A_48_305e_A_48_305f_EF
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A_48_305e.pdf (english) A_48_305f.pdf (french)
UNITED A NATIONS General Assembly Distr. GENERAL A/48/305 15 October 1993 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH Forty-eighth session Agenda item 70 PREVENTION OF AN ARMS RACE IN OUTER SPACE Study on the application of confidence-building measures in outer space Report by the Secretary-General 1. The General Assembly, in its resolution 45/55 B of 4 December 1990, requested the Secretary-General, with assistance of a group of governmental experts, to carry out a study on the specific aspects related to the application of different confidence-building measures in outer space, including the different technologies available, possibilities for defining appropriate mechanisms of international cooperation in specific areas of interest, and to report thereon to the Assembly at its forty-eighth session. 2. Pursuant to that resolution, the Secretary-General has the honour to submit to the General Assembly the Study on the Application of Confidence-building Measures in Outer Space (see annex). 93-44574 (E) 231093 /...A/48/305 English Page 2 ANNEX Study on the application of confidence-building measures in outer space CONTENTS Paragraphs Page Acronyms and abbreviations ............................................. 6 Letter of transmittal .................................................. 10 Foreword by the Secretary-General ...................................... 12 I. INTRODUCTION ........................................ 1 -16 13 II. OVERVIEW ............................................ 17 -55 17 A. Current uses of outer space ..................... 18 -44 17 1. Imaging satellites .......................... 25 -26 23 2. Signals intelligence satellites ............. 27 -28 23 3. Early warning satellites .................... 29 23 4. Weather satellites .......................... 30 23 5. Nuclear explosion detection systems ......... 31 24 6. Communication satellites .................... 32 24 7. Navigation satellites ....................... 33 24 8. Anti-satellite weapons ...................... 34 -40 24 9. Anti-missile weapons ........................ 41 -44 25 B. Emerging trends ................................. 45 -55 26 1. Other States’ space capability .............. 46 -48 26 2. Increasing numbers and capabilities ......... 49 -50 27 3. Dual-use systems ............................ 51 -54 27 4. Combat applications ......................... 55 28/...A/48/305 English Page 3 CONTENTS (continued) Paragraphs Page III. EXISTING LEGAL FRAMEWORK: AGREEMENTS AND DECLARATIONS OF PRINCIPLES .......................... 56 -80 29 A. Global multilateral agreements .................. 59 29 1. Outer Space Treaty .......................... 59 -60 29 2. Other global multilateral agreements ........ 61 -67 34 B. Bilateral treaties .............................. 68 -75 36 C. United Nations General Assembly resolutions on declarations of principles ...................... 76 -80 38 IV. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE CONCEPT OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES ........................ 81 -114 40 A. Characteristics ................................. 91 -103 41 B. Criteria ........................................ 104 -109 43 C. Applicability ................................... 110 -114 44 V. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE ...................................... 115 -175 46 A. Specific features of the space environment....... 117 -129 46 B. Political and legal ............................. 130 -138 48 C. Technological and scientific .................... 139 49 1. Technology and outer space .................. 144 -158 50 (a) Technology for monitoring space operations ............................. 146 -147 50 (b) Ground-based passive optical systems ... 147 -149 50 (c) Ground-based active optical systems .... 150 51 (d) Ground-based radars .................... 151 -152 51 (e) Other technical means of monitoring space characteristics .................. 153 -154 51 (f) Monitoring space weapons ............... 155 -158 52/...A/48/305 English Page 4 CONTENTS (continued) Paragraphs Page 2. Technology and confidence-building measures .................................... 159 52 (a) PAXSAT-A ............................... 163 53 (b) Satellites for monitoring terrestrial activities ............................. 163 -165 53 (c) International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) .......................... 166 53 (d) International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA) ......................... 167 54 (e) PAXSAT-B ............................... 174 -175 55 VI. CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES ........................ 176 56 A. The need for confidence-building measures in outer space ..................................... 176 -184 56 B. Proposals for specific confidence-building measures in outer space ......................... 185 -225 57 Overviews of proposals .......................... 57 1. Confidence-building measures on a voluntary and reciprocal basis ........................ 189 -193 63 2. Confidence-building measures on a contractual obligation basis ............................ 194 -203 64 3. Proposals for institutional framework ....... 204 -207 66 4. The international transfer of missiles and other sensitive technologies ................ 208 -214 67 5. Proposals for confidence-building measures in outer space within bilateral United States of America-Union of Soviet Socialist Republics negotiations ...................... 215 -219 68 6. Other proposals ............................. 220 -225 69 C. Analysis ........................................ 226 -244 71 1. General measures to enhance transparency and confidence .............................. 227 -230 71/...A/48/305 English Page 5 CONTENTS (continued) Paragraphs Page 2. Strengthening the registration of space objects and other related measures .......... 231 -235 71 3. Code of conduct and rules of the road ....... 236 -242 72 4. The international transfer of missile and other sensitive technologies ................ 243 -244 73 VII. MECHANISMS OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION RELATED TO CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE ......... 245 -293 74 A. Existing mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space .................................. 247 74 1. Global mechanisms ........................... 248 -262 74 2. Regional multilateral mechanisms ............ 263 -274 77 3. Bilateral mechanisms ........................ 275 -281 79 B. Some proposals for creating new international mechanisms ...................................... 282 -293 80 VIII. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ..................... 294 -331 84 APPENDICES I. Text of the Outer Space Treaty ..................................... 97 II. Guidelines adopted by the United Nations Disarmament Commission .. 103 III. Status of multilateral treaties relating to activities in outer space .................................................. .......... 115 Selected bibliography on technical, political and legal aspects of outer space activities ................................................. 125/...A/48/305 English Page 6 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ABM Anti-ballistic missile ABM Treaty Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty ARABSAT Arab Satellite Communication Organization ASAT Anti-Satellite BMD Ballistic missile defence CBM Confidence-building measure CCD Charge-coupled device CD Conference on Disarmament CEPT European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations COPUOS Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space COSPAS-SARSAT Space system for tracking ships in distress -search and rescue satellite EHF Extremely high frequency ELINT Electronic intelligence ENMOD Convention Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques ESA European Space Agency EUMETSAT European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites EUTELSAT European Telecommunications Satellite Organization GPALS Global protection against limited strikes GPS Global positioning system HOT LINE Agreement between the United States of America and the AGREEMENT Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on Measures to Reduce the Risk of Outbreak of Nuclear War ICBM Intercontinental ballistic missile IFRB International Frequency Registration Board /...A/48/305 English Page 7 IMO International Maritime Organization INF Treaty Treaty on the Elimination of Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles INMARSAT International Maritime Satellite Organization INTELSAT International Telecommunications Satellite Organization INTERCOSMOS Council on International Cooperation in the Study and Utilization of Outer Space INTERSPUTNIK International Organization of Space Communications IPIC Image Processing and Interpretation Centre ISI International Space Inspectorate ISMA International Satellite Monitoring Agency ISpMA International Space Monitoring Agency ITU International Telecommunication Union LIABILITY CONVENTION Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects LPAR Large phased array radar MOON AGREEMENT Agreement Governing the Activities on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies MTCR Missile Technology Control Regime NOTIFICATION OF Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist LAUNCHES AGREEMENT Republics and the United States of America on Notification of Launches of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles and Submarine-launched Ballistic Missiles NTMs National technical means of verification NUCLEAR ACCIDENT Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist AGREEMENT Republics and the United States of America on Measures to Reduce the Risk of Outbreak of Nuclear War OUTER SPACE TREATY Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies PAROS Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space /...A/48/305 English Page 8 PREVENTION OF Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist DANGEROUS MILITARY Republics and the United States of America on the ACTIVITIES Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities AGREEMENT PTBT Treaty on Banning Nuclear Weapons Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water REGISTRATION Convention on the Registration of Objects Launched CONVENTION into Outer Space RESCUE AGREEMENT Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space RIO Regional international organizations RISK REDUCTION Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist AGREEMENT Republics and the United States of America on the Establishment of Nuclear Risk Reduction Centres RV Re-entry vehicle SALT Strategic Arms Limitation Talks SIGINT Signal intelligence SIPA Satellite Image Processing Agency SLBM Submarine-launched ballistic missile SPIC Space Processing Inspectorate Centre SPOT Système Probatoire d’Observation de la Terre START-I Treaty on Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms START-II Treaty on Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms UHF Ultra-high frequency UNDC United Nations Disarmament Commission UNIDIR United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research UNISPACE United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space UNITRACE International Trajectography Centre WEU Western European Union /...A/48/305 English Page 9 WMO World Meteorological Organization WSO World Space Organization /...A/48/305 English Page 10 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 16 July 1993 Sir, I have the honour to submit herewith the report of the Group of Governmental Experts to Undertake a Study on the Application of Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space, which was appointed by you in accordance with paragraph 3 of General Assembly resolution 45/55 B of 4 December 1990. The Governmental Experts appointed were the following: Dr. Mohamed Ezz El Din Abdel-Moneim, Deputy Director Department of International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs Cairo, Egypt Mr. Sergey D. Chuvakhin Department for Arms Reduction and Disarmament Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Russia Moscow, Russian Federation Mr. F. R. Cleminson, Head Verification and Research Section Arms Control and Disarmament Division Department of External Affairs Ottawa, Canada Dr. Radoslav Deyanov, Minister Plenipotentiary Head, Arms Control and Disarmament Division Department of International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sophia, Bulgaria Mr. Luiz Alberto Figueiredo Machado, First Secretary Ministério das Relaçoes Exteriores Departamento do Meio Ambiente Brasilia, Brazil Mr. P. Hobwani Ministry of Foreign Affairs Harare, Zimbabwe Dr. C. Raja Mohan, Associate Professor Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses New Delhi, India Mr. Pierre-Henri Pisani, Special Adviser Directorate for International Relations Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales Paris, France /...A/48/305 English Page 11 Mr. Archelaus R. Turrentine Bureau of Multilateral Affairs United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency Washington, D.C., United States of America Mr. Sikandar Zaman, Chairman Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission Karachi, Pakistan The report was prepared between July 1991 and July 1993, during which period the Group held four sessions in New York: the first from 29 July to 2 August 1991; the second from 23 to 27 March 1992; the third from 1 to 12 March 1993; and the fourth from 6 to 16 July 1993. At the third session of the Group, Mr. SHA Zukang of the People’s Republic of China participated as an expert and, at the fourth session, Mr. WU Chengjiang of the People’s Republic of China participated as an expert. In carrying out its work, the Group had before it relevant publications and papers which were circulated by members of the Group. The members of the Group wish to express their appreciation for the assistance which they received from members of the Secretariat. They wish, in particular, to thank Mr. Davinic´, Director, Office for Disarmament Affairs, and Ms. Olga Sukovic, who served as Secretary of the Group. I have been requested by the Group of Experts, as its Chairman, to submit to you, on its behalf, the present report, which was unanimously approved. In not blocking consensus and allowing the study to go forward in its final form, the expert from the United States indicated that he had received additional comments and reservations from his Government regarding the study which would be conveyed to the Secretary-General. I have been informed that those comments and reservations will be circulated separately as a United Nations document under agenda item 70. (Signed) Robert GARCIA-MORITAN Chairman of the Group of Governmental Experts on the Study on the Application of Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space /...A/48/305 English Page 12 Foreword by the Secretary-General All States have the right to explore and beneficially use our common space environment. For the international community, the constant challenge of the space age has been to expand human horizons through the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, while also preventing space and space technology from being used for threatening or destructive purposes. Outer space issues have been on the United Nations agenda for nearly four decades now. During that time, international agreements on outer space have aimed at preventing the militarization of outer space, and ensuring access by all States to the potential benefits of space-related technology. Technology is a dynamic force. Rapid developments and growing disparities in space technology capabilities have inevitably generated a certain degree of mistrust and suspicion. The insufficient application of space technologies to development needs to be addressed. As more and more countries have become involved in space activities, the need for greater bilateral and multilateral cooperation has become urgently apparent. Cooperation is essential if we are to succeed in safeguarding outer space for peaceful purposes and bring the benefits of space technology to all States. A new international environment has now been created. The post-cold-war era has witnessed many dramatic and far-reaching changes. But the world remains a dangerous place. To avoid conflicts based on misperceptions and mistrust, it is imperative that we promote transparency and other confidence-building measures -in armaments, in threatening technologies, in space and elsewhere. I am encouraged by the growing international recognition of the need for confidence-building measures on issues involving outer space. Building cooperation and confidence must be a high priority, for confidence and cooperation are contagious. International cooperation in space technology can help to pave the way for further cooperation in other areas -political, military, economic and social. I believe that it was with this intent and in this spirit that the General Assembly requested the study on confidence-building measures in outer space. The study is a useful reference and a thought-provoking resource. I hope that it will help to harmonize views, and that it will contribute to building a strong international consensus on outer space issues. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the Group of Experts for their work in preparing the present report. I commend the report to the General Assembly, and urge that it be given close consideration. Boutros Boutros-Ghali Secretary-General United Nations/...A/48/305 English Page 13 I. INTRODUCTION 1. Since the launching of the first man-made satellite into outer space in 1957, outer space questions have been discussed in various forums of the United Nations and its related organizations. From the point of view of this study, the main relevant organ is the Conference on Disarmament (CD) and its subsidiary body, the Ad Hoc Committee on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space, which has had on its agenda since 1982 an item entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space" and which has been examining, through substantive and general consideration, issues relevant to outer space. As far as peaceful uses of outer space are concerned, the most relevant body is the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS), with its Legal Subcommittee, and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee. The deliberations of COPUOS contributed to the conclusion of several international legal instruments concerning the peaceful aspects of the uses of outer space. 2. The space age, which began nearly four decades ago, has also been characterized by a rapid development in the field of space technology and by the inherent dangers of an arms race in outer space causing increased concerns. In l978, the General Assembly formally recognized such concerns in the Final Document of its tenth special session, the first special session devoted to disarmament, 1/and called for additional measures to be taken and appropriate international negotiations to be held on that issue. Many Member States considered it necessary to take further measures to preclude the possibility of the militarization of outer space. 3. Over the years, Member States have pursued two separate set of outer space interests in international forums -those related to peaceful application and those related to the prevention of an arms race. As the scope of military and national security activities in outer space has grown, so have concerns by many States about the risk of an arms race in outer space. At the same time, there has been an attempt to keep in perspective the potential benefits of applying to civil purposes space technologies initially developed under military and national security programmes. It is in connection with military and related security activities that proposals have been made on a set of rules whose purpose would be to increase confidence among States generally and particularly in specific areas of their space activities. 4. In l993, there were about 300 operational satellites in orbit, more than half of them with military or national security-related missions. In addition to the two main space Powers, there is a large group of States that have achieved self-sufficiency with specific space missions. Also, there are a number of States that have space-related capabilities in specialized technologies or facilities, while there is a growing interest by the vast majority of States that would like to participate in the activities in outer space and to share space technology. 5. In view of the absence of full-scale arrangements to prevent an arms race in outer space, interest has grown in building confidence through acceptance of certain measures, guidelines or commitments among States regarding space-related activities. Many believe that such measures would constitute a constructive move towards the prevention of an arms race in outer space. The purpose of such /...A/48/305 English Page 14 measures is to obtain greater transparency and predictability in space activities in general, through such measures as prior notification, verification, monitoring, code of conduct; thus, contributing to global and regional security. 6. At its forty-fifth session, on 4 December 1990, the General Assembly adopted two resolutions concerning outer space. By resolution 45/55 A entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space", the General Assembly expressed its conviction, inter alia, "that further measures should be examined in the search for effective and verifiable bilateral and multilateral agreements in order to prevent an arms race in outer space", and reaffirmed "the importance and urgency of preventing an arms race in outer space and the readiness of all States to contribute to that common objective, in conformity with the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies" (further referred to as Outer Space Treaty). It further recognized "the relevance of considering measures in confidence-building and greater transparency and openness in space", and requested the Conference on Disarmament "to continue building upon areas of convergence with a view to undertaking negotiations for the conclusion of an agreement or agreements, as appropriate, to prevent an arms race in outer space in all its aspects". 7. By the second resolution 45/55 B, entitled "Confidence-building measures in outer space", the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to carry out, with the assistance of governmental experts, the present study. It reads as follows: "The General Assembly, "Conscious of the importance and urgency of preventing an arms race in outer space, "Recalling that, in accordance with the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, 2/the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind, "Aware of the fact that more and more States are taking an active interest in outer space or participating in important space programmes for the exploration and exploitation of that environment, "Recognizing, in this context, the relevancy space has gained as an important factor for the socio-economic development of many States, in addition to its undeniable role in security issues, "Emphasizing that the growing use of outer space has increased the need for more transparency as well as confidence-building measures, "Recalling that the international community has unanimously recognized the importance and usefulness of confidence-building measures, which can/...A/48/305 English Page 15 significantly contribute to the promotion of peace and security and disarmament, in particular through General Assembly resolutions 43/78 H of 7 December 1988 and 44/116 U of 15 December 1989, "Noting the important work being carried out by the Ad Hoc Committee on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space of the Conference on Disarmament, which contributes to identifying potential areas of confidence-building measures, "Aware of the existence of a number of different proposals and initiatives addressing this subject, which attests to a growing convergence of views, "1. Reaffirms the importance of confidence-building measures as means conducive to ensuring the attainment of the objective of the prevention of an arms race in outer space; "2. Recognizes their applicability in the space environment under specific criteria yet to be defined; "3. Requests the Secretary-General to carry out, with the assistance of government experts, a study on the specific aspects related to the application of different confidence-building measures in outer space, including the different technologies available, possibilities for defining appropriate mechanisms of international cooperation in specific areas of interest and so on, and to report thereon to the General Assembly at its forty-eighth session." 8. After the adoption of the above-mentioned resolutions, the United Nations General Assembly has adopted two resolutions under the agenda item entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space". By resolution 46/33 of 6 December 1991, the Assembly again requested the Conference on Disarmament "to consider as a matter of priority the question of preventing an arms race in outer space", recognized, inter alia, "the relevance of considering measures on confidence-building and greater transparency and openness in space" and, by resolution 47/51 of 9 December 1992, recognized, "the growing convergence of views on the elaboration of measures designed to strengthen transparency, confidence and security in the uses of outer space." 9. In fulfilling its mandate, the Group decided to divide the study into eight chapters. In addition, it considered it useful to include as annexes a number of texts relevant to the study, as well as a selected bibliography. 10. After this introductory chapter, chapter II of the present study considers the current uses of outer space and emerging trends with special emphasis on the technical problems involved, such as different types of satellites and their missions, anti-satellite weapons and anti-missile weapons. When it refers to emerging trends, emphasis is put on States’ space capabilities, dual-use systems and combat applications. 11. The third chapter deals with the existing legal framework: global multilateral agreements and bilateral agreements concerning both military and peaceful aspects of the exploration and uses of outer space, as well as with a /...A/48/305 English Page 16 number of resolutions containing declarations of principles adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. 12. The fourth chapter addresses the overall question of confidence-building measures. Such measures have found increasing application in a wide range of contexts, including global, regional and bilateral security environments. They have been used to address security concerns raised by conventional weapons, as well as nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. A number of common characteristics of confidence-building measures are identified, and several broad criteria are noted for their successful implementation. Also, the applicability of such measures is considered. 13. The fifth chapter covers specific aspects of confidence-building measures as they apply to outer space. Political, legal, technological and scientific considerations are analysed with regard to their implementation. Technological opportunities and constraints are identified both for confidence-building in space, that is, those measures pertaining to space operations, as well as confidence-building from space, that is, measures that use space technology. 14. The sixth chapter addresses specific confidence-building measures in outer space that have been proposed by various Governments, and considers various aspects of their potential implementation. 15. The seventh chapter reviews the range of mechanisms of international cooperation related to confidence-building measures in outer space. This includes the role of the United Nations, the Conference on Disarmament, as well as some other global, regional, bilateral and other forums for their development and implementation. It also addresses some proposals for creation of new international mechanisms. 16. The final chapter contains the conclusions and recommendations of the Expert Group. /...A/48/305 English Page 17 II. OVERVIEW 17. The dream of humanity to make the fullest possible use of outer space for the development of science and the well-being of humankind has not yet been fulfilled and thus remains a purpose to be achieved. There have been major achievements in space sciences including the Earth and atmospheric observational sciences, and lunar and interplanetary exploration, and these are becoming the basis of environmental sciences of the future. There have been significant achievements as well in space applications such as communications, navigation, search and rescue, meteorology, and Earth-remote sensing for many purposes. Space has become an important factor in the social and economic well-being of many States. 18. Since the launch of the first sputnik in 1957, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 3/the United States and a growing number of other countries have used space for military purposes. This fact determines the context in which the idea of confidence-building measures in outer space has been developed. Most of the approximately 300 satellites 4/currently operational in Earth orbit are used in conjunction with military missions both for peacetime operations and increasingly directly in support of military forces on Earth. Communication, navigation, observation, weather and other satellites help, inter alia, to increase the effectiveness of terrestrial military systems. 19. The development of and/or access to a space launch capability is essential to the effective exploitation of space or peaceful and commercial purposes and in support of the arms regulation processes, as well as for military purposes. Much remains to be done, through satellites and other forms of space craft, in areas of space science, solar and interplanetary research, space biology, environmental and other purposes. A. Current uses of outer space 20. The development of space research and applications was made possible by the constant improvement of available launching systems, in some cases driven by military needs. Two categories of launch systems exist: (a) Reusable space transport systems the primary function of which is to assure manned flights and service of in-orbit infrastructures; their reliability must be the highest possible, taking into account the human presence on-board; (b) Expendable launching systems which according to their capacity in terms of thrust can put into different orbits payloads of varying masses. The recent evolution witnessed in the field of disarmament enables one to envisage the use of converted missiles to put payloads into low-Earth orbit. 21. Satellites typically are deployed in four types of orbits, which are defined by their altitude, period and inclination to the Earth’s equator (figure 1). /...A/48/305 English Page 18 Figure I. Representative satellite orbits All simple satellite orbits involve elliptical motion in a plane fixed in celestial space and passing through the centre of mass of the system (typically Earth), while the Earth rotates beneath the spacecraft and its orbit. /...A/48/305 English Page 19 A Low Earth orbit B Circular semisynchhronou orbit C Elliptic semisynchhronou orbit D Geosynchronous orbit Figure II. Representative satellite orbits All simple satellite orbits involve elliptical motion in a plane fixed in celestial space and passing through the centre of mass of the system (typically Earth), while the Earth rotates beneath the spacecraft and its orbit. /...A/48/305 English Page 20 (a) Low Earth orbits include those with altitudes of a few hundred to over 1,000 kilometres, which may be of any inclination, although typically such orbits are at high inclinations in order to maximize coverage of high-latitude portions of the Earth’s surface; (b) Geosynchronous orbits are at an altitude of nearly 36,000 kilometres, and have a period of about one day, permitting a satellite to view instantaneously nearly half the Earth’s surface. Such orbits are useful for communications, early warning or electronic intelligence collection. If the satellite is in the orbit plane of the Earth’s equator (zero inclination), such orbits are called geostationary, and provide single satellite full-time coverage of an area; (c) Semi-synchronous orbits have a period of 12 hours, with satellites at an altitude of about 20,000 kilometres. Circular semi-synchronous orbits are primarily used by modern navigation satellites; (d) Molniya orbits are a subset of semi-synchronous orbits, which are highly elliptical, having low points (perigees) of a few hundred kilometres, and high points (apogees) of nearly 40,000 kilometres. Those orbits typically have inclinations of 63 degrees, and are used for coverage of polar and high-latitude regions. 22. Space systems may also be categorized by the functions they serve, as illustrated in table 1 and discussed in more detail in the following sections. As with other satellites, military satellites generally perform two types of functions: acquisition of information; and transmission of information. Satellites can be used to acquire information concerning the disposition of terrestrial military forces using imagery or by picking up electronic transmissions (electronic intelligence or ELINT, and signal intelligence or SIGINT). Other information acquisition functions include weather, missile alerting, and nuclear explosion detection. Certain information is relayed by communications and navigation satellites. 23. In recent years, there has been a trend towards greater openness and transparency with regard to many space activities, including a number that serve military purposes. Nevertheless, it should be recognized that some details on the precise capabilities and operations of satellites with military missions are likely to continue to be considered highly classified by States to which they belong. 24. It also must be noted that most space technologies are prime examples of technologies which have a dual-use potential. Satellites, which are essential in many applications in the civil sector, for example weather satellites, are also seen as significant force-multipliers when used for military purposes. The technology required to intercept satellites in space is, in some respects, similar to that required to intercept ballistic missiles or their warheads. Expertise in the anti-ballistic missile (ABM) field, could constitute a direct technological basis from which to design an ASAT capability. The reverse is not necessarily true. /...A/48/305 English Page 21 Table 1. General characteristics of some typical space missions Mission Typical orbits Power Space craft features/sensors/instruments Notes A. Science Atmospheric and upper atmospheric observation Low altitude High inclination Low Medium Optical near infrared and infrared sensors Life of 2-5 years Radiation and magnetic field measurement Elliptical, high altitude and high inclination Low Magnetometers, radiation sensors charged particle detectors Life of 5-8 years Solar Solar orbits some out of solar plane orbits Moderate Electro-optical, radiation, magnetic and particle sensors, with complex thermal control Inter-planetary Planetary, sling-shots Moderate Electro-optical, radian measurement sensors, special long-distance data transmission systems Many include fly-bys, orbiters, landers, carrying similar systems as Earth science systems B. Earth observations Land, vegetation and water resources monitoring Low altitude inclined Low-moderate Optical infrared, multi-spectral sensors Synthetic Aperture Radars with large antennas, with wide band data links Life of 5-8 years, some have off-track pointing capability, some have onbooar data Atmospheric and meteorological monitoring Low altitude inclined Low-medium Optical, near infrared and infrared sensors Life of 5-8 years Environmental monitoring Low altitude inclined Low Sensors to measure constituent gases in atmosphere Life of 5-7 years Air traffic monitoring Medium altitude inclined Very high Space-borne radars with very large antennas Life of 5 or more years /...A/48/305 English Page 22 Mission Typical orbits Power Space craft features/sensors/instruments Notes C. Communications International and domestic Highly elliptical, highly inclined Geo-Syn equatorial High Multi-frequency transponders and antennas 10-15 year life with station-keeping capabilities -voice, data and video communications Direct Broadcasting System Geo-Syn equatorial High High-frequency transmitters and antennas Direct broadcast of radio and TV programmes 10-12 years of life Mobile Geo-Syn equatorial High Large low-frequency transmitters and antennas e.g. M-Satellite of INMARSAT Personal Low-altitude constellation Low-moderate Ant. config. multiple satellites Constellation of satellites Military Geo-Syn equatorial High UHF to EHF frequency transmitters and antennas, with encryption mechanism Life of 10-15 years. Also used for data transmission Search and rescue Low altitude Moderate Receivers and transmitters with doppler effect measurement capabilities Picks up signals from an activated beacon, when beacon-carrier is in emergency D. Navigation Navigation and global positioning Medium altitude inclined Moderate Precision time and frequency measurement Constellation of satellites, providing aircraft and land applications /...A/48/305 English Page 23 1. Imaging satellites 25. Imaging satellites, orbiting at altitudes of several hundred kilometres, make use of film, electro-optical cameras or radars, to produce high resolution images of the surface of the Earth in various regions of the spectrum. Such satellite imaging can be readily used to detect objects on the ground or at sea and, in the case of some military satellite systems of highest resolution, to identify and distinguish between different types of vehicles and other equipment. Perhaps their most significant applications have been as national technical means (NTM) of verifying arms limitation agreements. 26. Use of optical imagery from civilian satellites, such as LANDSAT, SPOT and the COSMOS series, have already been used to detect certain anomalies as in the case of the Chernobyl accident (1986) and the extent of environmental concerns in terms of the Gulf War (1991). Military reconnaissance satellites and their associated analytical capabilities are generally much more effective in this regard. 2. Signals intelligence satellites 27. Signals intelligence satellites are designed to detect transmissions from terrestrial communications systems, as well as radars and other electronic systems. The interception of such transmissions can provide information on the type and location of even low power transmitters, such as hand-held radios. However, these satellites are not capable of intercepting communications carried over land lines. 28. Signals intelligence consists of several categories. Communications intelligence is directed at the analysis of the source and content of message traffic. While most important military communications are protected by encryption techniques, computer processing can be used to decrypt some traffic, and additional intelligence can be derived from analysis of patterns of transmissions over time. Electronic intelligence is devoted to analysis of non-communications electronic transmissions. This would include telemetry from missile tests, or radar transmitters. 3. Early warning satellites 29. Early warning satellites carry infrared sensors that detect the heat from a rocket’s engines. These satellites are used for monitoring missile launches to ensure treaty compliance, as well as providing early warning of missile attack. They can also be used to locate the launch sites of missiles used in combat operations. 