. Resumen de las principales recomendaciones sobre especialistas civiles: a) La Secretaría debería establecer en la Internet/Intranet una lista central de candidatos civiles seleccionados con antelación para desplegar operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz con poco aviso previo. A las misiones sobre el terreno debería otorgárseles acceso y delegar autoridad en ellas para contratar candidatos, de conformidad con las directrices sobre distribución geográfica y por género equitativas, directrices que debería establecer la Secretaría; b) La categoría de personal del Servicio Móvil debe reformarse para que esté de acuerdo con las demandas periódicas a que hacen frente las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, especialmente a nivel medio y superior en las esferas administrativa y logística; c) Las condiciones de servicio para el personal civil de contratación externa deben revisarse con objeto de que las Naciones Unidas puedan atraer los candidatos más altamente calificados, y después ofrecer mayores perspectivas de carrera a aquellos que han prestado servicios en forma distinguida; d) El Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz debe formular una estrategia amplia de dotación de personal para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en la que se esbocen, entre otras cosas, la utilización de Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas, los arreglos de reserva para el suministro de personal civil con 72 horas de aviso previo para facilitar la puesta en marcha de la misión, y las divisiones de responsabilidad entre los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad para la aplicación de esa estrategia. F. Capacidad de información pública 146. La capacidad eficaz en materia de información pública y comunicaciones en las zonas de las misiones es una necesidad operacional para prácticamente todas las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas. Las comunicaciones eficaces ayudan a disipar los rumores, contrarrestan la desinformación y garantizan la cooperación de las poblaciones locales. Pueden constituir un medio de tratar con los dirigentes de grupos rivales, aumentar la seguridad del personal de las Naciones Unidas y servir como fuerza multiplicadora. Es pues esencial que todas las operaciones de30 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 mantenimiento de la paz formulen estrategias relacionadas con una campaña de información pública, especialmente para aspectos fundamentales del mandato de la misión, y que tales estrategias y el personal necesario para aplicarlas se incluyan en los primeros elementos desplegados para ayudar en la puesta en marcha de una nueva misión. 147. Las misiones sobre el terreno necesitan portavoces competentes que estén integrados en el grupo de gestión de categoría superior y proyecten al mundo su fisonomía cotidiana. Para ser eficaz, el portavoz debe tener experiencia e instintos de periodista y saber cómo funcionan la misión y la Sede de las Naciones Unidas. Él o ella debe disfrutar de la confianza del Representante Especial del Secretario General y establecer buenas relaciones con otros miembros de la dirección de la misión. La Secretaría por lo tanto debe aumentar sus esfuerzos para formar y retener un grupo de ese personal. 148. Las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno también tienen necesidad de poder hablar eficazmente a su propia gente, mantener al personal informado acerca de la política y las novedades de la misión y establecer vínculos entre los componentes tanto hacia arriba como hacia abajo de la cadena de mando. La nueva tecnología de la información proporciona instrumentos eficaces para ese tipo de comunicaciones, y debe incluirse en el equipo básico de puesta en marcha en las reservas de equipo de la Base Logística de las Naciones Unidas en Brindisi (Italia). 149. Los recursos que se dediquen a la información pública y al personal conexo y la tecnología de la información necesarios para dar a conocer el mensaje de la operación y para establecer vínculos de comunicaciones internas eficaces, que ahora rara vez exceden el 1% del presupuesto de funcionamiento de una misión, deben aumentarse de conformidad con el mandato, el tamaño y las necesidades de la misión. 150. Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre la capacidad de despliegue rápido para información pública: en los presupuestos de las misiones deben dedicarse recursos adicionales a la información pública y al personal y la tecnología de la información conexos que se necesiten para dar a conocer el mensaje de una operación y establecer vínculos de comunicaciones internas eficaces. G. Apoyo logístico, proceso de adquisición y gestión de los gastos 151. El despliegue de la reserva de equipo de las Naciones Unidas, prolongados tiempos de preparación incluso para los contratos de sistemas, los embotellamientos en el proceso de adquisición y las demoras en la obtención de dinero en efectivo para las adquisiciones sobre el terreno restringen aún más el despliegue rápido y el funcionamiento eficaz de las misiones que logran llegar a los niveles autorizados de dotación de personal. Sin un apoyo logístico eficaz, las misiones no pueden funcionar en forma adecuada. 152. Los tiempos de preparación necesarios para que las Naciones Unidas proporcionen misiones sobre el terreno con el equipo y los servicios comerciales básicos requeridos para la iniciación de la misión y el pleno despliegue son dictados por el proceso de adquisiciones de las Naciones Unidas. Ese proceso está regulado por el Reglamento Financiero y la Reglamentación Financiera Detallada establecidos por la Asamblea General, y por las interpretaciones de ese reglamento y esa reglamentación (conocidos como políticas y procedimientos dentro del vocabulario de las Naciones Unidas) que efectúe la Secretaría. Los reglamentos, normas, políticas y procedimientos se han traducido en un proceso de unos ocho pasos que la Sede debe seguir para proporcionar a las misiones sobre el terreno, el equipo y los servicios que necesite, a saber: 1. Determinación de las necesidades y emisión de una solicitud de compra; 2. Certificación de que se dispone de los fondos para la compra de esos artículos; 3. Iniciación de un llamado a licitación o una solicitud de propuesta; 4. Análisis de las ofertas; 5. Presentación de los casos al Comité de Contratos de la Sede; 6. Concesión de un contrato y emisión de una orden de producción; 7. Espera de la producción de los artículos; 8. Entrega de los artículos a la misión. 153. La mayoría de las organizaciones gubernamentales y las empresas comerciales siguen procesos similares, si bien no todos esos procesos son tan engorrososn0059473.doc 31 A/55/305 S/2000/809 como el de las Naciones Unidas. Por ejemplo, todo el proceso en las Naciones Unidas puede llevar 20 semanas en el caso de mobiliario de oficina, 17 a 21 semanas para generadores, 23 a 27 semanas para edificios prefabricados, 27 semanas para vehículos pesados; y 17 a 21 semanas para equipo de comunicaciones. Naturalmente, ninguno de esos tiempos de preparación permite el pleno despliegue de la misión dentro de los plazos sugeridos si la mayoría de los procesos comienzan únicamente después que se ha establecido una operación. 154. Las Naciones Unidas iniciaron el concepto del equipo básico de puesta en marcha durante el auge de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz a mediados del decenio de 1990 para abordar parcialmente ese problema. El equipo básico de puesta en marcha contiene el equipo requerido para establecer y mantener un cuartel general de misión de 100 personas durante los primeros 100 días de despliegue. Se ha comprado y embalado con antelación y está en espera en Brindisi, listo para el despliegue sin preaviso alguno. Las contribuciones asignadas a la misión a la que se despliega el equipo básico de puesta en marcha a menudo se utilizan para reconstituir nuevo equipo básico de puesta en marcha y, una vez que se liquida una misión, el equipo duradero y no fungible de esa misión se devuelve a Brindisi y se mantiene en reserva, además del equipo básico de puesta en marcha. 155. Sin embargo, debido al desgaste natural de los vehículos livianos y otros artículos en un ambiente de postguerra, a menudo los gastos de envío y servicios son más costosos que la venta del artículo que por su utilización para la obtención de repuestos, y luego la compra de otro artículo nuevo. Por consiguiente, las Naciones Unidas han pasado a hacer subastas de tales artículos in situ con mayor frecuencia, pese a que la Secretaría no está autorizada a utilizar los fondos adquiridos mediante ese proceso para la compra de nuevo equipo, sino que debe devolverlo a los Estados Miembros. Se debe considerar la posibilidad de permitir que la Secretaría utilice los fondos adquiridos con esos medios para la compra de nuevo equipo que se mantendrá en reserva en Brindisi. Además, se debe considerar la posibilidad de emitir una autorización general para que las misiones sobre el terreno donen, en consulta con el Coordinador Residente de las Naciones Unidas, por lo menos un porcentaje de ese equipo a organizaciones no gubernamentales locales bien conceptuadas, como medio de ayudarlas a fomentar la incipiente sociedad civil. 156. Sin embargo, la existencia de ese equipo básico de puesta en marcha y reserva de equipo parece haber facilitado notablemente el despliegue rápido de las operaciones más pequeñas organizadas a mediados y fines del decenio de 1990. No obstante, el establecimiento y la ampliación de nuevas misiones ha sido ahora más rápido que la liquidación de las operaciones existentes, con lo que la Base Logística de las Naciones Unidas se ha visto prácticamente despojada de artículos que lleven mucho tiempo de preparación y se necesiten para el pleno despliegue de una misión. A menos que una de las operaciones grandes que actualmente están en vigor se liquide hoy en día, y que todo su equipo se envíe en buenas condiciones a la Base Logística de las Naciones Unidas, la Organización no tendrá a mano el equipo necesario para apoyar la puesta en marcha y el rápido y pleno despliegue de una misión grande en un futuro cercano. 157. Por supuesto, hay límites respecto de cuánto equipo pueden y deben mantener en reserva las Naciones Unidas en la Base Logística o en otro lado. El equipo mecánico almacenado necesita mantenerse, lo que puede ser costoso, y si no se hace en forma adecuada, el resultado puede ser que las misiones reciban artículos que han esperado durante mucho tiempo pero que no funcionen. Además, los sectores comercial y público a nivel nacional han pasado cada vez más a tener inventarios “justo a tiempo” o entregas “justo a tiempo”, debido a los altos costos de oportunidad de utilizar fondos para equipo que tal vez no se despliegue durante algún tiempo. Además, el ritmo actual de adelantos tecnológicos hace que ciertos artículos, tales como los equipos de comunicaciones y de los sistemas de información, se vuelvan obsoletos en cuestión de meses, por no hablar de años. 158. Por lo tanto, las Naciones Unidas se han movido en esa dirección en los últimos años, y han concertado unos 20 contratos de sistemas comerciales permanentes para el suministro de equipo común para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, en particular los que se necesiten para la puesta en marcha de una misión y su ampliación. Con arreglo a los contratos de sistemas, las Naciones Unidas han podido reducir el tiempo de preparación en forma considerable, al seleccionar a los proveedores con anticipación y mantenerlos en reserva para las solicitudes de producción. Sin embargo, la producción de vehículos livianos con arreglo al32 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 contrato de sistemas actual lleva 14 semanas y requiere otras cuatro semanas para la entrega. 159. La Asamblea General ha adoptado una serie de medidas para abordar la cuestión del tiempo de preparación. El establecimiento de un Fondo de Reserva para el mantenimiento de la paz que, cuando llegue a su capital pleno, ascenderá a 150 millones de dólares, proporcionó una reserva permanente de dinero que puede utilizarse con rapidez. El Secretario General puede pedir la aprobación de la Comisión Consultiva en Asuntos Administrativos y de Presupuesto (CCAAP) para extraer hasta 50 millones de dólares del fondo con objeto de facilitar la puesta en marcha de una nueva misión o de ampliar en forma imprevista una misión existente. El Fondo luego se repone con cargo a los presupuestos de las misiones una vez que han sido aprobados o aumentados. Para contraer compromisos que excedan los 50 millones de dólares es menester la aprobación de la Asamblea General. 160. En casos excepcionales, la Asamblea General, por consejo de la CCAAP, ha otorgado al Secretario General autoridad para comprometer hasta 200 millones de dólares en gastos con objeto de facilitar la puesta en marcha de misiones más grandes (UNTAET, UNMIK y MONUC), en espera de la presentación de las propuestas presupuestadas detalladas que son necesarias, y que pueden llevar meses de preparación. Todos esas son novedades bien acogidas que indican el apoyo de los Estados Miembros para mejorar la capacidad de despliegue rápido de la Organización. 161. Al mismo tiempo, todas esas novedades sólo se aplican después que se ha aprobado una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad que autorice el establecimiento de una misión o sus elementos de avanzada. Salvo que algunas de esas medidas se apliquen con mucha antelación a la fecha prevista de despliegue de la misión, o que se modifiquen para ayudar a mantener una reserva mínima de equipo que exige mucho tiempo de preparación para su adquisición, las metas sugeridas para el despliegue rápido y eficaz no pueden cumplirse. 162. Por consiguiente, la Secretaría debería formular una estrategia global de apoyo logístico a fin de permitir el despliegue rápido y eficaz de las misiones dentro de los plazos de despliegue propuestos. Esa estrategia debería formularse sobre la base de un análisis de costo–eficacia del nivel apropiado de artículos que requieren mucho tiempo de preparación y que pueden mantenerse en reserva, y de aquellos que sería mejor adquirir mediante contratos permanentes, incluyendo el costo de tiempos de entrega más rápidos, según sea necesario, para apoyar la estrategia. Los elementos sustantivos de los departamentos de paz y seguridad necesitarían dar a los planificadores logísticos una estimación del número y los tipos de operaciones que habría necesidad de establecer en los próximos 12 a 18 meses. El Secretario General debería presentar periódicamente a la Asamblea General, para su examen y aprobación, una propuesta detallada para aplicar esa estrategia, que entrañaría considerables consecuencias financieras. 163. Entre tanto, la Asamblea General debería autorizar y aprobar un gasto por una sola vez para la creación de tres equipos básicos de puesta en marcha en Brindisi (hasta un total de cinco), que luego automáticamente se repondrían con cargo a los presupuestos de las misiones que los utilicen. 164. Se debe facultar al Secretario General para que utilice hasta 50 millones de dólares del Fondo de Reserva para el Mantenimiento de la Paz, antes de que se apruebe una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad por la que se autorice el establecimiento de una misión, pero previa aprobación de la CCAAP, a fin de facilitar el despliegue rápido y eficaz de las operaciones en los plazos propuestos. El Fondo debe ser repuesto automáticamente con cargo a las contribuciones asignadas a las misiones que lo utilicen. El Secretario General debe pedir a la Asamblea General que considere la conveniencia de aumentar la magnitud del Fondo, en caso de que él determine que se hubiere agotado por haberse establecido varias misiones en rápida sucesión. 165. Mucho después de haberse iniciado una misión, a menudo las misiones sobre el terreno deben aguardar meses hasta recibir artículos que necesitan, sobre todo cuando los supuestos de planificación iniciales resultan inexactos o las necesidades de la misión varían ante nuevos acontecimientos. Aunque esos artículos se puedan obtener localmente, la adquisición de bienes localmente está sujeta a varias limitaciones: en primer lugar, la flexibilidad y las facultades de las misiones sobre el terreno son limitadas, por ejemplo, en lo que se refiere a transferir con rapidez economías de una partida presupuestaria de un presupuesto a otra a fin de hacer frente a demandas imprevistas; en segundo lugar, por lo general, a las misiones no se les delegan facultades para efectuar órdenes de compra por un valor superior a 200.000 dólares estadounidenses. Las compras superiores a esa cuantía deben ser remitidas a la Sede yn0059473.doc 33 A/55/305 S/2000/809 a su proceso de decisión en ocho etapas (véase el párrafo 152 supra). 166. El Grupo respalda las medidas que reducen la microgestión por la Sede de las misiones sobre el terreno y facilitan a ésta las facultades y la flexibilidad necesarias para mantener la credibilidad y la eficacia de las misiones, al mismo tiempo que las hace responsables de su actuación. Ahora bien, cuando la participación de la Sede comporta un verdadero valor, por ejemplo respecto de los contratos permanentes, la Sede debe conservar las facultades en materia de adquisiciones. 167. Según las estadísticas de la División de Adquisiciones, el 93% de las 184 órdenes de compra emitidas por la Sede en 1999 en apoyo de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, relativas a bienes y servicios cuya cuantía oscilaba entre 200.000 y 500.000 dólares estadounidenses, se refería a servicios de aeronaves y transportes, vehículos a motor y computadoras, que se contrataron o bien a través de licitadores internacionales o están cubiertas normalmente por contratos de sistemas. A condición de que se activen rápidamente estos contratos de sistemas y de que den lugar al suministro puntual de los bienes y servicios, la participación de la Sede en esos casos es razonable. Es de presumir que los contratos de sistemas y el recurso a licitadores internacionales permiten adquirir bienes y servicios al por mayor a precio más reducido que si se adquiriesen localmente, y en muchos casos se refieren a bienes y servicios inexistentes en las zonas de las misiones. 168. En cambio, no está nada claro qué valor real añade la participación de la Sede al proceso de adquisición de bienes y servicios que no cubren los contratos de sistemas ni los contratos permanentes de servicios comerciales y que se pueden adquirir más fácilmente localmente y por menor costo. En esos casos, convendría delegar sobre el terreno la facultad de adquirir esos bienes y servicios y supervisar el proceso y sus controles financieros mediante el mecanismo de auditoría. Por consiguiente, la Secretaría debe asignar prioridad a la creación de capacidades sobre el terreno para asumir lo antes posible un nivel superior de facultades de adquisición (por ejemplo, contratando y formando al adecuado personal sobre el terreno y elaborando documentos de orientación de fácil comprensión) respecto de todos los bienes y servicios que se puedan adquirir localmente y que no cubran los contratos de sistemas ni los contratos permanentes de servicios comerciales (hasta una cuantía de 1 millón de dólares estadounidenses, según la magnitud y las necesidades de la misión de que se tratase). 169. Resumen de las recomendaciones esenciales sobre apoyo logístico y gestión de los gastos: a) La Secretaría debe elaborar una estrategia general de apoyo logístico para que las misiones se puedan desplegar con rapidez y eficacia en los casos propuestos y que corresponda a los supuestos de planificación determinados por las oficinas sustantivas del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz; b) La Asamblea General debe autorizar y aprobar el gasto preciso, realizado de una sola vez, para mantener en Brindisi por lo menos cinco equipos básicos de puesta en marcha de misiones, que deberán disponer de equipo de comunicaciones desplegable con rapidez. Esos equipos básicos de puesta en marcha deberán ser repuestos sistemáticamente financiándolos con cargo a las contribuciones asignadas a las operaciones que recurran a ellos; c) Se debe facultar al Secretario General para utilizar hasta 50 millones de dólares estadounidenses del Fondo de Reserva para Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, una vez que esté claro que es probable que se establezca una operación, con la aprobación de la CCAAP, pero antes de que el Consejo de Seguridad apruebe la resolución correspondiente; d) La Secretaría debe llevar a cabo un examen de todas las políticas y todos los procedimientos de adquisición (en caso necesario, formulando propuestas a la Asamblea General con miras a modificar el Reglamento Financiero y la Reglamentación Financiera Detallada de las Naciones Unidas), a fin de facilitar, en particular, el despliegue rápido y completo de una operación en los plazos propuestos; e) La Secretaría deber llevar a cabo un examen de las políticas y los procedimientos por los que se rige la gestión de los recursos financieros de las misiones sobre el terreno, a fin de facilitar a éstas mucha mayor flexibilidad en lo que se refiere a la gestión de sus presupuestos;34 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 f) La Secretaría debe aumentar el nivel de facultades de adquisición delegadas a las misiones sobre el terreno (de 200.000 hasta 1 millón de dólares estadounidenses, según la magnitud y las necesidades de cada misión) respecto de todos los bienes y servicios que se pueden adquirir localmente y que no cubren los contratos del sistema ni los contratos permanentes de servicios comerciales. IV. Los recursos de la Sede y la estructura de planificación y apoyo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz 170. Para crear en la Sede una capacidad suficiente de apoyo a las operaciones de paz es necesario abordar y resolver las tres cuestiones de su cantidad, su estructura y su calidad, es decir: el número de funcionarios necesarios para realizar esa labor; las estructuras y los procedimientos orgánicos que facilitan un apoyo eficaz; y disponer de personas y métodos de trabajo de calidad dentro de esas estructuras. En esta sección, el Grupo examina fundamentalmente las dos primeras cuestiones, sobre las que formula recomendaciones, y abordará los temas de la calidad del personal y de la “cultura propia de la Organización” en la Sección VI infra. 