4. Weather satellites 30. The civil usefulness of weather satellites is generally recognized. They also provide vital support to military operations both in peace and in war. The cost-free access to data from weather satellites has been a fine example of international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space throughout the /...A/48/305 English Page 24 years and has proved to be fundamental in helping States develop better weather forecasting and in increasing natural disaster preparedness. 5. Nuclear explosion detection systems 31. Since the early 1960s satellites which are capable of detecting nuclear explosions on the Earth and in space have been deployed. Some of those satellites, along with weather and early warning satellites, carry several types of sensors to detect the location of nuclear explosions and to evaluate their yield. The information from these satellites could be also used for the purpose of planning military operations. 6. Communications satellites 32. Communication represents one of the most widespread applications of modern satellites. Communication satellites are important both for military and civil applications. These satellites may be classified into three categories, according to their orbital characteristics: they are geosynchronous, semi-synchronous or non-synchronous. They may also be classified by their operating frequencies, bandwidth or by the type of traffic and service provided. Most communication satellites are in the geostationary Earth orbit. Satellites are today a routine and vital element of the international telecommunication systems, as well as many national networks, and in specialized systems, such as the international COSPAS-SARSAT search and rescue system. 7. Navigation satellites 33. Navigation satellites were one of the earliest military applications of space technology, and are among the most useful to military forces on Earth. Military aircraft now use navigation satellites to guide them to aerial tankers for inflight refuelling as they fly non-stop from their home bases to conflicts thousands of miles away. They can also use navigation satellites to guide them to their targets with pinpoint precision, where they can drop their bombs with an accuracy that will rival that of much more expensive "smart" weapons. 8. Anti-satellite weapons 34. As the applications of military space systems have increased in importance over time for States with the most active space programmes, interest has grown in developing anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons to counter the contributions that a potential adversary’s satellites might make to its combat effectiveness. 35. Any use of an anti-satellite weapon against an orbiting space object is feared to produce debris that in some cases could affect other space objects or may also fall over populated areas, with unpredictable consequences. This concern is more vivid vis-à-vis the environmental consequences of an uncontrolled re-entry in the atmosphere of the remains of a space object carrying a nuclear power source. /...A/48/305 English Page 25 36. Early research into the development of an ASAT capability was initiated by the space Powers in the 1950s. The first successful ASAT intercept took place near Kwajalein Island in the Pacific Ocean in May 1963. A year later, nucleartipppe ASATs became operational on Johnson Island. This programme, based on the Thor rocket, ended in 1976 and emphasis on research and development shifted to non-nuclear, kinetic-kill mechanisms. In the early 1980s, research focused on the developments of an air-launched hypersonic miniature homing vehicle, but the programme was frozen in 1988. Research continues on a ground-based kinetic-kill interceptor based on a solid fuel missile system. 37. Parallel in time to the project, which involved the Kwajalein Island testing, research was undertaken to develop a co-orbital interceptor designed to place a multi-ton satellite in low Earth orbit. The theory was that, by manoeuvring close to a satellite target and co-orbiting with it, an explosive charge could be detonated, which would shower the target with shrapnel. Satellites which are delicate, it was reasoned, could be readily destroyed by this method. Testing between 1968 to 1982 had limited success (approximately 70 per cent as mentioned in some publications) when using a radar homing device and much less when a heat-seeking homing device was used. The entire system was cumbersome and limited in employment. Although of marginal effectiveness, it was declared operational. The system has not been tested since 1982. 38. Work has also been carried out on the use of directed energy systems for ASAT missions. Various types of ground-based high-energy lasers, if sufficiently focused and coupled with highly accurate tracking, might be able to damage satellites in orbit as they pass overhead. 39. It should be noted that much of the work on these ASAT systems has now become of lower priority, or has been terminated. This reflects the more cooperative relationship between the two States with the most active space programmes. 40. In summary, it appears that research specifically related to developing ASAT technology has been inconclusive and sporadic, although interest in the concept resurfaces from time to time. Aspects of this concept continue to be a subject of considerable controversy. 9. Anti-missile weapons 41. Anti-missile weapons involved in defending against offensive strategic missiles are relevant to this study to the degree that they represent a potential residual ASAT capability, are based in space, or employ space-based components. 42. Any satellite that passes through the limited attack zone of an anti-missile weapon would probably be as vulnerable to attack as would any strategic missile or warhead passing through that zone. In most instances, only satellites in low-orbit would be subject to such theoretical vulnerabilities. 43. It should be noted, however, that accurate high-energy lasers, space-based interceptors, and long-range anti-missiles systems could all contribute to extending the zone of vulnerability of satellites to anti-missile systems. /...A/48/305 English Page 26 44. While space-based anti-missile weapons have been under serious study, not all of the technical challenges associated with such weapons have been solved. At present, there are no known programmes to deploy systems involving such weapons. B. Emerging trends 45. Outer space continues to assume a growing importance both for military and civilian activities, as discussed earlier in the section. The importance is illustrated, inter alia, by: (a) a growing number of countries exploring ways to use outer space; (b) military uses spreading from strategic to tactical purposes or missions; (c) communications technology for civilian purposes operating at higher powers and in new frequency bands; and (d) an increasing commonality of use of outer space between commercial and military applications. Although since the end of the cold war some aspects of military use of outer space by some powers has been reconsidered, research in this field is continued by the leading space countries. 1. Other States space capabilities 46. A number of other States have or are planning to develop national space capabilities. While at present most of these national programmes or plans do not envision a military component, military capabilities could be built upon those programmes. Increased transparency in space programmes, including these programmes, would be an important factor in building confidence among States. 47. In implementing the recommendations of UNISPACE II, and on the recommendation of COPUOS, the United Nations Secretary-General, on the basis of United Nations General Assembly resolution 46/45 of 9 December 1991, requested Member States to submit annual reports on their space activities. The annual reports submitted by States were reproduced in the report of the Secretary-General submitted to the General Assembly at its forty-seventh session (A/47/383). Taking into account that report, the Assembly again requested the Secretary-General, under resolution 47/67 of 14 December 1992, to report to it at its forty-eighth session on the implementation of the recommendations of the Conference. Those requests pertaining to reporting on national space activities and on the implementation of recommendations of UNISPACE appear as regular items in the United Nations General Assembly annual resolutions on peaceful uses of outer space. 48. Describing the national programmes of individual States is beyond the mandate of this Study Group. Most of these activities are carried out for purposes such as telecommunications, meteorology, research and remote sensing of the Earth and other activities. 5/It is worth noting that Member States of the European Space Agency (ESA) had decided to "Europeanize" a greater part of their national space programmes by integrating them into Agency programmes. 6//...A/48/305 English Page 27 2. Increasing numbers and capabilities 49. During the 1980s, there was an expansion in the number and sophistication of military satellites. In addition to an increase in optical imaging capabilities, new radar imaging satellites were introduced that provide high resolution coverage under all weather and lighting conditions. 50. Just as armed forces are increasingly more dependent on satellites, those satellites are used more and more in a coordinated manner; for instance, information from weather satellites might help programming for cloud-free observation, or navigation satellites because of their precision can assist in accurate determination of satellite in-orbit location and control. 7/3. Dual use systems 51. Space technologies are to a large extent of dual use in their application, as to a lesser degree are the systems. While the technologies employed may be similar or identical, the purpose for which they are employed -military or civil -is normally identifiable, albeit sometimes with some difficulty. The military may also contract with commercial corporations in a manner similar to other customers when it appears cost-effective to do so and where their security and availability requirements can be met. 52. Roles likely to be exclusively military include imaging satellites employed as national technical means (NTM) for intelligent purposes as well as SIGINT and ELINT collectors. Their primary purpose is the collection of other types of military and strategic intelligence. They have a potential, as well, to locate targets for attack. These are more likely to be strategic than tactical targets. Early warning satellites can be used in the interest of ballistic missile defences, specifically providing information on the launching of ballistic missiles. Nevertheless many of these satellites, particularly imaging satellites, contribute significantly to the function of arms control verification. Commercial imaging systems are closing the technology gap in terms of resolution, and therefore may contribute significantly in increasing future transparency on a global basis. They do not yet have the capability to contribute to arms control verification in other than a support role in determining presence of major infrastructures and monitor possible environmental degradations. 53. There are a number of areas, low altitude weather satellites for example, that are based on nearly equal civil and military capabilities. Physically quite similar and often made by the same company, the military often make use of both systems. Discrete military and civilian low altitude navigational satellite systems are deployed. The military use of full Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities, however, remain unavailable to civilian users. The military mapping community is a leading customer for commercially available remote sensing data and high resolution remote sensing film products, which are apparently derived from satellites whose primary mission was initially military map-making, is now becoming available to the commercial sector. /...A/48/305 English Page 28 54. It is clear that a considerable potential now exists to make use of data gathered by military or commercial means on a broader basis. Clearly, in the post bi-polar world of space technology, cooperative efforts must be developed. Data collected should be utilized in an organized manner and on a global basis. 4. Combat applications 55. The increased integration of military space capabilities with terrestrial military planning and that of space systems with each other have resulted in the expanding role of space and military space systems. One recent example of this was the Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm where United States satellites for imaging, signals intelligence, early warning, weather, communications and navigation were extensively used. 8//...A/48/305 English Page 29 III. EXISTING LEGAL FRAMEWORK: AGREEMENTS AND DECLARATIONS OF PRINCIPLES 56. Since the beginning of the space era, several international instruments concerning both military and peaceful aspects of the exploration and uses of outer space have been concluded. 57. The existing treaties concerning activities of States in outer space could be divided into three categories: global multilateral agreements (see appendix III), regional multilateral agreements and bilateral agreements. In addition, the General Assembly of the United Nations has adopted a number of resolutions containing declarations of principles concerning the space activities of States. 58. An attempt to identify several confidence-building components in some of these treaties is made in table 2. A. Global multilateral agreements 1. Outer Space Treaty 59. The 1967 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (Outer Space Treaty) 9/established the principles governing peaceful activities of States in outer space. According to article I, the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be (a) "carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind"; (b) "shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law"; and (c) "there shall be freedom of scientific investigation, ... and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigations". Further, activities of States Parties to this Treaty shall be carried out "in accordance with international law, including the United Nations Charter, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding" (art. III). In article IV, paragraph 1, the States Parties undertake, inter alia, not to place "in orbit around the Earth any object carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner". The Treaty further provides that the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes, and forbids "the establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any kind of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies" (art. IV, para. 2). /...A/48/305 English Page 30 TABLE 2 CBMsIN SOME MULTILATERAL AND BILATERAL ARMS LIMITATION AND DISARMAMENT AGREEMENTS (a) MULTILATERAL AGREEMENTS RELATED TO OUTER SPACE a/Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? PTBT Moscow 5 August 1963 10 October 1963 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 119 States Parties No verification clauses; but NTMs have been routinely used for verification purposes. Outer Space Treaty London, Moscow, Washington 27 January 1967 10 October 1967 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 93 States Parties Opportunity to observe the flight of space objects; onsiit inspection on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies; consultations if an activity is potentially harmful to those of others; an obligation to inform the United Nations Secretary-General of the nature, conduct, locations and results of their activities in outer space; the Secretary-General should be prepared to disseminate such information immediately and effectively; stipulates that all installations, equipment and space vehicles shall be open to representatives of other States Parties, on condition of reciprocity. Rescue Agreement New York 22 April 1968 3 December 1968 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 69 States Parties Specifies an obligation to notify the launching authority in case of accident; notify the United Nations Secretary-General about it; the Secretary-General shall disseminate the information received. Liability Convention New York 29 March 1972 1 September 1972 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 35 States Parties Questions arising from damage are solved through a Claim Commission. Registration Convention New York 14 January 1975 15 September 1976 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 37 States Parties Stipulates the framework for reporting to the United Nations Secretary-General information regarding name of launching State; appropriate designator; date and location of the launching of objects in space; basic orbital parameters, general function; changes in orbital parameters after launch, recovery date of the spacecraft. /...A/48/305 English Page 31 Table 2 (continued) Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? ITU Convention Geneva December 1992 Enters into force on 1 July 1994 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 128 States Parties The Union maintains and extends international cooperation among all members for the improvement and rational use of telecommunications of all kinds; coordinates efforts to eliminate harmful interference between radio stations of different countries; fosters international cooperation in the delivery of technical assistance to the developing countries, etc. ENMOD Convention New York 18 May 1977 5 October 1978 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 57 States Parties Consultation and cooperation among parties in solving problems concerning the implementation of the Convention; a Consultative Committee of Experts may undertake to make appropriate finding of facts and provide expert views relevant to any problem raised; in case of a breach of obligations, any State Party may lodge a complaint with the Security Council. Moon Agreement New York 18 December 1979 11 July 1984 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 8 States Parties Requires informing the United Nations Secretary-General of activities concerned with the exploration and use of the Moon; the required information should include: the time, purposes, locations, orbital parameters and duration of each mission to the Moon; shall inform the Secretary-General of any phenomenon they discovered in outer space, including the Moon; information on manned or unmanned stations on the Moon; on-site inspection by all parties; consultation in case a State Party believed unfulfilment of obligations, and if such consultation does not result in settlement, any party may seek the assistance of the United Nations Secretary-General. Note: The extracts regarding confidence-building measures are for illustrative not interpretative purposes. They do not represent a judgement or endorsement by the Group of Experts. Readers are advised to refer to the original documents for additional detail. /...A/48/305 English Page 32 (b) BILATERAL AGREEMENTS RELATED TO OUTER SPACE Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? Nuclear Accident Agreement Washington 30 September 1971 30 September 1971 Unlimited USSR, USA Mutual notification in case of accidental incident involving a risk of outbreak of nuclear war; establishment of Direct Communication Link; consultations to consider questions relating to implementation of the Agreement. Hot Line Agreement Washington 30 September 1971 30 September 1971 Unspecified USSR, USA Provides the establishment of a satellite communication system to increase reliability of the Direct Communication Link. ABM Agreement Moscow 26 May 1972 3 October 1972 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for verification measures by National Technical Means (NTMs), as well as establishing the principle of non-interference with NTMs; establishment of a Standing Consultative Commission to consider question concerning compliance. SALT-I Moscow 26 May 1972 3 October 1972 Five years (Expired in 1977) USSR, USA Provisions similar to those in the ABM Treaty. TTBT Moscow 3 July 1974 11 December 1990 Five years Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Similar to those in the ABM Treaty and SALT-I. PNET Moscow 28 May 1976 11 December 1990 Five years, with possibility of extension USSR, USA NTMs; allows access to sites of explosions; establishes Joint Consultative Commission for information necessary for verification. SALT-II Vienna 18 June 1979 Has never entered into force Five years USSR, USA NTMs; voluntary data exchange within the framework of Standing Consultative Commission. /...A/48/305 English Page 33 Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? Nuclear Risk Reduction Centres Washington 15 September 1987 15 September 1987 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Protocol I provides for notification of ballistic missile launches under Article 4 of the 1971 Nuclear Accident Agreement, and under paragraph 1 of Article 6 of the 1972 Prevention of Incidents on and over High Seas Agreement; Protocol II provides for the establishment and maintenance of facsimile communications between each party’s Nuclear Risk centres (an INTELSAT satellite circuit and a STATSIONAR satellite circuit). INF Treaty Washington 8 December 1987 1 June 1988 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for verification measures by NTMs; paragraph 2, subparagraph (a) confirms the principle of non-interference with NTMs; provides intrusive on-site inspections. Notification of Launches Moscow 31 May 1988 31 May 1990 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for notification, not less than twenty-four hours in advance, of planned date, launch area, and area of impact for any launch of an ICBM or SLBM; including the geographic coordinates of the planned impact area or areas of the RVs. Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities Moscow 2 June 1989 1 January 1990 Unspecified Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Stipulates an obligation of the Parties to notify use of a laser; establishes and maintains communications as provided in its annex I; establishes a Joint Military Commission to consider questions of compliance with obligations. START-T b/Moscow 31 July 1991 Has not entered into force 15 years Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for extensive on-site inspections and continuous monitoring activities; use of NTMs of verification; confirms the principle of non-interference with such means; rights and obligations concerning notification of different activities are elaborated in a Notification Protocol; establishes a Joint Compliance and Inspection Commission, etc. START-II Moscow 3 January 1993 Has not entered into force As long as START-I Right to withdrawal FR, USA Provides that the provisions of the START Treaty shall be used for implementation of this Treaty; establishes a Bilateral Implementation Commission for resolving questions related to compliance with the obligations assumed, and to agree on additional measures to improve effectiveness of the Treaty. a/Number of States Parties as of 1 January 1993. b/The START-I Treaty was converted into a multilateral treaty by the signing of the Lisbon Protocol on 23 May 1992 by Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United States. /...A/48/305 English Page 34 60. The Treaty regulates some other relevant questions, such as international responsibility (art. VI), international liability for damage due to such activities (art. VII), the question of jurisdiction, control and ownership over launched objects (art. VIII), cooperation among the States Parties, consultations in case of potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties (art. IX); there is an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by other States (art. X); and "all stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on Moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on the basis of reciprocity" (art. XII). The text of the Treaty is reproduced in appendix I. 2. Other global multilateral agreements 61. (a) The first global multilateral treaty regulating military activities of States in outer space is the 1963 Treaty on Banning Nuclear Weapons Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water (PTBT). 10/Under article I of the Treaty, the States Parties have undertaken "to prohibit, to prevent, and not to carry out any nuclear weapons test explosions, or any other nuclear explosion, at any place under its jurisdiction or control" in the atmosphere; beyond its limits, including outer space; or under water, or any other environment. The Treaty does not provide a verification mechanism and it is left to the States Parties to do so by their own national technical means (NTMs). 62. (b) The 1967 Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space 11/stipulates obligations of the States Parties in case that "the personnel of a spacecraft have suffered accident, or experiencing conditions of distress or have made an emergency or unintended landing" in territory of another State, and that they shall (a) "notify the launching authority or, if it cannot identify and immediately communicate with the launching authority, immediately make a public announcement by all appropriate means of communication at its disposal;" and (b) "notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who should disseminate the information without delay by all appropriate means of communication at his disposal" (art. l). The remaining provisions regulate in details the obligations of the "launching authority" and the obligations and rights of the other contracting Parties involved in such accidents, as well as further obligations of the Parties to notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations on steps undertaken regarding their search and rescue operations. 63. (c) The 1971 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects 12/provides that "a launching State shall be absolutely liable to pay compensation for damage caused by its space object on the surface of the Earth or to aircraft flight" (art. II). The remaining articles elaborate the obligations and rights of States Parties in the event of damage, such as the procedure to claim compensation, including the establishment of a claim commission, liability of international organizations which conduct space activities, etc. 64. (d) Under the 1975 Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space, 13/States Parties undertake an obligation that they shall, when a space object is launched into Earth orbit or beyond, register such objects in an /...A/48/305 English Page 35 appropriate register and inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the establishment of such a register (art. II). The Secretary-General shall maintain a Register in which the information furnished in accordance with article II shall be recorded. Article IV enumerates the information that shall be furnished by each State of registry, such as name of the launching State or States; an appropriate designator of the space object; date and territory or location of launch; basic orbital parameters, and general function of the space object. For more details, see chapter VII of this study. 65. (e) The basic instruments of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) are the Constitution and the Convention as adopted in 1992 and complemented by the Radio Regulations and the Final Acts of the World Administrative Radio Conferences. The main role of the Union is to allocate bands of the radio frequency spectrum, to allot radio frequencies and any associated orbital positions on the geostationary orbit. In addition, each satellite operator, irrespective of the mission of the satellite, has to notify the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) of its plans, thus ensuring an optimal functioning as well as avoiding harmful interference. 14/66. (f) The l978 Convention on the Prohibition of Military or Any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques 15/(ENMOD Convention) prohibits military or any other hostile use of environmental modification techniques having widespread, long-lasting or severe effects as the means of destruction, damage or injury to any other State Party (art. I) and defines these techniques as those changing -through deliberate manipulation of natural processes -the dynamics, composition or structure of the Earth, including its biota, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere, or of outer space (art. II). The States Parties have undertaken "to consult each another and to cooperate in solving problems which may arise in relation to the objectives of, or in the application of the provisions of, the Convention"; such consultations and cooperation may also be undertaken through appropriate international procedures within the framework of the United Nations and in accordance with its Charter, as well as of a Consultative Committee of experts as provided for in paragraph 2 of article V (art. V, para. 1). The composition and the procedure of the work of the Consultative Committee of Experts are elaborated in an annex to the Convention. In addition, Understandings Regarding the Convention (related to arts. I, II, III and VIII) are relevant for the interpretation of the Convention. 16/67. (g) The 1979 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies 17/has further elaborated the principles established under the Outer Space Treaty concerning States’ activities on the Moon and other celestial bodies. The Moon shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and the Agreement prohibits any threat or use of force or any hostile act or threat of hostile act on it. It also confirms the obligations of States not to place in orbit around or other trajectory to or around the Moon objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other weapons of mass destruction, nor to establish military bases, installations and fortifications. The Moon Agreement also requires that "States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of their activities concerned with the exploration and use of the Moon". The required information shall include the time, purposes, locations, orbital parameters and duration of each mission to/...A/48/305 English Page 36 the Moon as soon as possible after launching, while information on the results of each mission, upon its completion (art. 5, para. 1). In addition, the States Parties "shall inform the Secretary-General, as well as the public and the international scientific community, of any phenomenon they discover in outer space, including the Moon, which could endanger human life or health, as well as of any indication of organic life" (art. 5, para. 2). Under article 9, "States Parties may establish manned and unmanned stations on the Moon. A State Party establishing a station shall use only that area which is required for the needs of the station and shall immediately inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the location and purposes of that station. Subsequently, at annual intervals that State shall likewise inform the Secretary-General whether the station continues in use and whether its purposes have changed." B. Bilateral treaties 68. (a) The 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (ABM Treaty), 18/signed between the USSR and the United States, is of unlimited duration, and is of special significance to the study. The objective of the Treaty is to limit ABM systems and their components designed to intercept strategic ballistic missiles or their warheads in flight. This includes ABM launchers, interceptors, and radars constructed and developed for an ABM role or tested in an ABM mode. Article 1 sets forth the basic principle of the Treaty, namely to limit the deployment of ABM systems to agreed levels and regions. The Treaty bans the development, testing, and deployment of ABM systems and/or their components that are sea-based, mobile land-based, air-based, and, the most important in the context of the study, space-based (art. 5). 69. Apart from weapon limitation, the ABM Treaty is also relevant to the study because of the norms it has established on the use of NTMs for verification purposes. This is the first agreement (along with the SALT I agreement) to refer to verification by these means, as may be seen from article l2, paragraph l, which codifies national means of verification and specifies that they shall be carried out in a manner consistent with generally recognized principles of international law. Here the concept of non-interference with NTMs (art. 12, para. 2) is also important since NTMs include ground and space-based systems. This concept also implicitly includes the protection of such space-based systems as reconnaissance satellites (art. l2, para. 3) and thus protection against any form of interference. Legitimacy was therefore given by the Parties to the Treaty to their satellite activities for monitoring arms limitation and disarmament agreements. In addition, to promote the objectives and implementation of the provisions of the Treaty, a Standing Consultative Commission is established, within the framework of which the Parties will consider, inter alia, questions concerning compliance with the obligations assumed; provide on voluntary basis such information as either Party considers necessary to assure confidence in compliance with the obligations assumed; questions involving unintended interference with NTMs of verification, possible changes in the strategic situation that have a bearing on the provisions of the Treaty, etc. 70. (b) Non-interference with NTMs has also been stipulated in other USA/USSR agreements. Like the provisions of the ABM Treaty, the verification measures in the 1972 Strategic Arms Limitation Talks SALT I Agreement 19/and the 1979 /...A/48/305 English Page 37 Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty SALT II 20/are of special relevance to outer space. According to the provisions of article 9, paragrah l (c) of SALT II Treaty the development, testing or deployment of systems for placing into Earth orbits nuclear weapons or any other kind of weapons of mass destruction, including fractional orbital missiles, are prohibited. The 1991 START-I Treaty also provides that "each Party shall use national technical means of verification" (art. IX, para. l); each is enjoined, too, "not to interfere with the national technical means of verification" (art. IX, para. 2). 21/The 1993 START-II Treaty of 3 January 1993 between the Russian Federation and the United States provides that the verification provisions of START-I Treaty shall be used for the implementation of this Treaty. 22/71. (c) Some other bilateral instruments which, although they do not stipulate arms limitation or disarmament measures, have some relevance to the study should be mentioned here. One is the l97l USA/USSR Agreement to Reduce the Risk or Outbreak of Nuclear War. 23/Under this Agreement, each Party undertakes to notify the other in the event of an accidental or unauthorized incident that might cause a nuclear war. In article 4, the notification requirement includes advance notice of planned launches in the case that any such launches extend beyond the national territory of the launching Party and in the direction of the other Party. However, it is article 3 that is more directly relevant to the context of the study, since the Parties of that Treaty legitimized the existence and the use of certain satellite systems for military purposes. 72. (d) These two aspects of the l97l Agreement were further codified in another bilateral instrument signed on the same day -namely, the 1971 Agreement on Measures to Improve the USA-USSR Direct Communication Link. 24/The advances in satellite communications technology that had occurred since 1963 25/offered the possibility of greater reliability than the arrangements originally agreed upon. The Agreement, with its annex detailing the specifics of operation, equipment, and allocation of costs, provides for the establishment of two satellite communications circuits between the USA and the USSR, with a system of multiple terminals in each country. The United States is to provide one circuit via the Intelsat system, and the Soviet Union a circuit via its Molniya II system. In addition, each Party shall be responsible for providing to the other Party notification of any proposed modification or replacement of the communication satellite system containing the circuit provided by it that might require accommodation by Earth stations using that system or that might otherwise affect the maintenance of the Direct Line Communication Link. 73. (e) With the view to supplement earlier measures of communication at the Government-to-Government level, the l987 USA/USSR Nuclear Risk Reduction Centres Agreement 26/and its Protocols I and II, further codify the use of satellite communication in the interest of mutual security. Communication between the two countries is based on direct satellite links. These links are used for the exchange of information and for notifications as required under certain existing and possible future arms control and confidence-building agreements. Protocol I, article 1, calls for notification of ballistic missile launches under article 4 of the 197l Nuclear Accident Agreement and under paragraph 1 of article 6 of the 1972 Prevention of Incidents on and Over High Sea Agreement. To achieve this, Protocol II, article 1, stipulates the establishment and maintenance of an INTELSAT satellite circuit and a STATSIONAR satellite circuit /...A/48/305 English Page 38 to provide facsimile communication among each Party’s national Nuclear Risk Centres. 74. (f) Two other bilateral agreements with some bearing on the subject of the study are the l988 Agreement on Notification of Launches of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles and Submarine-launched Ballistic Missiles 27/and the l989 Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities Agreement. 28/Article 1 of the l988 Agreement stipulates that each Party shall provide notification, no less than 24 hours in advance, of the planned date, launch area, and area of impact for any launch of a strategic ballistic missile (ICBM or SLBM), as well as the geographic coordinates of the planned impact area or areas of the reentry vehicles. The Parties further agree to hold consultations, as mutually agreed, to consider questions relating to implementation of the provisions of the Agreement. In the l989 Agreement, words and terms such as lasers and interference with command and control networks are defined. This Agreement also codifies the use of lasers in peacetime. Article 2 stipulates, for example, that each Party shall take the necessary measures directed towards preventing the use of "a laser in such a manner that its radiation could cause harm to personnel or damage to equipment of the armed forces of the other Party". There is also an obligation of the Parties to notify each other in case of such use of a laser (art. IV, para. 2). Further, for the purpose of preventing dangerous military activities, as well as expeditiously resolving any incident, the Parties shall establish and maintain communications as provided in annex 1 to this Agreement (art. VII). In addition, a Joint Military Commission is established to consider questions of compliance with the obligations assumed under the Agreement (art. IX). 75. A number of bilateral and regional treaties were concluded among different States containing provisions concerning space-related matters. C. United Nations General Assembly resolutions on declarations of principles 76. On recommendation of COPUOS, the General Assembly has adopted a number of sets of principles governing the space activities of States: the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space (1963); the Principles Governing the Use of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting (1982); the Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Space (1986); and the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space (1992). 77. (a) On 13 December 1963, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 1962 (XVIII) containing the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and the Use of Outer Space. 29/On the basis of the principles contained in the Declaration, a number of multilateral agreements were negotiated and concluded under the auspices of the United Nations (as indicated in sections A and B above). The Declaration provides, inter alia, that "If a State has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State /...A/48/305 English Page 39 which has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by another State would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment" (Principle 6). 78. (b) On 10 December 1982, the General Assembly adopted resolution 37/92 containing the Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting. 30/It provides, inter alia, that "activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be carried out in a manner compatible with the sovereign rights of States" (Principle 1); and "in a manner compatible with the development of mutual understanding and the strengthening of friendly relations and cooperation among all States and peoples in the interest of maintaining international peace and security" (Principle 3). 79. (c) On 3 December 1986, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 41/65 containing Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Space. 31/These Principles provide, inter alia, that remote sensing activities "shall not be conducted in a manner detrimental to the legitimate rights and interests of the sensed State" (Principle IV) and that "a State carrying out a programme of remote sensing shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations" and shall "make available any other relevant information to the greatest extent feasible and practicable to any other State, particularly any developing country that is affected by the programme, at its request" (Principle IX). 80. (d) On 14 December 1992, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 47/68 containing the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space. 32/The Principles define guidelines and criteria for the safe use of nuclear power sources. They provide, inter alia, that the results of safety assessment of nuclear power sources carried out by a launching State "shall be made publicly available prior to each launch, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations shall be informed on how States may obtain such results of the safety assessment as soon as possible prior to each launch" (Principle 4). Also, the launching State operating "a space object with nuclear power sources on board shall in a timely fashion inform States concerned in the event this space object is malfunctioning with a risk of re-entry of radioactive materials on the Earth"; such information shall be also transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations "so that the international community will be informed of the situation and will have sufficient time to plan for any national response activities deemed necessary" (Principle 5). /...A/48/305 English Page 40 IV. GENERAL CONSIDERATION OF THE CONCEPT OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES 81. Confidence-building measures are increasingly accepted as an important element in reducing suspicion and tension between nations and enhancing international peace and stability. Over the past three decades, States have initiated a growing number of bilateral and multilateral confidence-building measures. This rich history of experience can provide the basis for an evaluation of the potential contribution of confidence-building in the space arena. A review of this history reveals a number of common characteristics of such measures, as well as guidelines for their applicability to particular circumstances. Thus several criteria can be identified for considering the implementation of confidence-building measures in outer space. 82. Confidence-building measures have also played an increasing role in the security planning of States. While initially limited to bilateral arrangements pertaining to strategic nuclear weapons, they have more recently found application in a multilateral context relating to conventional military forces. A clear pattern emerges of initial measures reducing the risk of misperception leading to the further development of more elaborate measures building on this positive experience. 83. The United Nations system has given increasing attention to the potential contribution of confidence-building measures to strengthening international peace and stability. The positive experience that has emerged in a bilateral context and in certain regions has formed a basis for the potential extension of this process to other areas and subjects. 84. At its First Special Session devoted to disarmament in June 1978, the General Assembly noted in paragraph 93 of the Final Document of the session that:"In order to facilitate the process of disarmament, it is necessary to take measures and pursue policies to strengthen international peace and security and to build confidence among States. Commitment to confidence-building measures could significantly contribute to preparing for further progress in disarmament." 33/85. At its thirty-third regular session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 33/91 B on 16 December 1978, calling on all States to consider regional arrangements for confidence-building and to inform the Secretary General on views and experience on appropriate and feasible confidence-building measures. 86. Based on these replies, the General Assembly approved resolution 34/87 B on 11 December 1979, calling for the preparation of a comprehensive study of confidence-building measures. The group of 14 governmental experts appointed to carry out this study, adopted its report by consensus on 14 August 1981. The study represented the first attempt to clarify and develop the concept of confidence-building measures in a global context. The experts expressed the hope that the report would provide guidelines and advice to Governments that intended to introduce and implement confidence-building measures. They also hoped to promote public awareness of the importance of such measures for the /...A/48/305 English Page 41 maintenance of international peace and security, as well as for developing and fostering a process of confidence-building in various regions. 34/87. At its thirty-sixth regular session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 36/97 F of 9 December 1982, by which it reaffirmed the importance of confidence-building measures and invited all States to consider regional arrangements for confidence building. It also called for the submission of the Comprehensive Study on Confidence-Building Measures to the General Assembly at its second special session devoted to disarmament. 88. At its thirty-seventh regular session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 37/100 D, by which it requested the Disarmament Commission to consider the elaboration of guidelines for appropriate types of confidencebuilldin measures and for the implementation of such measures on a global or regional level. The Guidelines 35/were finally adopted by the Commission on 18 May 1988 and endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 43/78 H. The Guidelines are reproduced in appendix II to this study. 89. Confidence-building measures have been acknowledged and advocated by the United Nations as a means for dispelling mistrust and stabilizing situations of tension, thus contributing to create a favourable climate for the conclusion of effective disarmament and arms limitation measures. 90. On the basis of the Comprehensive Study on Confidence-Building Measures, the Guidelines adopted by the United Nations Disarmament Commission and other existing agreements, the following common characteristics and criteria for their implementation and applicability are discussed. A. Characteristics 91. The process of confidence-building emerges from the belief in the cooperative predisposition of other States. Confidence increases over time as the conduct of States indicates their willingness to engage in cooperative behaviour. 92. The process of building confidence between States evolves through step-bystte reductions and even elimination of the causes of mistrust, fear, misunderstanding and miscalculation with regard to relevant military and/or dual-use capabilities of other States, as well as their other security-related activities. This process is premised on the recognition of States’ need for reassurance that certain military or security-related activities of other States do not threaten their own security. 93. The effectiveness of confidence-building measures depends on the extent to which they directly respond to the specific perceptions of uncertainty or threat in a particular situation or environment. Thus specific measures must be tailored to specific circumstances. 94. The confidence-building process must strike a balance between bilateral and multilateral applications. Regional examples may not find global applications, but such measures should have a global context with specific regional considerations. /...A/48/305 English Page 42 95. Improved confidence is based primarily on practical military policy carried out by States and on concrete actions that express a political commitment whose significance can be examined, verified and assessed. The development of certainty evolves from experience with the conduct of States in specific situations. Thus proclamations of generally accepted principles of international behaviour, declarations of intent, or pledges of future behaviour are welcomed, but may not be sufficient for reducing suspicion or perceptions of threat. 96. A higher degree of confidence can be achieved only when the amount of information that States command enables them to predict satisfactorily and to calculate the actions and reactions of other States within their political environment. The level of such predictability increases the degree of openness and transparency with which States are prepared to conduct their political and military affairs. 97. The openness, predictability and reliability of the policies of States are essential for the maintenance and strengthening of confidence. Agreements on specific confidence-building measures can help to allay suspicions and to engender trust by creating the framework for a wide range of contacts and exchanges. Prejudices and misconceptions, which are the basis for mistrust and fear, can be alleviated through expanded personal contacts at levels of decision-making. 98. Reductions in perceptions of threat or conditions of uncertainty are most effectively achieved through the consistent, continuous, and complete implementation of accepted confidence-building measures. The reliability, seriousness and credibility of the commitment of States to the process of reducing mistrust is demonstrated through their dependable implementation of such measures. 99. Confidence-building is a process whereby the accumulation of greater experience of positive interactions forms the basis for greater trust and thereby for further measures of confidence-building. This is a dynamic process, accelerating over time. 100. Thus, this process usually proceeds from general commitments of a less restraining nature to more specific commitments, eventually leading to the progressive elaboration of a comprehensive network of measures enhancing the security of States. (a) One means of developing confidence is to enhance the quality and quantity of information exchanged on military activities and capabilities. (b) Another means of furthering the development of trust and predictability involves the expansion of the scope of confidence-building measures. (c) Another means of strengthening confidence-building is increasing the degree of commitment to the process. Voluntary unilateral measures should be reciprocated, leading to mutually established political commitments, thence to measures that may subsequently be developed into legally binding obligations./...A/48/305 English Page 43 101. Confidence-building measures have primarily political and psychological effects and, although closely related, cannot always be considered as arms limitation measures by themselves in the sense of limiting or reducing armed forces. Rather, improved confidence can have a positive impact on the subjective estimation of the intentions and expectations of other States. 102. Confidence-building measures can contribute to progress in concrete disarmament and arms limitation agreements. They can supplement disarmament and arms limitation agreements, and thus can become an important avenue for progress in reducing international tensions. In the context of disarmament and arms limitation negotiations, such measures may form part of an agreement itself, facilitating implementation and verification provisions. 103. Confidence-building measures cannot substitute for concrete progress in limiting and reducing armaments. In the face of unconstrained increases in the number of weapons, or of continued improvements in the capabilities of weapons, the distrust and apprehension that is created will outweigh the contribution of confidence-building initiatives. B. Criteria 104. The effective implementation of confidence-building measures requires careful analysis in order to determine with a high degree of clarity those factors that will support or undermine confidence in specific situations. 105. Accurate assessment of the implementation of agreed measures is fundamental to contribute fully to the development of predictability and trust. Thus it is essential that the details of agreed confidence-building measures should be defined with as much precision and detail as possible. 106. Thus the process of confidence-building requires clear criteria by which States’ behaviour may be judged. These criteria are necessary both so that States may guide their own activities and so that States may evaluate the activities of others. The development of confidence proceeds from the extent to which States’ behaviour is consistent with such accepted and established criteria. 107. The requirement for clarity also implies that accepted criteria will be readily verified by interested and affected parties. Verification procedures in and of themselves can contribute to the building of confidence. 108. The initiation of confidence-building measures requires the consensus of participating States. It is the product of the political will of States, in a free exercise of sovereignty, to accept practical measures to implement legitimate and universal principles of international conduct. This decision involves commitments as to which measures are to be implemented and the form of the implementation. Observation of the principles of sovereign equality and undiminished and balanced security are essential conditions for those States participating in the confidence-building process. 109. Specific confidence-building measures must be applicable to specific military capabilities and relevant to the particular technological /...A/48/305 English Page 44 characteristics of military systems. The measures must take into account those aspects of military technologies and systems which are most relevant to the security concerns of interested and affected States. Similarly, confidencebuilldin measures must take into account the unique characteristics of the geographical and physical environment in which they are to be implemented. C. Applicability 110. Confidence-building measures are applicable to three categories of States: (a) those that are direct participants in activities that may be the source of mistrust or tension; (b) other States that are affected by military or security policies of those in the first category; and (c) those States that are involved in encouraging further development of the confidence-building process. 111. Confidence-building measures differ according to whether they constitute positive responsibilities or negative constraints. They also differ as to whether the obligation involves an exchange of information or a constraint on activities. 112. Such measures have been divided into three broad categories, according to the activities to which they are applied: (a) Encouraged activities are those that promote the peaceful uses of space for all human-kind, such as scientific exploration and discovery. These also include measures by which States demonstrate that their intentions and capabilities are not hostile or aggressive. Such measures, which may be implemented on a continuing basis, involve exchanges of information and personnel, including data on force levels and characteristics; (b) Permitted activities encompass the full range of those not explicitly prohibited, though not specifically encouraged. They include measures that reduce the apprehensions States may have concerning the combat potentials of particular military activities. In particular, measures which are intended to reduce concerns about surprise attack may include notification of military behaviour and related activities; (c) Prohibited activities are those forbidden by various elements of the present international legal regime, such as the placement of weapons of mass destruction in space. Measures that strengthen these prohibitions include those that seek to limit or prohibit the scope or nature of certain classes of activities, either under particular circumstances or in general. These measures differ from traditional disarmament and arms limitation measures in that it is the activity of forces, rather than the capabilities or potentials of the forces, that are limited or prohibited. 113. There are other categories of activities, too, whose prohibition will build confidence. These are: -Activities that have not yet taken place and are not currently contemplated, confirming existing norms of behaviour and extending these norms into the future. /...A/48/305 English Page 45 -Activities that might otherwise take place in a particular region or environment, including activities in particularly sensitive areas such as border regions. -Activities that would only be conducted at a stage of deteriorating political or military relations. 114. Such measures may place limitations on some military options, but they cannot replace more concrete arms control and disarmament measures which would directly limit and reduce military capabilities. /...A/48/305 English Page 46 V. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE 115. The extension of universal principles of confidence-building measures to outer space must take into account the unique characteristics of the space environment and space technology. Bilateral and regional experience to date with confidence-building initiatives may contribute to the elaboration of further initiatives. 116. There are a number of aspects of the space environment that distinguish it from other environments in which confidence-building measures have previously been implemented.A. Specific features of the space environment 117. Outer space is both distant and nearby. It is distant because it is difficult to access, and because the extent of even stratospheric space dwarfs terrestrial dimensions. It is nearby in that no State is more than a relatively short distance from outer space, which lies only a few hundred kilometres above every nation. 118. Outer space is simultaneously a uniquely harsh environment and one that is uniquely benign. The vacuum of space is fatal to unprotected humans and presents novel challenges for experimentation as well as the basic operation of objects in space. Similarly, hazards are posed by the radiation in space, which far exceeds that of Earth. In addition, natural meteoroids and debris from human space activities create dangers to equipment and living creatures that have little parallel on Earth. The spacecraft must protect both itself and its occupants (if any) from the low temperatures of the Earth’s shadow or of deep space, as well as from the high temperatures produced by high-power operations in full sunlight. Yet space is also a uniquely benign environment. Once in orbit, free of the extreme stresses of launch and air-drag, spacecraft may deploy enormous and delicate structures that would quickly collapse if erected on the Earth’s surface or released at high velocities through the atmosphere. 119. A rocket takes only a few minutes to take a spacecraft from the Earth’s surface to low Earth orbit. Once there, a satellite moves at more than 25,000 kilometres each hour, circling the globe up to 16 times a day and providing a unique vehicle for observations of Earth. Further, a spacecraft in orbit above the atmospheric drag regime, will continue unimpeded on its gravitation-and radiation-appointed trajectory for years, even decades. 120. These environmental characteristics present unique technological problems to those who wish to reach and utilize the space environment. The technical difficulties and financial burdens of entering and operating in space challenge even the most technically advanced and wealthiest countries and far exceed the capacity and resources of most States. 121. Consequently, countries may be divided according to their space capabilities into at least three categories. So far only two nations, the United States and the Russian Federation, possess the full range of small and/...A/48/305 English Page 47 large launch vehicles, piloted and unmanned spacecraft, and military and civilian space proficiencies that are currently attainable. 122. A growing number of other States possess some but not all of these capabilities, typically launching capacities and competence in the design, manufacturing and operation of satellites for research and other applications. The vast majority of countries that remain are not space Powers of this order and derive their benefits from the exploitation of space only through the capabilities of others. 123. At the same time, the number of countries that participate directly or indirectly in activities in space has steadily increased since 1957, as have their capabilities. There is every reason to expect these trends to continue in the decades to come. 124. The Group notes the view of some States that there is a need to adjust certain aspects of the present space market as soon as possible, especially in the new global political climate. 125. Confidence-building proposals have focused largely on measures intended to reduce concerns about surprise attack or inadvertent war. One fundamental issue in applying confidence-building to outer space is precisely what security issues posed by space activities and technology are to be addressed. 126. This calls for understanding the relative value of space-related confidence-building measures and cooperation in space projects. Space cooperation itself can strengthen international confidence and may be considered a confidence-building measure. 127. Confidence-building measures can respond to the intrusive character of outer space activities. Access to space gives space-faring nations access to all points on Earth for a wide variety of civilian and military applications. This intrusive capability, even where it does not involve weapons, can generate mistrust. Thus, confidence-building measures could function to provide assurances that outer space activity is not being used against non-space countries. Greater openness in military and other space activities may be a positive development not only in the military sphere, but in the economic and social spheres as well. 128. From another perspective, one of the future threats to stability may be not only military space systems generally, but space weapons in particular. The implications of developing new military systems designed to be deployed in space should be studied further. 129. The application of confidence-building measures to space activities is affected by a variety of other factors, too. The verification of compliance is an essential component of confidence-building. Space presents both challenges and opportunities for verification. The vast distances of space, and the sophisticated technologies of space systems can make verification complex. At the same time, space is the most transparent of environments, open in all directions, and the technologies lend themselves to verification. Since some space systems may be used for both civilian and military purposes, differentiating between the two is not always easy. /...A/48/305 English Page 48 B. Political and legal 130. The political basis for confidence-building in space derives from the application of universal principles of international cooperation and State practice to the outer space environment. 131. The prevention of an arms race in outer space is one of the specific objectives of the efforts to elaborate confidence-building measures in outer space. Other objectives, however, may also be relevant to this process. 132. Such other objectives arise from the concerns of different groups of States and are based primarily on the possibility of having access to space, the implementation of technology transfers to enable such access, and matters of regional and global stability. The growing dependence of the national and international communities on space technology for economic and social purposes increases the necessity for all activities in space to take place in a safe environment. These concerns derive from the great differences in capabilities among differing categories of States. 133. In the past, the outer space activities of the major space Powers appeared to be predicated, in part at least, on the strategic objectives that each of these nations seemed to pursue in terms of their bilateral strategic relationship. Since the ABM Treaty negotiations of the early 1970s to the most recent Defense and Space Talks (the last rounds of which took place in October 1991), emphasis on their bilateral strategic relationship was obvious. With the significant changes in this bilateral relationship since 1989, some of the activities of each in the space environment particularly for military purposes, appear to have been reframed and restrained, at least in part by considerations related to cost, technological capacity and existing legal constraints. 134. Another important consideration in this regard is the fact that the number of nations with growing capacities in fields related to outer space is increasing. This has global as well as regional implications and its significance for the use of outer space from a strategic, economic or environmental perspective remain to be seen. 135. Whether the new space Powers will be mainly interested in scientific and other civilian activities rather than military applications, like the current leading space Powers also remains an open question. The answer may depend in part on the extent of international cooperation in space, as well as the nature of their strategic interests. 136. The non-space Powers want assurances that the major space Powers will not use their space capabilities against non-space countries in any way. In addition, these States are concerned that space be used exclusively for peaceful purposes. 137. The Outer Space Treaty and the other treaties dealt with in chapter III include some measures that may be considered confidence-building components. There are currently two points of view in terms of the legal regime: first, that the existing legal regime represents a framework of confidence-building /...A/48/305 English Page 49 measures in outer space that calls for continuous review; second, that the existing legal regime is not sufficient and should be examined further. In the latter case, the elaboration of confidence-building measures in outer space would facilitate the application of existing treaties. 138. Whether confidence-building measures in outer space could be a subject of a separate treaty or that of a special instrument remains to be determined. In any case, there is still a need for a more precise definition of legal terms and the development of some others to fulfil the requirements of the political situation on the one hand, and on the other, technological and scientific developments in outer space. C. Technological and scientific 139. The technological implications of confidence-building measures in outer space are twofold. They concern those technologies that can be used in support of confidence-building in space and those that can be used for confidence-building from space. 140. Some confidence-building activities in space may require a range of technologies that can be used both to monitor space activities and to enhance the transparency of space operations. At present, while some space activities are the subject of international agreements, such as the advance publication and notification procedures for all satellite stations pursuant to International Telecommunication Union regulations, many space activities are not covered by specific international agreements. 141. Confidence-building from space can be enhanced by various systems that can monitor terrestrial military activities in support of both existing and prospective confidence-building measures and disarmament and arms limitation regimes. 142. Many space systems have inherent dual capabilities: they have the potential to perform both military and civilian functions. The technology used to launch satellites is similar in many aspects to that used for long-range ballistic missiles. Satellites used for monitoring natural resources can also provide images of interest to military planners, while communications, weather, and many other types of satellites are useful for both military and civilian purposes. 143. The multiple applications of space technology have several specific consequences. Some space operations, including but not limited to military operations, produce artificial debris in space that can become a danger to other satellites. In addition, nuclear-power sources may be required for some types of space missions, both military and civilian. Compliance with the information clauses contained in General Assembly resolution 47/68 could allay anxieties concerning the safety of using such devices in outer space. Although a complete ban on such power sources may not be acceptable, the provision of more information, as well as greater openness may be needed to alleviate security concerns. /...A/48/305 English Page 50 1. Technology and outer space 144. Technological considerations provide a number of opportunities for the implementation of confidence-building measures in space, while also placing a number of practical limitations on space operations. The technological considerations pertain to both the nature of activities in space, as well as to the means of observing these activities. 145. Activities in space may be divided into several phases, such as launch, transfer orbits, deployments, check-out, and operations. Before becoming operational, the full classification of a specific satellite in terms of its final function may be difficult. However, while operating in orbit, satellites generally exhibit characteristics that are unique to spacecraft performing a particular function. Consequently this function at least can usually be identified. Communications satellites will relay radio-frequency transmissions with specific power, frequency coverage and polarization characteristics. Satellites used for meteorological and optically based resource monitoring functions, as well as those used for imaging intelligence and early warning of missile launches, will all use optical systems with apertures of various sizes, and transmit large quantities of data when sensing. Radar satellites, both civilian and military, will deploy large transmitting and receiving antennas that emit distinctive radio-frequency signals, coupled with high-speed data. Electronic intelligence satellites may deploy distinctive receiving antennas. Finally, all types of satellites transmit to ground stations distinguishing telemetry patterns. (a) Technology for monitoring space operations 146. Since 1957, the United States and the Soviet Union have deployed a wide range of systems for monitoring space activities. 36/One mission of these systems has been to provide warnings of strategic missile attacks. But the growing number of satellites in orbit has increased the necessity of keeping track both of new launches and the impending decays of satellites so as to avoid confusing these events with hostile missile launches. In addition, the increasing scope of military space operations has made the tracking and characterization of space systems a significant mission in its own right. 147. Satellite tracking systems, both optical and radar, are among the most sophisticated and expensive military sensor technologies. Spacetrack radars typically have ranges and sensitivities 10-100 times greater than radars for tracking aircraft or surface targets. Moreover, optical tracking systems use telescopes that rival all but the largest civilian astronomical observatories. (b) Ground-based passive optical systems 148. The earliest form of satellite tracking systems, still the least expensive, rely on sunlight reflected off a spacecraft. Visible against the pre-dawn or post-dusk sky, the largest low orbiting spacecraft, such as space stations or imaging intelligence satellites, are comparable to the brighter stars in the sky, while many other low-orbiting satellites are visible to the naked eye. 37/Even satellites at geosynchronous altitudes are visible with relatively modest optics under optimal lighting conditions. 38//...A/48/305 English Page 51 149. The capability of a telescope to observe satellites is primarily a function of the aperture of its primary optical surface, as well as the properties of the means used to form the image. Telescopes with mirrors up to four metres in diameter have been used for satellite tracking. Initially, satellite tracking cameras used film systems; more recently, electronic charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have replaced them. CCDs provide an instantaneous read-out of the image, avoiding the time-consuming processing required by film systems. These electronic cameras, coupled with image-processing devices, have enabled scientific telescopes of modest apertures of a few metres to obtain recognizable images of large spacecraft in low orbits. 39/(c) Ground-based active optical systems 150. Although most optical sensors rely on reflected sunlight or emitted infrared energy for satellite tracking, active optical sensors are finding increasingly application. By illuminating a target with coherent laser radiation, these systems can image satellites that are not illuminated by sunlight at night, as well as targets that may be obscured by sky-glow during daylight hours. The use of active illumination also permits direct measurement of the range of the target, as well as facilitating the characterization of the satellite’s structure. (d) Ground-based radars 151. Ground-based radar systems have been used since the late 1950s to track civilian and military satellites. 40/Radars have several advantages over optical tracking systems, including the ability to observe targets and to measure their range in all weather and independently of natural illumination. Today the United States and the Commonwealth of Independent States both deploy extensive networks of radars that perform the satellite tracking function, as well as other tasks, such as the detection of missile attacks. 152. As radar technology has advanced, the problem has taken on a new dimension. Today’s modern and sophisticated large-phased array radars (LPARs) can serve many functions. They can provide early warning of missile or bomber attacks. LPARs can track satellites and other objects in space and observe missile tests to obtain information for monitoring purposes. They are also an essential component of present generation ABM systems, providing initial warning of an attack and battle management support, distinguishing reentry vehicles from decoys, and guiding interceptors to their targets. (e) Other technical means of monitoring space characteristics 153. Although these various information collection systems -many of which have been constructed for other purposes -can enhance the transparency of space operations, some military space activities may require the application of special techniques developed to provide adequate confidence concerning their precise nature. 154. The presence of nuclear-power sources and many space weapons on satellites could be determined by pre-launch inspections of all satellite payloads. /...A/48/305 English Page 52 (f) Monitoring space weapons 155. Three criteria are applicable to the consideration of systems for monitoring space weapons. First, the technical collection systems required to enhance transparency, as well as other means to this end, should be available during the time-frame in which activities of concern are likely to occur. 156. Second, the cost of monitoring may be a major obstacle to verification. Schemes that require vast expenditure and produce much data of little interest are unlikely to generate adequate support. 157. Third, technical collection systems should not be so powerful that they reproduce the anti-missile systems that they may be intended to limit. Verification schemes that require inspection satellites to rendezvous with other satellites in order to determine the presence or absence of prohibited activities may be difficult to distinguish from prohibited anti-satellite systems. Similarly, large space-based infrared telescope sensors used for verification may be difficult to distinguish from sensors that would form the basis for an ABM battle management system. 158. The performance of a laser (its "brightness") is a function of the aperture of its mirror and the power and wavelength of the laser beam. While the mirror aperture can be monitored by a variety of means, it is not clear that the technology currently available can check more than the main operational beam. Machinery adequate to monitoring the power and wavelength of lasers may not be available for another decade. 159. For example, the development and deployment of entirely new specialized space-based sensors for monitoring factors such as laser brightness may require as much as 10 years after a decision to produce such a device. Given this situation, cooperative measures such as in-country monitoring stations might be considered, since they could be deployed much sooner. 160. Civilian and military satellites are all placed in orbit by launch vehicles that can be observed by early warning satellites. Launching facilities and activities are monitored by imaging satellites. All orbiting satellites can be tracked by a variety of ground based radars and cameras. 161. ASAT and related tests against a point in space without benefit of a target would not provide adequate assurance in tests for the error-free accuracy required by kinetic energy impact kill mechanisms. The intercept manoeuvres of kinetic energy interceptors are distinguishable from the activities of other satellites. Further, telemetry streams from satellites are subject to monitoring by space-based sensors. Consequently, because of their unique testing requirements, kinetic energy weapons could be readily monitored by various means. 2. Technology and confidence-building measures 162. While space systems may be a subject of monitoring and confidence-building, they can also contribute to this process. Satellites can be used to monitor other satellites, as well as terrestrial developments. While this latter /...A/48/305 English Page 53 application is one of the missions for the imaging and other intelligence satellites discussed earlier, there have also been proposals for developing satellites specifically for this purpose. For some countries, transparency concerning space launching capabilities is now a significant issue. (a) PAXSAT-A 163. The Canadian PAXSAT-A concept, developed in 1987-1988, was the outcome of a feasibility study on the ability of a specialized spacecraft to provide information on other spacecraft, while the PAXSAT-B concept (discussed below) was intended to monitor ground activities from space. 