171. El Grupo considera que es claramente necesario aumentar los recursos en apoyo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. Se necesitan en particular más recursos en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, el departamento que se encarga fundamentalmente de planificar y respaldar las operaciones sobre el terreno más complejas y de perfil más elevado de las Naciones Unidas. A. Niveles de dotación de personal y financiación del apoyo en la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz 172. Los gastos correspondientes al personal de la Sede y los gastos conexos para planear y respaldar todas las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz sobre el terreno se pueden considerar gastos de las Naciones Unidas, en concepto de apoyo directo, no sobre el terreno, a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. No han superado el 6% del costo total de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en los 50 años últimos (véase el cuadro 4.1) y en la actualidad están más cerca del 3% y disminuirán por debajo del 2% en el presupuesto anual para el mantenimiento de la paz, según los planes existentes de ampliación de algunas misiones como la MONUG en la República Democrática del Congo, el despliegue total de otras como la UNAMSIL, en Sierra Leona, y el establecimiento de una nueva operación en Eritrea y Etiopía. Un analista de gestión conocedor de las necesidades prácticas de grandes organizaciones, públicas o privadas, que cuentan con un número importante de elementos desplegados sobre el terreno podría llegar a la conclusión de que una organización que se esfuerza en llevar a cabo actividades sobre el terreno con costos de apoyo desde la Sede equivalentes a un 2% no está respaldando suficientemente a su personal sobre el terreno y muy probablemente está consumiendo sus estructuras de apoyo en ese proceso. 173. En el cuadro 4.1 figuran los presupuestos totales de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz desde mediados de 1996 a mediados de 2001 (los ciclos presupuestarios de mantenimiento de la paz van de julio a junio, es decir, con un desfase de seis meses respecto del ciclo presupuestario ordinario de las Naciones Unidas). Figuran asimismo en él los gastos totales de la Sede en apoyo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, tanto dentro como fuera del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y lo mismo si se financian con cargo al presupuesto ordinario como con cargo a la Cuenta de Apoyo para las Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz (el presupuesto ordinario abarca dos años y sus gastos se prorratean entre los Estados Miembros conforme a la escala de cuotas ordinarias; la Cuenta de Apoyo abarca un año —con el propósito de que los niveles de personal de plantilla de la Secretaría fluyan y refluyan con el nivel de las operaciones sobre el terreno— y sus gastos se prorratean conforme a la escala de cuotas fijadas para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz).n0059473.doc 35 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Cuadro 4.1 Proporción de total de gastos de apoyo de la Sede sobre los presupuestos totales de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de 1996 a 2001 (En millones de dólares EE.UU.) Jul. 1996– jun. 1997 Jul. 1997– jun. 1998 Jul. 1998– jun. 1999 Jul. 1999– jun. 2000 Jul. 2000– jun. 2001a Presupuestos de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz 1 260 911,7 812,9 1 417 2 582b Gastos de apoyo de la Sede conexosc 49,2 52,8 41,0 41,7 50,2 Proporción de gastos entre la Sede y las operaciones sobre el terreno 3,90% 5,79% 5,05% 2,95% 1,94% a Cifras basadas en los informes financieros del Secretario General. Se excluyen las misiones finalizadas al 30 de junio de 2000. Comprende los gastos aproximados del despliegue total de la MONUC, cuyo presupuesto todavía no se ha preparado. b Estimaciones. c Cifras obtenidas del Contralor de las Naciones Unidas; comprenden todos los puestos de la Secretaría (fundamentalmente del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz) financiados con cargo al presupuesto ordinario bienal y con cargo a la Cuenta de Apoyo; se tiene en cuenta, además, un factor de cuáles habrían sido los gastos correspondientes a las contribuciones en especie o al personal proporcionado gratuitamente, en caso de haberse tenido que financiar enteramente. 174. La Cuenta de Apoyo financia el 85% del presupuesto del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, es decir, aproximadamente 40 millones de dólares al año. Otros 6 millones de dólares del Departamento proceden del presupuesto ordinario del bienio. Estos 46 millones de dólares financian en gran medida los salarios y gastos conexos de los 231 profesionales civiles, militares y de policía y de los 173 funcionarios de servicios generales del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz (pero no comprende el Servicio de Actividades Relativas a las Minas, que se financia con contribuciones voluntarias). La Cuenta de Apoyo financia además puestos en otros sectores de la Secretaría, ocupados por personas dedicadas a apoyar las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, como la División de Financiación de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y partes de la División de Adquisiciones del Departamento de Gestión, la Oficina de Asuntos Jurídicos y el DIP. 175. Hasta mediados del decenio, se calculó la Cuenta de Apoyo en el 8,5% del total de los gastos en concepto de personal civil de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, pero no se tuvieron en cuenta los gastos de apoyo al personal de policía civil y a los voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas, ni los gastos de contratistas privados o tropas militares de apoyo. Este método del porcentaje fijo fue sustituido por la justificación anual de todos los puestos financiados con cargo a la Cuenta de Apoyo. Los niveles de personal de plantilla del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz aumentaron poco con la aplicación del nuevo sistema, en parte porque la Secretaría al parecer ha ajustado sus peticiones a lo que consideraba políticamente factible. 176. Está claro que el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y demás oficinas de la Secretaría que respaldan esas operaciones deben ampliar y disminuir su personal en alguna medida conforme al nivel de las actividades sobre el terreno, pero exigir al Departamento que justifique cada año siete de cada ocho puestos de sus puestos es actuar como si se creyese que se trata de una operación temporal y que las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz son una responsabilidad temporal de la Organización. Los 52 años de operaciones ya transcurridos indican lo contrario y de la historia reciente se desprende además que una preparación permanente es esencial, incluso durante las épocas de baja actividad sobre el terreno porque la evolución de los acontecimientos es muy difícil de predecir y, una vez perdidas, la capacidad y la experiencia del personal puede hacer falta mucho tiempo para recuperarlas, como ha aprendido a su costa el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz en los dos años últimos. 177. Como la Cuenta de Apoyo financia prácticamente a todo el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz con carácter anual, ni ese Departamento ni las demás oficinas financiadas con cargo a ella pueden contar con un nivel básico previsible de financiación y puestos con respecto al cual contratar y mantener a personal. El personal traído del terreno que ocupa puestos financiados con cargo a la Cuenta de Apoyo no sabe si36 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 esos puestos existirán al año siguiente. Habida cuenta de las condiciones de trabajo existentes y de la incertidumbre respecto de la carrera profesional que entraña la financiación con cargo a la Cuenta de Apoyo, es muy notable que el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz haya conseguido conservarlos. 178. Los Estados Miembros y la Secretaría han reconocido desde hace mucho la necesidad de determinar un nivel básico de personal y financiación y de establecer un mecanismo aparte gracias al cual se pueda contratar y despedir a personal en el Departamento a tenor de las necesidades. Ahora bien, sin un examen de las necesidades de personal del Departamento basado en algunos criterios objetivos de gestión y productividad, es difícil determinar el nivel básico adecuado. Aunque el Grupo no está en condiciones de efectuar ese examen metódico de los aspectos de gestión del Departamento, considera que se debe llevar a cabo y que, entre tanto, algunas carencias actuales de personal son dolorosamente patentes y merece la pena señalarlas. 179. La División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, presidida por el Asesor Militar de las Naciones Unidas, está facultada para disponer de 32 oficiales militares y nueve oficiales de policía civil. A la Dependencia de Policía Civil se le ha asignado el respaldar todos los aspectos de las operaciones de policía internacional de las Naciones Unidas, desde el desarrollo doctrinal al despliegue de oficiales en las operaciones sobre el terreno, pasando por su selección. En la actualidad, apenas puede hacer algo más que identificar el personal, tratar de preseleccionarlo con los equipos de asistencia en la selección de personal visitantes (actividad que ocupa aproximadamente la mitad del personal) y procura después que vayan sobre el terreno. Además, en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz (ni tampoco en algún otro lugar del sistema de las Naciones Unidas) no existe una dependencia encargada de planificar y respaldar los elementos de imposición del estado de derecho de una operación, que a su vez respaldan una labor eficaz de policía, ya sea de asesoramiento o ejecutiva. 180. Once oficiales de la Oficina del Asesor Militar respaldan la identificación y la rotación de las unidades militares de todas las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz y prestan asesoramiento militar a los oficiales políticos del Departamento. Se supone además que los oficiales militares del Departamento tienen que hallar tiempo para “capacitar a los formadores” de los Estados Miembros, elaborar directrices, manuales y demás material de información y colaborar con la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno para determinar las necesidades logísticas y demás necesidades operativas de los componentes militar y de policía de las misiones sobre el terreno. Ahora bien, en la situación actual, la Dependencia de Capacitación está formada únicamente por cinco oficiales militares en total. Diez oficiales del Servicio de Planificación Militar son los principales planificadores de las misiones militares a nivel operacional dentro del Departamento; se han autorizado otros seis puestos más, pero todavía no tienen titular. Esos 16 oficiales de planificación constituyen todo el complemento de personal militar disponible para determinar las necesidades de fuerzas para iniciar y ampliar las misiones, participar en estudios técnicos y evaluar la preparación de los principales contribuyentes de tropas. A uno de los 10 planificadores militares autorizados originalmente se le asignó la tarea de elaborar las normas de intervención y directrices para los jefes de fuerzas de todas las operaciones. Sólo hay un oficial, a tiempo parcial, para gestionar la base de datos del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas. 181. En el cuadro 4.2 figura una relación entre el total de efectivos militares y de policía desplegados y el total autorizado del personal de apoyo correspondiente en la Sede. Ningún gobierno nacional enviaría 27.000 soldados a operaciones sobre el terreno y dejaría sólo 32 oficiales en el país para que les proporcionaran orientación militar sustantiva y operacional. Ninguna organización de policía desplegaría a 8.000 oficiales de policía y dejaría sólo nueve en el cuartel general para que les proporcionaran apoyo policial sustantivo y operacional. Cuadro 4.2 Relación entre el personal militar y de policía civil en la Sede y el personal militar y de policía civil sobre el terreno Personal militar Policía civil Operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz 27 365 8 641 Sede 32 9 Relación entre la Sede y las misiones sobre el terreno 0,1% 0,1% a Total autorizado de efectivos militares al 15 de junio de 2000 y de policía civil al 1° de agosto de 2000.n0059473.doc 37 A/55/305 S/2000/809 182. La Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, a la que pertenecen los oficiales de asuntos políticos encargados de coordinar las distintas operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, es otro sector que parece disponer de mucho menos personal del necesario. Cuenta actualmente con 15 funcionarios del cuadro orgánico encargados de coordinar 14 operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en marcha y dos posibles nuevas operaciones, es decir, menos de un oficial por misión como promedio. Un oficial tal vez podría atender las necesidades de una o incluso dos misiones más pequeñas, pero esto parece insostenible en el caso de las misiones mayores, como la UNTAET en Timor Oriental, la UNMIK en Kosovo, la UNAMSIL en Sierra Leona y la MONUC en la República Democrática del Congo. En circunstancias parecidas se encuentran los oficiales de logística y personal de la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y el personal de apoyo conexo del Departamento de Gestión, la Oficina de Asuntos Jurídicos, el Departamento de Información Pública y otras oficinas que prestan apoyo a su labor. En el cuadro 4.3 figura el número total de funcionarios en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y otras dependencias de la Secretaría que se dedican a jornada completa a prestar apoyo a las misiones mayores, junto con sus presupuestos anuales para misiones y sus plantillas autorizadas. 183. La escasez general de personal supone que en muchos casos los funcionarios que realizan tareas fundamentales no cuenten con sustitutos, no tengan medios de cubrir más de un turno en un día en que se produce una crisis a una distancia de 6 a 12 husos horarios salvo que hagan ellos mismos dos turnos, y no puedan tomar vacaciones, ponerse enfermos o visitar la misión a no ser que dejen gran parte de sus tareas de apoyo sin nadie que se pueda hacer cargo de ellas. En la situación actual resulta inevitable optar por soluciones intermedias cuando hay que atender a la vez a diversas cuestiones, lo cual puede afectar al apoyo a las misiones sobre el terreno. En Nueva York, las tareas relacionadas con la Sede, como la obligación de presentar informes a los órganos legislativos, tienden a adquirir prioridad porque los representantes de los Estados Miembros presionan, muchas veces en persona, para que se tomen medidas al respecto. La labor sobre el terreno, por el contrario, está representada en Nueva York por un mensaje por correo electrónico, un telegrama o las notas tomadas de una conversación telefónica. Por consiguiente, en la lucha por reclamar la atención del funcionario competente en la Sede suelen salir perdiendo las operaciones sobre el terreno, de modo que su personal se ve obligado a resolver los problemas por cuenta propia. Sin embargo, se les debería asignar la máxima prioridad. Los que prestan servicios sobre el terreno hacen frente a circunstancias difíciles, a menudo con peligro de sus vidas, y se merecen mejor suerte, al igual que el personal en la Sede que desea apoyarlos de manera más eficaz. Cuadro 4.3 Total de funcionarios asignados a jornada completa para apoyar operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz complejas establecidas en 1999 UNMIK (Kosovo) UNAMSIL (Sierra Leona) UNTAET (Timor Oriental) MONUC (República Democrática del Congo) Presupuesto estimado Julio de 2000 a Junio de 2001 410 millones de dólares 465 millones de dólares 540 millones de dólares 535 millones de dólares Total de miembros de componentes clave actualmente autorizado 4 718 policías más de 1 000 civiles internacionales 13 000 militares 8 950 militares 1 640 policías 1 185 civiles internacionales 5 537 militares 500 observadores militares Personal del cuadro orgánico en la Sede asignado a jornada completa para apoyar la operación 1 oficial de asuntos políticos 2 policías civiles 1 coordinador de logística 1 especialista en contratación de civiles 1 especialista en finanzas 1 oficial de asuntos políticos 2 militares 1 coordinador de logística 1 especialista en finanzas 1 oficial de asuntos políticos 2 militares 1 policía civil 1 coordinador de logística 1 especialista en contratación de civiles 1 especialista en finanzas 1 oficial de asuntos políticos 3 militares 1 policía civil 1 coordinador de logística 1 especialista en contratación de civiles 1 especialista en finanzas Total del personal de apoyo en la Sede 6 5 7 838 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 184. Aunque parezca haber cierta duplicación de funciones entre los oficiales encargados de las operaciones en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y sus homólogos de las divisiones regionales del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, un examen más minucioso indica que no es así. Por ejemplo, el homólogo del oficial encargado de la UNMIK en el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos sigue la evolución de la situación en toda Europa sudoriental y su homólogo en la Oficina del Coordinador de Asuntos Humanitarios se ocupa de todos los Balcanes y de partes de la Comunidad de Estados Independientes. Si bien es esencial que a los oficiales del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y de la Oficina del Coordinador de Asuntos Humanitarios se les dé la oportunidad de hacer alguna aportación, con el conjunto de sus esfuerzos prestan menos apoyo a la UNMIK de lo que lo haría otro oficial equivalente a jornada completa. 185. Los tres Directores Regionales de la Oficina de Operaciones deberían visitar las misiones periódicamente y mantener un diálogo constante a nivel de políticas con los Representantes Especiales del Secretario General y los jefes de los componentes sobre los obstáculos que la Sede podría ayudarles a superar. En lugar de ello, se ven envueltos en los procesos que ocupan el tiempo de los oficiales encargados de sus operaciones porque éstos necesitan su apoyo. 186. Este conflicto creado por la necesidad de atender a la vez a cuestiones diversas es aún más evidente en los casos del Secretario General Adjunto y el Subsecretario General de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. Uno y otro proporcionan asesoramiento al Secretario General y mantienen un enlace con las delegaciones y las capitales de los Estados Miembros y el uno o el otro analiza cada informe sobre operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz (40 durante el primer semestre de 2000) que se presenta al Secretario General para su aprobación y firma antes de ser presentado a los órganos legislativos. Desde enero de 2000, los dos han suministrado información en persona al Consejo en más de 50 ocasiones, en sesiones que duraron hasta tres horas y que exigieron varias horas de preparación a cargo de funcionarios sobre el terreno y en la Sede. También se dedica un tiempo a las reuniones de coordinación que podría emplearse en mantener un diálogo sobre cuestiones fundamentales con las misiones sobre el terreno, en efectuar visitas sobre el terreno, en reflexionar sobre los medios de mejorar la dirección de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas y en concentrarse en la gestión. 187. La escasez de personal a que hace frente el componente sustantivo del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz tal vez se vea superada por la que existe en las esferas de apoyo administrativo y logístico, especialmente en la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno. En la actualidad, la División presta apoyo no sólo a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz sino también a otras oficinas sobre el terreno, como la Oficina del Coordinador Especial de las Naciones Unidas en los territorios ocupados (UNSCO) en Gaza, la Misión de las Naciones Unidas de Verificación de derechos humanos en Guatemala (MINUGUA) y otra docena de oficinas pequeñas, por no hablar de su constante participación en la gestión y reconciliación de la liquidación de las misiones ya concluidas. Toda la División agrega aproximadamente un 1,25% al costo total de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz y otras operaciones sobre el terreno. El Grupo está convencido de que si las Naciones Unidas tuvieran que subcontratar las funciones de apoyo administrativo y logístico que desempeña la División, les resultaría muy difícil encontrar una empresa comercial que estuviera dispuesta a realizar una tarea equivalente por la misma suma. 188. Cabe mencionar unos cuantos ejemplos que demuestran la grave escasez de personal que sufre la División: la Sección de Dotación de Personal del Servicio de Apoyo y Administración del Personal, que se encarga de la contratación y los viajes de todo el personal civil, así como de los viajes de la policía civil y los observadores militares, cuenta con sólo 10 oficiales de contratación del cuadro orgánico, a cuatro de los cuales se les ha asignado al examen y acuse de recibo de las 150 solicitudes de empleo que se envían motu proprio y que la oficina recibe ahora diariamente. Los otros seis oficiales se ocupan del proceso de selección propiamente dicho: uno a jornada completa y otro a media jornada para Kosovo, uno a jornada completa y otro a media jornada para Timor Oriental y tres que se ocupan de todas las demás misiones sobre el terreno juntas. Tres oficiales de contratación están tratando de determinar quiénes son los candidatos idóneos para ocupar puestos en dos misiones de administración civil que necesitan centenares de funcionarios con experiencia en una gran cantidad de campos y disciplinas. Han transcurrido de nueve a 12 meses desde que se pusieron en marcha la UNMIK y la UNTAET y ni la una ni lan0059473.doc 39 A/55/305 S/2000/809 otra cuentan todavía con todo el personal que les corresponde. 189. Los Estados Miembros deben conceder cierta flexibilidad al Secretario General y poner a su disposición los recursos financieros que le permitan obtener el personal que necesita para asegurar que no se vea empañada la credibilidad de la Organización por no hacer frente a las situaciones de emergencia como debería hacerlo una organización profesional. Se deben poner a disposición del Secretario General los recursos necesarios para aumentar la capacidad de la Secretaría de responder inmediatamente a las demandas imprevistas. 190. La responsabilidad de proporcionar a los que prestan servicios sobre el terreno los bienes y servicios que necesitan para desempeñar sus tareas recae principalmente en el Servicio de Logística y Comunicaciones de la División. La descripción de las funciones de uno de los 14 coordinadores de logística del Servicio tal vez ayude a dar una idea de la carga de trabajo que tiene que soportar actualmente todo el Servicio. Esa persona es el planificador principal de logística tanto para la ampliación de la misión en la República Democrática del Congo (MONUC) como para la ampliación de la Fuerza Provisional de las Naciones Unidas en el Líbano (FPNUL). La misma persona se encarga también de redactar las normas y procedimientos de logística para la muy importante Base Logística de las Naciones Unidas en Brindisi y de coordinar la preparación de las solicitudes presupuestarias anuales de todo el Servicio. 191. Simplemente sobre la base de ese examen sumario, y teniendo presente que el costo total de apoyo al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y a las oficinas conexas de la Sede de apoyo a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz no supera ni siquiera los 50 millones de dólares por año, el Grupo está convencido de que la asignación de recursos adicionales a ese Departamento y los demás que lo apoyan sería una inversión fundamental para asegurar que se empleen bien los más de 2.000 millones de dólares que los Estados Miembros gastarán en operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en 2001. Por consiguiente, el Grupo recomienda un aumento considerable de los recursos destinados a ese fin e insta al Secretario General a que presente una propuesta a la Asamblea General en la que se indiquen las necesidades completas de la Organización. 192. El Grupo cree también que se debe dejar de tratar a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz como una necesidad temporal y al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz como una estructura de organización temporal. Hace falta una base financiera firme y previsible para hacer algo más que mantener a flote las misiones existentes. Se debería contar con recursos que permitieran planificar, en previsión de posibles imprevistos, para períodos de seis meses a un año; desarrollar instrumentos de gestión a fin de ayudar a las misiones a funcionar mejor en el futuro; estudiar los posibles efectos de la tecnología moderna sobre diferentes aspectos del mantenimiento de la paz; aprovechar la experiencia adquirida con operaciones anteriores, y aplicar las recomendaciones que figuran en los informes de evaluación de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna de los últimos cinco años. Al personal se le debe dar la oportunidad de preparar y llevar a cabo programas de capacitación para el personal recién contratado en la Sede y sobre el terreno. Deberían finalizarse las directrices y los manuales que podrían ayudar al personal nuevo de las misiones a realizar sus tareas de manera más profesional y de conformidad con las normas, reglamentaciones y procedimientos de las Naciones Unidas, y que se encuentran ahora a medio terminar en una docena de oficinas del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz porque sus autores están ocupados atendiendo a otras necesidades. 193. Por consiguiente, el Grupo recomienda que se considere el apoyo que presta la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz una actividad esencial de las Naciones Unidas y, en tal caso, que se financie la mayor parte de los recursos necesarios para ese fin por medio del mecanismo del presupuesto por programas bienal ordinario de la Organización. En espera de que se prepare el nuevo presupuesto ordinario, el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General solicite lo antes posible a la Asamblea General un aumento complementario de emergencia en la última cuenta de apoyo. 194. La asignación específica de recursos debería determinarse en base a un examen profesional y objetivo de las necesidades, pero las cifras brutas deberían reflejar la experiencia histórica del mantenimiento de la paz. Se podría seguir el criterio de calcular la base del presupuesto ordinario para el apoyo de la Sede al mantenimiento de la paz como porcentaje del costo medio del mantenimiento de la paz durante los cinco años anteriores. El presupuesto básico resultante reflejaría el nivel previsto de actividad para el que debería estar preparada la Secretaría. Sobre la base de las cifras proporcionadas por el Contralor (véase el cuadro 4.1),40 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 el promedio de los últimos cinco años (incluido el actual año del presupuesto) es de 1.400 millones de dólares. Si se fija la base al 5% del costo medio se obtendría, por ejemplo, un presupuesto básico de 70 millones de dólares, aproximadamente 20 millones más que el actual presupuesto anual para el apoyo de la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. 195. Para financiar niveles de actividad superiores a la media o “en exceso”, se debería considerar la posibilidad de imponer un recargo porcentual simple a las misiones cuyos presupuestos excedan el nivel básico de gastos para operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. Por ejemplo, la cifra aproximada de 2.600 millones de dólares estimada para financiar las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en el actual año del presupuesto supera en 1.200 millones de dólares la base hipotética de 1.400 millones de dólares. Con un recargo del 1% sobre esos 1.200 millones de dólares se obtendría una suma adicional de 12 millones de dólares que permitiría a la Sede hacer frente a ese aumento. Con un recargo del 2% se obtendrían 24 millones de dólares. 196. Ese método directo de prever la capacidad de aumento debería sustituir a la justificación anual, puesto por puesto, que se requiere actualmente para solicitar recursos para la cuenta de apoyo. Se debería conceder al Secretario General la flexibilidad necesaria para determinar la manera óptima de utilizar esos fondos a fin de hacer frente a un aumento de la actividad y en esos casos se deberían aplicar medidas de contratación de emergencia para poder llenar inmediatamente los puestos temporarios que permitan cubrir tal aumento de las necesidades. 197. Resumen de las principales recomendaciones para financiar el apoyo que presta la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz: a) El Grupo recomienda un aumento considerable de los recursos para el apoyo de la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz e insta al Secretario General a que presente una propuesta a la Asamblea General en la que indique sus necesidades completas; b) Se debe considerar el apoyo que presta la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz una actividad esencial de las Naciones Unidas y, en tal caso, se debe financiar la mayor parte de los recursos necesarios para ese fin por medio del mecanismo del presupuesto por programas bienal ordinario de la Organización; c) En espera de que se preparen las solicitudes para el próximo presupuesto ordinario, el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General solicite a la Asamblea General un aumento complementario de emergencia en la cuenta de apoyo para permitir la contratación inmediata de personal adicional, especialmente en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. B. Necesidad de contar con equipos de tareas integrados para las misiones y propuesta de que se establezcan 198. En el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz no existe actualmente una dependencia integrada de planificación o de apoyo en la que estén representados los responsables en materia de análisis político, operaciones militares, policía civil, asistencia electoral, derechos humanos, desarrollo, asistencia humanitaria, refugiados y desplazados, información pública, logística, finanzas y contratación de personal, entre otras esferas. Por el contrario, como se describió supra, el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz sólo tiene un puñado de funcionarios dedicados a tiempo completo a la planificación y el apoyo incluso de las operaciones grandes y complejas, como las de Sierra Leona (UNAMSIL), Kosovo (UNMIK) y Timor Oriental (UNTAET). Cuando se trate de una misión política de paz o de una oficina de consolidación de la paz, esas funciones se llevan a cabo dentro del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, con iguales limitaciones en materia de recursos humanos. 199. La Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz está encargada de elaborar un concepto general de operaciones para las nuevas misiones de mantenimiento de la paz. A ese respecto, le incumbe una doble y pesada tarea en materia de análisis político y de coordinación interna con los demás elementos del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz que se encargan de los asuntos militares y de policía civil, logística, finanzas y personal. Pero cada uno de esos otros elementos tiene una línea diferente de dependencia orgánica, y muchos de ellos, de hecho, están separados físicamente en varios edificios distintos. Además, el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, el Programa de las Naciones Unidasn0059473.doc 41 A/55/305 S/2000/809 para el Desarrollo, la Oficina de Coordinación de Asuntos Humanitarios, la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados, la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos, el Departamento de Información Pública y varios otros departamentos, organismos, fondos y programas tienen una función cada vez más importante que cumplir en la planificación de cualquier operación futura, especialmente en las operaciones complejas, y tienen que ser incluidos formalmente en el proceso de planificación. 200. La colaboración entre divisiones, departamentos y organismos distintos se produce en los hechos, pero depende en grado demasiado alto de las redes personales y del apoyo caso por caso. Hay equipos de tareas convocados para planificar las principales operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, en los que confluyen diversas partes del sistema, pero funcionan más como cajas de resonancia que como órganos ejecutivos. Además, los actuales equipos de tareas tienden a reunirse con poca frecuencia, o incluso a dispersarse, una vez que una operación ha comenzado a desplegarse, y bastante antes de que esté completamente desplegada. 201. Invirtiendo la perspectiva, una vez que una operación se ha desplegado, los Representantes Especiales del Secretario General sobre el terreno tienen competencia general de coordinación de todas las actividades de las Naciones Unidas en su zona de misión, pero no tienen en la Sede un único centro de coordinación a nivel operativo capaz de responder a todas sus preocupaciones con rapidez. Por ejemplo, el funcionario responsable de la operación o su director regional en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz da respuesta a las preguntas políticas relacionadas con las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, pero por lo común no puede dar una respuesta directa a las preguntas acerca de los elementos militares, policiales, humanitarios, de derechos humanos, electorales, jurídicos o de otra índole de una operación, y no tienen necesariamente una contraparte de fácil ubicación en cada una de esas esferas. Una misión impaciente por obtener respuestas encontrará por sí sola, a la larga, los contactos primarios adecuados, y tal vez los encuentre en decenas de casos, formando sus propias redes con distintas partes de la Secretaría y de los organismos pertinentes. 202. Las misiones no deberían sentir la necesidad de formar sus propias redes de contactos. Deberían saber exactamente a quiénes dirigirse en busca de las respuestas y el apoyo que necesitan, especialmente en los críticos meses iniciales en que una misión está avanzando hacia el despliegue completo y haciendo frente a crisis cotidianas. Además, deberían poder entrar en contacto con un solo lugar en busca de tales respuestas, una entidad que comprendiese a todos los funcionarios de apoyo y expertos necesarios para la misión, provenientes de una serie de elementos de la Sede que reflejen las funciones de la propia misión. El Grupo denominaría a tal entidad equipo de tareas integrado de la misión. 203. Este concepto toma como punto de partida las medidas cooperativas contenidas en las directrices para aplicar el concepto de departamento “coordinador” que el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos acordaron en junio de 2000, en una reunión conjunta de los departamentos presidida por el Secretario General, pero amplía considerablemente su alcance. El Grupo recomendaría, por ejemplo, que el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos determinasen conjuntamente el coordinador de cada nuevo equipo de tareas, pero sin que ello obligase a limitar la selección a los actuales funcionarios de uno u otro departamento. Puede haber ocasiones en que el volumen de trabajo de los directores regionales o los oficiales de asuntos políticos de ambos departamentos les impida asumir esa función a tiempo completo. En tales casos, tal vez sea mejor traer a un funcionario de las oficinas exteriores con ese fin. Tal flexibilidad, inclusive la flexibilidad de asignar el cometido a la persona más capacitada para el puesto, requeriría que se aprobaran mecanismos de financiación para responder a la demanda en momentos de alza repentina, como se recomendó supra. 204. El Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad o un subgrupo determinado dentro de él debería decidir colectivamente la composición general de cada equipo de tareas integrado de la misión, que el Grupo prevé que se forme en una etapa bastante temprana de un proceso de prevención de conflictos, establecimiento de la paz, posible mantenimiento de la paz o posible despliegue de una oficina de apoyo para la consolidación de la paz. Quiere decir que la noción de apoyo integrado y concentrado en un punto para las actividades de paz y seguridad de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno debería abarcar toda la gama de operaciones de paz, y su tamaño, su composición sustantiva, su lugar de reunión42 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 y su coordinador deberían adecuarse a las necesidades de la operación. 205. La coordinación y el concepto de departamento coordinador han planteado algunos problemas en el pasado, cuando el eje de la presencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno dejó de ser político para pasar a consistir en el mantenimiento de la paz, o viceversa, con lo cual no sólo cambió el contacto primario en la Sede para la presencia sobre el terreno, sino además todo el elenco de apoyo en la Sede. En la forma en que el Grupo visualiza el funcionamiento de los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones, el elenco de apoyo seguiría siendo sustancialmente el mismo durante esos períodos de transición y después de ellos, con adiciones o sustracciones a medida que cambie la naturaleza de la operación, pero sin cambios en el núcleo de personal del equipo de tareas para las funciones que sirven de puente de transición. La coordinación del equipo de tareas integrado de la misión pasaría de un miembro del grupo a otro (por ejemplo, de un director regional u oficial de asuntos políticos del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz a su contraparte del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos). 206. El tamaño y la composición estarían en consonancia con la naturaleza y la etapa de la actividad sobre el terreno a la que se prestara apoyo. La adopción de medidas preventivas en relación con una crisis exigiría un apoyo político bien informado que mantuviera a un enviado de las Naciones Unidas enterado de la evolución política dentro de la región y de otros factores fundamentales para el éxito de su esfuerzo. Los encargados del establecimiento de la paz que estuvieran trabajando para poner fin a un conflicto necesitarían saber más acerca de las opciones en materia de establecimiento de la paz y mantenimiento de la paz, para que tanto sus posibilidades como sus limitaciones se reflejasen en cualquier acuerdo de paz en cuya aplicación interviniesen las Naciones Unidas. Los asesores u observadores de la Secretaría que estuviesen trabajando con el encargado del establecimiento de la paz estarían vinculados al equipo de tareas integrado de la misión que prestase apoyo a las negociaciones, y lo mantendrían informado de los progresos que se fuesen realizando. El coordinador del equipo de tareas integrado de la misión, a su vez, actuaría como punto de contacto ordinario en la Sede para el encargado del establecimiento de la paz, con rápido acceso a niveles más altos de la Secretaría para las respuestas a averiguaciones políticamente delicadas. 207. Un equipo de tareas integrado de la misión como el que se ha descrito podría ser un órgano “virtual”, que sesionaría periódicamente pero cuyos miembros no estarían físicamente en un mismo lugar, sino que permanecerían en las oficinas en que trabajasen normalmente y se vincularían entre sí gracias a la moderna tecnología de la información. Para apoyar su labor, cada uno de ellos haría aportaciones a los datos y análisis creados e introducidos en la Intranet de las Naciones Unidas por la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad que se propone en los párrafos 65 a 75 supra. 208. Los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones creados para planificar posibles operaciones de paz también podrían comenzar como órganos virtuales. Cuando aumentase el grado de probabilidad de concreción de la operación, el equipo de tareas debería tomar forma físicamente y todos sus miembros deberían estar ubicados en el mismo espacio, preparados para trabajar juntos como equipo en forma continuada durante el tiempo necesario para lograr que la nueva misión llegue a su completo despliegue. Ese período tal vez comprenda hasta seis meses, en el supuesto de que se hayan aplicado las reformas en materia de despliegue rápido recomendadas en los párrafos 84 a 169 supra. 