41/164. PAXSAT-A concerns verifying the stationing of weapons in space, which requires the determination of the function and purpose of a satellite using non-intrusive means. These sensors would function in a complementary fashion, for example, combining an image of a satellite’s radar antenna with data on the operating wavelength of the radar, thus providing an indication of the satellite’s resolution and ground coverage. The mass of the target satellite could be assessed by knowledge of the thruster aperture combined with radar observations of the satellite’s accelerations after thruster firings of measured duration, which would be monitored by the infrared sensor. 165. The PAXSAT-A constellation might initially consist of two operational satellites plus one spare in high-inclination orbits at altitudes of 500-2,000 kilometres. Subsequently, another satellite might be launched into semi-synchronous orbit, with another placed into geosynchronous orbit. (b) Satellites for monitoring terrestrial activities 166. Imaging and other intelligence satellites have made a significant contribution to arms limitation. Thus far, however, satellites used for arms limitation verification have served this function as an adjunct to their primary mission of collecting strategic and tactical military intelligence. None the less, there have been several proposals for satellites that would be deployed specifically for arms limitation verification. Such satellites could make a positive contribution to regional and global confidence-building initiatives within given institutional arrangements. (c) International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) 167. In 1978, at the First Special Session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, France submitted a proposal calling for the establishment of an International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) for the international verification of disarmament and arms limitation agreements, as well as for monitoring crisis situations. 42/This proposal led to a study by a Group of Experts on the implications of setting up such an agency. 43/168. The implementation of the ISMA concept was expected to proceed in three phases: (a) In Phase I, an Image Processing and Interpretation Center (IPIC) would be established using imagery from existing civilian and other national satellites for training and exploitation; /...A/48/305 English Page 54 (b) In Phase II, a network of 10 specialized ground stations would be devoted to receiving data from civilian and non-civilian satellites; (c) In Phase III three specialized ISMA spacecraft would be launched and operated. 169. The initial phase of this proposal was subsequently proposed by France at the third special session devoted to disarmament in June 1988, entitled Satellite Image Processing Agency (SIPA). 44/The principal function of the Agency would correspond to the initial phase of ISMA, the gathering and processing of data emanating from existing civilian satellites and the dissemination of the resulting analysis to Member States. This could contribute to verification of existing disarmament and arms limitation agreements, establishing facts prior to the conclusion of new agreements, monitoring crisis situations and disengagement agreements, as well as preventing and handling disasters and major natural hazards. The Agency could serve as a centre for the training of photo-interpretation experts, as well as a research centre for the further development of these applications. (d) International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA) 170. At the third special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament in 1988, the Soviet Union proposed the establishment of an International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA), 45/which would provide the international community with information relating to compliance with multilateral arrangements for disarmament and the reduction of international tension and would also monitor the military situation in areas of conflict. In the opinion of the Soviet Union, placing the results of monitoring by national satellite systems at the disposal of an international organization would be a major step towards promoting confidence and openness in relations between States. 171. In addition to its military policy aspects, the activities of ISpMA could interest many States by supplying them with satellite data important to their economic development. 172. ISpMA might be assigned the following functions: (a) Collection of information from space monitoring; (b) Consideration of requests from the United Nations and individual States for a study of information services that could prove useful to them in evaluating compliance with international arrangements and agreements concerning local wars and crisis situations; (c) Elaboration of recommendations on procedures for the use of space facilities for monitoring or verification of future treaties and agreements. 173. The ISpMA concept can be successfully implemented by moving forward in stages and establishing a sound political, legal and technical basis for the implementation of subsequent steps. (a) At the first stage a Space Image Processing and International Centre would be created as the main technical organ of ISpMA. In view of the /...A/48/305 English Page 55 heterogeneity of data coming from national space monitoring sources, it is particularly important to have a universal facility to convert data from various sources into an integrated geographical information system for subsequent processing and analysis. Obligations to provide such a facility might be assumed by Member States that possess the necessary resources, financial or technological, for creating it; (b) At the second stage of ISpMA’s activities, a network of ground datareceeptio points would be created to receive data through channels operating in near-real time from Member States that have space monitoring facilities. 46/(e) PAXSAT-B 174. The PAXSAT-B spacecraft grew out of a feasibility study by Canada of space technologies specifically geared to verifying treaties based on the control of conventional forces over a limited region, such as the European theatre. 47/It was assumed that it would operate in the political and military context previously outlined for PAXSAT-A. The PAXSAT-B was required to provide data based on two scenarios: (a) The more critical was the detection of a violation breakout and involved satellite access to any point in the region within 36 hours. (b) The less critical was surveying the entire treaty area over a period of 30-40 days. 175. Given the meteorological conditions of the European region, this meant that the satellite had to carry an all-weather imaging radar sensor, which was expected to have some capability for penetrating rudimentary camouflage countermeasures. /...A/48/305 English Page 56 VI. CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE A. The need for confidence-building measures in outer space 176. The potential importance of confidence-building measures in outer space derives both from concerns over emerging trends in space activities, as well as from the need to prevent an arms race in outer space. 177. A number of security concerns have been voiced by various States about current and potential directions of military space activities. Some of these are interrelated and such concerns may apply at both global and regional levels. 178. These concerns among States are not only related to the militarization of outer space, but also particularly to the "weaponization" of outer space. At present there are no weapons deployed in space, and most of the world community wants to be sure that such systems will not appear in future. One source of these concerns lies basically in the areas of ballistic missile defence (BMD) and anti-satellite (ASAT) systems. These systems could threaten satellites in orbit, including those playing an important role in maintaining strategic stability. 179. A second concern is based on the increasing application of military space systems to support terrestrial combat operations, and the significant disparities in such capabilities of modern weapon systems. Military satellites are of increasing relevance to the contemporary battlefield. 180. Another concern derives from the proliferation of missile technology in the world. While recognizing the legitimate right of States to acquire space-launch capability for peaceful purposes, many States believe that such capability might be used for military applications. The latter could include space activities that might be considered hostile to other States. 181. The most significant concern arises from all those mentioned above, namely, that the peaceful uses of the space environment may become increasingly constrained by military considerations. Thus far, space missions have coexisted largely with relatively little mutual interaction. But future growth in military space programmes might result in diminished opportunities for international cooperation in peaceful uses of outer space. 182. Currently, however, there is no agreement as to whether the existing international regime applicable to outer space is adequate. While the importance of this regime has been recognized, uncertainties remain. Thus some Parties to the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 maintain that the Treaty places no constraints on military activities in the Earth’s orbit other than the placement of nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction. Other Parties to the Treaty contend that the Treaty’s mandate that space be used for peaceful purposes precludes the application of space systems to combat support functions. 183. As indicated earlier in chapter IV, at least three categories of space activities are envisioned under the present international legal regime for outer space. Activities that are prohibited by various elements of the legal regime, such as, for example, the placement of weapons of mass destruction in space. Activities that are encouraged are those that promote the peaceful uses of space /...A/48/305 English Page 57 for the benefit of all humankind, such as scientific exploration and discovery. Activities that are permitted encompass the full range of those not explicitly prohibited, though not specifically encouraged. While these broad distinctions may have been adequate in the early years of the space age, it is not clear that they provide sufficient guidance for the decades ahead. Enlarged space capabilities and the enlarged community of nations that are actively participating in the utilization of the space environment may require a further elaboration of international norms of behaviour. 184. The progressive expansion of the range of space activities and the increasing number of space-faring nations justify the progressive development of new international norms for space activities. Given the time required to complete the negotiation of any potential additional multilateral treaties governing space activities, a range of confidence-building measures could make a positive contribution to this process. B. Proposals for specific confidence-building measures in outer space 185. Over the past decades a wide range of measures have been proposed by various States to address the issue of the prevention of an arms race in outer space. As early as 1957, in the Subcommittee of the Disarmament Commission, Canada, France, the United Kingdom and the United States called for a technical study of the features of an inspection system to ensure that the launching of objects through outer space was conducted exclusively for peaceful and scientific purposes. 48/186. Some of the proposals advanced over the past decade are directly concerned with arms limitation and prohibitions on space weapons and related activities. A number of other suggestions have been advanced relating to confidence-building measures in this field. Some arms limitation initiatives, too, contain elements that provide enhanced transparency of activities, and thus are also of interest in the present context. Overview of proposals 49/187. A schematic overview of proposals concerning confidence-building measures (CBMs) advanced over the past decade is presented in table 3. These proposals generally fall into a number of categories, including: (a) Those intended to increase the transparency of space operations generally; (b) Those intended specifically to increase the range of information concerning satellites in orbit; (c) Those that would establish rules of behaviour governing space operations; (d) Those that pertain to the international transfer of space and rocket technology. /...A/48/305 English Page 58 Table 3 Confidence-building proposals discussed in the Ad Hoc Committee for the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space A. Confidence-building measures Nature of measures Major objective Measures Means Voluntary/reciprocal (1989) Transparency in international law of outer space and activities in that environment Indicate States’ understanding of and adherence to relevant treaty obligations Sharing of information regarding their current and prospective activities in outer space Dissemination of information through: Diplomatic channels in the CD The Secretary-General of the CD Contractual obligation Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road/Rules of Behaviour International law: Improving existing legal norms aimed at transparency Outer space and activities: Establishing a set of norms to guide States’ behaviour in respect of their own and/or others’ activities in outer space Reducing the risk of accidental collisions, preventing incidents, preventing close-range co-orbital pursuits, and ensuring better knowledge of outer space traffic Provision of regular updating, in the event of manoeuvres or drifting, of orbital elements declared at the time of registration The keeping of a minimal distance between any two satellites placed in the same orbit (in order to avoid not only accidental collisions, but also short-range co-orbital tracking, which is a precondition for the system of space mines) Monitoring of close-range passing (to limit risks of collision or interference Broadening of the Registration Convention relating to information on launches scheduled by States Establishment of a procedure providing for requests for explanations in the event of incidents/suspicious acts Identification of keep-out zones in the form of two spherical zones moving with each satellite: (1) a proximity zone to delimit the location of each space object in reciprocal orbit, as well as the capability of each object to move with respect to the others, and (2) a wider approach zone, with obligatory notification for passage through it International Launch-Notification Centre Notification of ballistic missile and space launcher launches The establishment of an international centre under the auspices of the United Nations Launch data collection and analysis International Trajectography Centre (1989) Collect data for updating registration Monitor space objects Conduct real time calculation of space objects’ trajectories The establishment of an international trajectography centre and Consultation Machinery Data provided by each State concerning its own satellites or the satellites it has detected. Constant upgrade information on orbits and manoeuvres /...A/48/305 English Page 59 Nature of measures Major objective Measures Means Satellite Image Processing Agency (1989) Collect data to facilitate the verification of disarmament agreements, and to serve as a clearing-house for the exchange of data, the establishment of certain facts, such as force estimates, in advance of the conclusion of disarmament agreements Monitoring of compliance with disengagement agreements (local conflicts) Prevention/handling of natural disasters/development programmes Establishment of a low-cost Agency assigned to conduct data-processing, management, analysis, and dissemination operations The collection and processing of data obtained from existing civilian satellites, and then to disseminate this material to the Agency’s members Source: UNIDIR study entitled Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for International Security UNIDIR/92/77 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.92.0.30), p. 100. /...A/48/305 English Page 60 B. Confidence-and security-building measures concerning a Code of Conduct for the Space Activities of States __________ Source: Reproduction from document CD/OS/WP.58 (based on proposals by States members of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space). /...A/48/305 English Page 61 C. Possible institutional arrangements Feature ISMA France 1978 WSO USSR 1985 PAXSAT A Canada 1986 ISI Soviet Union 1988 ISpM Soviet Union 1988 UNITRAS France 1989 SIPA France 1989 INC France 1993 Type Proposal Proposal Concept Proposal Proposal Proposal Proposal Proposal Scope Global: existing and future treaties (unlimited number of treaties covering any type of weapon and weapons system) Global: to promote global cooperation in outer space development Treaty specific on the PAROS (unlimited number of treaties) Specific treaty on the PAROS: prohibiting the placement of weapons of any kind in outer space Global: existing and future treaties (unlimited number of treaties covering any type of weapon and weapons systems) Global: all States possessing or using satellites; future agreements Global: Agency’s members Global: new international instrument on regime of prior notification of space launches and ballistic missiles Objective Monitoring; verification (under special arrangements) Cooperation in communication, navigation, rescue of people, weather forecasting service etc. Verification (under special arrangements) Verification Monitoring: verification (under special arrangements) Monitoring of the trajectory of Earthorbiitin devices Collect and process data obtained by existing civilian satellite; to serve as research centre; to train national personnel to interpret space images; Strengthening cooperation and transparency in outer space Application -monitoring and/or verification (as applicable) Arms limitation and disarmament; RIOs dealing with security issues; Settlement of disputes Coordination of different peaceful uses of outer space Arms limitation and disarmament Arms limitation and disarmament Arms limitation and disarmament; RIOs dealing with security issues; Confidencebuilldin measures; Settlement of disputes; Natural disasters; Other emergencies Confidencebuillding provide proof of good faith in the event of alleged deliberate collision Confidencebuilldin and securitybuillding Monitoring of compliance with disengagement agreements in local conflicts Notification, CBMs, transparency /...A/48/305 English Page 62 Feature ISMA France 1978 WSO USSR 1985 PAXSAT A Canada 1986 ISI Soviet Union 1988 ISpM Soviet Union 1988 UNITRAS France 1989 SIPA France 1989 INC France 1993 Method Remote sensing (space-to-Earth) Remote probing of the Earth by geophysical methods and by means of unmanned interplanetary spacecraft Remote sensing (space-to-space) On-site Remote sensing (space-to-Earth) Data collection through States’ satellites; high-performance tracking and computer devices Data collection through ground sensors and satellite-borne detectors Receiving information; establishing databank; providing information Function NTMs; ISMA satellites Communication, rescue of people, study and preservation of the earth’s biosphere; developing of new sources of energy etc. Permanent inspection teams; Ad Hoc inspection teams PAXSAT satellites (NTMs of contracting parties may contribute some data) Permanent inspection teams; Ad Hoc inspection teams NTMs; Possibility of ISMA satellites Collects data for updating registrations; monitoring space objects; conduct real time calculation of space objects’ trajectories Processing of remote maintenance data; data quality control; manned techniques of photo interpretation and computerassiiste interpretation Supply information: using detection capabilities of States on voluntary basis Output Supply of satellite monitoring/verification data Disseminate scientific and technological data Supply of satellite verification data Treaty specific verification Supply of satellite monitoring/verification data Provide data to be stored, not published Disseminate restricted or unrestricted data Supply through data bank information Source: UNIDIR study entitled Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space, UNIDIR/86/08 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.86.0.2), p. 137 and documents DP/PV.377, CD/937 and CD/OS/WP.59.6 /...A/48/305 English Page 63 188. Coverage of all existing, official and non-official proposals goes beyond the need of the present study. Therefore the overview of proposals that follows will be confined to those submitted to various disarmament forums, including the Conference on Disarmament, the United Nations Disarmament Commission and the United Nations General Assembly’s First Committee, as well as to some bilateral proposals put forward within the framework of the negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union, among others. According to a UNIDIR study, 50/those proposals fall in the categories set forth in the following paragraphs. 1. Confidence-building measures on a voluntary and reciprocal basis 189. Agreements could be reached on certain arrangements that would not, initially, be intended to constitute a treaty. Any such agreement would take the form of non-mandatory provisions that States would observe in a spirit of reciprocity. This type of approach, if agreed, would demonstrate cooperative behaviour and contribute to mutual confidence. 190. In a proposal of this kind, Pakistan suggested in 1986 that the Conference on Disarmament "should call upon the space powers to share information regarding their current and prospective activities in space and to indicate their understanding of and adherence to relevant treaty obligations". 51/191. In 1989, Poland submitted a proposal whereby measures would be adopted by the Conference on Disarmament itself, to which participating States would submit information leading to transparency in outer space activities. 52/These measures, which were not intended to be legal obligations, would include information on the following: (a) Positive law of outer space -a reaffirmation of the importance of space law; a call on all States to act in conformity with space law; a call on all States not yet parties to agreements related to outer space to consider their accession to such international instruments; a suggestion to all States Parties to multilateral treaties and agreements related to outer space to accept the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice in all disputes concerning interpretation and application of such instruments; (b) Transparency in space activities -an exchange of information on a voluntary basis of their space activities such as: activities having military or military-related functions; prior notification of the launching of space objects; sending observers to the launching of space objects or to the preparation of or participation in other space activities, particularly those having military or military-related functions (in the spirit of reciprocity and goodwill); supplying other information considered useful for (i) building confidence and (ii) the reduction of misunderstanding; (c) Destination of information -to other members of the Conference on Disarmament, either through usual diplomatic channels or through the Secretary-General of the Conference on Disarmament and open to all States. 192. Further measures proposed by Poland suggested that members of the Conference on Disarmament, particularly those with outer space capabilities, /...A/48/305 English Page 64 should agree to recognize that increased voluntary transparency would reduce misunderstanding among States. 193. In 1991, France declared itself "... ready to give favourable consideration to a measure providing for assessment visits at launch site or orbital control site of a registered space object", made it clear that measures involving such visits should take place on a voluntary basis and, stated that "... only States which had agreed to such an inspection could be visited". 53/2. Confidence-building measures on a contractual obligation basis 194. Confidence-building measures on contractual basis have been the subject of several different proposals. For example, in 1986, Pakistan expressed the view that such measures could include, inter alia: negotiations to reach an interim or partial agreement in view of an international treaty to supplement the ABM Treaty; a moratorium on the development, testing and deployment of ASAT weapons; and immunity for space objects. 54/195. To the above-mentioned proposals could be added proposals such as those for the creation of an international space agency and/or an international trajectography centre. (a) Space Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road 196. The two terms, Space Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road, have been used interchangeably in the discussions of the Conference on Disarmament about confidence-building measures. In its generic meaning, a Space Code of Conduct has been considered to consist of a set of norms to guide States’ behaviour in respect of their own and/or others’ activities. The Rules of the Road, sometimes referred to as Rules of Behaviour, however, represent either the reaching of agreements on such norms or the norms themselves. The Rules of the Road would therefore be part of the Space Code of Conduct. 197. France, for example, has advocated that the aim of a code of conduct "... is to guarantee the security of space activities while preventing the use of space for aggressive purposes". It has further stated that, "... what is most important is to be able at any time to distinguish an incident of fortuitous or accidental origin from the result of specific aggression. To that end, it is suggested that a set of rules of behaviour should be drawn up ...". 55/Thus, both concepts would be employed as yardsticks in the establishment of measures to increase the safety of space objects and the predictability of space activities. 198. Germany 56/has repeatedly advocated that negotiations on these two concepts be undertaken under the auspices of the Conference on Disarmament for a number of reasons. A Space Code of Conduct is seen by Germany as a mechanism to reduce misinterpretation of space activities and inadvertent collisions with other space objects. In its view, this would create more transparency in respect of accidents in outer space, as well as provide a means of consultation between States in any such eventualities. /...A/48/305 English Page 65 199. Germany also suggested a number of subject areas from which specific rules could be created. These included a mutual renunciation of measures that would interfere with the operation of other States’ space objects; the establishment of minimum distances between space objects; the imposition of speed limits on space objects that approach one another and on high-velocity fly-by and trailing; restrictions on very low altitude overflight by manned or unmanned spacecraft; stringent requirements for advanced notice of launch activities; the grant of the right of inspection or restrictions on it; and the establishment of Keep-out Zones. 57/200. The various measures mentioned above have sometimes been referred to as a sort of traffic code for space objects. 201. Such measures were formally proposed by France in 1989 within the framework of its proposal on satellite immunity. 58/However, the French proposal was not conceived as exclusive; it focused mainly on the development of rules of conduct for space vehicles to reduce the risk of accidental collisions, prevent incidents, prevent close-range co-orbital pursuit, and ensure better knowledge of space traffic as follows: (a) Providing for regular updating, in the event of manoeuvres or drifting, of orbital elements declared at the time of registration; (b) Keeping a minimum distance between any two satellites placed in the same orbit in order to avoid not only accidental collision, but also short-range co-orbital tracking, which is a precondition for the system of space mines; (c) Monitoring close-range passing to limit risks of collision or interference. 202. In 1991, a French working paper 59/suggested that these rules might be implemented by: (a) A broadening of the Registration Convention relating to information on launches scheduled by States; (b) A procedure providing for requests for explanations in the event of an incident or suspicious activity; (c) The identification of keep-out zones in the form of two spherical zones moving with each satellite: a proximity zone to delimit the location of each space object in reciprocal orbit, as well as the capability of each object to move with respect to the others; a wider approach zone, with obligatory notification for passage through it. (b) Open outer space 203. In addition to proposals made at the Conference on Disarmament, some delegations have advocated a wide range of confidence-building measures to foster transparency and safety in space activities as viable contributions to achieving mutual confidence. The concept of open outer space has been presented as one such approach and is aimed at building confidence on a step-by-step basis. It would mean reaching agreement on a measure such as providing for data /...A/48/305 English Page 66 exchange and then gradually build up confidence to obtain agreement on a measure more directly concerned with arms limitation. The Soviet Union has suggested 60/that this concept be examined by the Conference on Disarmament since, in its view, the most important measures related to the realization of the open outer space are: the strengthening of the 1975 Registration Convention; the elaboration of Rules of the Road or a Code of Conduct for space activities; the use of space-based monitoring devices in the interest of the international community; and the establishment of an international space inspectorate. 3. Proposals for institutional framework 204. There are several proposals suggesting the creation of different mechanisms for space activities, whose functioning could also contribute to enhancing and/or contributing to confidence-building in outer space activities. (a) International Trajectography Centre (UNITRACE) 205. In July l989, France proposed the creation of an international trajectography centre (UNITRACE), 61/to be set up within the framework of an agreement on the immunity of satellites and possibly as part of the United Nations Secretariat. The membership of the Centre would be open, on a voluntary basis, to all States possessing or using satellites. Since its main objective would be clearly confined to the monitoring of the trajectory of Earth-orbiting devices, France suggested that the Centre could play a key role in building up confidence among States. The Centre’s principal function would therefore be to collect data for updating registration, monitor space objects, and conduct real time calculation of space objects’ trajectories. Moreover, to fulfil its functions properly, the Centre would also require constantly upgraded information on orbits and manoeuvres. While the French proposal acknowledged that the existence of such a database would lead to a higher level of transparency, it also recognized that the nature of this data-gathering was such that the protection of technological and military information would be a serious consideration. (b) Satellite Image-Processing Agency (SIPA) 206. In 1989, France proposed the creation of a Satellite Image-Processing Agency (SIPA), 62/which would constitute the initial phase of an international institution for satellite monitoring. However, the French initiative clearly stated that the proposed agency "... would be a confidence-building device and would not be intended to be the embryo of a verification system with universal competence attached to the United Nations". Instead, SIPA is to be understood as an agency to be created within the framework of confidence-building and security-building measures. It would be designed as a low-cost agency with three objectives. The first of these would be to collect and process data obtained from existing civilian satellites, and then to disseminate that material to the Agency’s members. Its second objective would be to serve as a research unit or centre charged with (a) identifying groups of satellites which could contribute to the implementation of multilateral civil or military programmes, and (b) designing various possible linkage agreements. The third objective would be to train national personnel to interpret space images and /...A/48/305 English Page 67 ascertain the extent to which the monitoring and verification of arms limitation and disarmament could be performed by means of satellites. 207. At the third special session of the United Nations General Assembly devoted to disarmament, held in 1988, the Soviet Union proposed the creation of an International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA), which was later elaborated in more detail in the Conference on Disarmament (for more details see chapter V). 63/According to this proposal, the main function of the Agency would be to collect information about monitoring space; providing information to the United Nations and Governments that could be useful in controlling local conflicts and crisis situations; and consideration of recommendations concerning the use of space-monitoring for control of future agreements. 4. The international transfer of missiles and other sensitive technologies 208. Concerns about the proliferation of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, as well as the proliferation of delivery systems for such weapons, particularly long-range ballistic missiles, has been one of the sources of interest in creating mechanisms for the international transfer of missiles and other sensitive technologies. 209. In 1987, a group of States, 64/sharing concerns about the proliferation of certain missile systems capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction, agreed to a Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). The primary purpose of this regime is to limit the proliferation of certain missiles, as well as specified components and technologies. This regime is not based on a formal treaty. Rather, each party has taken appropriate unilateral measures to adopt and implement common guidelines. Since 1987, additional countries, including a number of developing countries with important missile or space programmes, have adopted the regime’s guidelines or declared their support for the regime’s objectives. 65/210. The international supplier-control regime applied to the proliferation of ballistic and cruise missiles has been the subject of a number of suggestions. 211. In the context of MTCR, which has been developed to limit the proliferation of some types of missiles and missile technology, France has suggested that it: "... should only be a stage towards a more general agreement, one that is geographically more extensive, better controlled and applicable to all. The agreement would lay down rules promoting civilian cooperation in space, while removing the dangers of the diversion of technology for developing a military ballistic capability ... the aim would be to arrive at a situation where all States wishing to gain access to space for development purposes would cooperate in a framework guaranteeing security." 66/212. In 1991, Argentina and Brazil proposed a set of guidelines for the international transfer of sensitive technology that addressed this issue. They noted that: /...A/48/305 English Page 68 "To aim at universality, and to prove capable of generating really effective international controls, the regulation of the flows of sensitive technologies cannot fail to take account of the interest and need of a large number of States in enjoying access to those technologies for peaceful purposes. It seems fair to assume that the degree of adherence by the community of nations to rules intended to curb the use of sensitive technologies in weapons of mass destruction will be in proportion to the perception that such rules do not constitute an impediment, but rather an encouragement, to the dissemination of scientific and technological knowledge for peaceful purposes." 67/213. The suggested guidelines included: "Enhanced international cooperation in the areas of science and technology strengthens confidence among States. "The existence of disparities of treatment in this area and the differing degrees of access to high technology may result in a deterioration of confidence among countries. "Because sensitive technologies can be used both for peaceful purposes and for weapons of mass destruction, they cannot be defined as inherently harmful. It is the intent or purpose underlying their utilization that such technologies may or may not have security implications. "A system of international controls over flows of sensitive technology products, services and know-how should be seen essentially as of a monitoring nature, and not as a mechanism for the restriction of legitimate transfers." 68/214. This general approach is consistent with a number of other suggestions that have been made for revising the present international technology transfer regime in light of the new world political environment. 5. Proposals for confidence-building measures in outer space within bilateral USA-USSR negotiations 215. A broad range of transparency and predictability measures has been discussed in the bilateral Defence and Space Talks between the United States and the Soviet Union. 69/These have included: (a) Annual exchanges of data, meetings of experts, briefings, visits to laboratories, observations of tests, and ABM test satellite notifications; (b) A proposal for "dual pilot implementation" with each side demonstrating its proposed predictability measures; (c) A proposal to conclude a free-standing agreement covering those measures, independent of the status of negotiations on concrete limitations on anti-missile testing and deployment. /...A/48/305 English Page 69 216. Concrete steps taken with respect to these initiatives include the visit in December 1989 by Soviet specialists to United States-directed energy facilities in California and New Mexico. 217. Although these measures were proposed in a bilateral context, it was suggested, in 1986, by Sri Lanka that they might usefully be extended to multilateral application: 70/"The ’open laboratories’ offer of the United States delegation could be implemented in an Ad Hoc Committee of the Conference with information provided by all delegations ..." 218. Also, in 1988, Pakistan suggested that, in addition to providing detailed information in advance of a launch concerning the nature of the payload, that this information should be verified: "... at the launch site by an international agency ... such an institution could be set up for the purpose of verifying data concerning the function of space objects with a view to providing the international community with reliable information on activities in space, especially those of a military nature." 71/219. At the Summit Meeting in June 1992 between the Presidents of the United States and of the Russian Federation, it was stated in a joint statement issued on a Global Protection System (GPS) that they were continuing their discussion of the potential benefits of a Global Protection System against ballistic missiles, agreeing that it was important to explore the role for defences in protecting against limited ballistic missile attacks. They also agreed that they should work together with allies and other interested States in developing a concept for such a system as part of an overall strategy regarding the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction. 72/6. Other proposals 220. In 1985, a broader approach to the question of international cooperation in space technology was suggested by the Soviet Union, which proposed the formation of a World Space Organization (WSO) to coordinate and promote global cooperation in space development. 