209. Durante ese período, los miembros del equipo de tareas deberían ser oficialmente adscritos al equipo de tareas integrado de la misión por su división, departamento, organismo, fondo o programa de origen. Es decir que un equipo de tareas integrado de la misión debería ser mucho más que un comité de coordinación o un equipo de tareas del tipo de los que actualmente se establecen en la Sede. Debería ser un grupo de personal temporal pero coherente, creado para un fin concreto, que cuyo tamaño o composición pudiera incrementarse o reducirse en respuesta a las necesidades de la misión. 210. Cada uno de los miembros del equipo de tareas debería estar autorizado para desempeñarse no sólo como enlace entre el equipo de tareas y su base de origen, sino además como su principal encargado de la adopción de decisiones a nivel operacional para la respectiva misión. El coordinador del equipo de tareas integrado de la misión —dependiente del Subsecretario General de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz en caso de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, y del Subsecretario General competente del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos en caso de actividades de establecimiento de la paz— debería, a su vez, tener autoridad jerárquican0059473.doc 43 A/55/305 S/2000/809 sobre los miembros de su equipo de tareas durante el período de su adscripción, y debería actuar como primer nivel de contacto para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en todos los aspectos de su labor. Los asuntos relacionados con la estrategia y las políticas a largo plazo deberían considerarse a nivel de Subsecretario General o Secretario General Adjunto en el Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad, con el apoyo de la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico. 211. A fin de que el sistema de las Naciones Unidas esté preparado para aportar personal a un equipo de tareas integrado de la misión, será necesario establecer centros de responsabilidad para cada uno de los componentes sustantivos principales de las operaciones de paz. Los departamentos y organismos tienen que ponerse de acuerdo de antemano, en caso necesario por escrito, respecto de los procedimientos para la adscripción y respecto de su apoyo al concepto de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones. 212. El Grupo no está en condiciones de sugerir oficinas “coordinadoras” de cada posible componente de una operación de paz, pero cree que el Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad debería meditar colectivamente sobre esta cuestión y asignar a uno de sus miembros la responsabilidad de mantener un nivel de preparación respecto de cada uno de los posibles elementos de una operación de paz, con excepción de las esferas militar, policial y judicial, y de logística y administración, que deberían seguir siendo de competencia del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. El organismo designado como coordinador debería ser responsable de elaborar conceptos genéricos de las operaciones, descripciones de puestos, necesidades en materia de dotación de personal y equipo, cronogramas de despliegue y trayectoria crítica, bases de datos normalizadas, acuerdos sobre el componente civil de las fuerzas de reserva y listas de otros posibles candidatos para dicho componente, así como para la participación en los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones. 213. Los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones brindan un enfoque flexible para hacer frente a necesidades que deben satisfacerse en el momento exacto e insumen muchos recursos, pero en definitiva son temporales, a fin de apoyar la planificación, la puesta en marcha y el mantenimiento inicial de la misión. El concepto se funda en gran medida en la noción de “gestión matricial”, muy utilizada por grandes organizaciones que deben tener la capacidad de asignar el talento necesario a proyectos concretos sin reorganizarse a sí mismas cada vez que surge un proyecto. Utilizada por entidades tan diferentes como RAND Corporation y el Banco Mundial, la gestión matricial da a cada funcionario un departamento “de origen” o “madre”, pero permite —en realidad, espera— que los funcionarios actúen en apoyo de distintos proyectos según sea necesario. Aplicando un enfoque de gestión matricial a la planificación y el apoyo de las operaciones de paz en la Sede podría lograrse que los departamentos, organismos, fondos y programas —organizados internamente del modo que convenga a sus necesidades globales— aporten funcionarios a equipo de tareas interdepartamentales o interinstitucionales que fuesen coherentes y se organizasen para brindar ese apoyo. 214. La estructura de los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones tendría importantes consecuencias para la estructuración actual de la Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, y efectivamente sustituiría a la estructura de divisiones regionales. Por ejemplo, las operaciones más grandes, como las de Sierra Leona, Timor Oriental y Kosovo, justificarían el establecimiento de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones separados para cada una, encabezados por funcionarios de categoría de Director. Otras misiones, como las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz “tradicionales” en Asia y el Oriente Medio, establecidas desde hace mucho tiempo, podrían agruparse en otro equipo de tareas integrado. La cantidad de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones que se formaran dependería en gran medida de la cantidad de recursos adicionales asignados al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y los departamentos, organismos, fondos y programas conexos. A medida que aumentara la cantidad de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones, la estructura orgánica de la Oficina de Operaciones se iría achatando. Podría haber consecuencias análogas respecto de los Subsecretarios Generales del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos, de quienes dependerían los coordinadores de los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones durante la etapa de establecimiento de la paz o cuando se estuviese estableciendo una gran operación de apoyo a la consolidación de la paz, como presencia de seguimiento de una operación de mantenimiento de la paz o como iniciativa separada. 215. Si bien los directores regionales del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz (y del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos en los casos en44 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 que sean nombrados coordinadores de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones) se encargarían de la supervisión de una menor cantidad de misiones que en la actualidad, realmente estarían administrando a una mayor cantidad de funcionarios, entre ellos, los funcionarios adscritos a tiempo completo de las oficinas de los asesores militares y de policía civil, la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno (o las divisiones que la hayan sucedido) y otros departamentos, organismos, fondos y programas, según fuese necesario. El tamaño de cada equipo de tareas integrado de la misión dependería también de la cantidad de recursos adicionales que se suministraran, a falta de los cuales las entidades participantes no estarían en condiciones de adscribir a sus funcionarios a tiempo completo. 216. Asimismo cabe señalar que, para que el concepto de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones funcione con eficacia, sus miembros deben estar ubicados en un mismo lugar físico durante las etapas de planificación y despliegue inicial. Tal cosa no sería posible en la actualidad sin hacer importantes ajustes en la asignación de los espacios de oficinas en la Secretaría. 217. Resumen de las principales recomendaciones en materia de planificación y apoyo integrados para las misiones: el medio normal para la planificación y el apoyo concretos para cada una de las misiones estaría constituido por equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones, que contarían con miembros adscritos provenientes de las distintas partes del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, según fuese necesario. Los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones serían el primer punto de contacto para todo ese apoyo, y los coordinadores de los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones deberían tener autoridad jerárquica temporal sobre el personal adscrito, de conformidad con los acuerdos que se celebrasen entre el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y otros departamentos, programas, fondos y organismos que aporten personal. C. Otros ajustes estructurales necesarios en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz 218. El concepto de equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones fortalecería la capacidad de la Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz para funcionar como verdadero centro de coordinación de todos los aspectos de una operación de mantenimiento de la paz. Sin embargo, también se necesitan ajustes estructurales en otros elementos del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, en particular, la División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil, la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno y la Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y Resultados. 1. División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil 219. Todos los oficiales de policía civil entrevistados en la Sede y sobre el terreno expresaron frustración ante el hecho de que las funciones de policía estuvieran comprendidas en una línea de dependencia jerárquica militar en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. El Grupo está de acuerdo en que ese arreglo es de escaso valor desde los puntos de vista administrativo y sustantivo. 220. Los oficiales militares y policiales del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz prestan funciones durante tres años, porque las Naciones Unidas exigen que estén en servicio activo. Si desean permanecer más tiempo, e incluso egresan de sus fuerzas policiales o militares nacionales para ello, las políticas de personal de las Naciones Unidas impiden que se les contrate en sus cargos anteriores. Por consiguiente, la tasa de movimiento de los oficiales militares y policiales es elevada. Habida cuenta de que no existe un método establecido para recoger la experiencia obtenida en la práctica de la Sede, de que no hay programas completos de capacitación para los recién llegados y de que aún no ha terminado la elaboración de procedimientos administrativos y manuales de fácil utilización, a la elevada tasa de movimiento de personal va unida como consecuencia una pérdida de memoria institucional que sólo puede subsanarse mediante varios meses de aprendizaje en el empleo. La actual escasez de personal también implica que los oficiales militares y de policía civil resultan asignados a funciones que no están necesariamente en consonancia con sus especializaciones. Quienes se han especializado en operaciones (J3) o en planes (J5) pueden verse asignados a labores cuasi diplomáticas o a desempeñarse como oficiales de personal y administración (J1), administrando el continuo movimiento de personal y unidades sobre eln0059473.doc 45 A/55/305 S/2000/809 terreno, en desmedro de su capacidad de supervisar la actividad operacional sobre el terreno. 221. La falta de continuidad del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz en esas esferas tal vez explique también por qué, después de 50 años de desplegar observadores militares para supervisar violaciones de cesaciones del fuego, el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz todavía no tiene una base de datos normalizada que pueda suministrarse a los observadores militares sobre el terreno para documentar las violaciones de cesaciones del fuego y generar estadísticas. Actualmente, si se desea saber cuántas violaciones han ocurrido en un semestre en determinado país en que se ha desplegado una operación, sería necesario contar físicamente cada una de ellas en los ejemplares impresos de los informes diarios de situación correspondientes a dicho período. Cuando existen bases de datos de esa índole, han sido creadas por las propias misiones caso por caso. Lo mismo se aplica a la diversidad de estadísticas del delito y otras informaciones comunes a la mayoría de las misiones de policía civil. Los adelantos tecnológicos también han transformado radicalmente las formas de vigilancia de las violaciones de cesaciones del fuego, así como los movimientos en zonas desmilitarizadas y la remoción de armas de lugares de almacenamiento. Sin embargo, esas cuestiones no están actualmente asignadas a ningún funcionario de la División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. 222. El Grupo recomienda que la División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil se divida en dos entidades separadas, una para las actividades militares y la otra para la policía civil. La Oficina del Asesor Militar del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz debería ampliarse y reestructurarse a fin de adecuarse más estrechamente a la forma en que están estructurados los cuarteles generales militares de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, a fin de prestar un apoyo más eficaz a las actividades sobre el terreno y brindar un asesoramiento militar mejor informado a los altos funcionarios de la Secretaría. Asimismo, deberían proporcionarse importantes recursos adicionales a la Dependencia de Policía Civil, y debería considerarse la posibilidad de elevar el grado y la categoría del Asesor de Policía Civil. 223. Para asegurar un mínimo de continuidad en las capacidades de actividades militares y de policía civil del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, el Grupo recomienda que una proporción de los cargos que se añadan en esas dos dependencias se reserven para funcionarios militares y de policía civil que hayan tenido experiencia en las Naciones Unidas y hayan egresado recientemente de las respectivas fuerzas nacionales, quienes serían designados como funcionarios ordinarios. Con ello se estaría siguiendo el precedente del Servicio de Logística y Comunicaciones de la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno, varios de cuyos funcionarios se desempeñaron anteriormente como oficiales militares. 224. Los componentes de policía civil sobre el terreno están participando cada vez más en la reestructuración y la reforma de las fuerzas locales de policía, y el Grupo ha recomendado un cambio doctrinal según el cual dichas actividades pasarían a ser uno de los centros primarios de atención de la policía civil en futuras operaciones de paz (véanse los párrafos 39, 40 y 47 b) supra). Sin embargo, hasta la fecha la Dependencia de Policía Civil formula planes y listas de necesidades para los componentes de policía de las operaciones de paz sin contar con el necesario asesoramiento jurídico sobre las estructuras judiciales locales y los procedimientos, códigos y leyes penales en vigor en el respectivo país. Esa información es vital para los encargados de planificar las actividades de policía civil, y sin embargo no es una función respecto de la cual se hayan asignado hasta la fecha recursos de la cuenta de apoyo con destino a la Oficina de Asuntos Jurídicos, al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz o a departamento alguno de la Secretaría. 225. Por consiguiente, el Grupo recomienda que se establezca una nueva dependencia en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, que esté separada de las demás dependencias y cuente con los expertos necesarios en materia de derecho penal, con el cometido concreto de brindar asesoramiento a la Oficina del Asesor de Policía Civil en las cuestiones relacionadas con el imperio de la ley esenciales para la eficaz utilización de la policía civil en las operaciones de paz. Esta dependencia debería también trabajar en estrecho contacto con la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos en Ginebra, con la Oficina de Fiscalización de Drogas y de Prevención del Delito en Viena y con otras partes del sistema de las Naciones Unidas que centren la atención en la reforma de las instituciones relacionadas con el imperio del derecho y el respeto de los derechos humanos.46 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 2. División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno 226. La División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno no tiene competencia para dar forma definitiva a los presupuestos de las operaciones sobre el terreno que planifica y presentar dichos presupuestos, ni para la efectiva adquisición de los bienes y servicios que necesitan. Dicha competencia incumbe a las Divisiones de Financiación de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y de Adquisiciones del Departamento de Gestión. Todos los pedidos de adquisiciones correspondientes a la Sede son tramitados por los 16 oficiales de compras de la División de Adquisiciones que se financian con cargo a la cuenta de apoyo, que elaboran los contratos más grandes (aproximadamente 300 en 1999) para su presentación al Comité de Contratos de la Sede, negocian y adjudican los contratos de bienes y servicios no adquiridos localmente por las misiones sobre el terreno y formulan las políticas y procedimientos de las Naciones Unidas para las adquisiciones a escala mundial o local con destino a las misiones. El efecto combinado de la limitada dotación de personal y los trámites adicionales que entraña este proceso parece contribuir a las demoras en materia de adquisiciones que han señalado las misiones sobre el terreno. 227. Se podría incrementar la eficiencia en materia de adquisiciones delegando al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz la competencia para elaborar y presentar los presupuestos, emitir autorizaciones de habilitación de fondos y efectuar las adquisiciones, durante un período de prueba de dos años y con la correspondiente transferencia de puestos y funcionarios. A fin de asegurar la rendición de cuentas y la transparencia, el Departamento de Gestión debería conservar la competencia en relación con las funciones de contabilidad, prorrateo entre los Estados Miembros y tesorería. También debería conservar su función de establecimiento y supervisión de políticas de carácter general, como la ha conservado en lo tocante a la contratación y la administración del personal sobre el terreno, respecto de las cuales ya se ha delegado al Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz la autoridad y la responsabilidad correspondientes. 228. Además, a fin de evitar las sospechas de irregularidades que podrían surgir en caso de que los responsables de la presupuestación y las adquisiciones trabajasen en la misma división en la que se determinan las necesidades, el Grupo recomienda que la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno se divida en dos: una División de Servicios Administrativos, a la que corresponderían las funciones de personal, presupuesto y finanzas y adquisiciones, y una División de Servicios de Apoyo Integrados (por ejemplo, logística, transporte, comunicaciones). 3. Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y Resultados 229. Todos han convenido en la necesidad de aprovechar la experiencia acumulativa recogida sobre el terreno, pero no se ha hecho lo bastante por mejorar la capacidad del sistema para recoger esa experiencia o reutilizarla en la elaboración de doctrinas, planes, procedimientos ni mandatos operacionales. La labor de la Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y Resultados del DOMP existente no parece haber surtido gran efecto sobre la práctica de las operaciones de paz, y la recopilación de la experiencia adquirida parece tener lugar principalmente después de que una misión ha terminado. Esto es lamentable, ya que el sistema de mantenimiento de la paz día a día está creando nueva experiencia. Esa experiencia debería recogerse y retenerse en beneficio de otros encargados actuales de operaciones de paz y de futuras operaciones. La experiencia adquirida debería considerarse un aspecto de la gestión de información que contribuye a mejorar las operaciones en forma cotidiana. Los informes retrospectivos serían entonces sólo una parte de un proceso más vasto de adquisición de experiencia, el resumen de remate, en lugar del objetivo principal de todo el proceso. 