73/The programme of work would include: (a) Communication, navigation, rescue of people on Earth, in the atmosphere and outer space; (b) Remote sensing of the Earth for agricultural development of the natural resources of the land, the world’s seas and oceans; (c) The study and preservation of the Earth’s biosphere; (d) The establishment of a global weather forecasting service and notification of natural disasters; (e) The development of new sources of energy and the creation of new materials and technologies; /...A/48/305 English Page 70 (f) The exploration of outer space and celestial bodies by geophysical methods and by means of unmanned interplanetary spacecraft. 74/221. In August 1987, the Soviet Union suggested the creation of an International Space Inspectorate (ISI). This proposal was subsequently elaborated, 75/on the basis that: "On-site inspection directly before launch is the simplest and most effective method of making sure that objects to be launched into and stationed in space are not weapons and are not equipped with weapons of any kind." 222. Suggested measures within the concept of International Space Inspectorate included:"(a) Advance submission by the receiving State to the representatives of the International Space Inspectorate of information on every forthcoming launch, including the date and time of launch, the type of launch vehicle, the parameters of the orbit, and general information on the space object to be launched; "(b) The permanent presence of inspection teams at all sites for launching space objects in order to check all such objects irrespective of the vector; "(c) The start of inspection -days before the object to be launched into space is mounted on the launch vehicle or other vector; "(d) The holding of inspections also at agreed storage facilities, industrial enterprises, laboratories and testing centres; "(e) The verification of undeclared launches from undeclared launching pads by means of ad hoc on-site inspection." 76/223. Although the proposal for an International Space Inspectorate was advanced in the context of an agreement that would ban all space weapons, this approach, in the Soviet Union’s view, could be also considered as the basis for a free-standing initiative to enhance transparency and predictability. 224. Space-related matters have been proposed as a possible area of interest in some regional and multilateral arms control and disarmament negotiations. 225. The Tenth Conference of the Heads of State or Government of Non-Aligned Countries, which met in Jakarta from 1 to 6 September 1992, called for "the establishment of a multilateral satellite verification system under the auspices of the United Nations", which would ensure equal access to information for all States. 77//...A/48/305 English Page 71 C. Analysis 226. Although each of those suggestions makes a positive contribution to understanding the opportunities for confidence-building in outer space, there remain a number of issues that need to be more fully addressed. 1. General measures to enhance transparency and confidence 227. Based on the experience in other terrestrial arenas, the application of additional measures to increase the level of information concerning current and future space activities seems highly appropriate. The precedent of steps for providing improved predictability in the bilateral Defence and Space Talks is a useful beginning. 228. Two aspects, however, require further attention. The first relates to the question of whether such confidence-building measures have the character of voluntary steps that each State is free to exercise as it chooses, or whether they constitute legal obligations incumbent on all States. While many of these steps could provide an effective method for publicly demonstrating the character of a State’s space activities, it remains to be seen how far States would be prepared to go in this direction in the absence of general reciprocity. From the point of view of some States, there is a necessity for some States to protect certain intelligence-related space activities; this is a factor that has to be taken into consideration. 229. The second question relates to the nature of activities that might be disclosed. From one perspective, these transparency measures would help to demonstrate that no proscribed space activities are occurring. From another perspective, such measures would be used to reduce the likelihood of misunderstanding or misperception with respect to space weapons and other activities. 230. Although many of the confidence-building mechanisms that have been suggested would be applicable in either context, agreement on which context is relevant may have significant consequences for the initiation and implementation of such measures. 2. Strengthening the registration of space objects and other related measures 231. A revision and strengthening of the provisions of the Registration Convention is, from the point of view of some States, one of the avenues for strengthening the international space legal regime covering military and other activities in space. 232. The proposal for an International Trajectography Centre also raises some operational concerns. In 1989, France noted that: "... to give, say, the precise position of an observation satellite is, however, to disclose thereby the precise object of its monitoring function. How, then, to reconcile the constraints of confidentiality /...A/48/305 English Page 72 with the gathering of all the requisite information concerning satellite’s trajectories!"? 78/233. While this may be the situation for imaging intelligence satellites with optical systems, which must modify their orbits so that they fly directly over an area of interest, more sophisticated imaging satellites are not so constrained. However, concerns about the confidentiality of orbital information are still present, since notice of an impending overflight could provide sufficient warning to permit concealment from observation from space. 234. France further suggested that: "... the grouping of that information in a computer system operating on the ’black box’ principle could constitute an appropriate solution ... (the centre) ... would receive and store, without publishing it, the orbital data declared at the time of registration and updated in the event of any subsequent change of trajectory." 79/235. However, given the present level of classification that surrounds the orbits of intelligence satellites, it is necessary that such a centre should provide a sufficient level of protection for such information. This situation may evolve with increasing confidence among the major space Powers, which, thanks to their developed tracking facilities, would allow the cross-verification of the data communicated to the centre. In any case, it may appear profitable for space Powers to communicate data concerning their satellites in exchange of the immunity of the latter. 3. Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road 236. Keep-out zones should be in conformity with the provisions of the Outer Space Treaty. Keep-out zones could be established in a multilateral context, and considered in a functional manner. 237. The need for a separate regime to guarantee the immunity of certain classes of satellites from attack has been questioned. It has been suggested that: "... international legal instruments already exist intended to ensure the immunity of satellites. These instruments prohibit the use of force against satellites except in cases of self-defence. Indeed, these international agreements go further than the proposals because they also prohibit the threat of the use of force against satellites. On the other hand, if these proposals mean to prohibit nations from taking actions against satellites in legitimate cases of self-defence, then they undermine the Outer Space Treaty, the United Nations Charter, and the inherent right of sovereign States to take adequate measures to protect themselves in the event of the threat or use of force." 80/238. The question of precisely which type of satellites would be granted immunity remains to be studied further. It has been noted that: /...A/48/305 English Page 73 "... information gathered by reconnaissance and surveillance satellites has also been used in support of military operations. However, if the functions performed by reconnaissance and surveillance satellites are as benign as they are sometimes made out to be, one may well ask why this capability should remain the monopoly of the space Powers. Should we not entrust surveillance and reconnaissance activities by satellite to an international agency in order to monitor compliance with disarmament agreements?" 81/239. It might be easier, at least initially, to reach international agreement on granting some appropriate form of protection to satellites owned and operated by international organizations than it would be to reach such an agreement on generic categories of satellites. 240. One of the problems with suggestions for grants of immunity is that many space systems have multiple applications. Military satellites may serve various missions depending on the operational context, while other satellites may perform both military and civilian functions. 241. Imaging intelligence satellites are used for arms control treaty verification, a function that is generally accorded a privileged status. But these same satellites can also support targeting of terrestrial weapons, an application that is a source of some ambivalence in the international community, and an impetus to the development of anti-satellite weapons. It is difficult to imagine how immunity could be granted to a satellite when it is performing its treaty verification function, while denying immunity to the same satellite a few minutes later as it supports targeting in some terrestrial conflict. 242. The viability of declarations on immunity would also be open to question as long as States were in the possession of means to attack and destroy satellites. The existence of robust anti-satellite capabilities would largely negate the significance of such declarations. France has proposed to grant legal immunity to all satellites that are not capable of active interference with other objects, that is, serving only stabilizing functions as opposed to aggressive uses of outer space. 82/4. The international transfer of missile and other sensitive technologies 243. In the past, the question of the development of space weapons was discussed largely in an East-West context, a focus that has substantially altered since the dramatic changes in the international environment. To an increasing extent, the question is now framed in a much broader context. The concerns of some countries over the proliferation of missile and other sensitive technologies require appropriate international arrangements. 244. New appropriate international arrangements for the transfer of space-related technology could provide a number of avenues for responding to security concerns posed by a number of States on the question of dual use technologies. /...A/48/305 English Page 74 VII. MECHANISMS OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION RELATED TO CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE 245. Resolution 45/55 B, which defines the mandate of the Study Group, recognized "the relevancy space has gained as an important factor for the socioeconnomi development of many States". In the same resolution, the General Assembly requested the Group to examine, inter alia, "possibilities for defining appropriate mechanisms of international cooperation in specific areas of interests and so on ..." 246. Priorities in specific areas of cooperation vary from one State and from one region to another. For the purposes of the study, international cooperation is viewed in the broader sense, including cooperation related to confidencebuilldin measures in outer space. This chapter therefore examines two categories of international mechanisms and proposals for creating new mechanisms. A. Existing mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space 247. There are three categories of international mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space: global, regional, and bilateral. 1. Global mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space 248. The United Nations has dealt with the questions concerning outer space since the beginning of the space age, mainly in two broader areas of its activities: peaceful uses of outer space and prevention of an arms race in outer space. 249. Growing interest in peaceful uses of outer space led to the establishment, in l959, of the Committee on the Peaceful Use of Outer Space (COPUOS) which was charged to report to the General Assembly on various aspects of the peaceful use of outer space, including: (a) activities of the United Nations and its specialized agencies; (b) dissemination of data on outer space research; (c) coordination of national research programmes; (d) further international arrangements to facilitate international cooperation in outer space within the framework of the United Nations; (e) and legal problems that might arise as a result of the exploration of outer space. The annual reports of the Committee are considered by the Special Political Committee of the United Nations General Assembly. 250. Since then, the work of the Committee and its two subcommittees -one concerned with legal issues, the other with scientific and technical matters -has led to the formulation of five international instruments dealing with general principles for the exploration and use of outer space, the rescue of astronauts and the return of objects launched into outer space, liability for damage caused by space objects, the registration of objects launched into space and activities on the Moon and other celestial bodies. /...A/48/305 English Page 75 251. The following questions are, inter alia, on the agenda of COPUOS 83/: (a) ways of maintaining outer space for peaceful purposes; (b) the work of its Scientific and Technical Sub-Committee and its Legal Sub-Committee; (c) the implementation of the recommendations of the United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space; (d) spin-off benefits of space technology, etc. For details see chapter III above.) 252. In addition to the elaboration of the above-mentioned agreements, the General Assembly, at the recommendation of COPUOS, has adopted the following Principles: (a) the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and the Use of Outer Space (resolution 1962 (XVIII); (b) Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting (resolution 37/92); (c) Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Space (resolution 41/65) and (d) Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space (resolution 47/68). 253. To contribute to the use of outer space for peaceful purposes, the United Nations has organized two special conferences on the subject: the First United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space 84/was held in l968 to examine the practical benefits of space exploration and research and the opportunities available to non-space powers to cooperate institutionally in space activities. The Second Conference, known as UNISPACE 82, 85/was held in Vienna in August l982. The Conference recommended, inter alia, guidelines for the rapidly growing use of space technology; called for the establishment of a United Nations space information system, initially to consist of a directory of information and data services accessible to all States. The Conference also considered the question of the utilization of outer space and stated that preventing an arms race in outer space was essential if States were to continue to cooperate with each other in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes. 254. Parallel to the United Nations activities related to the peaceful uses of outer space, the question of preventing an arms race in outer space has been on the General Assembly agenda since the early l950s. As early as l957, proposals were made in the Disarmament Commission 86/for an inspection system that would ensure that objects launched into outer space would be solely for peaceful purposes. The desire of the international community to prevent an arms race in outer space was expressed, as indicated earlier, by the General Assembly in its l978 Final Document, adopted at the tenth special session devoted to disarmament, which stated that "in order to prevent an arms race in outer space, further measures should be taken and appropriate international negotiations held in accordance with the spirit of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies" (para. 80). 255. The question of preventing an arms race in outer space has been on the agenda of the General Assembly since 1982. A number of resolutions have been adopted requesting the Conference on Disarmament to consider the question of negotiating effective and verifiable agreements for preventing an arms race in outer space or to consider as a matter of priority the question of negotiating an agreement to prohibit anti-satellite (ASAT) systems. /...A/48/305 English Page 76 256. Since 1982, the Conference on Disarmament, the sole multilateral negotiating body on this subject, has had on its agenda an item entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space". However, because of differing views concerning the formulation of a mandate, it was only in l985 that the Conference on Disarmament 87/was able to set up an ad hoc committee with a mandate to examine, as a first step, through substantive and general consideration, issues relevant to the subject. 257. The Ad Hoc Committee has continuously, since its inception, examined three subject areas within its mandate: (a) Issues relevant to the prevention of an arms race in outer space; (b) Existing agreements governing space activities; and (c) Existing proposals and future initiatives on the prevention of an arms race in outer space. Some States in the Ad Hoc Committee have been advocating adopting several confidence-building proposals as contributions to the prevention of an arms race in outer space. 258. In addition, the United Nations has additional functions related to space activities of States. Thus, the Secretary-General has been appointed as depositary of the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched in Outer Space (1975); the ENMOD Convention of 1977, and the Agreement Governing the Activities on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies of 1979. 259. According to the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space, 88/the States Parties have undertaken to maintain a central registry and to provide the Secretary-General of the United Nations with information on the space objects they have launched. According to articles 3 and 4, the mandatory reporting of space launches and the structure of the uniform system to be maintained by the Secretary-General is provided as follows: 1. Each State of registry shall furnish the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as soon as practicable, the following information concerning each space object on its registry: (a) The name of the launching State or States; (b) An appropriate designator of the space object or its registration number; (c) The date and territory or location of launch; (d) Basic orbital parameters, including: (i) nodal period, (ii) inclination, (iii) apogee, /...A/48/305 English Page 77 (iv) perigee; (e) The general function of the space object. 2. Each State of registry may, from time to time, provide the Secretary-General with additional information concerning a space object carried on its registry; 3. Each State of registry shall notify the Secretary-General to the greatest extent feasible and as soon as practicable, of space objects concerning which it has previously transmitted information and which have been, but no longer are in Earth orbit. 260. In the framework of multilateral mechanisms, it is noteworthy to mention two additional organizations: the International Telecommunication Satellite Organization (1971) and the International Maritime Satellite Organization (1976). 261. The International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT) is a commercial cooperative of 124 countries that owns and operates a global communications satellite system that is used by more than 170 countries around the world for international communications and by more than 30 countries for domestic communications. INTELSAT has been providing satellite services for public telecommunications since 1965 by means of a successive series of satellites known as INTELSAT I to VI. As of July 1992, the INTELSAT space segment consists of 18 INTELSAT V, V-A and VI satellites in geostationary orbit over the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. INTELSAT VII, which is currently the most technically advanced commercial satellites ever designed, will be launched in 1993. 89/262. The International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) was established on the initiative of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The INMARSAT Convention and Operating Agreement were adopted in September 1976 and entered into force in July 1979. INMARSAT was originally established to meet the needs of international shipping for reliable communications. Amendments to the constituent instrument to extend INMARSAT’s competence so that it can provide aeronautical satellite communications entered into force on 13 October 1989. Further amendments were adopted by the INMARSAT Assembly of Parties in January 1989 to enable INMARSAT to provide land mobile communications, but these amendments have not yet entered into force. INMARSAT is required to act exclusively for peaceful purposes. Its space segment is open for use by ships, aircraft and land mobile users of all nations, without discrimination on the basis of nationality. As of 31 May 1993, 67 States were Parties to the Convention. 90/2. Regional multilateral mechanisms 263. Parallel to the efforts made within the United Nations framework and in the Conference on Disarmament, there are several international instruments regarding activities of States in outer space of a given region, on the basis of which intensive cooperation has taken place. /...A/48/305 English Page 78 264. The International Organization of Space Communications (INTERSPUTNIK) was established in 1971 by an Agreement signed in November 1971, which entered into force in July 1972. It was established to meet the demands of various countries for telephone and telegraph communications and the exchange of radio and television programmes, as well as transmission of other kinds of information via satellite with a view to enhancing political, economic, and cultural cooperation. The following countries have been members of INTERSPUTNIK: Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, the German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Kazakhstan, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Laos, Mongolia, Poland, Romania, USSR, Viet Nam and the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen. At present INTERSPUTNIK is in a transitional period, as States consider the possibility of its functioning on a purely commercial basis. 91/265. In 1975, the European Space Conference, meeting in Brussels, approved the text of the Convention setting up the European Space Agency (ESA). The Member States are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Finland is an associate member, and Canada a closely cooperating State. According to the Convention, the purpose of the Agency is to provide for and to promote, for exclusively peaceful purposes, cooperation among European States in space research and technology and their space applications, with a view to their being used for scientific purposes and for operational space application systems. 92/266. In April 1967, a programme of comprehensive cooperation among the socialist countries for the peaceful uses of outer space was formed and later named the Council on International Cooperation in the Study and Utilization of Outer Space (INTERCOSMOS). Multilateral cooperation among those countries under the INTERCOSMOS programme was given legal status with the signature of an intergovernmental Agreement on Cooperation in the Peaceful Exploration and Use of Outer Space, which was signed in Moscow in July 1976 and entered into force in March 1977. Joint efforts under the INTERCOSMOS programme have been conducted in five main areas: space physics, including space material science; space meteorology; space biology and medicine; space communications and remote sensing of the Earth. Ten countries (Bulgaria, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, the German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Mongolia, Poland, Romania, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Viet Nam) participated in the programme. Its future status and specific forms of possible cooperation are at present under discussion. 93/267. The members of the Arab League founded the Arab Satellite Communication Organization (ARABSAT) by the adoption of the ARABSAT Charter, signed in April 1976. Twenty-one Arab States are members of the ARABSAT communication service. Its main objective is to establish and maintain a regional telecommunications systems for the Arab region. 94/268. In Africa a framework exists in the field of remote sensing -training, exchange of data, etc. -pursuant to the resolutions adopted by the Organization of African Unity and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa -and coordinated by the African Organization for Cartography and Remote Sensing. 269. The European Telecommunication Satellite Organization (EUTELSAT) was created in May 1977 by 17 European telecommunications administrations or recognized private operators of the European Conference of Postal and /...A/48/305 English Page 79 Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT). The organization attained its definitive form on 1 September 1985 upon the entry into force of an International Convention and an Operating Agreement signed by 26 European States. EUTELSAT now has 36 member countries. 95/270. The European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is an intergovernmental organization founded by 16 European member States and their meteorological services. The EUMETSAT Convention entered into force on 19 June 1986. Its primary objective is to establish, maintain and exploit European systems of operational meteorological satellites, taking into account as far as possible the recommendations of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). 96/271. The Western European Union (WEU) is one example of a regional effort to develop confidence-building initiatives related to space. The WEU has recently decided to set aside ECU 10 million for the implementation of a remote sensing centre, being now established in Torejon, Spain. 272. The agreement between France, Spain and Italy to develop and operate jointly the HELIOS imaging intelligence satellites is another example of a subregional arrangement that builds confidence in space among the Parties. 273. The II Space Conference for the Americas, held in Santiago de Chile from 26 to 30 April 1993, adopted a Declaration, whereby it emphasized the need for regional and international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space. The Conference also identified concrete areas and specific projects for cooperation among States of that region and also with States of other regions. 274. The first Asia-Pacific Workshop on Multilateral Cooperation in Space Technology and Applications, held in Beijing, China in December 1992, made a set of recommendations emphasizing the need for regional and international cooperation in space technology and its applications and proposed to identify, at its next workshop, potential multilateral cooperation projects among States of the Asia-Pacific region. 3. Bilateral mechanisms 275. As indicated earlier, negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union have produced some of the fundamental agreements related to their military activities in outer space, notably the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972. 97/The ABM Treaty provides, inter alia, for a Standing Consultative Commission of the two States to promote its objectives and implementation. The details concerning the Commission were elaborated in the Memorandum of Understanding Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics Regarding the Establishment of A Standing Consultative Commission 98/of 21 December 1972. 276. The Standing Consultative Commission has been used for cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union in promoting and implementing agreements signed within the framework of SALT-I and SALT-II 99/. The Treaty on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-Range and Shorter Range Missiles (INF Treaty /...A/48/305 English Page 80 of 1987) provides for the establishment of a Special Verification Commission. 100/277. On the basis of the Treaty on Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START-I), 101/a Joint Compliance and Inspection Commission was established. On the basis of the Protocol to the Treaty, signed in Lisbon in March 1992, representatives of Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine, as well as of the Russian Federation, will participate in the work of the Commission. 278. On the basis of the Treaty on Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START-II), 102/the Russian Federation and the United States established a new Bilateral Implementation Commission for resolving questions related to compliance with obligations assumed. 279. In addition, several agreements mainly concerning confidence-building between the two leading space Powers, such as the Nuclear Accident Agreement (1971); the Hot Line Agreement (1971); the Agreement on the Establishment of Nuclear Risk Prevention Centres (1987); and the Notification Agreement (1989) are providing for the notification, monitoring, verification and creation of different mechanisms or to use some existing mechanisms (such as an INTELSAT satellite circuit and a STATSIONAR satellite circuit), which are relevant to the prevention of an arms race in outer space. 280. The most recent Space Agreement between the United States and the Russian Federation (17 June 1992) on cooperation between the two countries provides a broad framework for cooperation related to space activities. 281. Various forms of international cooperation in space related matters exist in other bilateral agreements among different States of different regions. B. Some proposals for creating new international mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space 282. While the overview of the existing global, regional and bilateral mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space shows the extent of cooperation existing among States concerning their activities in outer space, none of the above-mentioned mechanisms, even those of global character, is an all-embracing organization that covers all aspects of space activities. Consequently, there are several proposals to expand existing mechanisms and/or to create new ones. 283. In general, most of the proposals put forward to date are linked to monitoring and/or verification of existing or future arms limitation agreements or represent a part of more comprehensive proposals concerning activities of States in outer space. As monitoring and verification could be a part of any international agreement on the prevention of an arms race in outer space, they could at the same time contribute to confidence-building and thus to furthering cooperation among States. 284. It is obvious that any monitoring or verification mechanism of arms limitation and disarmament agreements will be a very complex matter involving a /...A/48/305 English Page 81 wide spectrum of procedures such as Earth-to-space, space-to-space, space-to-Earth, air-to-ground, and on-site monitoring. Such an elaborate network would necessarily have to be designed to improve confidence-building. 285. Among the most widely discussed plans, are the French and Soviet proposals discussed in chapter V above. At the first special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, in June 1978, France put forward a detailed proposal for the establishment of an International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA). 103/One of the proposal’s main features was that existing and future disarmament and security agreements should be monitored, presumably via some special arrangement between the Contracting Parties and the Agency. The French proposal suggested that the Agency should be set up in stages and in 1981 became a subject of the United Nations study: The Implications of Establishing an International Satellite Monitoring Agency. 104/The study outlined the missions and facilities needed for ISMA, its organizational structure and the technical, legal and financial implications of its establishment. 286. At the second special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, in 1988, the Soviet Union proposed that the Conference on Disarmament should be charged with undertaking detailed negotiations on the establishment of an International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA). 105/Although the Soviet proposal would be based on the same principles as that of the French, there are several differences. The Soviet proposal suggested that the Agency should be developed in two stages, the first being a period for training the personnel and structuring the Agency itself, during which information would be supplied by States possessing space monitoring facilities and a Space Processing Inspectorate Centre (SPIC) would be created. The second stage would involve primarily the development of the ground segment by creating a network of data-reception points. 106/287. In March 1988, the Soviet Union proposed the creation of an International Space Inspectorate (ISI) 107/to verify the non-deployment of weapons of any kind in outer space. As ISI is based on the principle of on-site inspections before the launching of space objects, the scope of prohibition envisaged would include weapon systems equipped to conduct ground, air, or outer space strikes, "... irrespective of the physical principles on which they are based". 288. The Canadian proposal, PAXSAT, 108/or peace satellite, is a verification concept using space-based remote-sensing technology. As outlined in chapter V above, it has two potential applications, respectively PAXSAT A and PAXSAT B. In the first application, PAXSAT would be associated with agreements on outer space that entails space-to-space remote-sensing capability. By using nonclasssifie technology, PAXSAT A research is aimed at designing a satellite that can accurately ascertain whether other objects in orbit are able to perform as space weapons (e.g. ASAT weapons) or have space weapon capability. PAXSAT B is a segment of a Canadian research project that is to be associated with agreements calling for the regional ground observation. In addition, PAXSAT research also embraces the development of a database, presumably on space objects for application A and on conventional forces and weapons for application B. 289. In 1989, France proposed the establishment of an International Trajectography Centre (UNITRACE). 109/Since it would be designed to alert the States concerned in the event of threatened incidents and to supply evidence of /...A/48/305 English Page 82 good or bad faith in the event of an accident, it should meet the requirement of transparency and should also be in permanent possession of up-to-date information concerning the trajectories of space objects. At the same time, if it is to be acceptable to satellite-owning States, such a centre should be able to observe a degree of confidentiality in respect of military activities in space. Under the auspices of the United Nations Secretariat, it would have the following functions: (a) collection of data for updating registrations; (b) monitoring of space objects; (c) real time calculation of all possible trajectories. 290. Considering that the implementation of regional agreements on confidencebuilldin and security could draw to an increasing extent on the use of satellite images, France was prepared to contribute to the establishment and operation of regional agencies responsible for transparency in three forms: (a) assistance in training specialists in the interpretation of satellite data;(b) study of the possible structure and size of the reception facilities (engineering), which might be made available to States participating in such agencies; (c) initiation of more far-reaching consideration of the question of access to data and satellite information and discussion with other countries producing space images, with a view to possible agreements to supply regional agencies, at their request, with the information they need to perform such tasks. 291. At the forty-seventh session of the General Assembly, France indicated that it was going to propose a measure to enhance confidence by making it mandatory to give advance notice of the firing of ballistic missiles and rockets carrying satellites or other space objects. That notification measure, if adopted, would be complemented by the establishment of an international centre, under United Nations auspices, responsible for collecting and using the data received. 110/292. France elaborated its proposal in a working paper which it submitted in the Ad Hoc Committee on Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space of the Conference on Disarmament on 12 March 1993. 111/France proposed, inter alia, the establishment, through a new international instrument, which could be negotiated at the Conference on Disarmament, of a regime of prior notification of launches of space launchers and ballistic missiles. Such a regime should be supplemented by the establishment of an International Notification Centre responsible for the centralization and redistribution of collected data, so as to increase the transparency of space activities. The Centre would be set up under the auspices of the United Nations and legally attached to it, and could take the form of a division of the Office for Disarmament Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat. The main function of the Centre would be to receive notification of launches of ballistic missiles and space launches transmitted to it by States Parties. It would receive the information transmitted by States on launches /...A/48/305 English Page 83 actually carried out. States possessing detection capabilities, would be invited to communicate to the Centre, on a voluntary basis, data relating to launches they have detected; and it would place such information, through a data bank, at the disposal of the international community. 293. The establishment of a "World Space Organization" 112/was suggested by the Soviet Union in 1985 as a broader mechanism for international cooperation. The suggested functions of such Organization have been outlined in some detail in chapter VI. /...A/48/305 English Page 84 VIII. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 294. Since the adoption of resolution 45/55 B by the General Assembly, there has been substantial and rapid political change providing a new international context in which confidence-building measures in outer space have to be considered. New opportunities for global, regional and bilateral cooperation have arisen in space activities. 295. The Group of Experts therefore concludes that these changes, together with developments in technology, have not only preserved the relevance for confidence-building measures in space, but have also created an environment conducive to their implementation. 296. The Group of Experts believes that it has been demonstrated that space missions and operations have the potential to provide substantial scientific, environmental, economic, social, political and other benefits, and that the space environment should be used for the progress of humankind. Thus there is a clear tendency for a growing number of States to expand their activities related to outer space, some considering a military component important to their space activities. All space activities, though, should be conducted to enhance international peace and security. 297. It has been concluded by the Group that space applications are becoming more significant in terms of benefits in all respects and, accordingly, increasingly meaningful in both strategic and civilian aspects of life on earth. The use of space also has the potential to increase, aggravate or, by contrast, mitigate tension between States. 