230. El Grupo estima que esta función necesita reforzarse con urgencia y recomienda que se la sitúe donde pueda colaborar estrechamente con las operaciones en curso al igual que con la planificación de las misiones y la elaboración de doctrinas y directrices, y contribuir eficazmente a ello. El Grupo considera que quizás la mejor ubicación sea la Oficina de Operaciones, que supervisará las funciones de los equipos de tareas integrados de misión que propone el Grupo para integrar la planificación y el apoyo de las operaciones de paz en la Sede (véanse los párrafos 198 a 217 supra). La dependencia, al estar situada en un elemento del DOMP que por norma habitual incorporará representantes de muchos departamentos y organismos, podría actuar como “director de aprendizaje” de las operaciones de paz para todas esas instituciones, manteniendo y poniendo al día la memoria institucional a que podrían recurrir por igual las misiones y los equipos de tareas para lan0059473.doc 47 A/55/305 S/2000/809 solución de problemas, prácticas óptimas y prácticas que deben evitarse. 4. Personal directivo superior 231. Actualmente hay dos Subsecretarios Generales en el DOMP: uno para la Oficina de Operaciones y otro para la Oficina de Logística, Gestión y Actividades Relativas a las Minas (la DALAT y el Servicio de Actividades Relativas a las Minas). El Asesor Militar, que al mismo tiempo se desempeña como Director de la División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil, actualmente da cuenta al Secretario General Adjunto de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz por conducto de uno de los dos Subsecretarios Generales o directamente al Secretario General Adjunto, dependiendo del carácter de la cuestión de que se trate. 232. Habida cuenta de los diversos aumentos de la plantilla y ajustes estructurales que se proponen en las secciones anteriores, el Grupo estima que hay argumentos sólidos en favor de que se designe a un tercer Subsecretario General para el Departamento. El Grupo estima además que uno de los tres Subsecretarios Generales debería designarse como “Subsecretario General Principal” y actuar como adjunto del Secretario General Adjunto. 233. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre otros ajustes estructurales en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz: a) Debe reestructurarse la actual División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil, dejando a la Dependencia de Policía Civil fuera de la cadena de rendición de cuentas militar. Debería considerarse la posibilidad de mejorar el grado y la categoría del Asesor de Policía Civil; b) Debe reestructurarse la Oficina del Asesor Militar en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz de modo que corresponda más estrechamente a la forma en que están estructurados los cuarteles generales militares sobre el terreno en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas; c) Debería establecerse una nueva dependencia en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y dotársela del personal especializado competente para prestar asesoramiento sobre cuestiones de derecho penal que revisten importancia crítica para el uso eficaz de la policía civil en las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas; d) El Secretario General Adjunto de Gestión debería delegar autoridad y responsabilidad de las funciones de presupuestación y adquisición relacionadas con el mantenimiento de la paz en el Secretario General Adjunto de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, por un período de prueba de dos años;e) La Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y Resultados debe reforzarse apreciablemente y trasladarse a una Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz reorganizada; f) Debería considerarse la posibilidad de aumentar de dos a tres el número de Subsecretarios Generales en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, designándose a uno de los tres como “Subsecretario General Principal”, que actúe como adjunto del Secretario General Adjunto. D. Ajustes estructurales que son necesarios fuera del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz 234. Debe fortalecerse la planificación y el apoyo en materia de información pública en la Sede, al igual que los elementos en el DAP que prestan apoyo a las actividades de consolidación de la paz y las coordinan y que proporcionan apoyo electoral. Fuera de la Secretaría, debe reforzarse la capacidad de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos para planificar los componentes de derechos humanos de operaciones de paz y prestarles apoyo. 1. Apoyo operacional a la información pública 235. A diferencia de los componentes de las misiones militar, de policía civil, de actividades relativas a las minas, de logística, de telecomunicaciones y de otra índole, ninguna dependencia en la Sede tiene responsabilidad jerárquica concreta de las necesidades operacionales de los componentes de información pública en las operaciones de paz. La responsabilidad más concentrada de información pública relacionada con las misiones recae en la Oficina del Portavoz del Secretario General y los portavoces y las oficinas de48 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 información pública respectivas en las propias misiones. En la Sede, cuatro funcionarios del cuadro orgánico en la Sección de Paz y Seguridad, que forma parte de la División de Promoción y Servicios Públicos de la División de Asuntos Públicos del DIP, están encargados de producir publicaciones, elaborar y actualizar el contenido del sitio de la Web relativo a operaciones de paz y ocuparse de otras cuestiones que varían desde el desarme hasta la asistencia humanitaria. Si bien la Sección produce y gestiona información relativa al mantenimiento de la paz, ha tenido escasa capacidad para crear doctrinas, estrategia o procedimientos operacionales uniformes para las funciones de información pública sobre el terreno, salvo de manera esporádica y caso por caso. 236. La Sección de Paz y Seguridad del Departamento de Información Pública se está ampliando en cierto grado mediante redistribución interna de personal del DIP, pero debería ampliarse considerablemente y volverse operacional o bien debería trasladarse la función de apoyo al DOMP, posiblemente con la adscripción de algunos de sus funcionarios del DIP. 237. Dondequiera que se sitúe la función, debería prever las necesidades de información pública y la tecnología y los recursos humanos para satisfacerlas, fijar prioridades y procedimientos operacionales uniformes sobre el terreno, prestar apoyo en la etapa de iniciación de nuevas misiones y proporcionar apoyo y orientación permanentes mediante la participación en los equipos de tareas integrados de misión. 238. Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre ajustes estructurales en materia de información pública: debe crearse una dependencia de planificación y apoyo operacionales de la información pública en las operaciones de paz, ya sea dentro del DOMP o dentro de un nuevo servicio de información de paz y seguridad en el DIP que dé cuenta directamente al Secretario General Adjunto de Comunicación e Información Pública. 2. Apoyo a la consolidación de la paz en el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos 239. El Departamento de Asuntos Políticos (DAP) es el centro de coordinación designado para las actividades de consolidación de la paz de las Naciones Unidas y actualmente tiene el cometido de establecer, apoyar o asesorar oficinas de consolidación de la paz y misiones políticas especiales en cerca de 10 países, además de las actividades de cinco enviados y representantes del Secretario General a quienes se han asignado misiones de establecimiento de la paz o prevención de conflictos. Se prevé que los fondos con cargo al presupuesto ordinario en apoyo a estas actividades durante el próximo año civil sean inferiores en 31 millones de dólares, o sea en un 25%, a las necesidades. En efecto, dicha financiación con cargo a cuotas es relativamente rara en la esfera de la consolidación de la paz, en que la mayoría de las actividades se financian con cargo a donaciones voluntarias. 240. La Dependencia de Apoyo a la Consolidación de la Paz del DAP en gestación es una de dichas actividades. En su calidad de Presidente del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad y coordinador de las estrategias de consolidación de la paz, el Secretario General Adjunto de Asuntos Políticos debe poder coordinar la formulación de estrategias de dicha índole con los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad y otros elementos del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, especialmente aquellos en las esferas humanitaria y de desarrollo, habida cuenta del carácter multisectorial de la consolidación de la paz propiamente tal. Para lograrlo, la Secretaría está reuniendo contribuciones voluntarias de varios donantes para un proyecto experimental de tres años de duración en apoyo de la dependencia. Mientras evoluciona la planificación de esta dependencia experimental, el Grupo insta al DAP a que celebre consultas con todos los interesados en el sistema de las Naciones Unidas que puedan contribuir a su éxito, en particular el PNUD, que está haciendo renovado hincapié en la democracia, la buena gestión de los asuntos públicos y otras esferas relacionadas con la transición. 241. La Oficina Ejecutiva del DAP presta apoyo a algunas de las actividades operacionales de que éste se encarga, pero no está concebida como una oficina de apoyo a las actividades sobre el terreno ni está dotada para ello. La DALAT también presta apoyo a algunas de las misiones sobre el terreno que dirige el DAP, pero ni los presupuestos de esas misiones ni el presupuesto del DAP asignan recursos adicionales a la DALAT para este objeto. La División intenta satisfacer las demandas de las operaciones más reducidas de consolidación de la paz, pero reconoce que las operaciones más vastas imponen fuertes demandas de gran prioridad a su plantilla actual. Así pues, las necesidades de las misiones más pequeñas tienden a quedar postergadas. El DAP ha tenido experiencia satisfactoria con el apoyo de la Oficina de Servicios para Proyectos de las Nacionesn0059473.doc 49 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Unidas (UNOPS), un derivado del PNUD de cinco años de antigüedad que administra programas y fondos para muchos clientes dentro del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, utilizando prácticas modernas de gestión y derivando toda su financiación básica del cobro de un arancel de gestión de hasta el 13%. La UNOPS puede prestar apoyo de logística, gestión y contratación para misiones más pequeñas con bastante rapidez. 242. La División de Asistencia Electoral del DAP también depende de contribuciones voluntarias para satisfacer la demanda cada vez mayor de su asesoría técnica, misiones de evaluación de las necesidades y otras actividades que no entrañan directamente la observación de elecciones. Para junio de 2000 había pendientes 41 solicitudes de asistencia de los Estados Miembros, pero el fondo fiduciario en apoyo de dichas actividades sin fines especiales sólo contaba con el 8% de la financiación necesaria para satisfacer las necesidades corrientes hasta el fin del año civil 2001. Así pues, mientras crece de manera considerable la demanda de un elemento fundamental del fomento de instituciones democráticas hecho suyo por la Asamblea General en su resolución 46/137, el personal de la División de Asistencia Electoral primero debe conseguir los fondos de programas necesarios para realizar su labor. 243. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre apoyo a la consolidación de la paz en el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos: a) El Grupo apoya las gestiones de la Secretaría para crear una dependencia de consolidación de la paz experimental dentro del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos en cooperación con otros elementos integrantes de las Naciones Unidas y sugiere que los Estados Miembros examinen nuevamente la posibilidad de financiar esta dependencia con cargo al presupuesto ordinario si el programa experimental da buenos resultados. El programa debe evaluarse en el contexto de la orientación que ha facilitado el Grupo en el párrafo 46 supra y, si se considera la mejor opción posible para fortalecer la capacidad de consolidación de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, debe presentarse al Secretario General conforme a la recomendación que figura en el apartado d) del párrafo 47 supra; b) El Grupo recomienda que se aumenten considerablemente los recursos con cargo al presupuesto ordinario para los gastos programáticos de la División de Asistencia Electoral a fin de satisfacer la demanda de sus servicios en rápido aumento, en lugar de contribuciones voluntarias; c) Para aliviar la demanda sobre la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno y la Oficina Ejecutiva del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y para mejorar los servicios de apoyo prestados a las oficinas exteriores políticas y de consolidación de la paz más pequeñas, el Grupo recomienda que la adquisición, la logística, la contratación de personal y otros servicios de apoyo para dichas misiones no militares sobre el terreno más pequeñas sean de cargo de la Oficina de Servicios para Proyectos de las Naciones Unidas. 3. Apoyo a las operaciones de paz en la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos 244. La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos debe participar más íntimamente en la planificación y ejecución de los elementos de las operaciones de paz que se ocupan de los derechos humanos, especialmente las operaciones complejas. Actualmente, la Oficina tiene insuficientes recursos para participar de esa forma o proporcionar personal para prestar servicios sobre el terreno. Si las operaciones de las Naciones Unidas han de tener componentes eficaces de derechos humanos, la Oficina debería poder coordinar e institucionalizar la labor sobre el terreno en materia de derechos humanos en las operaciones de paz; adscribir personal a los equipos de tareas integrados de misión en Nueva York; contratar funcionarios de derechos humanos que actúen sobre el terreno; organizar la capacitación en derechos humanos para todo el personal de las operaciones de paz, incluidos los componentes relativos al orden público, y crear bases de datos modelo de actividades en materia de derechos humanos sobre el terreno. 245. Resumen de la recomendación principal sobre el fortalecimiento de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos: el Grupo recomienda que se refuerce apreciablemente la capacidad para planificación y preparación de misiones sobre el terreno de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos, con financiación en parte con cargo al presupuesto ordinario y en parte con cargo a los presupuestos de las misiones de operaciones de paz.50 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 V. Operaciones de la paz y la era de la información 246. En muchas partes del presente informe se intercalan referencias a la necesidad de vincular mejor el sistema de paz y seguridad; facilitar las comunicaciones y la puesta en común de datos; dar al personal los instrumentos que necesita para su trabajo; y, en última instancia, permitir a las Naciones Unidas que sean más eficaces en la prevención de conflictos y en la prestación de ayuda a las sociedades para que vuelvan a la normalidad después de la guerra. Una tecnología de la información moderna, bien utilizada, es fundamental para permitir alcanzar muchos de estos objetivos. En la presente sección se toma nota de las lagunas en la estrategia, la política y la práctica que dificultan a las Naciones Unidas utilizar eficazmente la tecnología de la información, y se hacen recomendaciones para cubrirlas. A. Tecnología de la información en las operaciones de paz: cuestiones de estrategia y de política 247. El problema de la estrategia y la política de la tecnología de la información es mayor que el de las operaciones de paz y se hace extensivo al sistema de las Naciones Unidas en su totalidad. El contexto más amplio de la tecnología de la información suele salirse del mandato del Grupo, pero el mayor alcance de los problemas no debe excluir la adopción de normas comunes para los usuarios de la tecnología de la información para las operaciones de paz y para las dependencias de la Sede que les prestan apoyo. El Servicio de Comunicaciones de la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno puede proporcionar las conexiones vía satélite y las posibilidades de conexión a nivel local sobre las cuales las misiones pueden construir redes y bases de datos eficaces de tecnología de la información, pero es necesario mejorar la estrategia y la política para la comunidad de usuarios a fin de que puedan aprovechar las bases tecnológicas que se están estableciendo. 248. Cuando las Naciones Unidas despliegan una misión sobre el terreno, es fundamental que sus elementos puedan intercambiar datos con facilidad. Todas las operaciones complejas de paz reúnen a muchos elementos diferentes: organismos, fondos y programas de todo el sistema de las Naciones Unidas, así como los departamentos de la Secretaría; contratados para la misión que no están familiarizados con el sistema de las Naciones Unidas; en ocasiones, organizaciones regionales; frecuentemente, organismos de ayuda bilateral; y siempre, docenas de centenares de organizaciones no gubernamentales humanitarias y de desarrollo. Todos ellos necesitan un mecanismo que facilite la puesta en común de información e ideas de manera eficaz, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta que cada uno de ellos es una pequeña punta de un gran iceberg burocrático con su propia cultura, métodos de trabajo y objetivos. 249. Una tecnología de la información mal planificada e integrada plantea obstáculos a la cooperación. Cuando no existen normas convenidas para la estructura y el intercambio de datos al nivel de aplicación, la “superposición” entre ambos supone una laboriosa recodificación manual, que tiende a derrotar los objetivos de invertir en un medio ambiente de trabajo basado en la red y muy computadorizado. Las consecuencias también pueden ser más graves que la simple pérdida de tiempo: oscilan de la mala comunicación de las políticas hasta no lograr “dar a conocer al mundo” las amenazas a la seguridad u otros cambios importantes en el medio ambiente operacional. 250. La ironía de los sistemas de datos distribuidos y descentralizados es que necesitan ese tipo de normas comunes para funcionar. Es difícil dar soluciones comunes a los problemas de la tecnología de la información en los niveles superiores —entre los componentes sustantivos de una operación, entre las oficinas sustantivas en la Sede, o entre la Sede y el resto del sistema de las Naciones Unidas— en parte porque la formulación de políticas sobre sistemas operacionales de información está dispersa. En particular, la Sede carece de un centro de responsabilidad suficientemente sólido a nivel de los usuarios para las estrategias y políticas de tecnología de la información de las operaciones de paz. En el gobierno o la industria, esta responsabilidad pertenecería a un jefe de servicios de información. El Grupo cree que las Naciones Unidas necesita que alguien en la Sede, preferentemente en la SIAE, desempeñe esa función, supervisando el desarrollo y la aplicación de la estrategia de tecnología de la información y las normas de los usuarios. Ese oficial también debería formular y supervisar programas de formación en tecnología de la información, tanto en los manuales para el exterior como en la formación práctica: la necesidad de esto es sustancial y no debe ser subestimada. Los contrapartes de la oficina del Representanten0059473.doc 51 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Especial del Secretario General en cada misión sobre el terreno deben supervisar la aplicación de la estrategia común de tecnología de la información así como la formación sobre el terreno, complementando y desarrollando la labor de la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno y de la División de Servicios de Tecnología de la Información del Departamento de Gestión en cuanto a proporcionar estructuras y servicios básicos de tecnología de la información. 