298. The Group finds that a significant part of the main concerns among the vast majority of States is still related to the possibility of introducing weapons in outer space. Some other military activities are also subjects of concern. To the vast majority of States, the question of access to and benefits from space technology is also becoming a significant factor that may need to be addressed specifically by confidence-building measures. 299. The rights of all States to explore and use outer space for the benefit and in the interest of all humankind is a universally accepted legal principle. It is the concern and responsibility of all States to ensure that these rights are realized in accordance with international law in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation. 300. The Outer Space Treaty, the cornerstone of international space law, was adopted in 1967, an era prior to the wider use of space technology for telecommunications purposes, prior to the availability of remote sensing systems, and prior to the incorporation of space applications into much of the civil infrastructure and capabilities of States. The rapid advances in space technologies require keeping continuously under review the need for updating or supplementing the current international legal regime. 301. The Group therefore concludes that legal norms may have to be developed further, whenever appropriate, to address new developments in space technology and increasing universal interest in its application. In this context, the need /...A/48/305 English Page 85 to formulate a framework for the enhancement of cooperation and confidencebuilldin among States was expressed in the Group. 302. The significant contribution of space activities to national and regional development, as well as to international understanding, is enhanced to the extent that such activities are conducted in a safe environment free from outside threats. It is also observed that concerns can arise from the fear of either a military or economic advantage provided through space, as well as from the difficulty of accessing the desired benefits of space applications in a cost-effective manner. 303. In addition to the status and capabilities of individual nations, the Group concludes that aspects of global and regional balance are to be taken into consideration. Given the complementary nature of space to military forces on the ground, some confidence-building measures may be contemplated with respect to neighbouring States or groups of States in cases of tension. The Group observes that advanced space technologies, providing a planetary perspective, have created a sense that any point on Earth could be reached from space. The Group therefore considers that all States can and should be involved at the global level in confidence-building regarding space. 304. The Group agrees that the application of space technologies is ambivalent in nature and that dual-purpose aspects of sensitive technologies should not be defined as harmful per se. It is the way in which they are utilized that determines whether they are harmful or not. Because the unilateral or rapid expansion of certain space capabilities by States can arouse suspicion in other States, the Group concludes that the extension of such capabilities should be accompanied, when appropriate, by a confidence-building framework designed to enhance transparency and openness. These space capabilities should also be developed in accordance with internationally agreed provisions ensuring their non-diversion for prohibited purposes. 305. There is potential concern, however, on both military and economic grounds that a State acquiring data revealing the weaknesses or other circumstances of another State could be exploited to the detriment of that State. Some countries fear that transparency measures regarding their space activities could affect their national security. Therefore transparency measures should be designed in such a way as to reconcile the need to build international confidence and the protection of national security interests. 306. The concerns are not only those that can be directly recognized, but also those related to the degree of commitment by others to confidence-building measures. Accordingly, the Group concludes that due consideration be given to the assessment of the implementation of confidence-building measures to ensure compliance, as well as making appropriate use of any verification provisions that may be included. 307. The Group has considered the span of technology and facilities required in a space mission, for the development of the spacecraft itself, the launch vehicle and launch operations, including tracking support as well as all other related operations during its lifetime. It is noted that many States have, as a matter of necessity or choice, specialized in specific fields, relying on others to complement these areas and fulfil their additional requirements. The Group /...A/48/305 English Page 86 believes that this is an important factor to be taken into account in addressing confidence-building measures. 308. The Group concludes that, in consideration of possible confidence-building measures in outer space, the differences in space capabilities among States should be taken into account. For the time being, only the United States and the Russian Federation have the full diversity of technology and available hardware to achieve self-sufficiency in the full diversity of space missions. Beyond this, there is a second, larger group of States that have achieved self-sufficiency within specific space missions. There is also a third substantial group of States that have space-related capabilities in specialized technologies or facilities, but lack autonomy in space. This includes those with direct space experience and ongoing programmes, as well as those with missile or other technologies that can be rapidly applied to space missions or portions thereof. 309. All States have legitimate interests in space and, in many cases, are benefiting from space activities. Some of them even own and operate space or space-associated assets, but are largely or totally dependent upon the commercial or political actions of others for their participation in space activities. 310. The disparities in levels of space capabilities among these groups, as well as among individual States, the inability to participate in space activities without the assistance of others, uncertainty concerning sufficient transfer of space technologies and the inability to acquire significant space-based information are factors in the lack of confidence among States. The existence of such factors may not be conducive to prevention of an arms race in outer space. In this context, the Group concludes that issues of access to and benefits from space should be addressed in order to promote cooperation and confidence-building among States. 311. The Group observes that full autonomous space capabilities in all States is neither technologically nor economically feasible in the foreseeable future. It therefore concludes that international cooperation is an important vehicle for promoting the right of each nation to achieve its legitimate objectives to benefit from space technology for its own development and welfare. Cooperation, with involvement of other nations, in the achievement of national objectives, requires confidence in the capabilities of others and in the policies providing access to these capabilities. 312. The Group concludes that some confidence-building measures in outer space could be considered as complementary to such measures applicable to terrestrial military activities and arrangements, thus constituting a wider body of mechanisms aimed at creating and maintaining confidence between States. 313. The Group observes that there are several causes of concerns in some States without military space capabilities regarding the application and use of such capabilities by other States. For example, certain space capabilities could serve as force multipliers in case of conflict, regional or otherwise. Satellites could be used to acquire data that could be exploited in a given military situation. Increased transparency can be instrumental in allaying /...A/48/305 English Page 87 mistrust and building confidence with regard to all space-related means and capabilities. 314. The Group concludes that appropriate confidence-building measures between States could address some of these current causes of concerns. Transparency could help allay suspicion and thus remove some of the factors constraining international cooperation. Causes of concerns about space capabilities may also need to be addressed by measures of arms control and disarmament, as well as adjustments of transfers of technology, without inhibiting the potential growth and development of peaceful space capabilities. Confidence-building measures in space in relation to regional security arrangements may also be contemplated in this respect. 315. The Group has examined the ways in which a State can advance its space technology such as endogenous development, technology transfer, and technical assistance that allows the receiving State to move rapidly through different phases and bring its own skills to the desired levels. The Group concludes that international cooperation is important for the advancement of space technology. 316. The Group concludes that specific confidence-building measures addressing the dual-use nature of technologies related to space may help establish a better environment for international cooperation. It believes that use of such technologies should be encouraged and access to their benefits secured under appropriate national and internationally agreed provisions that ensure their non-diversion for prohibited purposes. 317. The Group has considered the possibility of concluding an international agreement on banning weapons in outer space and concludes that this question deserves further consideration. The Group concludes further that there are many States that believe that in view of the new political situation in the world, the time has come to begin full-scale negotiations to work out an international agreement on banning weapons in outer space. Those States believe that such an agreement could become one of the most effective confidence-building measures in itself. 318. The Group notes the growing importance of space systems in providing support for international diplomacy. The Group emphasizes the potential of these systems, which could promote the effectiveness of the United Nations in preventive diplomacy, crisis management, the settlement of international disputes and conflict resolution. The Group believes that this is an important aspect of the role of these systems in promoting confidence and stability in international relations. 319. The point of departure for the recommendations of the Group is the text of General Assembly resolution 45/55 B and the provisions of the Outer Space Treaty, as well as concepts of transparency, predictability, aspects of conduct, and international cooperation, which are being considered mainly in the Conference on Disarmament, the United Nations Disarmament Commission, and the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. 320. The Group recommends, first of all, that all States Parties strictly observe the provisions of the Outer Space Treaty and other treaties on outer space concluded under the auspices of the United Nations, since these /...A/48/305 English Page 88 instruments include components establishing confidence among States. United Nations resolutions that enjoy universal support and that embody such principles on outer space can also contribute to confidence. 321. It is recommended by the Group that existing bilateral and multilateral mechanisms, particularly those multilateral mechanisms within the United Nations, should continue to play an important role in any further consideration and possible elaboration of specific confidence-building measures in the context of the prevention of an arms race in outer space. It is also suggested that the Conference on Disarmament be requested to continue considering further measures contributing to the prevention of an arms race in outer space. In this regard, should negotiations on further measures, including negotiations on outer space confidence-building measures, be required, the Conference on Disarmament should serve as an appropriate negotiating forum. 322. The Group of Experts recommends that the legal sub-committee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, within its mandate concerning the international legal regime governing outer space, continue to keep under review, inter alia, the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space with respect to staying abreast of technological developments and possible transparency and predictability needs. 323. The Group recommends that the International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) and the International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA) proposals be re-examined in the light of current and future developments. The Group has considered the possibility of the establishment of an international registry of orbital and functional data on vehicles and missions, which would receive submissions from tracking centres of Member States, and finds that this question deserves further consideration in view of its potential relevance to confidence-building. 324. The Group recommends building upon existing mechanisms related to space activities for alert in case of accidents or vehicle failure and to consider a role the United Nations might play in this respect. The idea of an international alert system may be further explored. 325. The Group of Experts recommends that States operating remote sensing systems operate these systems in conformity with United Nations General Assembly resolution 41/65, so as to contribute and facilitate the broadest access possible by the international community to remote sensing data on a non-discriminatory basis and at a reasonable cost, taking into account the needs and circumstances of the developing countries and the countries in transition. 326. The Group recommends that the concepts and proposals on "rules of the road", as possible components of confidence-building measures in outer space, should be kept under review. Factors such as manoeuvrability of spacecraft, potential conflicting orbits and predictability of close approaches should be taken into consideration. 327. The Group recommends that institutional mechanisms to encourage international cooperation among States in respect of space technology, including international transfer, should be evaluated, taking into account the legitimate concerns about dual-purpose technology. It is further recommended that measures /...A/48/305 English Page 89 be considered to enable all States to have access to space for peaceful purposes on a cost-recoverable or reasonable commercial basis, and that those States that need assistance in this respect could make use of appropriate forms of technical cooperation, duly taking into account the needs of the developing countries and the countries in transition. 328. The Group recommends that COPUOS explore mechanisms coordinating various international space activities, including interplanetary exploration, environmental monitoring, meteorological science, remote sensing, disaster relief and mitigation, search-and-rescue, training of personnel and spin-off. In this context, concepts involving universal participation such as a "World Space Organization" are possible useful points of reference for this exploratory work. 329. The Group notes the view expressed that given the dual-use nature of some space technologies and the international character of the relevant issues discussed in the context of the prevention of an arms race in outer space and of the peaceful uses of outer space, the possibility of establishing working contacts between the Conference on Disarmament and COPUOS should be explored and appropriate actions considered by the General Assembly to encourage such contacts. 330. The Group of Experts concludes that appropriate confidence-building measures with respect to outer space activities are potentially important steps towards the objective of preventing an arms race in outer space and ensuring the peaceful use of outer space by all States. 331. The Group hopes that the present study will be a useful reference for the continuing work of the Conference on Disarmament, in its Ad Hoc Committee on Outer Space, the United Nations Disarmament Commission and the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, as well as other international bodies interested in outer space and the questions dealt with in this study. Notes 1/See Official Records of the General Assembly, Tenth Special Session, Supplement No. 4 (A/S-10/4), sect. III. 2/General Assembly resolution 2222 (XXI), annex. 3/For events which occurred before December 1991, reference is made to the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics, and thereafter to the Russian Federation. 4/The use of the word "satellite" here does not exclude the relevance of other forms of spacecraft, such as "space station", "space shuttle", "sky lab" etc. 5/See: International Cooperation in the Uses of Outer Space -Activities of Member States, Note by the Secretariat (A/AC.105/505 and Add.1 to 3). /...A/48/305 English Page 90 6/Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.I.30), pp. 135-136. 7/Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for International Security, UNIDIR, Research Papers, No. 15, (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.92.0.30). 8/World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992 (Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 509-530. 9/The Treaty was adopted by the General Assembly on 13 December 1966 by resolution 2222 (XXI), annex, opened for signature on 27 January 1967, and entered into force on 10 October 1967. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.I.30, pp. 231-236. 10/The Treaty was signed on 10 October 1963 and entered into force on the same date. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Status of Multilateral Arms Regulations and Disarmament Agreements, 4th edition: 1992 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.93.IX.11), vol. I, p. 33. 11/The Agreement was adopted by the General Assembly on 19 December 1967 by resolution 2345 (XXII), and entered into force on 3 December 1968. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 237-240. 12/The Convention was adopted by the General Assembly on 29 November 1971 by resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex; opened for signature on 29 March 1972, and entered into force on 1 September 1972. The text of the Convention is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 241-249. 13/Adopted by the General Assembly on 12 November 1974 in resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex; entered into force on 15 September 1976. The text is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 250-254. 14/A revised Constitution and a revised Convention of the International Telecommunication Union (Geneva, 1992) were adopted at the Additional Plenipotentiary Conference (APP-92), which provided for their entry into force on 1 July 1994. Upon entry into force, the Geneva Constitution and Convention shall abrogate and replace the Nairobi Convention (1982), which is still in force. See International Telecommunication Union Convention, Nairobi, 1982, General Secretariat of the ITU, Geneva, ISBN 92-61-01651-0; the Nice Convention and Constitution signed on 30 June 1989, have not come into force. International Telecommunication Union, General Secretary, Geneva, 1989, PP-89/FINACTS/CONVO1E1.TXS. 15/The Convention was signed on 18 May 1977 and entered into force on 5 October 1978. The text of the Convention is reproduced in Status, vol. I, p. 217. 16/These Understandings are not incorporated into the Convention, but are part of the negotiating record and were included in the report transmitted by the Conference on Disarmament to the General Assembly in September 1976. The text is reproduced in Status, vol. I, p. 231. /...A/48/305 English Page 91 17/The Agreement was adopted by the General Assembly, by resolution 34/68, annex; opened for signature on 18 December 1979 and entered into force on 11 July 1984. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 255-263. 18/The Treaty was signed on 26 May 1972 and entered into force on 3 October 1972. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, 1990 edition, United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Washington, D.C. 20451, pp. 157-161. 19/The SALT-I Agreement was signed on 26 May 1972 and entered into force on 3 October 1972. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 169-176. 20/The SALT-II Treaty was signed on 18 June 1979, but never entered into force. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 267-300. 21/The START-I Treaty was signed on 31 July 1991 and has not yet entered into force. It was supplemented by the Lisbon Protocol, signed on 23 May 1992 by Belarus, Kazakhstan, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United States. The text of the Treaty has been published as a CD document, CD/1192 and the text of the Protocol as CD/1193. 22/The START-II Treaty was signed by the Russian Federation and the United States on 3 January 1993 and its entry into force depends on the entry into force of the START-I Treaty. The text of the Treaty has been published as a CD document, CD/1194. 23/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 30 September 1971. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 120-121. 24/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 30 September 1971. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 124-128. 25/The USA and the USSR had agreed in 1963 to establish, for use in time of emergency, a direct communications link between the two Governments. The so-called "Hot Line" agreement provided for a wire telegraph circuit and, as a back-up system, a radio telegraph circuit. For the text of the Memorandum of Understanding with Annex, of 20 June 1963, see Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., pp. 34-36. 26/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 15 September 1987. Its text is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., pp. 338-344. 27/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 31 May 1988. Its text is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., pp. 457-458. /...A/48/305 English Page 92 28/The Agreement was signed on 12 June 1989 and entered into force on 1 January 1990. The text of the Agreement, its annexes and the agreed statements in connection with the Agreement is issued as a document of the Conference on Disarmament, CD/943, 4 August 1989. 29/Official Records of the General Assembly, Eighteenth Session, Supplement No. 15 (A/5515), pp. 15-16. 30/Ibid., Thirty-seventh Session, Supplement No. 51 (A/37/51), pp. 98-99. 31/Ibid., Forty-first Session, Supplement No. 53 (A/41/53), pp. 115-116. 32/See Resolutions and decisions adopted by the General Assembly during its forty-seventh session, 15 September to 23 December 1992. 33/Official Records of the General Assembly, Tenth Special Session, Supplement No. 4 (A/S-10/4). 34/Comprehensive Study on Confidence-Building Measures, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.82.IX.3. 35/General Assembly Official Records: Fifteenth Special Session, Supplement No. 3 (A/S-15/3). 36/Jasani, Buphendra, "Military Space Activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978 (Taylor and Francis, London, 1978); and DeVere, G. T., and Johnson, N. L., "The NORAD Space Network", Spaceflight, July 1985, vol. 27, pp. 306-309; and North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD Space Detection and Tracking System", Factsheet, 20 August 1982. 37/King-Hele, Desmond, Observing Earth Satellites (Macmillan, London, 1983).38/Manly, Peter, "Television in Amateur Astronomy", Astronomy, December 1984, pp. 35-37. 39/The 2.3 meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona has been used to produce images of the Hubble Space Telescope (McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared Astronomy: Pixels to Spare", Sky & Telescope, July 1991, pp. 31-35) and the Mir space station ("Satellite Trackers Bag Soviet Space Station", Sky & Telescope, December 1987, p. 580). 40/Jackson, P., "Space Surveillance Satellite Catalog Maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 April 1990. 41/"PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", External Affairs Canada, Verification Brochure, No. 2, 1987, 1988, pp. 97-102. 42/"Address by His Excellency Mr. Valery Giscard d’Estaing, President of the French Republic", A/S-10/PV.3, 25 May 1978. /...A/48/305 English Page 93 43/Study on the Implications of Establishing an International Satellite Monitoring Agency -report of the Secretary-General, A/AC.206/14, 6 August 1981. 44/France, Working Paper -Space in the Service of Verification -Proposal Concerning a Satellite Image Processing Agency, CD/945, CD/OS/WP.40, 1 August 1989. 45/Statement by Mr. E. A. Shevardnadze, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, at the third special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, A/S-15/PV.9. 46/CD/OS/WP.39. 47/"PAXSAT Concept", Verification Brochure, op. cit., pp. 97-102. 48/The United Nations and Disarmament 1945-1970 (United Nations publication, Sales No. 70.IX.1), p. 174. 49/See table 3. 50/Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space: A Guide to the Discussion in the Conference on Disarmament, UNIDIR/91/79 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.91.0.17), pp. 107-128. 51/CD/708. 52/CD/941. 53/CD/1092. 54/CD/708. 55/CD/1092. 56/CD/PV.318, CD/PV.345 and CD/PV.516. 57/Ibid. 58/CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35. 59/CD/1092. 60/CD/PV.560. 61/CD/937 and CD/PV.570. 62/CD/945 and CD/937. 63/CD/OS/WP.39. 64/Original participants of MTCR are: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom and United States. See The Arms Control Reporter, 1993, 706.A.2. /...A/48/305 English Page 94 65/As of 31 December 1992, the following additional countries had become participants of MTCR (in chronological order): Spain, Australia, Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Norway, Austria, Finland, Sweden, New Zealand, Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Switzerland. Ibid. 66/France, "Arms control and disarmament plan submitted by France" (CD/1079, 3 June 1991). 67/Argentina and Brazil, Working Paper entitled "International transfer of sensitive technologies" (A/CN.10/145, 25 April 1991). 68/Ibid. 69/United States of America, "Statement to the Outer Space Committee of the Conference on Disarmament" (CD/1087, 8 July 1991). 70/Statement by Mr. Dhanapala of Sri Lanka (CD/PV.354, 8 April 1986). 71/Statement by Mr. Ahmad of Pakistan (CD/PV.460, 26 April 1988). 72/CD/1162. 73/CD/PV.332, 22 August 1985, p. 23. 74/Ibid. 75/Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, "Establishment of an international system of verification of the non-deployment of weapons of any kind in outer space" (CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19, 17 March 1988). 76/Ibid. 77/Tenth Conference of Heads of State or Government of the Non-Aligned Countries, Jakarta, 1-6 September 1992, Final Document (A/47/675-S/24816), chap. II, para. 44. 78/France, Working Paper entitled "Prevention of an arms race in space: proposals concerning monitoring and verification and satellite immunity", CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35, 31 July 1989). Emphasis on original. 79/Ibid. 80/"Statement by the representative of the United States of America in the Ad Hoc Committee on 2 August 1988" (CD/905, CD/OS/WP.28, 21 March 1989). 81/Statement by Mr. Ahmad of Pakistan (CD/PV.413, 16 June 1987). 82/CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35 of 31 July 1989. 83/Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-eighth Session, Supplement No. 20 (A/48/20). /...A/48/305 English Page 95 84/Space Exploration and Applications; Papers Presented at the Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, Vienna, 14-27 August 1968, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.69.I.16, vols. I and II. 85/A/CONF.101/10 and Corr.1 and 2. 86/The United Nations and Disarmament 1945-1970, United Nations publication, Sales No. 70.IX.1, pp. 66-68. 87/Official Records of the General Assembly, Fortieth Session, Supplement No. 27 (A/40/27). 88/Ibid., Sixteenth Session, A/RES/1721 (XVI), 20 December 1961, annex B. 89/Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations. A review of the activities and resources of the United Nations, its specialized agencies and other international bodies relating to the peaceful uses of outer space, A/AC.105/521, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.I.30, pp. 164-173. 90/Ibid., pp. 179-185. 91/Ibid., pp. 174-175. 92/Ibid., pp. 135-164. 93/Ibid., pp. 175-178. 94/Ibid., pp. 185-186. 95/Ibid., pp. 187-188. 96/Ibid., pp. 188-190. 97/Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1990 Edition, pp. 157-161. 98/Ibid., pp. 175-176. 99/Ibid., pp. 169-176; 267-291. 100/Ibid., pp. 350-362. 101/The Treaty and related documents were published in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements: START, Treaty Between the United States of America and the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (United States Arms Control Agency), 1990, Washington, D.C. 102/Text of the Treaty has been published as CD document CD/1194. /...A/48/305 English Page 96 103/Official Records of the General Assembly, Tenth Special Session, A/S-10/AC.1/7, 1 June 1978. 104/A/AC.206/14, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.83.IX.3. 105/Ibid., A/S-15/34. 106/CD/OS/WP.39, 2 August 1989. 107/CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19 of 17 March 1988. 108/Canada, External Affairs, "PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", Verification Brochure No. 2, 1987. 109/CD/937 and CD/PV.570. 110/Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-seventh Session, Plenary Meetings, 8th meeting, Statement by Mr. R. Dumas, on 23 September 1992. 111/Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space, Notification of Launches of Space Objects and Ballistic Missiles, CD/OS/WP.59. 112/The proposal was made in the Conference on Disarmament on 22 August 1985, CD/PV.332, p. 23. /...A/48/305 English Page 97 APPENDIX I Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies* The States Parties to this Treaty, Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man’s entry into outer space, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the benefit of all peoples irrespective of the degree of their economic or scientific development, Desiring to contribute to broad international cooperation in the scientific as well as the legal aspects of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that such cooperation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between States and peoples, Recalling resolution 1962 (XVIII), entitled "Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space", which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 December 1963, Recalling resolution 1884 (XVIII), calling upon States to refrain from placing in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, or from installing such weapons on celestial bodies, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 17 October 1963, Taking account of United Nations General Assembly resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space, Convinced that a Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, will further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Have agreed on the following: * General Assembly resolution 2222 (XXI), annex. /...A/48/305 English Page 98 Article I The exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind. Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies. There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigation. Article II Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation or by any other means. Article III States Parties to the Treaty shall carry on activities in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding. Article IV States Parties to the Treaty undertake not to place in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner. The Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used by all States Parties to the Treaty exclusively for peaceful purposes. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration of the Moon and other celestial bodies shall also not be prohibited. Article V States Parties to the Treaty shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of another State Party /...A/48/305 English Page 99 or on the high seas. When astronauts make such a landing, they shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle. In carrying on activities in outer space and on celestial bodies, the astronauts of one State Party shall render all possible assistance to the astronauts of other States Parties. States Parties to the Treaty shall immediately inform the other States Parties to the Treaty or the Secretary-General of the United Nations of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, which could constitute a danger to the life or health of astronauts. Article VI States Parties to the Treaty shall bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in the present Treaty. The activities of non-governmental entities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the appropriate State Party to the Treaty. When activities are carried on in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with this Treaty shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States Parties to the Treaty participating in such organization.Article VII Each State Party to the Treaty that launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and each State Party from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to another State Party to the Treaty or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air or in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies. Article VIII A State Party to the Treaty on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and over any personnel thereof, while in outer space or on a celestial body. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, including objects landed or constructed on a celestial body, and of their component parts, is not affected by their presence in outer space or on a celestial body or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State Party to the Treaty on whose registry they are carried shall be returned to that State Party, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return. /...A/48/305 English Page 100 Article IX In the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, States Parties to the Treaty shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties to the Treaty. States Parties to the Treaty shall pursue studies of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination and also adverse changes in the environment of the Earth resulting from the introduction of extraterrestrial matter and, where necessary, shall adopt appropriate measures for this purpose. If a State Party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State Party to the Treaty which has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by another State Party in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment. Article X In order to promote international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in conformity with the purposes of this Treaty, the States Parties to the Treaty shall consider on a basis of equality any requests by other States Parties to the Treaty to be afforded an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by those States. The nature of such an opportunity for observation and the conditions under which it could be afforded shall be determined by agreement between the States concerned. Article XI In order to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States Parties to the Treaty conducting activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, agree to inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of the nature, conduct, locations and results of such activities. On receiving the said information, the Secretary-General of the United Nations should be prepared to disseminate it immediately and effectively. /...A/48/305 English Page 101 Article XII All stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on a basis of reciprocity. Such representatives shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited. Article XIII The provisions of this Treaty shall apply to the activities of States Parties to the Treaty in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by a single State Party to the Treaty or jointly with other States, including cases where they are carried on within the framework of international intergovernmental organizations. Any practical questions arising in connection with activities carried on by international intergovernmental organizations in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be resolved by the States Parties to the Treaty either with the appropriate international organization or with one or more States members of that international organizations which are Parties to this Treaty. Article XIV 1. This Treaty shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Treaty before its entry into force, in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article, may accede to it at any time. 2. This Treaty shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments. 3. This Treaty shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments, including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Treaty. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Treaty, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of an accession to this Treaty, the date of its entry into force and other notices. /...A/48/305 English Page 102 6. This Treaty shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article XV Any State Party to the Treaty may propose amendments to this Treaty. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Treaty accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Treaty and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Treaty on the date of acceptance by it. Article XVI Any State Party to the Treaty may give notice of its withdrawal from the Treaty one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XVII This Treaty, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Treaty shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Treaty. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, the twenty-seventh day of January, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven. /...A/48/305 English Page 103 APPENDIX II Guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures and for the implementation of such measures on a global or regional level a/The Commission has elaborated the subsequent guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures for the consideration of the General Assembly at its forty-first session, in keeping with resolution 39/63 E of 12 December 1984. The text of the guidelines is agreed on all counts. The Commission wishes to draw particular attention to paragraph 1.2.5 of the guidelines, where it is emphasized that the accumulation of relevant experience with confidence-building measures may necessitate the further development of the text at a later time, should the General Assembly so decide. In elaborating the guidelines, all delegations were aware, notwithstanding the high significance and role of confidence-building measures, of the primary importance of disarmament measures and the singular contribution only disarmament can make to the prevention of war, in particular nuclear war. Some delegations would have wished to see the criteria and characteristics of a regional approach to confidence-building measures spelt out in greater detail. 