251. Resumen de la recomendación sobre la estrategia y la política de la tecnología de la información: los departamentos encargados de la paz y la seguridad en la Sede necesitan contar con un centro de responsabilidad que formule y supervise la aplicación de una estrategia común de tecnología de la información e imparta capacitación en operaciones de paz, que tenga su centro en la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico. También debe nombrarse contrapartes de misión para ese centro de responsabilidad para que presten servicios en las oficinas del Representante Especial del Secretario General en las operaciones de paz complejas a fin de supervisar la aplicación de esa estrategia. B. Instrumentos para la gestión de los conocimientos 252. La tecnología puede contribuir a asimilar la información y las experiencias y a difundirlas. Puede utilizarse mucho mejor para ayudar a participantes muy diversos que trabajan en la zona de operaciones de una misión de las Naciones Unidas a adquirir y compartir datos de manera sistemática y que se refuerce mutuamente. Las comunidades de desarrollo y socorro humanitario de las Naciones Unidas, por ejemplo, trabajan en la mayoría de los lugares en los que las Naciones Unidas han desplegado operaciones de paz. Estos equipos nacionales de las Naciones Unidas, además de las organizaciones no gubernamentales que desempeñan trabajos complementarios a nivel popular, habrán estado en la región mucho antes de la llegada de una operación de paz compleja y permanecerán en ella después de que la misión haya partido. En conjunto, tendrán un caudal de conocimientos y experiencias locales que podrían ayudar en la planificación y aplicación de las operaciones de paz. Un servicio de facilitación de datos electrónico, administrado por la SIAE, que se encargara de intercambiar estos datos, podría prestar asistencia en la planificación y ejecución de la misión y también ayudar en la prevención y evaluación de los conflictos. La participación adecuada de estos datos, y de los datos reunidos con posterioridad al despliegue por los diversos componentes de una operación de paz, así como su utilización con los sistemas de información geográfica (SIG), podrían crear instrumentos importantes para seguir la pista de las necesidades y los problemas en la zona de la misión, así como de las consecuencias de los planes de acción. Se podría asignar a cada equipo de misión especialistas en SIG, además de recursos de formación en SIG. 253. En la labor humanitaria y de reconstrucción realizada en Kosovo desde 1998 pueden observarse ejemplos de las actuales aplicaciones de los SIG. El Centro Comunitario de información sobre asuntos humanitarios ha puesto en común datos de los SIG producidos por fuentes tales como el Centro de Satélites de Europa Occidental, el Centro de Remoción de Minas Humanitaria de Ginebra, la KFOR, el Instituto Yugoslavo de Estadísticas y el Grupo Internacional de Administración. Estos datos se han combinado para crear un atlas que se ha puesto a disposición del público en los sitios de las redes de esas fuentes, en CD–ROM para quienes no tienen acceso a Internet o tienen un acceso lento, y en forma impresa. 254. Las simulaciones por computador pueden constituir importantes instrumentos de aprendizaje para el personal de la misión y las partes locales. En principio, se pueden crear simulaciones para cualquier componente de una operación. Las simulaciones pueden facilitar la solución de problemas dentro de un grupo y revelar a las partes locales las consecuencias a veces imprevistas de sus opciones de política. Con conexiones de Internet pertinentes y amplias, las simulaciones pueden integrarse en las series de instrumentos de aprendizaje a distancia que se preparan para una nueva operación y se utilizan para impartir formación previa a los recién reclutados en una misión. 255. Un espacio mejorado sobre paz y seguridad en la Intranet de las Naciones Unidas (la red de información de la Organización que está abierta a una serie determinada de usuarios) constituiría una valiosa adición a la planificación, el análisis y la ejecución de las operaciones de paz. A modo de división de la red más amplia, se concentraría en unir cuestiones de información relativas directamente a la paz y la seguridad, incluidos análisis de la SIAE, informes de situación, mapas de SIG, y conexiones con las experiencias obtenidas. El establecimiento de diversos niveles de acceso52 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 de seguridad podría facilitar la comunicación de información delicada entre grupos limitados. 256. Los datos que figuran en la Intranet deben conectarse a una Extranet de operaciones de paz que utilizaría las comunicaciones existentes y previstas de la red de zona para unir las bases de datos de la SIAE y las oficinas sustantivas con los de las oficinas sobre el terreno, y a las misiones sobre el terreno entre sí. La Extranet de Operaciones de Paz podría contener toda la información administrativa, de procedimiento y jurídica para las operaciones de paz y proporcionar un acceso único a la información generada por muchas fuentes, dar a los encargados de la planificación la capacidad de producir más rápidamente informes amplios y aumentar la puntualidad de la respuesta a las situaciones de emergencia. 257. Algunos componentes de la misión, como la policía civil y las dependencias conexas de justicia penal y los investigadores de derechos humanos, requieren una mayor seguridad para su red, así como los sistemas y programas cibernéticos que puedan apoyar los niveles requeridos de almacenamiento, transmisión y análisis de datos. Dos tecnologías fundamentales para la policía civil, son los SIG y los programas de cartografía de delitos, utilizados para convertir datos generales en representaciones geográficas que ilustran las tendencias en materia de delito y otra información fundamental, facilitan el reconocimiento de las pautas y los acontecimientos, o subrayan las características especiales de las zonas problemáticas, mejorando la capacidad de la policía civil para combatir el delito o asesorar a sus contrapartes locales. 258. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales para los instrumentos de tecnología de la información en las operaciones de paz: a) La Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico, en cooperación con la División de Servicios de Tecnología de la Información, debe aplicar un elemento mejorado de operaciones de la paz en la actual Intranet de las Naciones Unidas y conectarlo a las misiones por conducto de una Extranet para las operaciones de paz; b) Las operaciones de paz podrían beneficiarse considerablemente de un uso más generalizado de la tecnología de los sistemas de información geográfica, que integran rápidamente la información operacional en los mapas electrónicos de la zona de la misión, para aplicaciones tan diversas como la desmovilización, las funciones de policía civil, el registro de los votantes, la vigilancia de los derechos humanos y la reconstrucción; c) Las necesidades de tecnología de la información de componentes de la misión que tienen necesidades exclusivas de tecnología de la información, como los de policía civil y derechos humanos, deben preverse y atenderse de una manera más coherente en la planificación y aplicación de la misión. C. Aumento de la puntualidad de la información pública basada en Internet 259. Como observó el Grupo en la sección III supra, para crear y mantener el apoyo a las misiones actuales y a las del futuro es esencial comunicar con eficacia al público la labor de las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas. No solamente es esencial crear una imagen positiva desde el principio para establecer un ambiente de trabajo favorable, sino que también es importante mantener una campaña sólida de información pública para conseguir y mantener el apoyo de la comunidad internacional. 260. El órgano actualmente responsable de comunicar la labor de las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas es la sección de Paz y Seguridad del DIP de la Sede, del que se habló en la sección IV supra. Un funcionario del DIP tiene la responsabilidad de publicar en el sitio de la red toda la información relativa a la paz y la seguridad, además de todas las informaciones que aporta la misión para uso de la red, a fin de garantizar que la información publicada es coherente y compatible con las normas de la red para la Sede. 261. El Grupo apoya la aplicación de normas, pero la normalización no tiene por qué significar centralización. El actual proceso de producción de noticias y publicación de datos en el sitio de la red de las Naciones Unidas hace más lento el ciclo de actualizaciones, pero sin embargo las actualizaciones cotidianas pueden ser importantes para una misión en una situación de rápido cambio. También limita la cantidad de información que puede presentarse sobre cada misión. 262. El DIP y el personal sobre el terreno han manifestado interés en reducir este estancamiento mediante el desarrollo de un modelo de “gestión conjuntan0059473.doc 53 A/55/305 S/2000/809 del sitio de la red”. A juicio del Grupo, esta solución parece adecuada para este estancamiento de información particular. 263. Resumen de las recomendaciones principales sobre puntualidad de la información pública con base en Internet: el Grupo alienta el desarrollo de una gestión conjunta del sitio de la red por la Sede y las misiones sobre el terreno, en la que la Sede mantendría la función de supervisión pero cada una de las misiones contarían con personal autorizado para producir y colocar información en la red amoldada a unas normas y políticas de presentación básicas. * * * 264. En el presente informe, el Grupo ha hecho hincapié en la necesidad de cambiar la estructura y las prácticas de la Organización a fin de permitirle que desempeñe con mayor eficacia sus responsabilidades en apoyo de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y el respeto de los derechos humanos. Algunos de estos cambios no serían viables sin las nuevas capacidades que ofrecen las tecnologías de información en la red. El informe mismo no habría podido prepararse sin las tecnologías de que ya dispone la Sede de las Naciones Unidas y a las que tienen acceso los miembros del Grupo en todas las regiones del mundo. El público utiliza instrumentos eficaces, y una tecnología de la información eficaz puede utilizarse mucho mejor en aras de la paz. VI. Dificultades para la aplicación de las recomendaciones 265. Este informe, en el que se presentan recomendaciones para la reforma, tiene dos destinatarios, a saber, los Estados Miembros y la Secretaría. Reconocemos que la reforma no se llevará a cabo si los Estados Miembros no se lo proponen efectivamente. Al mismo tiempo, consideramos que los cambios que hemos recomendado para la Secretaría deben ser promovidos activamente por el Secretario General y ejecutados por los funcionarios superiores. 266. Los Estados Miembros deben reconocer que las Naciones Unidas son la suma de sus partes y que la responsabilidad primordial por la reforma recae precisamente en ellos. Los fracasos de las Naciones Unidas no pueden atribuirse exclusivamente a la Secretaría, ni a los comandantes de los contingentes ni a los directores de las misiones sobre el terreno; en su mayor parte se han debido a que el Consejo de Seguridad y los Estados Miembros han formulado y respaldado mandatos ambiguos e incoherentes para cuya ejecución no se ha aportado financiación suficiente, y luego se han limitado a observar el fracaso de esos mandatos, en ocasiones incluso expresando públicamente sus críticas en tanto que la credibilidad de las Naciones Unidas se veía sometida a sus más duras pruebas. 267. Los problemas de mando y control que se presentaron hace poco en Sierra Leona son el ejemplo más reciente de una situación que ya no puede tolerarse. Los países que aportan contingentes deben cerciorarse de que éstos comprendan plenamente la importancia de mantener una línea de mando integrada, de que el control de las operaciones quede en manos del Secretario General y de que se observen los procedimientos operacionales estándar y las normas para entablar combate establecidas para la misión. Es indispensable que se comprenda y respete la línea de mando de las operaciones y que los gobiernos de los diversos países se abstengan de impartir instrucciones a los comandantes de sus contingentes en materia operacional. 268. Estamos conscientes de que el Secretario General está llevando a cabo un amplio programa de reforma y reconocemos que puede ser necesario adaptar nuestras recomendaciones para integrarlas en ese contexto más amplio. Por otra parte, las reformas que hemos recomendado para la Secretaría y el sistema de las Naciones Unidas en general no podrán efectuarse de inmediato, aunque algunas exigen atención urgente. Reconocemos que en toda burocracia es normal que haya resistencia al cambio y nos complacemos de que algunos de los cambios que hemos propuesto como recomendaciones hayan tenido su origen en el propio sistema. También nos alienta la determinación del Secretario General de conducir a la Secretaría hacia la reforma, aunque para ello sea necesario desconocer normas de organización y procedimiento establecidas desde hace mucho tiempo y cuestionar y modificar algunos aspectos de las prioridades y la mentalidad de la Secretaría. En ese contexto, instamos al Secretario General a designar a un funcionario de categoría superior para que se encargue de supervisar la aplicación de las recomendaciones del presente informe. 269. El Secretario General ha insistido siempre en la necesidad de que las Naciones Unidas establezcan nexos con la sociedad civil y fortalezcan sus relaciones con las organizaciones no gubernamentales, las54 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 instituciones académicas y los medios de comunicación, que pueden ser aliados eficaces en la tarea de promover la paz y la seguridad para todos. Exhortamos a la Secretaría a tener presente esos criterios del Secretario General y a aplicarlos en su labor en favor de la paz y la seguridad. Pedimos a los funcionarios que tengan en cuenta en todo momento que las Naciones Unidas a las que prestan sus servicios representan la más importante organización universal. Los pueblos de todo el mundo tienen el pleno derecho de considerarla como propia y, por tanto, de emitir juicios sobre sus actividades y sobre los funcionarios que la integran. 270. Hay grandes diferencias en el desempeño del personal de la Secretaría que se ocupa de las funciones relativas a la paz y la seguridad en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, la División de Asuntos Públicos y otros departamentos competentes. Esta observación se refiere tanto a los civiles contratados por la Secretaría como al personal militar y de policía civil propuesto por los Estados Miembros. Tales diferencias son ampliamente reconocidas por quienes forman parte del sistema. A los funcionarios de mayor rendimiento se les impone una carga de trabajo excesiva para compensar las deficiencias de los menos capaces. Naturalmente, esto puede ser perjudicial para la moral de los funcionarios y puede crear resentimientos, especialmente entre quienes señalan con razón que las Naciones Unidas no han dedicado atención suficiente a través de los años a la promoción de las perspectivas de carrera, la capacitación y la orientación profesional, o a la tarea de implantar prácticas de gestión modernas. En pocas palabras, las Naciones Unidas hoy distan mucho de ser una meritocracia y si no se adoptan las medidas necesarias para transformarla, no se podrá contrarrestar la tendencia alarmante de que los funcionarios calificados, en particular los jóvenes, abandonen la Organización. Si la contratación, los ascensos y la delegación de funciones se basan en gran medida en la antigüedad o en las conexiones personales o políticas, los más calificados no tendrán ningún incentivo para ingresar a la Organización o permanecer en ella. Si los administradores de todos los niveles, comenzando por el Secretario General y sus funcionarios superiores, no se ocupan seriamente de este problema con carácter prioritario, no recompensan el desempeño sobresaliente y despiden a los incompetentes, se seguirán derrochando recursos y será imposible efectuar una reforma duradera. 271. Debe considerarse con igual rigor la labor del personal de las misiones de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno. En su mayoría, este encarna el ideal del funcionario público internacional, dispuesto a trasladarse a sitios asolados por la guerra y plagados de peligros para ayudar a mejorar las condiciones de vida de los más desfavorecidos, con un enorme sacrificio personal y, en ocasiones, grandes riesgos para su integridad física y mental. Esos funcionarios merecen el reconocimiento y la apreciación del mundo. A través de los años, muchos de ellos han dado la vida por la paz y es oportuno que aquí rindamos homenaje a su memoria. 272. El personal de las Naciones Unidas sobre el terreno, tal vez más que cualquier otro, tiene la obligación de respetar las normas, la cultura y las prácticas locales. Debe hacer todo lo que esté de su mano para demostrar ese respeto, en primer lugar, familiarizándose con el entorno de sus anfitriones y procurando aprender todo lo que pueda del idioma y la cultura locales. Su comportamiento debe basarse en el claro entendimiento de que es huésped en casa ajena aunque esa casa se encuentre en ruinas. Esto es importante especialmente cuando las Naciones Unidas cumplen las funciones de una administración de transición. Además, los funcionarios de las Naciones Unidas deben tratarse entre ellos con respeto y dignidad, mostrando una particular sensibilidad por las diferencias culturales y de género. 273. En breve, consideramos que se deben mantener normas muy altas para la selección del personal de la Sede y el personal sobre el terreno, y exigir también un alto estándar de conducta a ese personal. Cuando los funcionarios de las Naciones Unidas no cumplan las normas establecidas, se los debe hacer responsables. En el pasado, a la Secretaría le ha resultado difícil responsabilizar a los funcionarios superiores sobre el terreno, porque estos han podido señalar la insuficiencia de recursos, la imprecisión de las instrucciones o la falta de mecanismos adecuados de mando y control como impedimentos importantes para la eficaz ejecución del mandato de la misión. Esas deficiencias deben corregirse pero no se debe permitir que se invoquen para justificar a los funcionarios poco eficientes. El futuro de las naciones, la vida de las personas a quienes las Naciones Unidas deben ayudar y proteger, el éxito de las misiones y la credibilidad de la Organización pueden depender de lo que unos pocos individuos hagan o dejen de hacer. Quienes resulten incompetentes para lan0059473.doc 55 A/55/305 S/2000/809 tarea que han prometido cumplir deben ser retirados de la misión, sea cual fuera su nivel jerárquico. 274. Los propios Estados Miembros reconocen que ellos también necesitan reflexionar sobre su actitud y sus métodos de trabajo, al menos en lo que respecta a la ejecución de las actividades de las Naciones Unidas en favor de la paz y la seguridad. El procedimiento establecido de pronunciar declaraciones y el difícil proceso subsiguiente de lograr el consenso hacen que se ponga mayor énfasis en la gestión diplomática que en el resultado de las operaciones. Una de las principales ventajas que ofrecen las Naciones Unidas es que constituyen un foro en el que los 189 Estados Miembros intercambian opiniones sobre los más apremiantes problemas mundiales; sin embargo, el diálogo por sí solo muchas veces no basta para lograr que triunfen, frente a grandes obstáculos, las costosísimas operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, o las gestiones decisivas de prevención de conflictos o de establecimiento de la paz. Es preciso que las manifestaciones generales de apoyo que se consignan en las declaraciones y resoluciones vayan acompañadas de medidas prácticas. 275. Por otra parte, puede ocurrir que los Estados Miembros creen impresiones contradictorias en cuanto a las medidas que proponen, cuando sus representantes expresan apoyo político en un órgano determinado, mientras que en otro niegan a esas medidas el necesario apoyo financiero. Se ha observado esa incoherencia entre las declaraciones pronunciadas en las sesiones de la Quinta Comisión que se ocupa de los asuntos administrativos y presupuestarios, y en las sesiones del Consejo de Seguridad y del Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. 276. A nivel político, muchos de los partidos locales con los que tratan diariamente los encargados del mantenimiento de la paz y el establecimiento de la paz no respetan ni temen las condenas verbales del Consejo de Seguridad. Corresponde pues a los miembros del Consejo, y a los Estados Miembros en general, hacer efectivas las palabras que pronuncian, como lo hizo la delegación del Consejo de Seguridad que viajó a Yakarta y Dili tras la crisis surgida en Timor Oriental el año pasado, claro ejemplo de la acción efectiva del Consejo: res, non verba. 277. Al mismo tiempo, la estrechez financiera que aflige a las Naciones Unidas continúa socavando gravemente su capacidad de llevar a cabo las operaciones de paz de manera convincente y profesional. Instamos por tanto a los Estados Miembros a que cumplan las obligaciones adquiridas en virtud de tratados y paguen sus cuotas en su totalidad, oportunamente y sin condiciones. 278. Estamos conscientes asimismo de que hay otros problemas que entorpecen directa o indirectamente la acción efectiva de las Naciones Unidas en el ámbito de la paz y la seguridad. Entre éstos hay dos problemas aún no resueltos que no están incluidos en el mandato del Grupo, aunque son decisivos para las operaciones de paz, y que sólo pueden resolver los Estados Miembros. Se trata de los desacuerdos concernientes al prorrateo de las cuotas para la financiación de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz y la representación equitativa en el Consejo de Seguridad. Abrigamos la esperanza de que los Estados Miembros encuentren la forma de resolver sus diferencias en esos aspectos en cumplimiento de la responsabilidad internacional colectiva estipulada en la Carta. 