1. General considerations 1.1 Frame of reference 1.1.1 The present guidelines for confidence-building measures have been drafted by the Disarmament Commission in pursuance of resolution 37/1OO D adopted by consensus by the General Assembly, in which the Disarmament Commission was requested "to consider the elaboration of guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures and for the implementation of such measures on a global or regional level" and of resolutions 38/73 A and 39/63 E, in which it was asked to continue and to conclude its work, and was further requested to submit to the Assembly at its forty-first session a report containing such guidelines. 1.1.2 In elaborating the guidelines the Disarmament Commission took into account, inter alia, the following United Nations documents: the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session of the General Assembly, the first special session devoted to disarmament (resolution S-10/2); the relevant resolutions adopted by consensus by the General Assembly (resolutions 34/87 B, 35/156 B, 36/57 F, 37/1OO D and 38/73); the replies received from Governments informing the Secretary-General of their views and experiences regarding confidence-building measures; b/the Comprehensive Study on Confidence-building Measures c/by a Group of Governmental Experts; the proposals made by individual countries at the twelfth special session of /...A/48/305 English Page 104 the General Assembly; d/the second special session devoted to disarmament, as well as the views of delegations as expressed during the annual sessions of the Disarmament Commission in 1983, 1984 and 1986 and reflected in the relevant documents of those sessions. 1.2 General political context 1.2.1 These guidelines have been elaborated at a time when it is universally felt that efforts to heighten confidence among States are particularly pertinent and necessary. There is a common concern about the deterioration of the international situation, the continuous recourse to the threat or use of force and the further escalation of the international arms build-up, with the concomitant rise in instabilities, political tensions and in mistrust, and the heightened perception of the danger of war, both conventional and nuclear. At the same time, there is a growing awareness of the unacceptability of war in our time, and of the interdependence of the security of all States. 1.2.2 This situation calls for every effort by the international community to take urgent action for the prevention of war, in particular nuclear war -in the language of the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session, a threat whose removal is the most acute and urgent task of the present day -and for concrete measures of disarmament -to prevent an arms race in space and to terminate it on Earth, to limit, reduce and eventually eliminate nuclear arms and enhance strategic stability -but also for efforts to reduce political confrontation and to establish stable and cooperative relationships in all fields of international relations. 1.2.3 In this context, a confidence-building process embracing all these fields has become increasingly important. Confidencebuilldin measures, especially when applied in a comprehensive manner, have a potential to contribute significantly to the enhancement of peace and security and to promote and facilitate the attainment of disarmament measures. 1.2.4 This potential is at present already being explored in some regions and subregions of the world, where the States concerned -while remaining mindful of the need for global action and for disarmament measures -are joining forces to contribute, by the elaboration and implementation of confidence-building measures, to more stable relations and greater security, as well as the elimination of outside intervention and enhanced cooperation in their areas. The present guidelines have been drafted with these significant experiences in mind, but they also purport to provide further support to these and other endeavours on the regional and /...A/48/305 English Page 105 global level. They do not, of course, exclude the simultaneous application of other security-enhancing measures. 1.2.5 These guidelines are part of a dynamic process over time. While they are designed to contribute to a greater usefulness and wider application of confidence-building measures, the accumulation of relevant experience may, in turn, necessitate the further development of the guidelines at a later time, should the General Assembly so decide. 1.3 Delimitation of the subject 1.3.1 Confidence-building measures and disarmament 1.3.1.1 Confidence-building measures must be neither a substitute nor a precondition for disarmament measures nor divert attention from them. Yet their potential for creating favourable conditions for progress in this field should be fully utilized in all regions of the world, in so far as they may facilitate and do not impair in any way the adoption of disarmament measures. 1.3.1.2 Effective disarmament and arms limitation measures which directly limit or reduce military potential have particularly high confidence-building value and, among these measures, those relating to nuclear disarmament as especially conducive to confidence-building. 1.3.1.3 The provisions of the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session relating to disarmament, particularly nuclear disarmament, also have a high confidencebuilldin value. 1.3.1.4 Confidence-building measures may be worked out and implemented independently in order to contribute to the creation of favourable conditions for the adoption of additional disarmament measures, or, no less important, as collateral measures in connection with specific measures of arms limitation and disarmament. 1.3.2 Scope of confidence-building measures: military and non-military measures 1.3.2.1 Confidence reflects a set of interrelated factors of a military as well as of a non-military character, and a plurality of approaches is needed to overcome fear, apprehension and mistrust between States and to replace them by confidence. 1.3.2.2 Since confidence relates to a wide spectrum of activities in the interaction among States, a comprehensive approach is indispensable and /...A/48/305 English Page 106 confidence-building is necessary in the political, military, economic, social, humanitarian and cultural fields. These should include removal of political tensions, progress towards disarmament, reshaping of the world economic system and the elimination of racial discrimination, of any form of hegemony and domination and of foreign occupation. It is important that in all these areas the confidence-building process should contribute to diminishing mistrust and enhancing trust among States by reducing and eventually eliminating potential causes for misunderstanding, misinterpretation and miscalculation. 1.3.2.3 Notwithstanding the need for such a broad confidencebuilldin process, and in accordance with the mandate of the Disarmament Commission, the main focus of the present guidelines for confidence-building measures relates to the military and security field, and the guidelines derive their specificity from these aspects. 1.3.2.4 In many regions of the world economic and other phenomena touch upon the security of a country with such immediacy that they cannot be disassociated from defence and military matters. Concrete measures of a non-military nature that are directly relevant to the national security and survival of States are therefore fully within the focus of the guidelines. In such cases military and non-military measures are complementary and reinforce each other’s confidencebuilldin value. 1.3.2.5 The appropriate mixture of different types of concrete measures should be determined for each region, depending on the perception of security and of the nature and levels of existing threats, by the countries of the regions themselves. 2. Guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures and for their implementation 2.1 Principles 2.1.1 Strict adherence to the Charter of the United Nations and fulfilment of the commitments contained in the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session of the General Assembly (resolution S-10/2), the validity of which had been unanimously and categorically reaffirmed by all Member States at the Twelfth Special Session of the General Assembly, the second special session devoted to disarmament, make a contribution of overriding importance for the preservation of peace and for /...A/48/305 English Page 107 ensuring the survival of mankind and the realization of general and complete disarmament under effective international control. 2.1.2 In particular, and as a prerequisite for enhancing confidence among States, the following principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations must be strictly observed: (a) Refraining from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State; (b) Non-intervention and non-interference in the internal affairs of States; (c) Peaceful settlement of disputes; (d) Sovereign equality of States and self-determination of peoples. 2.1.3 The strict observance of the principles and priorities of the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session is of particular importance for enhancing confidence among States. 2.2 Objectives 2.2.1 The ultimate goal of confidence-building measures is to strengthen international peace and security and to contribute to the prevention of all wars, in particular nuclear war. 2.2.2 Confidence-building measures are to contribute to the creation of favourable conditions for the peaceful settlement of existing international problems and disputes and for the improvement and promotion of international relations based on justice, cooperation and solidarity; and to facilitate the solution of any situation which might lead to international friction. 2.2.3 A major goal of confidence-building measures is the realization of universally recognized principles, particularly those contained in the Charter of the United Nations. 2.2.4 By helping to create a climate in which the momentum towards a competitive arms build-up can be reduced and in which the importance of the military element is gradually diminished, confidence-building measures should in particular facilitate and promote the process of arms limitation and disarmament. 2.2.5 A major objective is to reduce or even eliminate the causes of mistrust, fear, misunderstanding and miscalculation with regard to relevant military activities and intentions of other States, factors which may generate the perception of an impaired /...A/48/305 English Page 108 security and provide justification for the continuation of the global and regional arms build-up. 2.2.6 A centrally important task of confidence-building measures is to reduce the dangers of misunderstanding or miscalculation of military activities, to help to prevent military confrontation as well as covert preparations for the commencement of a war, to reduce the risk of surprise attacks and of the outbreak of war by accident; and thereby, finally, to give effect and concrete expression to the solemn pledge of all nations to refrain from the threat or use of force in all its forms and to enhance security and stability. 2.2.7 Given the enhanced awareness of the importance of compliance, confidence-building measures may serve the additional objective of facilitating verification of arms limitation and disarmament agreements. In addition, strict compliance with obligations and commitments in the field of disarmament and cooperation in the elaboration and implementation of adequate measures to ensure the verification of such compliance -satisfactory to all parties concerned and determined by the purposes, scope and nature of the relevant agreement -have a considerable confidencebuilldin effect of their own. Confidence-building measures cannot, however, supersede verification measures, which are an important element in arms limitation and disarmament agreements. 2.3 Characteristics 2.3.1 Confidence in international relations is based on the belief in the cooperative disposition of other States. Confidence will increase to the extent that the conduct of States, over time, indicates their willingness to practice non-aggressive and cooperative behaviour. 2.3.2 Confidence-building requires a consensus of the States participating in the process. States must therefore decide freely and in the exercise of their sovereignty whether a confidence-building process is to be initiated and, if so, which measures are to be taken and how the process is to be pursued. 2.3.3 Confidence-building is a step-by-step process of taking all concrete and effective measures which express political commitments and are of military significance and which are designed to make progress in strengthening confidence and security to lessen tension and assist in arms limitation and disarmament. At each stage of this process States must be able to measure and assess the results achieved. Verification of/...A/48/305 English Page 109 compliance with agreed provisions should be a continuing process. 2.3.4 Political commitments taken together with concrete measures giving expression and effect to those commitments are important instruments for confidence-building. 2.3.5 Exchange or provision of relevant information on armed forces and armaments, as well as on pertinent military activities, plays an important role in the process of arms limitation and disarmament and of confidence-building. Such an exchange or provision could promote trust among States and reduce the occurrence of dangerous misconceptions about the intentions of States. Exchange or provision of information in the field of arms limitation, disarmament and confidence-building should be appropriately verifiable as provided for in respective arrangements, agreements or treaties. 2.3.6 A detailed universal model being obviously impractical, confidence-building measures must be tailored to specific situations. The effectiveness of a concrete measure will increase the more it is adjusted to the specific perceptions of threat or the confidence requirements of a given situation or a particular region. 2.3.7 If the circumstances of a particular situation and the principle of undiminished security allow, confidence-building measures could, within a step-by-step process where desirable and appropriate, go further and (though not by themselves capable of diminishing military potentials) limit available military options. /...A/48/305 English Page 110 2.4 Implementation 2.4.1 In order to optimize the implementation of confidence-building measures, States taking, or agreeing to, such measures should carefully analyse, and identify with the highest possible degree of clarity, the factors which favourably or adversely affect confidence in a specific situation. 2.4.2 Since States must be able to examine and assess the implementation of, and to ensure compliance with, a confidencebuilldin arrangement, it is indispensable that the details of the established confidence-building measures should be defined precisely and clearly. 2.4.3 Misconceptions and prejudices, which may have developed over an extended period of time, cannot be overcome by a single application of confidence-building measures. The seriousness, credibility and reliability of a State’s commitment to confidence-building, without which the confidence-building process cannot be successful, can be demonstrated only by consistent implementation over time. 2.4.4 The implementation of confidence-building measures should take place in such a manner as to ensure the right of each State to undiminished security, guaranteeing that no individual State or group of States obtains advantages over others at any stage of the confidence-building process. 2.4.5 The building of confidence is a dynamic process: experience and trust gained from the implementation of early largely voluntary and militarily less significant measures can facilitate agreement on further and more far-reaching measures. The pace of the implementation process both in terms of timing and scope of desirable measures depends on prevailing circumstances. Confidence-building measures should be as substantial as possible and effected as rapidly as possible. While in a specific situation the implementation of farreacchin arrangements at an early stage might be attainable, it would normally appear that a gradual step-by-step process is necessary. 2.4.6 Obligations undertaken in agreements on confidence-building measures must be fulfilled in good faith. 2.4.7 Confidence-building measures should be implemented on the global as well as on regional levels. Regional and global approaches are not contradictory, but rather complementary and interrelated. In view of the interaction between global and regional events, progress on one level contributes to advancement on the other level; however, one is not a pre-condition for the other. /...A/48/305 English Page 111 In considering the introduction of confidence-building measures in particular regions, the specific political, military and other conditions prevailing in the region should be fully taken into account. Confidence-building measures in a regional context should be adopted on the initiative and with the agreement of the States of the region concerned. 2.4.8 Confidence-building measures can be adopted in various forms. They can be agreed upon with the intention of creating legally binding obligations, in which case they represent international treaty law among parties. They can, however, also be agreed upon through politically binding commitments. Evolution of politically binding confidence-building measures into obligations under international law can also be envisaged. 2.4.9 For the assessment of progress in the implementing action of confidence-building measures, States should, to the extent possible and where appropriate, provide for procedures and mechanisms for review and evaluation. Where possible, timefraame could be agreed to facilitate this assessment in both quantitative and qualitative terms. 2.5 Development, prospects and opportunities 2.5.1 A very important qualitative step in enhancing the credibility and reliability of the confidence-building process may consist in strengthening the degree of commitment with which the various confidence-building measures are to be implemented; this, it should be recalled, is also applicable to the implementation of commitments undertaken in the field of disarmament. Voluntary and unilateral measures should, as early as appropriate, be developed into mutual, balanced and politically binding provisions and, if appropriate, into legally binding obligations. 2.5.2 The nature of a confidence-building measure may gradually be enhanced to the extent that its general acceptance as the correct pattern of behaviour grows. As a result, the consistent and uniform implementation of a politically binding confidence-building measure over a substantial period of time, together with the requisite opinio iuris, may lead to the development of an obligation under customary international law. In this way, the process of confidence-building may gradually contribute to the formation of new norms of international law. 2.5.3 Statements of intent and declarations, which in themselves contain no obligation to take specific measures, but have the potential to contribute favourably to an atmosphere of greater mutual trust, should be developed further by more concrete agreements on specific measures. 2.5.4 Opportunities for the introduction of confidence-building measures are manifold. The following compilation of some of/...A/48/305 English Page 112 the main possibilities may be of assistance to States wishing to define what might present a suitable opportunity for action. 2.5.4.1 A particular need for confidence-building measures exists at times of political tension and crises, where appropriate measures can have a very important stabilizing effect. 2.5.4.2 Negotiations on arms limitation and disarmament can offer a particularly important opportunity to agree on confidence-building measures. As integral parts of an agreement itself or by way of supplementary agreements, they can have a beneficial effect on the parties’ ability to achieve the purposes and goals of their particular negotiations and agreements by creating a climate of cooperation and understanding, by facilitating adequate provisions for verification acceptable to all the States concerned and corresponding to the nature, scope and purpose of the agreement, and by fostering reliable and credible implementation. 2.5.4.3 A particular opportunity might arise upon the introduction of peace-keeping forces, in accordance with the purposes of the United Nations Charter, into a region or on the cessation of hostilities between States. 2.5.4.4 Review conferences of arms limitation agreements might also provide an opportunity to consider confidencebuilldin measures, provided those measures are in no way detrimental to the purposes of the agreements; the criteria of such action to be agreed upon by the parties to the agreements. 2.5.4.5 Many opportunities exist in conjunction with agreements among States in other areas of their relations, such as the political, economic, social and cultural fields, for example in the case of joint development projects, especially in frontier areas. 2.5.4.6 Confidence-building measures, or at least a statement of intent to develop them in the future, could also be included in any other form of political declaration on goals shared by two or more States. 2.5.4.7 Since it is especially the multilateral approach to international security and disarmament issues which enhances international confidence, the United Nations can contribute to increasing confidence by playing its central role in the field of international peace, security and disarmament. Organs of the United Nations and other international organizations could/...A/48/305 English Page 113 participate in encouraging the process of confidencebuillding as appropriate. In particular the General Assembly and the Security Council -their tasks in the field of disarmament proper notwithstanding -can further this process by adopting decisions and recommendations containing suggestions and requests to States to agree on and implement confidence-building measures. The Secretary-General, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, could also contribute significantly to the process of confidencebuilldin by suggesting specific confidence-building measures or by providing his good offices, particularly at times of crises, in promoting the establishment of certain confidence-building procedures. 2.5.4.8 In accordance with item IX of its established agenda -the so-called dialogue -and without prejudice to its negotiating role in all areas of its agenda, the Conference on Disarmament could identify and develop confidence-building measures in relation to agreements on disarmament and arms limitation under negotiation in the Conference. /...A/48/305 English Page 114 Notes a/Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifteenth Special Session, Supplement No. 3 (A/S-15/3), pp. 21-32. b/A/34/416 and Add.1-3; A/35/397. c/United Nations publication, Sales No. E.82.IX.3. d/See A/S-12/AC.1/59. /...A/48/305 English Page 115 APPENDIX III Status of multilateral treaties relating to activities in outer space a/TREATIES TITLE PTBT Partial Test Ban Treaty (1963) OST Outer Space Treaty (1967) ARRA Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space (1968) Lib. Conv. Liability Convention (1972) Regis. Con. Registration Convention (1975) ITU International Telecommunication Convention (1992) b/ENMOD Conv. Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques (1977) Moon Agr. Moon Agreement (1979) ABBREVIATIONS a Ratification, accession, succession (no reservations, clarifications or statements) b Signature; no ratification c Declaration of acceptance /...A/48/305 English Page 116 Status of multilateral treaties relating to activities in outer space Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Afghanistan a a b a Albania a a b Algeria b b b a Antigua and Barbuda a a a a a a Argentina a a a a b b a Australia a a a a a b a a Austria a a a b a b a a Bahamas a a a b Bahrain b Bangladesh a a a Barbados a a b Belgium a a a a a b Benin a a a b a Bhutan a b Bolivia a b b b Botswana a b a a b Brazil a a a a b a Brunei Darussalam b /...A/48/305 English Page 117 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Bulgaria a a a a a b a Burkina Faso b a b Burundi b b b b b Belarus a a a a a b Cambodia b Cameroon b b a b Canada a a a a a b a Cape Verde a b a Central African Republic a b b b Chad a b Chile a a a a a b a China a a a a b Colombia a b b b b Comoros b Costa Rica a b b Côte d’Ivoire a b Croatia b Cuba a a a a b a Cyprus a a a a a b a Czech and Slovak Federal Republic c/a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 118 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Democratic People’s Republic of Korea b a Denmark a a a a a b a Djibouti b Dominican Republic a a b a Ecuador a a a a Egypt a a a b b a El Salvador a a a b b Equatorial Guinea a a Estonia b Ethiopia b b b b Fiji a a a a b Finland a a a a b a France a a a a b b Gabon a a a b Gambia a b a b b Germany a a a a a b a Ghana a b b b b a Greece a a a a b a Grenada b Guatemala a b a b /...A/48/305 English Page 119 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Guinea b Guinea-Bissau a a a Guyana b a Haiti b b b b Holy See b b b Honduras a b b b Hungary a a a a a b a Iceland a a a b b a India a a a a a b a b Indonesia a b b Iran, Islamic Republic of a b a a b b b Iraq a a a a b Ireland a a a a b a Israel a a a a b Italy a a a a b a Jamaica a a b b Japan a a a a a b a Jordan a b b b b Kenya a a a b Kuwait a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 120 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Laos a a a a a Latvia b Lebanon a a a b b b Lesotho b b b Liberia a b b Libyan Arab Jamahiriya a a Liechtenstein a b Lithuania b Luxembourg a b b a b b Madagascar a a a b Malawi a b a Malaysia a b b b Maldives a Mali b a a b Malta a b a b Mauritania a b Mauritius a a Mexico a a a a a b a Monaco b b Mongolia a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 121 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Morocco a a a a b b b Myanmar a a b b Nepal a a a b b Netherlands a a a a a b a a New Zealand a a a a b a Nicaragua a b b b b b Niger a a a a a b Nigeria a a a b Norway a a a b b a Oman b b Pakistan a a a a a b a a Panama a b a b Papua New Guinea a a a a b a Paraguay b a Peru a a a b a b Philippines a b b b b a Poland a a a a a b a Portugal b a b b Qatar b Republic of Korea a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 122 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Republic of Moldova b Romania a a a a b a b Russian Federation a a a a a b a Rwanda a b b b San Marino a a a b Sao Tome and Principe a Saudi Arabia a a b Senegal a b a b Seychelles a a a a a Sierra Leone a a b b b Singapore a a a a b b Slovenia b Solomon Islands a Somalia b b b South Africa a a a b Spain a a a a b a Sri Lanka a a a b a Sudan a b Suriname b Swaziland a a b /...A/48/305 English Page 123 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Sweden a a a a a b a Switzerland a a a a a b a Syrian Arab Republic a a a a b b Thailand a a a b Togo a a a Tonga a a a Trinidad and Tobago a b Tunisia a a a a b a Turkey a a b b b Uganda a a b Ukraine a a a a a b a United Arab Emirates b United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland a a a a a b a United Republic of Tanzania a b b United States of America a a a a a b a Uruguay a a a a a b a Venezuela a a b a b Viet Nam a b a Western Samoa a Yemen a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 124 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Yugoslavia a b a a a Zaire a b b b b Zambia a a a a b Zimbabwe b Organizations European Space Agency c c c European Telecommunication Satellite Organization c a/Signatories and Parties as of 1 January 1993. b/The States Parties listed in the table are those which have signed the Constitution and Convention of the International Telecommunication Union (Geneva, 1992). The Nairobi Convention (1982), which is still in force, has 128 States Parties. The Nice Constitution and Convention were ratified or accepted only by 22 States. c/As of 1 January 1993, two independent countries were named the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic. /...A/48/305 English Page 125 Selected bibliography on technical, political and legal aspects of outer space activities Note by the Secretariat 1. In the course of the discussion of the Group of Governmental Experts to Carry Out a Study on the Application of Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space, the Secretariat was asked to provide an illustrative bibliography on technical and legal aspects of outer space activities to serve as a preliminary listing of source materials and as a first step in a process of data collection. 2. There is already a large quantity of published materials on the subject of outer space and the number is growing rapidly. While every effort has been made to present a bibliographical selection that is representative of various viewpoints on the subject, this survey should not be considered as an exhaustive listing of the publications available on the issue of outer space technology and legal aspects of States’ activities in outer space. In particular, this preliminary listing does not adequately reflect materials published in languages other than English. 3. The views expressed by the various authors in the publications listed in the present document are solely their own. Inclusion in this select bibliographical listing does not convey any endorsement of the contents of the publications. /...A/48/305 English Page 126 1. Articles Adams, Peter, "New group to examine proliferation of satellites", EW Technology, Defense News, 5 February 1990, p. 33. Adams, Peter, "U.S., Soviets edge closer to rewritten ABM Treaty at defense and space talks", Defense News, 21 August 1989. "Administration sets policy on Landsat continuity", LANDSAT DATA USERS’ NOTES, Earth Observation Satellite Company, vol. 7, No. 1, Spring 1992, p. 4. "Advanced missile warning satellite evolved from smaller spacecraft", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 January 1989, p. 45. "AF Weapons Laboratory examines laser ASAT questions", SDI Monitor, 14 September 1990, pp. 209-211. Aftergood, Steve, David W. Hafemeister, Oleg F. Prilutsky, Joel R. Primack and Stanislav N. Rodionov, "Nuclear power in space", Scientific American, June 1991, vol. 264, No. 6, pp. 42-47. "Air Force wants to update spacetrack", Electronics, 6 January 1977, p. 34. "Allied milspace", Military Space, 19 November 1990, p. 5. "Allies, US explore space cooperation", Military Space, 19 November 1990, pp. 1-3. Anson, Peter, "The Skynet Telecommunication Programme", Colloque Activités Spaciales Militaires (Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989), pp. 143-159. Anthony, Ian (ed.), "The Co-ordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls", Arms Export Regulations (Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991), pp. 207-211. , "The missile technology control regime", Arms Export Regulations (Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991), pp. 219-227. "Argentina develops Condor solid-propellant rocket", Aviation Week and Space Technology, June 1985, p. 61. Asker, James R., "U.S. draws blueprints for first lunar base", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 31 August 1992, pp. 47-51. Aubay, P. H., J. B. Nocaudie, "Surveillance terrestre", Colloque Activités Spaciales Militaires (Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989), pp. 143-159. "Australian-Asian cooperation increases in telecommunications", Space Policy, vol. 8, 1 February 1992, p. 96. /...A/48/305 English Page 127 "Australian defence may launch own satellite", C and C Space and Satellite Newsletter, 8 June 1990, pp. 1-2. "Avco puts together laser radar for strategic defense", Space News, 30 July 1990. Ball, Desmond, Australia’s Secret Space Programmes, Canberra Paper on Strategy and Defence No. 43 (Canberra, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, 1988), 103 pp.and Helen Wilson (eds.), Australia and Space (Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992). Badurkin, V., "Mukachev radar facility prompts local protests", FBIS-Sov, 7 March 1990, pp. 2-3. Bates, Kelly, "SDIO’s Cooper says U.S. could deploy strategic defense system for $40 billion", Inside the Pentagon, 20 December 1990, pp. 10-11. Beatty, J. Kelly, "The GEODSS difference", Sky and Telescope, May 1982, pp. 469-473. Bennet, Ralph, "Brilliant pebbles", Reader’s Digest, September 1989, pp. 128-132. Bernard Raab, "Nuclear-powered infrared surveillance satellite study", Inter-Society Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 1977, Fairchild Space and Electronics Company, Germantown, Maryland. Bertotti, Bruno and Luciano Anselmo, The Problem of Debris and Military Activities in Space, Permanent Representative of Italy, Conference on Disarmament, 6 August 1991. Beusch, J., et al, "NASA debris environment characterization with the haystack radar", AIAA Paper 90-1346, 16 April 1990. Bhatia, A., "India’s space program -cause for concern?", Asian Survey, October 1985, p. 1017. Bhatt, S., "Space law in the 1990s", International Studies, vol. 26, No. 4, October 1989, pp. 323-335. Bobb, Dilip and Amarnath K. Menon, "Chariot of fire", India Today, 15 June 1989, pp. 28-32. Bosco, Joseph A., "International law regarding outer space -an overview", Journal of Air Law and Commerce, Spring 1990, pp. 609-651. Boulden, Jane, "Phase I of the Strategic Defense Initiative: current issues, arms control and Canadian national security", Issue Brief, Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, No. 12, August 1990. /...A/48/305 English Page 128 Bourely, Michael G., "La production du lanceur Ariane", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi 1981, pp. 279-314. Brankli, Hank, "Weather satellite photos and the Vietnam War", Naval History, Spring 1991, pp. 66-68. "Brazil plans to launch its own satellites in the 1990s", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 July 1984, p. 60. "Brazil’s space age begins", Interavia, December 1984, No. 12. "Brazil -aiming for self-sufficiency in orbit", Space World, October 1985, p. 29. Brooks, Charles D., "S.D.I.: a new dimension for Israel", Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, 11(4), Winter 1986, pp. 341-348. "Canada studies PAXSATS for arms control", Military Space, 31 August 1987, pp. 1-3. Chandrashekar, S., "An assessment of Pakistan’s missile programme", Unpublished, 1992. __________, "Export controls and proliferation: an Indian perspective, Forthcoming, 1992. __________, "Missile technology control and the Third World", Space Policy, November 1990, pp. 278-284. Charles, Dan, "Spy satellites: entering a new era", Science, 24 March 1989, pp. 1541-1543. Chayes and Chayes, "Testing and development of ’exotic’ systems under the ABM Treaty: the great reinterpretations caper", Harvard Law Review, No. 1956, 1986. Chen, Yanping, "China’s space policy: a historical review", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, pp. 116-128. Chen, Zhiqiang, "Sun Jiadong talking about China’s space technology", Military World, Jan./Feb. 1990, pp. 34-38. "China/Brazil space talks", Aerospace Daily, 10 August 1987, p. 219. Chosh, S. K., "India’s space program and its military implications", Agence Defence Journal, September 1981. Cleminson, Frank R. and Pericles Gasparini Alves, "Space weapon verification: a brief appraisal", Verification of Disarmament or Limitation of Armaments: Instruments, Negotiations, Proposals, Serge Sur (ed.) UNIDIR, New York, 1992, pp. 177-206. /...A/48/305 English Page 129 _________, "PAXSAT and progress in arms control", Space Policy, May 1988, pp. 97-102. Clark, Phillip, "Soviet worldwide ELINT satellites", Jane’s Soviet Intelligence Review, July 1990, pp. 330-332. Cohen, William S., "Limited defences under a modified ABM Treaty", Disarmament, vol. XV, No. 1, 1992, pp. 13-27. Condom, P., "Brazil aims for self-sufficiency in space", Interavia, January 1984, No. 1, pp. 99-101. Corradini, Alessandro, "Consideration of the question of international arms transfer by the United Nations", by Transparency in international transfers, Disarmament Topical Paper 3, United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs, New York: United Nations publication, 1990. Couston, M., "Vers un droit des stations spatiales", Revue française du droit aerien et spatial, 1990, No. 1. Covault, Craig, "New missile warning satellite to be launched on the first Titan 4", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 January 1989, pp. 34-40. __________, "USAF missile warning satellites providing 90-sec. Scud attack alert", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 January 1990, pp. 60-61. __________, "Soviet military space operations developing longer life satellites", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 April 1990, pp. 44-49. __________, "Maui optical station photographs external tank reentry breakup", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 June 1990, pp. 52-53. __________, "Russia seeks joint space test to build military cooperation", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 March 1992, pp. 18-19. "Congress splits on milspace budget", Military Space, 25 September 1989, p. 2. Cox, David, et al, "Security cooperation in the Arctic: a Canadian response to Murmansk", Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 24 October 1989. "Crisis shows need for better tactical satellite communications", Aerospace Daily, 31 January 1991, p. 174. Daly, P., "GLONASS status", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 September 1987, p. 108. Danchik, Robert, et al, "The Navy navigation satellite system (TRANSIT)", Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest, vol. 11, Nos. 1 and 2, 1990, pp. 97-101. de Briganti, Giovanni, "West Germany reverses stance on reconnaissance satellites", Space News, 9 April 1990. /...A/48/305 English Page 130 __________, "Budget reveals slower growth for military space programs", Defense News, 3 December 1990, p. 14. de Selding, Peter, "Defense minister says no to French radar spy satellite", Space News, 12 March 1990. __________, "UK Minister balks at call for European spy satellite", Space News, 16 July 1990, pp. 1, 20. DeVere, G. T. and N. L. Johnson, "The NORAD space network", Spaceflight, July 1985, vol. 27, pp. 306-309. Domke, M., "Kostendämpfungsstrategie: integration ziviler und militärischer produktion neuer technologien", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft und Frieden, 4/1991, pp. 26-31. Du, Shuhua, "The outer space and the moon treaties", Verification of current disarmament and arms limitation agreements: ways, means and practices, UNIDIR, New York: United Nations Publication, 1991. Dudney, Robert S., "The force forms up", Air Force Magazine, February 1992, p. 23. "European space industry eyes spy sats", Military Space, 23 April 1990, pp. 5-6. "Expert says no blessing for SDI deployment", FBIS-SOV, 91-023, 21 October 1991, p. 1. "Experts map out European satellite plan", Military Space, 9 April 1990, p. 7. Falkenheim, Peggy L., "Japan and arms control: Tokyo’s response to SDI and INF", Aurora Papers, No. 6, Ontario: The Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 1987. Finney, A. T., "Tactical uses of the DSCS III communications system", in NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium 16-19 October 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Foley, Theresa, "Raytheon proposes rail-mobile radar for midcourse SDI sensing", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 January 1988, pp. 22-24. "French milspace", Military Space, 5 December 1988, p. 5. "Foreign milspace", Military Space, 28 January 1991, p. 4. "French study military recon satellite", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 January 1973, p. 15. Furniss, Tim, "UK studies new military satellite plan", Flight International, 7 October 1989, p. 4. /...A/48/305 English Page 131 __________, "Iraq