279. Hacemos un llamamiento a los dirigentes del mundo reunidos en la Cumbre del Milenio para que, a la vez que reafirman su dedicación a los ideales de las Naciones Unidas, se comprometan también a reforzar la capacidad de la Organización para que pueda cumplir cabalmente el cometido que es razón fundamental de su existencia: ayudar a los pueblos sumidos en conflictos y mantener o restablecer la paz. 280. Al tratar de llegar a un consenso sobre las recomendaciones de este informe, nosotros, los miembros del Grupo de operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, hemos forjado también una visión común de las Naciones Unidas, como entidad que tiende una mano firme de ayuda a las comunidades, países o regiones para evitar los conflictos o poner fin a la violencia. Queremos ver a los representantes especiales del Secretario General llevar a buen fin sus misiones, habiendo ofrecido a la población de los países la oportunidad de lograr por sí misma lo que antes estaba fuera de su alcance: establecer y mantener la paz, conseguir la reconciliación, fortalecer la democracia o garantizar el respeto de los derechos humanos. Imaginamos, ante todo, a unas Naciones Unidas que no sólo tengan la voluntad, sino también la capacidad necesaria para cumplir su noble cometido, justificando así la confianza que ha puesto en ellas la inmensa mayoría de la humanidad.56 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Anexo I Miembros del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas Sr. J. Brian Atwood (Estados Unidos), Presidente de Citizens International; ex Presidente del National Democratic Institute; ex Administrador de la Agencia de los Estados Unidos para el Desarrollo Internacional. Sr. Lakhdar Brahimi (Argelia), ex Ministro de Relaciones Exteriores; Presidente del Grupo. Embajador Colin Granderson (Trinidad y Tabago), Director Ejecutivo de la Misión Civil Internacional de la Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA) y las Naciones Unidas en Haití, 1993-2000; Jefe de las misiones de la OEA de observación de las elecciones en Haití (1995-1997) y Suriname (2000). Dame Ann Hercus (Nueva Zelandia), ex Ministra del Gabinete y Representante Permanente de Nueva Zelandia ante las Naciones Unidas; Jefa de Misión de la Fuerza de las Naciones Unidas para el Mantenimiento de la Paz en Chipre (UNFICYP), 1998-1999. Sr. Richard Monk (Reino Unido) ex miembro de la Inspección de Policía de Su Majestad y asesor del Gobierno sobre cuestiones de policía internacional; Comisionado de la Fuerza Internacional de Policía de las Naciones Unidas en Bosnia y Herzegovina (1998-1999). General retirado Klaus Naumann (Alemania), Jefe de Defensa, 1991-1996; Presidente del Comité Militar de la Organización del Tratado del Atlántico Norte (OTAN), 1996-1999, con responsabilidades de supervisión en las operaciones de la Fuerza de Aplicación del Acuerdo de Paz y la Fuerza de Estabilización en Bosnia y Herzegovina y en la campaña aérea de la NATO en Kosovo. Sra. Hisako Shimura (Japón), Presidenta de Tsuda College, Tokio; se desempeñó 24 años en la Secretaría de las Naciones Unidas retirándose en 1995 como Directora de la División de Europa y América Latina del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. Embajador Vladimir Shustov (Federación de Rusia), Embajador especial con 30 años de relación con las Naciones Unidas; ex Representante Permanente Adjunto ante las Naciones Unidas en Nueva York; ex Representante de la Federación de Rusia ante la Organización para la Seguridad y la Cooperación en Europa. General Philip Sibanda (Zimbabwe), Jefe de Estado Mayor, Operaciones y Entrenamiento, cuartel general del Ejército de Zimbabwe, Harare; ex Comandante de la Fuerza en la Misión de Verificación de las Naciones Unidas en Angola (UNAVEM III) y la Misión de Observadores de las Naciones Unidas en Angola (MONUA), 1995-1998. Dr. Cornelio Sommaruga (Suiza), Presidente de la Fundación para el Rearme Moral, Caux y del Centro Internacional de Ginebra de Remoción Humanitaria de Minas; ex Presidente del Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja, 1987-1999.n0059473.doc 57 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Oficina del Presidente del Grupo sobre las Operaciones de Paz de las Naciones Unidas Dr. William Durch, Asociado Principal del Henry L. Stimson Center; Director de Proyectos. Sr. Salman Ahmed, Oficial de Asuntos Políticos, Secretaría de las Naciones Unidas. Sra. Clare Kane, Auxiliar Personal, Secretaría de las Naciones Unidas. Sra. Caroline Earle, Investigadora, Stimson Center. Sr. J. Edward Palmisano, miembro del Stimson Center (Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellow).58 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Anexo II Bibliografía Documentos de las Naciones Unidas Annan, Kofi A. Prevención de la guerra y los desastres: un desafío mundial que va en aumento. Memoria anual sobre la labor de la Organización, 1999. (A/54/1) __________. Alianza para una comunidad mundial. Memoria anual sobre la labor de la Organización, 1998. (A/53/1) __________. Afrontar el reto humanitario: hacia una cultura de la prevención. (ST/DPI/2070) __________. Nosotros los pueblos: la función de las Naciones Unidas en el siglo XXI. Informe del Milenio. (A/54/2000) Consejo Económico y Social. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna titulado “Evaluación a fondo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz: fase de puesta en marcha”. (E/AC.51/1995/2 y Corr.1) __________. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna titulado “Evaluación a fondo de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz: fase de terminación”. (E/AC.51/1996/3 y Corr.1) __________. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna titulado “Examen trienal de la aplicación de las recomendaciones sobre la evaluación de la fase de puesta en marcha de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz formuladas por el Comité del Programa y de la Coordinación en su 35° período de sesiones”. (E/AC.51/1998/4 y Corr.1) __________. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna titulado “Examen trienal de las recomendaciones sobre la evaluación de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz formuladas por el Comité del Programa y de la Coordinación en su 36° período de sesiones: fase de terminación”. (E/AC.51/1999/5) Asamblea General. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna sobre el examen de la División de Administración y Logística sobre el Terreno, Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. (A/49/959) __________. Informe del Secretario General titulado “Renovación de las Naciones Unidas: un programa de reforma”. (A/51/950) __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre las causas de los conflictos y el fomento de la paz duradera y el desarrollo sostenible en África. (A/52/871) __________. Informe del Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. (A/54/87 y Corr.1) __________. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna sobre la auditoría de la gestión de los contratos de servicios y de adquisición de raciones para las misiones de mantenimiento de la paz. (A/54/335) __________. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe anual de la Oficina de Servicios de Supervisión Interna sobre el período comprendido entre el 1° de julio de 1998 y el 30 de junio de 1999. (A/54/393) __________. Nota del Secretario General por la que se transmite el informe del Representante Especial del Secretario General sobre los niños y los conflictos armados titulado “La protección de los niños afectados por conflictos armados”. (A/54/430) __________. Informe del Secretario General presentado de conformidad con la resolución 53/55 de la Asamblea General, titulado “La caída de Srebrenica”. (A/54/549) __________. Informe del Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. (A/54/839)n0059473.doc 59 A/55/305 S/2000/809 __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre la aplicación de las recomendaciones del Comité Especial de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. (A/54/670) Asamblea General y Consejo de Seguridad. Informe del Secretario General presentado de conformidad con la declaración aprobada el 31 de enero de 1992 en la Reunión en la Cumbre del Consejo de Seguridad titulado “Un programa de paz: diplomacia preventiva, establecimiento de la paz y mantenimiento de la paz”. (A/47/277-S/24111) __________. Documento de posición del Secretario General presentado con ocasión del cincuentenario de las Naciones Unidas, titulado “Suplemento de un Programa de Paz”. (A/50/60-S/1995/1) __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre los niños y los conflictos armados. (A/55/163-S/2000/712) Consejo de Seguridad. Informe del Secretario General sobre la protección de la asistencia humanitaria a refugiados y otros que se encuentren en situaciones de conflicto. (S/1998/883) __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre el aumento de la capacidad de África en el ámbito del mantenimiento de la paz. (S/1999/171) __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre los acuerdos de fuerzas de reserva para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. (S/1999/361) __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre la protección de los civiles en los conflictos armados. (S/1999/957) __________. Informe de la Comisión Independiente de investigación acerca de las medidas adoptadas por las Naciones Unidas durante el genocidio de 1994 en Rwanda, al que se adjunta carta de fecha 15 de diciembre de 1999 dirigida al Presidente del Consejo de Seguridad por el Secretario General. (S/1999/1257) __________. Informe del Secretario General sobre la función de las Operaciones de las Naciones Unidas para el mantenimiento de la paz en el proceso de desarme, desmovilización y reintegración. (S/2000/101) __________. Carta de fecha 10 de marzo de 2000 dirigida al Presidente del Consejo de Seguridad por el Presidente del Comité del Consejo de Seguridad establecido en virtud de la resolución 864 (1999), relativa a la situación de Angola, a la que se adjunta el informe final del Grupo de Expertos en violaciones de las sanciones impuestas por el Consejo de Seguridad a la UNITA. (S/2000/203) Secretario General. Declaración formulada por el Secretario General en la Universidad de Georgetown. (SG/SM/6901) comunicado de prensa Boletín del Secretario General. Observancia del derecho internacional humanitario por las fuerzas de las Naciones Unidas. (ST/SGB/1999/13) Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo. Governance foundations for post-conflict situations: UNDP'experience. Documento de debate preparado por la División de Desarrollo de la Gestión y Buena Administración Pública del PNUD, enero de 2000. Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos. Annual appeal 2000: overview of activities and financial requirements. Ginebra. Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados. Catalogue of emergency response tools. Documento preparado por la Sección de Preparación y Respuesta ante Situaciones de Emergencia. Ginebra, 2000. Instituto de las Naciones Unidas para Formación Profesional e Investigaciones (UNITAR), Institute of Policy Studies of Singapur (IPS) y National Institute for Research Advancement of Japan. Report of the 1997 Singapore Conference: humanitarian action and peacekeeping operations. Nueva York, 1977. UNITAR, IPS y Japan Institute of International Affairs. The nexus between peacekeeping and peacebuilding: debriefing and lessons. Draft report of the 1999 Singapore Conference. Nueva York, 2000.60 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Goulding, Marrack. Practical measures to enhance the United Nations' effectiveness in the field of peace and security. Informe presentado al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. Nueva York, 30 de junio de 1997. Otras fuentes Berdal, Mats, y David M. Malone (directores). Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000.Berman, Eric G., y Katie E. Sams. Peacekeeping in Africa: capabilities and culpabilities. (UNIDIR/2000/3) Bigombe, Betty, Paul Collier y Nicholas Sambanis. Policies for building post–conflict peace. Ponencia presentada en una reunión de un grupo especial de expertos sobre la economía de los conflictos civiles en África, 7 y 8 de abril de 2000, organizada por la Comisión Económica para África. Blechman, Barry M., William J. Durch, Wendy Eaton y Julie Werbel. Effective transitions from peace operations to sustainable peace: final report. DFI International, Washington, D.C., septiembre de 1997. Childers, Erskine, y Brian Urquhart. Towards a More Effective United Nations: Two Studies. Uppsala, Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, 1992. Collier, Paul. Economic causes of civil conflict and their implications for policy. En Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson y Pamela Aall, Managing Global Chaos. Washington, D.C., United States Institute of Peace, en prensa. Cousens, Elizabeth M., Donald Rothchild y Stephen John Stedmand (directores). Ending Civil Wars, vol. II, Evaluating Peace Implementation, New York, Center for International Security and Cooperation of Stanford University e International Peace Academy, en prensa. De Soto, Alvaro, y Graciana del Castillo. Implementation of comprehensive peace agreements: staying the course in El Salvador. Global Governance, vol. 1, No. 2 (mayo-junio de 1995). Doyle, Michael W., y Nicholas Sambanis. International peacebuilding: a theoretical and quantitative analysis. Ponencia presentada en una conferencia del Center of International Studies y el Banco Mundial, Princeton University, 17 y 18 de marzo de 2000. Fafo Programme for International Cooperation and Conflict Resolution. Command from the saddle: managing United Nations peacebuilding missions. Informe con recomendaciones de un foro sobre los Representantes Especiales del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, dedicado al tema “Conformando la función de las Naciones Unidas en la aplicación de la paz”. Oslo, Peace Implementation Network, 1999. Fainberg, Anthony, Alan Shaw, Dean Cheng, Xavier Maruyama y Donald Gallagher. Technology for international peace operations. Washington, D.C., Institute for Technology Assessment, marzo de 1998. Forman, Shepard, Stewart Patrick y Dirk Salomons. Recovering from conflict: strategy for an international response. New York University, Center on International Cooperation, febrero de 2000. Fowler, Robert R. Informe del Grupo de Expertos en violaciones de las sanciones impuestas por el Consejo de Seguridad a la UNITA. Gobierno del Canadá. Towards a Rapid Reaction Capability for the United Nations. Ottawa, Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores y Comercio Internacional y Ministerio de Defensa Nacional, 1995. Griffin, Michèle, y Bruce Jones. Building peace through transitional authority: new directions, major challenges. International peacekeeping, vol. 7, No. 3 (verano de 2000). Henkin, Alice H. (directora). Honouring Human Rights and Keeping the Peace: Lessons from El Salvador, Cambodia and Haiti. Washington, D.C., Aspen Institute, 1995. __________, Honouring Human Rights, from Peace to Justice: Recommendations to the International Community. Edición resumida de Henkin, op. cit., Washington, D. C., Aspen Institute, 1999. Holm, Tor Tanke, y Espen Barth Eide (directores). Peacebuilding and Police Reform. International Peacekeeping, vol. 6, No. 4 (número especial, invierno de 1999).n0059473.doc 61 A/55/305 S/2000/809 Humanitarian Community Information Centre, Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados y Oficina de Coordinación de Asuntos Humanitarios de la Secretaría de las Naciones Unidas. Kosovo Atlas. Pristina, febrero de 2000. Jett, Dennis C. Why Peacekeeping Fails. Nueva York, St. Martin´s Press, 2000. Latter, Richard. Monitoring and verifying peace agreements. Informe basado en la Conferencia Wilton Park 597 sobre vigilancia y verificación de los acuerdos de paz, 24 a 26 de marzo de 2000, abril de 2000. Lehman, Ingrid A. Peacekeeping and Public Information: Caught in the Crossfire. London, Frank Cass, 1999. Lord, Christopher. Advisory note for Stimson Center/United Nations Panel on Peace Operations. Praga, Proyecto de Praga sobre los principios de la justicia penal en situaciones de emergencia, Instituto de Relaciones Internacionales, 27 de junio de 2000. Moore, Jonathan (director) Hard Choices. Lanham, Maryland, Rowman y Littlefield para el Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja, Ginebra, 1998. Plunkett, Mark. Justice re-establishment in United Nations peacekeeping: methods and techniques for the re-establishment of the rule of law in United Nations peace operations. 18 de abril de 2000. Salerno, Reynolds M., Michael G. Vannoni, David S. Barber; Randall R. Parish y Rebecca L. Frerichs. Enhanced peacekeeping with monitoring technologies. Informe Sandia. Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratories, 2000. Smillie, Ian, Lansana Gberie y Ralph Hazleton. The heart of the matter: Sierra Leone, diamonds and human securtity. Ottawa, Partnership Africa Canada, enero de 2000. Stedman, Stephen John. Spoiler problems in peace processes. International Security, vol. 22, No. 2 (otoño de 1997). Stewart, Frances, y A. Berry. The real causes of inequality. Challenge, vol. 43, No. 1 (2000). Stewart, Frances, Frank P. Humphreys y Nick Lee. Civil conflict in developing countries over the last quarter of a century: an empirical overview of economic and social consequences. Oxford Journal of Development Studies. vol. 25, No. 1 (febrero de 1997). Thant, Myint-U, y Elizabeth Sellwood. Knowledge and Multilateral Interventions: The United Nations Experiences in Cambodia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Royal Institute of International Affairs Discussion Paper, No. 83. Londres, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2000. Wallensteen, Peter, y Margareta Sollenberg. Armed conflict and regional conflict complexes,1989-1997. Journal of Peace Research, vol. 35, No. 5 (1998). Instituto del Banco Mundial e Interworks. The transition from War to Peace: An Overview. Washington, D.C. 1999.62 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 Anexo III Resumen de las recomendaciones 1. Medidas preventivas: a) El Grupo hace suyas las recomendaciones del Secretario General con respecto a la prevención de conflictos que figuran en el Informe del Milenio y las observaciones que hizo ante el Consejo de Seguridad en su segunda sesión pública sobre prevención de conflictos, en julio de 2000, y en particular su llamamiento a “todos los participantes en las actividades de prevención de conflictos y de desarrollo —las Naciones Unidas, las instituciones de Bretton Woods, los gobiernos y las organizaciones de la sociedad civil— [a que enfrenten] esos retos de una manera más integrada”; b) El Grupo apoya que el Secretario General recurra con mayor frecuencia a enviar misiones de determinación de los hechos a zonas de tensión y hace hincapié en las obligaciones que tienen los Estados Miembros, en virtud del apartado 5) del Artículo 2 de la Carta, de prestar “toda clase de ayuda” a estas actividades de las Naciones Unidas. 2. Estrategia de consolidación de la paz: a) Un pequeño porcentaje del presupuesto para el primer año de una misión debe estar a disposición del representante o del representante especial del Secretario General para que la misión pueda financiar proyectos de efecto inmediato en su zona de operaciones, con el asesoramiento del coordinador residente del equipo de las Naciones Unidas en el país; b) El Grupo recomienda un cambio doctrinal en el uso de la policía civil, otros elementos del imperio de la ley y los expertos en derechos humanos en operaciones complejas de paz a fin de reflejar un mayor enfoque en el fortalecimiento de las instituciones del imperio de la ley y el mejoramiento del respeto de los derechos humanos en los ambientes posteriores a los conflictos; c) El Grupo recomienda que los órganos legislativos consideren incluir los programas de desmovilización y reintegración en los presupuestos prorrateados de las operaciones de la paz complejas para la primera etapa de una operación, a fin de facilitar la disolución rápida de las facciones combatientes y reducir la probabilidad de que se reanuden los conflictos; d) El Grupo recomienda que el Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad delibere con el Secretario General y le recomiende un plan para fortalecer la capacidad permanente de las Naciones Unidas para desarrollar estrategias de consolidación de la paz y aplicar programas en apoyo de esas estrategias. 3. Teoría y estrategia del mantenimiento de la paz: Una vez desplegado, el personal de las Naciones Unidas para el mantenimiento de la paz debe estar en condiciones de cumplir su mandato de forma profesional y con éxito, así como de defenderse, defender a otros componentes de la misión y al mandato de ésta, sobre la base de unas normas para entablar combate sólidas, de quienes incumplan los compromisos adquiridos en virtud de un acuerdo de paz o traten de menoscabarlo por medio de la violencia. 4. Mandatos claros, convincentes y viables: a) El Grupo recomienda que, antes de que el Consejo de Seguridad convenga en aplicar una cesación del fuego o un acuerdo de paz mediante una operación de mantenimiento de la paz dirigida por las Naciones Unidas, se asegure de que el acuerdo reúna unas condiciones mínimas, como que cumpla las normas internacionales de derechos humanos y que las tareas y calendarios establecidos sean viables; b) El Consejo de Seguridad debe mantener en forma de proyecto toda resolución por la que se autoricen misiones con niveles elevados de contingentes hasta que el Secretario General haya obtenido de los Estados Miembros compromisos firmes sobre contingentes y otros elementos esenciales de apoyo de la misión, incluso para la consolidación de la paz; c) Las resoluciones del Consejo de Seguridad deben permitir que se cumplan los requisitos de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz que se desplieguen en situaciones potencialmente peligrosas, en especial que se atienda la necesidad de que exista una línea de mando clara y una unidad de acción; d) Al formular o modificar los mandatos de las misiones, la Secretaría debe informar al Consejo de Seguridad de lo que éste necesita saber, no de lo que desea saber, y los países que hayan destinado unidades militares a una operación deben tener acceso a las sesiones informativas que ofrezca la Secretaría al Conn0059473.doc 63 A/55/305 S/2000/809 sejo sobre cuestiones que afecten a la seguridad y protección de su personal, en especial a las referentes a cuestiones que tengan consecuencias para el uso de la fuerza en una misión. 5. Información y análisis estratégico: El Secretario General debe crear una entidad, que se denominará la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad, para satisfacer las necesidades de información y análisis de todos los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo; la entidad será administrada por los jefes del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, a quienes presentará sus informes. 6. Administración civil de transición: El Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General invite a un grupo de expertos jurídicos internacionales, entre los que figuren individuos con experiencia en operaciones de las Naciones Unidas que hayan estado encargadas de establecer una administración de transición, para que evalúe la viabilidad y conveniencia de elaborar un código penal provisional, incluidas todas las adaptaciones regionales que puedan requerirse, para que se utilice en esas operaciones mientras se restablece el estado de derecho local y la capacidad local para hacer cumplir la ley. 7. Determinación de los plazos para el despliegue: Por “capacidad de despliegue rápido y eficaz” las Naciones Unidas deben entender la capacidad, desde una perspectiva operacional, para desplegar plenamente operaciones tradicionales de mantenimiento de la paz dentro de los 30 días de la aprobación de una resolución del Consejo de Seguridad, y dentro de los 90 días cuando se trate de operaciones complejas de mantenimiento de la paz. 8. Plana mayor de la misión: a) El Secretario General debe sistematizar el método para seleccionar a los miembros de la plana mayor de una misión, comenzando por la compilación de una lista amplia de candidatos a representantes o representantes especiales del Secretario General, comandantes de fuerzas, comisionados de policía civil y sus adjuntos y otros jefes de los componentes sustantivos y administrativos, en el marco de una distribución geográfica y de género equitativa y con los insumos de los Estados Miembros; b) Todos los miembros del equipo de dirección de una misión deben ser seleccionados y reunirse en la Sede, lo antes posible a fin de que puedan participar en todos los aspectos fundamentales del proceso de planificación de la misión, recibir información sobre la situación en la zona de la misión y reunirse y trabajar con sus colegas del grupo de dirección; c) La Secretaría debe proporcionar normalmente a la plana mayor de la misión planes y orientación estratégica para prever y superar los problemas que puedan plantearse en la ejecución del mandato y, cuando sea posible, debe formular esas orientaciones y planes junto con los miembros del grupo de dirección de la misión. 9. Personal militar: a) Debería alentarse a los Estados Miembros, cuando procediera, a que entablaran relaciones de colaboración entre sí, en el ámbito del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas, para formar varias fuerzas coherentes de las dimensiones de una brigada, que contaran con las fuerzas de base necesarias y estuvieran preparadas para desplegarse de manera efectiva, en el plazo de 30 días a contar desde la aprobación de la resolución del Consejo de Seguridad en la que se hubiera establecido una operación de mantenimiento de la paz tradicional, o en el plazo de 90 días, en el caso de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz complejas; b) Debería otorgarse al Secretario General la autoridad de sondear oficialmente a los Estados Miembros que participaran en el sistema para averiguar si estarían dispuestos a aportar contingentes a una posible operación, una vez que pareciera probable que se llegaría a un acuerdo de cesación del fuego o a un acuerdo en que se encomendara alguna función práctica a las Naciones Unidas; c) La Secretaría debería tener por costumbre enviar un equipo que se encargara de confirmar que todos los países que pudieran aportar contingentes estuvieran preparados para cumplir las disposiciones del memorando de entendimiento relativas a las necesidades de adiestramiento y equipo, antes del despliegue; los Estados que no cumplieran los requisitos no deberían desplegar contingentes; d) El Grupo recomienda que se cree una "lista de personal de guardia" rotatoria de alrededor de 100 oficiales militares dentro del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva, que pudieran incorporarse con un aviso previo de siete días para engrosar el núcleo de64 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 planificadores del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz con equipos adiestrados para montar los cuarteles generales de las nuevas operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz. 10. Personal de la policía civil: a) Se alienta a los Estados Miembros a crear listas nacionales de los oficiales de la policía civil que puedan estar en condiciones para el despliegue rápido a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, en el contexto del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas; b) Se alienta a los Estados Miembros a establecer asociaciones regionales para la capacitación de los oficiales de la policía civil que figuren en sus respectivas listas nacionales a fin de promover un nivel común de preparación de conformidad con las directrices, los procedimientos normalizados para las operaciones y las normas de rendimiento que promulguen las Naciones Unidas; c) Se alienta a los Estados Miembros a designar un centro único de contacto en sus estructuras gubernamentales para encargarse de la aportación de los oficiales de la policía civil a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas; d) El Grupo recomienda que se establezca una lista de reserva rotatoria de unos 100 oficiales de policía y expertos conexos en el marco del sistema relativo a las fuerzas de reserva de las Naciones Unidas, que pueda estar disponible en un período de siete días, con equipos calificados para formar al componente de la policía civil de operaciones nuevas de mantenimiento de la paz, capacitar al personal nuevo y dotar de mayor coherencia al componente en la etapa inicial; e) El Grupo recomienda que se adopten medidas análogas a las que figuran en las recomendaciones a), b), c), supra en relación con los especialistas judiciales, penales y de derechos humanos y otros especialistas pertinentes, a fin de que integren, junto con la policía civil especializada, los equipos organizados de apoyo al imperio de la ley. 11. Especialistas civiles: a) La Secretaría debería establecer en la Internet/Intranet una lista central de candidatos civiles seleccionados con antelación para desplegar operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz con poco aviso previo. A las misiones sobre el terreno debería otorgárseles acceso y delegar autoridad en ellas para contratar candidatos, de conformidad con directrices sobre distribución geográfica y por género equitativas, directrices que debería establecer la Secretaría; b) La categoría de personal del Servicio Móvil debe reformarse para que esté de acuerdo con las demandas periódicas a que hacen frente las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz, especialmente a nivel medio y superior en las esferas administrativa y logística; c) Las condiciones de servicio para el personal civil de contratación externa deben revisarse con objeto de que las Naciones Unidas puedan atraer los candidatos más altamente calificados, y después ofrecer mayores perspectivas de carrera a aquellos que han prestado servicios en forma distinguida; d) El Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz debe formular una estrategia amplia de dotación de personal para las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz en la que se esbocen, entre otras cosas, la utilización de Voluntarios de las Naciones Unidas, los arreglos de reserva para el suministro de personal civil con 72 horas de aviso previo para facilitar la puesta en marcha de la misión, y las divisiones de responsabilidad entre los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo de Paz y Seguridad para la aplicación de esa estrategia. 12. Capacidad de despliegue rápido para información pública: En los presupuestos de las misiones deben dedicarse recursos adicionales a la información pública y al personal y la tecnología de la información conexos que se necesiten para dar a conocer el mensaje de una operación y establecer vínculos de comunicaciones internas eficaces. 13. Apoyo logístico y gestión de los gastos: a) La Secretaría debe elaborar una estrategia general de apoyo logístico para que las misiones se puedan desplegar con rapidez y eficacia en los casos propuestos y que corresponda a los supuestos de planificación determinados por las oficinas sustantivas del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz; b) La Asamblea General debe autorizar y aprobar el gasto preciso, realizado de una sola vez, para mantener en Brindisi por lo menos cinco equipos básicos de puesta en marcha de misiones, que deberán disponer de equipo de comunicaciones desplegable con rapidez. Esos equipos básicos de puesta en marcha den0059473.doc 65 A/55/305 S/2000/809 berán ser repuestos sistemáticamente financiándolos con cargo a las contribuciones asignadas a las operaciones que recurran a ellos; c) Se debe facultar al Secretario General para utilizar hasta 50 millones de dólares estadounidenses del Fondo de Reserva para Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, una vez que esté claro que es probable que se establezca una operación, con la aprobación de la Comisión Consultiva en Asuntos Administrativos y de Presupuesto (CCAAP), pero antes de que el Consejo de Seguridad apruebe la resolución correspondiente; d) La Secretaría debe llevar a cabo un examen de todas las políticas y todos los procedimientos de adquisición (en caso necesario, formulando propuestas a la Asamblea General con miras a modificar el Reglamento Financiero y la Reglamentación Financiera Detallada de las Naciones Unidas), a fin de facilitar, en particular, el despliegue rápido y completo de una operación en los plazos propuestos; e) La Secretaría deber llevar a cabo un examen de las políticas y los procedimientos por los que se rige la gestión de los recursos financieros de las misiones sobre el terreno, a fin de facilitar a éstas mucha mayor flexibilidad en lo que se refiere a la gestión de sus presupuestos; f) La Secretaría debe aumentar el nivel de facultades de adquisición delegadas a las misiones sobre el terreno (de 200.000 hasta 1 millón de dólares estadounidenses, según la magnitud y las necesidades de cada misión) respecto de todos los bienes y servicios que se pueden adquirir localmente y que no cubren los contratos del sistema ni los contratos permanentes de servicios comerciales. 14. Financiación del apoyo que presta la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz: a) El Grupo recomienda un aumento considerable de los recursos para el apoyo de la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz e insta al Secretario General a que presente una propuesta a la Asamblea General en la que indique sus necesidades completas; b) Se debe considerar el apoyo que presta la Sede a las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz como una actividad esencial de las Naciones Unidas y, en tal caso, se debe financiar la mayor parte de los recursos necesarios para ese fin por medio del mecanismo del presupuesto por programas bienal ordinario de la Organización; c) En espera de que se preparen las solicitudes para el próximo presupuesto ordinario, el Grupo recomienda que el Secretario General solicite a la Asamblea General un aumento complementario de emergencia en la cuenta de apoyo para permitir la contratación inmediata de personal adicional, especialmente en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz. 15. Planificación y apoyo integrados para las misiones: El medio normal para la planificación y el apoyo concretos para cada una de las misiones estaría constituido por equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones, que contarían con miembros adscritos provenientes de las distintas partes del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, según fuese necesario. Los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones serían el primer punto de contacto para todo ese apoyo, y los coordinadores de los equipos de tareas integrados de las misiones deberían tener autoridad jerárquica temporal sobre el personal adscrito, de conformidad con los acuerdos que se celebrasen entre el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y otros departamentos, programas, fondos y organismos que aporten personal. 16. Otros ajustes estructurales en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz: a) Debe reestructurarse la actual División de Actividades Militares y Policía Civil, dejando a la Dependencia de Policía Civil fuera de la cadena de rendición de cuentas militar. Debería considerarse la posibilidad de mejorar el grado y la categoría del Asesor de Policía Civil; b) Debe reestructurarse la Oficina del Asesor Militar en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz de modo que corresponda más estrechamente a la forma en que están estructurados los cuarteles generales militares sobre el terreno en las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas; c) Debería establecerse una nueva dependencia en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz y dotársela del personal especializado competente para prestar asesoramiento sobre cuestiones de derecho penal que revisten importancia crítica para el66 n0059473.doc A/55/305 S/2000/809 uso eficaz de la policía civil en las operaciones de paz de las Naciones Unidas; d) El Secretario General Adjunto de Gestión debería delegar autoridad y responsabilidad de las funciones de presupuestación y adquisición relacionadas con el mantenimiento de la paz en el Secretario General Adjunto de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, por un período de prueba de dos años; e) La Dependencia de Análisis de Políticas y Resultados debe reforzarse apreciablemente y trasladarse a una Oficina de Operaciones del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz reorganizada; f) Debería considerarse la posibilidad de aumentar de dos a tres el número de Subsecretarios Generales en el Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz, designándose a uno de los tres como "Subsecretario General Principal", que actúe como adjunto del Secretario General Adjunto. 17. Apoyo operacional a la información pública: Debe crearse una dependencia de planificación y apoyo operacionales de la información pública en las operaciones de paz, ya sea dentro del Departamento de Operaciones de Mantenimiento de la Paz o dentro de un nuevo servicio de información de paz y seguridad en el Departamento de Información Pública que dé cuenta directamente al Secretario General Adjunto de Comunicación e Información Pública. 18. Apoyo a la consolidación de la paz en el Departamento de Asuntos Políticos: a) El Grupo apoya las gestiones de la Secretaría para crear una dependencia de consolidación de la paz experimental dentro del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos en cooperación con otros elementos integrantes de las Naciones Unidas y sugiere que los Estados Miembros examinen nuevamente la posibilidad de financiar esta dependencia con cargo al presupuesto ordinario si el programa experimental da buenos resultados. El programa debe evaluarse en el contexto de la orientación que ha facilitado el Grupo en el párrafo 46 supra y, si se considera la mejor opción posible para fortalecer la capacidad de consolidación de la paz de las Naciones Unidas, debe presentarse al Secretario General conforme a la recomendación que figura en el apartado d) del párrafo 47 supra; b) El Grupo recomienda que se aumenten considerablemente los recursos con cargo al presupuesto ordinario para los gastos programáticos de la División de Asistencia Electoral a fin de satisfacer la demanda de sus servicios en rápido aumento, en lugar de contribuciones voluntarias; c) Para aliviar la demanda sobre la División de Administración y Logística de Actividades sobre el Terreno y la Oficina Ejecutiva del Departamento de Asuntos Políticos y para mejorar los servicios de apoyo prestados a las oficinas exteriores políticas y de consolidación de la paz más pequeñas, el Grupo recomienda que la adquisición, la logística, la contratación de personal y otros servicios de apoyo para dichas misiones no militares sobre el terreno más pequeñas sean de cargo de la Oficina de Servicios para Proyectos de las Naciones Unidas. 19. Apoyo a las operaciones de paz en la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos: El Grupo recomienda que se refuerce apreciablemente la capacidad para planificación y preparación de misiones sobre el terreno de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos, con financiación en parte con cargo al presupuesto ordinario y en parte con cargo a los presupuestos de las misiones de operaciones de paz. 20. Operaciones de paz y la era de la información: a) Los departamentos encargados de la paz y la seguridad en la Sede necesitan contar con un centro de responsabilidad que formule y supervise la aplicación de una estrategia común de tecnología de la información e imparta capacitación en operaciones de paz, que tenga su centro en la Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico. También debe nombrarse contrapartes de misión para ese centro de responsabilidad para que presten servicios en las oficinas del Representante Especial del Secretario General en las operaciones de paz complejas a fin de supervisar la aplicación de esa estrategia; b) La Secretaría de Información y Análisis Estratégico, en cooperación con la División de Servicios de Tecnología de la Información, debe aplicar un elemento mejorado de operaciones de la paz en la actual Intranet de las Naciones Unidas y conectarlo a las misiones por conducto de una Extranet para las operaciones de paz;n0059473.doc 67 A/55/305 S/2000/809 c) Las operaciones de paz podrían beneficiarse considerablemente de un uso más generalizado de la tecnología de los sistemas de información geográfica, que integran rápidamente la información operacional en los mapas electrónicos de la zona de la misión, para aplicaciones tan diversas como la desmovilización, las funciones de policía civil, el registro de los votantes, la vigilancia de los derechos humanos y la reconstrucción; d) Las necesidades de tecnología de la información de componentes de la misión que tienen necesidades exclusivas de tecnología de la información, como los de policía civil y derechos humanos, deben preverse y atenderse de una manera más coherente en la planificación y aplicación de la misión; e) El Grupo alienta el desarrollo de una gestión conjunta del sitio de la red por la Sede y las misiones sobre el terreno, en la que la Sede mantendría la función de supervisión pero cada una de las misiones contarían con personal autorizado para producir y colocar información en la red amoldada a unas normas y políticas de presentación básicas.