plans to launch two science satellites", Flight International, 21 February 1990, p. 20. Fujita Yasuki, "Recent developments in the peaceful utilization of space", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, March 1992, p. 1. "Gadhafi: Libya needs space power", Space News, 25 June 1990, p. 2. "General Dynamics wins MLV II competition", Aerospace Daily, 4 May 1988, p. 185.6. George, E. V., "Diffraction-limited imaging of Earth satellites", Energy and Technology Review, August 1991, p. 29. Gettins, Hal, "Shepherd touching off interservice row", Missiles and Rockets, 7 March 1960, pp. 21-28. Gilmartin, Trish, "Pentagon Advisory Panel Chairman urges gradual evolutionary approach to SDI", Defense News, 25 July 1988, p. 30. Goldblat, Josef, "The ENMOD Convention Review Conference", Disarmament, vol. VII, No. 2, Summer 1984, pp. 93-102. Goure, D., "Soviet radars: the eyes of Soviet defenses", Military Technology, 1988, n. 5, pp. 36-38. Graham, C. P., "Brazilian space programme -an overview", Space Policy, February 1991, pp. 72-76. Granger, Ken, Geographic information and remote sensing technologies in the defence of Australia, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Green, David, "UK space policy -a problem of culture", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, November 1987, pp. 277-279. Grossman, Elaine, "Small and light ’Brilliant Eyes’ could replace three SDI surveillance systems", Inside the Army, 28 May 1990, p. 15. Gullikstad, Espen, "Finland", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991, pp. 59-63. __________, "Sweden", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991, pp. 147-155. Halperin, Emmanuel, "Israel et les missiles", Politique internationale, No. 44, 1989, pp. 251-256. He, Changchui, "The development of remote sensing in China", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 1, February 1989, pp. 65-75. /...A/48/305 English Page 132 "Helios to deliver imagery to 3 nations", Military Space, 21 November 1988, pp. 1-3. Henize, Karl, "Tracking artificial satellites and space vehicles", Advances in Space Science (Academic Press, New York, 1960), vol. 2. Howell, Andreas, "The challenge of space surveillance", Sky and Telescope, June, 1987, pp. 584-588. Hua-bao, Lin, "The Chinese recoverable satellite program", 40th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, 7-12 October 1989, Malaga, Spain, IAF-89-426. "Hughes, Martin and Rockwell selected for GBI program", SDI Monitor, 31 August 1990, pp. 197-198. Hughes, Peter C., Satellites harming other satellites, Arms Control Verification Occasional Paper No. 7, Ottawa: Arms Control and Disarmament Division, External Affairs and International Trade, Canada, July 1991. Hurwitz, Bruce A., "Israel and the law of outer space", Israel Law Review, vol. 22, No. 4, Summer-Autumn 1988, pp. 457-466. Iguchi, Chikako, "International cooperation in lunar and space development: Japan’s role", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 256-267. "India’s space policy", Space Policy, November 1987, pp. 326-334. "Indigenous missile", Asian Defense Journal, September 1985. "Industrial view on European space-based verification", Presentation at Dornier, Dornier Deutsche Aerospace, Friedrichshafen, 18 February 1992. "Industry observer", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 June 1977, p. 11. "International space", Military Space, 9 April 1990, p. 5. "Invasion tip", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 6 August 1990, p. 15. "Iraqi space launch more modest than claimed", Flight International, 20 December 1989, p. 4. "Israeli satellite launch sparks concerns about Middle East missile build-up", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 26 September 1988, p. 21. "Israel hints at plans to launch spy satellite", Defense News, 11 March 1991, p. 9. Jackson, P., "Space surveillance satellite catalog maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 April 1990. "Japan plans satellite", Jane’s Defense Weekly, 16 September 1989. /...A/48/305 English Page 133 Jasani, Buphendra, "Military space activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978 (Taylor and Francis, London, 1978). __________, et al, "Share satellite surveillance", The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, March 1990, pp. 15-16. __________ and Larsson, Christer, "Security implications of remote sensing", Space Policy, February 1988, p. 48. Jeambrun, Georges, "La Politique de contrôle des satellites français (1990-2000)", Defense nationale, 43e année, Fevrier 1987, pp. 129-139. Karp, Aaron, "Space technology in the Third World: commercialization and the spread of ballistic missiles", Space Policy, May 1986, pp. 157-168. __________, "Ballistic-missile proliferation in the Third World", in World Armament and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1989, Oxford University Press, pp. 287-318. __________, "Ballistic missile proliferation", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 327-329. Kawachi, Masao, Toyohiko Ishii and Koichi Ijichi, "The Space Flyer Unit", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, March 1992. Kenden, A., "Military maneuvers in synchronous orbit", Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, February 1983, V. 36, pp. 88-91. Kiernan, Vincent, "Air Force begins upgrades to satellite scanning telescope", Space News, 23 July 1990, p. 8. __________, "Air Force alters GPS signals to aid troops", Space News, 24 September 1990, pp. 1, 35. __________, "Officials: changing world heightens demand for Milstar", Space News, 8 October 1990, p. 8. __________, "US Congress slashes Milstar funding, orders shift of system to tactical users", Space News, 22 October 1990, pp. 3, 37. __________, "DMSP satellite launched to aid troops in Middle East", Space News, 10 December 1990, p. 6. __________, "Pentagon prepares for ASAT flight testing in 1996", Space News, 5-18 August 1991, p. 23 Kirton, John, "Canadian space policy", Space Policy, vol. 6, No. 1, February 1990, pp. 61-73. Klass, Philip, "Inmarsat decision pushes GPS to forefront of Civ Nav-Sat field", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 January 1991, pp. 34-35. /...A/48/305 English Page 134 "Krasnoyarsk radar dismantling in full swing", FBIS-Sov, 10 October 1990, p. 1. Kubbing, B. W., "The SDI agreement between Bonn and Washington: review of the first four years", Space Policy, August 1990, pp. 231-247. Langberg, Mike, "Lockheed fights for Milstar as Cold War thaw threatens", San Jose Mercury News, 14 January 1991, pp. 1C, 6C. Lawler, Andrew, "Taiwan seeks start on $400 million plan to enter space arena", Space News, 19 February 1990, pp. 1, 36. Lawler, Andrew, "Brazil chafes at missile curbs", Space News, vol. 2, No. 35, 14-20 October 1991, p. 1, 20. __________, "South Korea plans to build, launch satellites", Space News, 25 June 1990, pp. 1, 20. "Le traité germano-américain sur l’IDS", Bruxelles: GRIP, No. 103, November 1986. Lee, Yishane, "South Korea, Taiwan gear up to enter satellite era", Space News, 24 September 1990, p. 7. Leitenberg, M., "Satellite launchers -and potential ballistic missiles -on the commercial market", Current Research on Peace and Violence, 1981, No. 2, pp. 115-128. Leopold, George, "Canada, US to begin talks on joint space-based radar", Defense News, 26 June 1989, p. 9. "Lessons of the Gulf War", Trust and Verify, No. 18, March 1991, pp. 1-2. "Les satellites d’observation: un instrument européen pour la verification du désarmement", Assemblée de l’Union de l’Europe occidentale, Commission technique et aerospatiale, Colloque, Rome 27, et 28, mars 1990. "Libya offers to finance Brazilian missile project", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 6 February 1988, p. 201. "Libya wants CSS-2", Flight International, 14 May 1988, p. 6. Lindsey, George, "Surveillance from space: a strategic opportunity for Canada", Working Paper 44, Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, June 1992. Liu Ji-yuan and Min Gui-rong, "The progress of astronautics in China", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 2, May 1987, pp. 141-147. "LLNL space imaging tests slated for Maui telescope", Space News, 19 February 1990, p. 12. Lockwood, Dunbar, "Verifying START: from satellites to suspect sites", Arms Control Today, vol. 20, No. 8, October 1990, pp. 13-19. /...A/48/305 English Page 135 Lopes, Roberto, "A satellite deal with Iraq", Space Markets, No. 3, 1989, p. 191. Lygo, Raymond, "The UK’s future in space", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, November 1987, pp. 281-283. "Magnavox prepares for GPS buildup", Military Space, 25 September 1989, pp. 3-5. Mahnken, T. G., "Why Third World space systems matter", Orbis, Fall 1991, S. 563-579. Maitra, Ramtanu, "India’s space program: boosting industry", Fusion, 7(4), July/August 1985, pp. 53-58. Manly, Peter, "Television in amateur astronomy", Astronomy, December 1984, pp. 35-37. Marov, Mikail Ya., "The new challenge for space in Russia", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 269-279. Matte, Nicolas, "The treaty banning nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water (10 October 1963) and peaceful uses of outer space", in Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. IX, 1984, pp. 391-414. McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared astronomy: pixels to spare", Sky and Telescope, July 1991, pp. 31-35. Mehmud, Salim, "Pakistan’s space programme", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 8, August 1989, pp. 217-225. "Meteor 2-20, after being stored on orbit, begins transmission", Aerospace Daily, 19 November 1990, p. 302. Middleton, B. S. and E. F. Cory, "Australian space policy", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 1, February 1989, pp. 41-46. Milhollin, G., "India’s missiles -with a little help from our friends", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, November 1989, pp. 31-35. Monserrat Filho, Jose, "Foguetes proibidos", O Globo, 24, June 1992, p. 6. "MTCR-Update: June-December 1991", Missile Monitor, No. 2, Spring 1992. NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium, 16-19 October 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Naval Space Command, "NAVSPASUR news release", NAVSPASURINST 5780.1, 11 July 1983. "Navy satellites approach critical replacement stage", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 March 1988, pp. 46, 51. /...A/48/305 English Page 136 Norman, Colin, "Cut price plan offered for SDI deployment", Science, 7 October 1988, pp. 24-25. North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD space detection and tracking system", Factsheet, 20 August 1982. Osborne, Freleigh, "PAXSAT space-based remote sensing for arms control verification", IEEE Electro/88, Boston, MA, 10-12 May 1988, Professional Program Session Record 24. "OSD puts USAF space radar plan on hold, OSD studies nonspace options", Inside the Air Force, 7 December 1990, pp. 10-11. Ospina, Sylvia, "Project CONDOR, the Andean regional satellite system -key legal considerations", Space Communication and Broadcasting, 1989, vol. 6, pp. 367-377. "Pakistan steps up its space program", Space World, May 1985, p. 33. Paolini, Jérôme, "French military space policy and European cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 4, No. 3, August 1988, pp. 201-210. "PAXSAT could monitor space arms treaty", Military Space, 14 September 1987, pp. 6-7. Payne, Jay H., "A limited antiballistic missile system", Ohio: Department of the Air Force, Air University, Air Force Institute of Technology, Defense Technical Information Center, 1990, pp. 2.13-2.24. Pederson, Kenneth S., "Thoughts on international space cooperation and interests in the post-Cold War world", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 205-219. Perry, Geoffrey, "Pupil projects involving satellites", Space Education, vol. 1, 1984, p. 320. Piazzano, Piero, "Cosi un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, Mo. 120, Aprile 1991, pp. 16-25. Pike, Gordon, "Chinese launch services: a user’s guide, Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, pp. 103-115. Pike, John, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 49-84. __________, Sarah Lang and Eric Stambler, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 121-146. Politi, Alessandro, "Italy plans military satellite network for early warning, reconnaissance", Defense News, 7 January 1991, pp. 3, 31. /...A/48/305 English Page 137 "Portuguese balk at US radar, leaving US with blind spot", Space News, 9 October 1989, p. 4. Potter, M., "Swords into ploughshares: missiles into commercial launchers", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, pp. 146-150. Rains, Lon, "Soviets launch first ELINT spy satellite since 1988", Space News, 29 May 1990. Rajan, Y. S., "Benefits from space technology: a view from a developing country", Space Policy, 4(3) August 1988, pp. 221-228. Rankin, Robert, "Iraq still gets US satellite weather photos", The Philadelphia Inquirer, 22 January 1991, p. 9-A. Rennow, Hans-Henrik, "The Information Revolution II: satellites and peace, The World Today, London, June 1989, pp. 97-99. "Requests for proposals -Air Force Space Technology Center", SDI Monitor, 25 May 1990, p. 125. "RFP for two more DSP satellites to be released Jan. 31", Aerospace Daily, 23 January 1991, p. 125. Richelson, J., The U.S. intelligence community (Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, 1985), pp. 140-143. Richelson, Jeffrey, "The future of space reconnaissance", Scientific American, January 1991, pp. 38-44. Richter, Andrew, North American Aerospace Defence Cooperation in the l99Os: Issues and Prospects, Department of National Defense, Canada, Operational Research and Analysis Establishment, Extra-Mural Paper No. 57, July 1991. Risse-Kappen, Thomas, "Star Wars controversy in West Germany", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, vol. 43, No. 6, July/August 1987, pp. 50-52. Rossi, Sergio A., "La politica military spaziale Europea e l’Italia", Afari Esteri, anno XIX, No. 76, autunno 1987, pp. 521-533. Rubin, Uzi, "Iraq and the ballistic missile scare", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 46(8), October 1990, pp. 11-13. Saint-Lager, Olivier de, "L’organisation des activités spatiales françaises: une combinaison dynamique du secteur public et du secteur privé", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi, 1981, pp. 475-487. Salvatori, Nicoletta, "Cosi un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, No. 120, Aprile 1991, pp. 109-121. "Satellite intelligence", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 25 February 1991, p. 13. /...A/48/305 English Page 138 "Satellite trackers bag Soviet space station", Sky and Telescope, December 1987, p. 580. Scheffran, Jiirgen and Aaron Karp, "The national interpretation of the missile technology control regime -the US and German experience", Controlling the Development and Spread of Military Technology: Lessons form the Past and Challenges for the 199Os, Vu University Press, Amsterdam 1992, pp. 235-251. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Verification and risk for an anti-satellite weapons ban", Bulletin of Peace Proposals, vol. 17, No. 2, 1986, pp. 165-173. __________, "Dual use of missile and space technologies", to be published in G. Neuneck, O. Ischebeck, Missile Technologies, Proliferation and Concepts for Arms Control, Hamburg 1992, pp. 1-16. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Startbahn für den weltraumkrieg? -Der ASAT-Test und die Osterinsel", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft & Frieden, No. 4, 1985. Scott, William B. and Stanley W. Kandebo, "NASA-AMES proposal could challenge NASP", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 September 1992, pp. 27-30. "SDI constellation grows in brilliance", Military Space, 14 January 1991, pp. 3-4. "SDIO plans to buy 4600 Brilliant Pebble interceptors", Defense Daily, 13 February 1990, p. 231. "SDIO retools for limited threats", SDI Monitor, 21 December 1990, pp. 281-282. "SDIO works up three limited-strike protection plans", SDI Monitor, 18 January 1991, p. 21. "Secret images for Japan", Aviation Week and Space Technologies, 9 March 1992, p. 11. Shastri, R., "The spread of ballistic missiles and its implications", Strategic Analysis, May 1988, pp. 157-168. "Shuttle-Deployed Syncom IV-5 arrives on station, begins testing", Aerospace Daily, 19 January 1990, p. 110. Simpson, John, Philip Acton and Simon Crowe, "The Israeli satellite launch: capabilities, intentions and implications", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 2, May 1989, pp. 117-128. "Sluggers pinch hit for Army GPS", Military Space, 24 September 1990, pp. 1, 8. Smith, David, "The defense and space talks: moving towards non-nuclear strategic defenses", NATO Review, vol. 28, No. 5, October 1990, pp. 17-21. "South Korea needs to develop spy satellite", Defense Daily, 26 November 1990, p. 312. /...A/48/305 English Page 139 "Soviet Union launches military navigation satellite", Aerospace Daily, 20 September 1990, p. 471. "Soviets announce failure of early warning satellite", Aerospace Daily, 28 June 1990, p. 518. "Soviets confirm Cosmos 1900 difficulties", Aerospace Daily, 16 May 1988, p. 252. "Soviets launch Mir resupply vehicle, two satellites", Aerospace Daily, 2 October 1990, p. 5. "Soviets reject transition to strategic defenses -Hadley", Defense Daily, 22 March 1990, p. 458. "Space surveillance contracts expected", Defense Electronics, June 1984, p. 19. "Space surveillance deemed inadequate", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 June 1980, pp. 249-259. "SSTS cost drivers identified", Military Space, 29 September 1986, p. 3. Sta. Romana, Elpidio R., "Japan, SDI and the Pacific", Foreign Relations, pp. 105-123. Stares, Paul B., "The military uses of space after the Cold War", Australia and Space, Desmond Ball and Helen Wilson (eds.), Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Surikov, Boris, "Krasnoyarsk radar station’s future considered", FBIS-Sov, 27 March 1990, pp. 2-3. "Surveillance system to monitor Soviet ASATs", Defense Electronics, March 1983, p. 16. "Swift development of China’s missiles and space technology: an interview with Mr. Liu Jiyan, Vice-Minister of the Ministry of the Aerospace Industry of China", CONMILIT, vol. 3, No. 182, 1992, pp. 45-52. Taylor, Trevor, "SDI -the British response", Star Wars and European Defence, Hans Günter Brauch (ed.), Houndmills: Macmillian Press, 1987, pp. 129-149. __________, "Britain’s response to the strategic defence initiative", International Affairs, vol. 62, No. 2, Spring 1986, pp. 217-230. Teitelbaum, Sheldon, "Israel and Star Wars: the shape of things to come", New Outlook, vol. 28, No. 5/6, May/June 1985, pp. 59-62. "The JDW Interview", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 9 February 1991, p. 200. "Third World countries are increasing their interest in space", SDI Monitor, 7 December 1990, p. 275. /...A/48/305 English Page 140 Thomas, Paul, "Space traffic surveillance", Space/Aeronautics, November 1967, pp. 75-86. Thomas, Raju G. C., "India’s nuclear and space programs: defence or development?", World Politics, 38(2), January 1986, pp. 315-342. "Transcarpathian Oblast radar project mothballed", FBIS-Sov, 22 August 1990, p. 51. "TRW to develop $33-million USAF space surveillance network", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 May 1978, pp. 24-25. Turner, R., "Brazil says missile technology controls hamper launch industry", Defense News, 24 July 1989, p. 18. Ulsamer, Edgar, "ESD: enhancing effectiveness electronically", Air Force Magazine, July 1978, p. 49. "USAF Asat test advances 1959 aircraft launch data", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 29 August 1983, p. 22. "US increasing coverage of Soviet space launches", Defense Daily, 15 April 1986, p. 251. "U.S. upgrading ground-based sensors", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 June 1980, pp. 239-241. van Reeth, George and Kevin Madders, "Reflections on the quest for international cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 221-231. von Welck, Stephan F., "India space program", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, November 1987, pp. 326-334. Vohra, Ruchita, "Iraq joins the missile club: impact and implications", Strategic Analysis, 13(1), April 1990, pp. 59-68. Weeb, Richard L., "Estimating the life cycle cost of the space exploration initiative", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 1, February 1992. Welk, S. F. von, "The export of space technology: prospects and dangers", Space Policy, August 1987, pp. 221-231. Wells, Damon R. and Daniel E. Hastings, "The US and Japanese space programmes: a comparative study", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 3, August 1991, pp. 233-256. Williamson, Mark, "The UK Parliamentary Space Committee", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 2, May 1992, pp. 159-165. Wilson, A., "Non-US launcher systems for the next decade", Interavia, July 1988, No. 7, p. 687. /...A/48/305 English Page 141 Wood, Lowell, "Concerning advanced architectures for strategic defense", Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Preprint UCRL-98424, 13 March 1988. __________, "Brilliant Pebbles missile defense concept advocated by Livermore scientist", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 13 June 1988, pp. 151-155. Wu, Guoxiang, "China’s space communications goals", Space Policy, vol. 4, No. 1, February 1988, pp. 41-45. Yang, Chunfu, "China’s LONG MARCH series carrier rockerts", Military World, May 1989, pp. 20-25. Zaloga, Steven, Soviet air defence missiles, Jane’s Information Group, Coulsdon, Surrey, 1989, pp. 118-148. Zaloga, Steve, "Soviet radars draw opposition", Armed Forces Journal International, June 1990, p. 21. Zhukov, G. and Y. Kolosov, International Space Law, 1984. Zorpette, Glenn, "Kwajalein’s new role", IEEE Spectrum, March 1989, pp. 64-69. 2. Books, special studies and reports Anti-satellite weapons, countermeasures, and arms control, Office of Technology Assessment, report no. OTA-ISC-281, September 1985. Atlas géographic de l’espace. Sous la direction de Fernand Verger, Sides-Reclus, 1992. Balaschak, M. et al., Assessing the comparability of dual-use technologies for ballistic missile development, Cambridge, M.A.: Center for International Studies, June 1981. Ball, Desmond, A base for debate (Allen and Unwin, London, 1987). Berman, R. P. and J. C. Baker, Soviet strategic forces, Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1982. Birkholz, M. et al., Die Bundesrepublik als Heimlicher Waffenexporteur, Berlin: Arbeitskreis Physik und Rüstung, 1983. Brauch, Hans Günter, Henny J. Van Der Graaf, John Grin and Wim A. Smit (eds.), Controlling the development and spread of military technology: lessons form the past and challenges for the 1990s, Vu University Press, Amsterdam 1992, 406 pp. Bunn, Matthew, Foundation for the future: the ABM treaty and national security, Washington, D.C.: The Arms Control Association, 1990. Carus, W. S., Ballistic missiles in modern conflict, Praeger, 1991. /...A/48/305 English Page 142 Cochran, C. D., D. M. Gorman and J. D. Dumoulin (eds.), Space handbook, Air University Press, January 1985. Cochran, T. B., W. M. Arkin, R. S. Norris and J. I. Sands, Nuclear weapons databook: Soviet nuclear weapons, vol. IV, New York, Harper and Row Publishers, 1989. Colloque: activités spatiales militaires, Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989, 382 pp. Christol, C., The Modern International Law of Outer Space, 1982. Chayes, Antonia H. and Paul Doty (eds.), Defending deterrence: managing the ABM treaty regime into the 21st century, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Dorn, Walter, Peace-keeping satellites: the case for international surveillance and verification, Dundas, Peace Research Institute, 1989, Peace Research Reviews, 187 pp. Dolye, Stephen, Civil uses of outer space: implications for international security, UNIDIR, New York, 1991. Disarmament: problems related to outer space, UNIDIR, New York, United Nations Publication, 1987, 190 pp. Gasparini Alves, Pericles, Prevention of an arms race in outer space: a guide to discussions at the conference on disarmament, New York: UNIDIR, 1991, 203 pp. Gatland, K., Space technology, New York: Harmony Books, Fourth Edition 1984. Gold, D., SDI -the US Strategic Defense Initiative and the implications of Israel’s participation, Center for Strategic Studies, Tel Aviv, Memorandum No. 16, December 1985. Gummett, P. and J. Reppy (eds.), The Relations between defence and civil technologies, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988. Hecht, J., Beam weapons -the next arms race, Plenum Press, 1984. Hord, R. M., CRC handbook of space technology: status and projections, Boca Raton, Florida, 1985. Huang, Z., Long March launch vehicles in the 1990s, in Sharokhi, F. et al., Space commercialization: launch vehicles and programs, Washington, D.C.: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 1990, pp. 1-6. Jasani, Bhupendra, Space and international security, London, Royal United Services Institute, 70 pp. __________, ed., Peaceful and non-peaceful uses of space: problems of definition for the prevention of an arms race, UNIDIR, 1991. /...A/48/305 English Page 143 __________, Space weapons and international security, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. __________, Outer space-battlefield of the future?, London, Taylor and Francis, 1978. Johnson, Nicholas L. (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs: Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1989. __________ (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs: Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1990. __________ and Darren S. McKnight, Artificial space debris, Malabar: Orbit Book Company, 1987. King-Hele, Desmond, Observing earth satellites (Macmillan, London, 1983). Krige, John, The prehistory of ESRO: 1959/1960, European Space Agency, HSR-1, July 1992. "Le Grandi Esplorazioni nel mondo sopra de noi", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, No. 120, Aprile 1991. Milton, A. Fenner, M. Scott Davis and John A. Parmentola, Making Space Defense Work, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Nolan, Janne E, Trappings of power: ballistic missiles in the Third World, The Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C., 1991, 209 pp. Outer space in the 1990s: the role of arms control, security, technical and legal implications, Proceedings of the Symposium, held on November 11-12-13, 1992. Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canada, 258 pp. Raiten, E. and K. Tsipis, Conventional antisatellite weapons, Program in Science and Technology for International Security, MIT, Cambridge, March 1984. Reijnen, G. C. M. and W. de Graff, The pollution of outer space, in particular of the geostationary orbit, Dordrecht, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989. Richelson, Jeffrey, The U.S. intelligence community, Ballinger, Cambridge, Ma. 1985. __________, America’s secret eyes in space, New York, Harper and Row, 1990. Rudert, R., K. Schichl and S. Seeger, Atomraketen als Entwicklungshilfe, Marburg 1985. Seiler, A., Die Entstehung und Entwicklung von Eureka, Diplomarbeit, Berlin, 1988. /...A/48/305 English Page 144 Sofaer, Abraham D., The ABM Treaty, Part I: treaty language and negotiating history, 11 May 1987. __________, The ABM Treaty, Part II: ratification process, 12 March 1987. __________, The ABM Treaty, Part III: subsequent practice, 9 September 1987. Space Log: 1957-1991, International Space Year, 1992, TRW, 1992. Space-strike arms and international security, Report of the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace Against the Nuclear Threat, Moscow, October 1985. Steinberg, G. M., Satellite reconnaissance: the role of informal bargaining, New York, Praeger, 1982. Space surveillance for arms control and verification: options, proceedings of the symposium held on October 21-23, 1988, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, Montreal, McGill University, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, 1988. Stanyard, Roger, World satellite survey, London, LLoyd’s Aviation Department, 1987. Stares, Paul, The militarization of space: US policy 1945-84, Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1985, p. 117. Sutton, G. P., Rocket propulsion elements, New York, etc., John Wiley, 1986. Swahn, Johan, Open skies for all: the prospects for international satellite surveillance, Gothenburg, Technical Peace Research Unit, January 1989, Chalmers University of Technology, 74 pp. Stutzle, W., B. Jasani and R. Cowen (eds.), The ABM treaty: to defend or not to defend, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. Long, F. A., D. Hafner and J. Boutwell (eds.), Weapons in space, New York, W. W. Norton and Company, 1986. -----NATIONS A UNIES Assemblée générale Distr. GENERALE A/48/305 15 octobre 1993 FRANCAIS ORIGINAL : ANGLAIS Quarante-huitième session Point 70 de l’ordre du jour PREVENTION D’UNE COURSE AUX ARMEMENTS DANS L’ESPACE Etude sur l’application de mesures de confiance à l’espace extra-atmosphérique Rapport du Secrétaire général 1. Dans sa résolution 45/55 B du 4 décembre 1990, l’Assemblée générale a prié le Secrétaire général de mener, avec l’aide d’experts gouvernementaux, une étude des aspects particuliers de l’application à l’espace de diverses mesures de confiance, y compris les différentes technologies disponibles, les possibilités de définir des mécanismes appropriés de coopération internationale dans des domaines d’intérêt déterminés et autres questions, et de lui rendre compte à ce sujet à sa quarante-huitième session. 2. En application de cette résolution, le Secrétaire général a l’honneur de présenter à l’Assemblée générale l’étude sur l’application de mesures de confiance à l’espace extra-atmosphérique (voir annexe). 93-44575 (F) 191093 221093 /...A/48/305 Français Page 2 ANNEXE Etude sur l’application de mesures de confiance à l’espace extra-atmosphérique TABLE DES MATIERES Paragraphes Page LISTE DES SIGLES ET ABREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LETTRE D’ENVOI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 AVANT-PROPOS DU SECRETAIRE GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 -16 13 II. APERCU GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 -55 16 A. Les utilisations actuelles de l’espace extra-atmosphérique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 -44 17 1. Les satellites imageurs . . . . . . . . . . 25 -26 23 2. Les satellites d’écoute électronique . . . . 27 -28 24 3. Les satellites d’alerte avancée . . . . . . 29 24 4. Les satellites météorologiques . . . . . . . 30 24 5. Les systèmes de détection d’explosions nucléaires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 24 6. Les satellites de télécommunications . . . . 32 24 7. Les satellites de navigation . . . . . . . . 33 24 8. Les armes antisatellites . . . . . . . . . . 34 -40 25 9. Les armes antimissiles . . . . . . . . . . . 41 -44 26 B. Les nouvelles tendances . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 -55 26 1. Les capacités spatiales des autres Etats . . 46 -48 26 2. Augmentation du nombre et de la capacité des satellites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 -50 27 3. Les systèmes à double finalité . . . . . . . 51 -54 27 4. Les applications au combat . . . . . . . . . 55 28 /...A/48/305 Français Page 3 TABLE DES MATIERES Paragraphes Page III. CADRE JURIDIQUE EXISTANT : ACCORDS ET DECLARATIONS DE PRINCIPES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 -80 29 A. Les accords multilatéraux à caractère universel 59 -67 29 1. Le Traité sur l’espace . . . . . . . . . . . 59 -60 29 2. Autres accords multilatéraux à caractère universel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 -67 34 B. Les traités bilatéraux . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 -75 36 C. Les résolutions et déclarations de principes adoptées par l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 -80 39 IV. EXAMEN GENERAL DE LA NOTION DE MESURES DE CONFIANCE 81 -114 40 A. Caractéristiques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 -103 42 B. Critères d’application . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 -109 44 C. Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 -114 44 V. CARACTERISTIQUES DES MESURES VISANT A RENFORCER LA CONFIANCE DANS L’ESPACE EXTRA-ATMOSPHERIQUE . . . 115 -175 46 A. Les caractéristiques spécifiques du milieu spatial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 -129 46 B. Les aspects politiques et juridiques . . . . . . 130 -138 48 C. Les aspects technologiques et scientifiques . . 139 -175 49 1. Technologie et espace . . . . . . . . . . . 144 -158 50 a) Les techniques relatives à la surveillance des opérations spatiales . 146 -147 51 b) Les systèmes optiques passifs basés au sol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 -149 51 c) Les systèmes optiques actifs basés au sol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 51 d) Les radars basés au sol . . . . . . . . 151 -152 52 e) Les caractéristiques des autres moyens techniques de surveillance de l’espace . 153 -154 52 /...A/48/305 Français Page 4 TABLE DES MATIERES Paragraphes Page f) La surveillance des armes spatiales . . 155 -161 52 2. La technologie et les mesures de confiance . 162 -175 53 a) PAXSAT-A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 -165 54 b) Les satellites pour la surveillance des activités terrestres . . . . . . . . 166 54 c) L’Agence internationale de satellites de contrôle (AISC) . . . . . . . . . . . 167 -169 54 d) L’Agence internationale de surveillance de l’espace (AISE) . . . . . . . . . . . 170 -173 55 e) PAXSAT-B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 -175 56 VI. MESURES DE CONFIANCE DANS L’ESPACE . . . . . . . . . 176 -244 57 A. La nécessité de mesures de confiance dans l’espace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 -184 57 B. Propositions de mesures de confiance spécifiques dans l’espace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 -225 58 1. Mesures de confiance sur une base de réciprocité librement consentie . . . . . . 189 -193 62 2. Mesures de confiance sur une base contractuelle ayant force obligatoire . . . 194 -203 63 3. Propositions concernant un cadre institutionnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 -207 65 4. Le transfert international de technologies missilières et autres techniques "névralgiques" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 -214 66 5. Propositions de mesures de confiance dans l’espace, dans le cadre des négociations bilatérales Etats-Unis-URSS . . . . . . . . 215 -219 68 6. Autres propositions . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 -225 69 /...A/48/305 Français Page 5 TABLE DES MATIERES Paragraphes Page C. Analyse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 -244 70 1. Mesures générales destinées à renforcer la transparence et la confiance . . . . . . 227 -230 70 2. Renforcement de l’immatriculation des objets spatiaux et autres mesures correspondantes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 -235 71 3. Code de conduite et code de la route . . . . 236 -242 72 4. Le transfert international de technologies missilières et autres techniques "névralgiques" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 -244 73 VII. MECANISMES DE COOPERATION INTERNATIONALE CONCERNANT L’APPLICATION DE MESURES DE CONFIANCE DANS L’ESPACE 245 -293 74 A. Les mécanismes existants dans le domaine de la coopération internationale dans l’espace . . . . 247 -281 74 1. Les mécanismes mondiaux de coopération internationale dans l’espace . . . . . . . . 248 -262 74 2. Mécanismes multilatéraux régionaux . . . . . 263 -274 78 3. Mécanismes bilatéraux . . . . . . . . . . . 275 -281 80 B. Propositions concernant la création de nouveaux mécanismes de coopération internationale dans l’espace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 -293 80 VIII. CONCLUSIONS ET RECOMMANDATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . 294 -331 83 APPENDICES I. Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extraatmosphhérique y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes . . 97 II. Directives pour des types appropriés de mesures propres à accroître la confiance et pour l’application de ces mesures sur un plan mondial et régional . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 III. Etat des traités multilatéraux relatifs aux activités dans l’espace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Bibliographie sélective relative aux aspects techniques, politiques et juridiques des activités spatiales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 /...A/48/305 Français Page 6 LISTE DES SIGLES ET ABREVIATIONS Accord sur la Lune Accord régissant les activités des Etats sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes Accord sur la notification des lancements Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques sur la notification des lancements de missiles intercontinentaux et de missiles lancés par sous-marins Accord sur la prévention des activités militaires dangereuses Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques sur la prévention des activités militaires dangereuses Accord sur la réduction des risques Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques portant sur la création de centres de réduction des risques nucléaires Accord sur les accidents nucléaires Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques portant sur des mesures destinées à réduire le risque du déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire Accord sur le sauvetage Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique Accord sur le téléphone rouge Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques portant sur les mesures destinées à réduire le risque de déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire AISC Agence internationale de satellites de contrôle AM (Missile) antimissiles balistiques ARABSAT Organisation arabe des communications par satellite ASAT Armes antisatellites ASE Agence spatiale européenne B. Dm Ondes décimétriques CD Conférence du désarmement /...A/48/305 Français Page 7 CCD Dispositif à couplage de charge CEPT Conférence européenne des administrations des postes et des télécommunications Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique COSPAS-SARSAT Système spatial de poursuite des navires en détresse (Fédération de Russie) Système de poursuite à satellite de recherche et de sauvetage (Etats-Unis) ELINT Systèmes d’écoute électronique. EUMETSAT Organisation européenne pour l’exploitation de satellites météorologiques EUTELSAT Organisation européenne des communications par satellite GPALS Protection globale contre les frappes limitées GPS Système mondial de localisation ICBM Missile balistique intercontinental IFRB Comité international d’enregistrement des fréquences INMARSAT Organisation internationale de télécommunications maritimes par satellites INTELSAT Organisation internationale des télécommunications par satellites Intercosmos Conseil de la coopération internationale pour l’étude et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique Interspoutnik Système international et organisation des télécommunications ISI International Space Inspectorate ISPMA Agence internationale de surveillance de l’espace /...A/48/305 Français Page 8 MTCR Régime de contrôle des technologies missilières MTN Moyens techniques nationaux de vérification OMI Organisation maritime internationale OMM Organisation météorologique mondiale OSM Organisation spatiale mondiale SALT Pourparlers sur la limitation des armes stratégiques SLBM Missile balistique lancé à partir d’un sous-marin SPIC Space Processing Inspectorate Center SPOT Système probatoire d’observation de la Terre START-I Traité sur la réduction et la limitation des armes stratégiques offensives START-II Traité sur une réduction et une limitation nouvelles des armements stratégiques offensifs Traité AM Traité sur les missiles antimissiles balistiques Traité INF Traité sur les forces nucléaires à portée intermédiaire Traité sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes UEO Union de l’Europe occidentale UIT Union internationale des télécommunications UNIDIR Institut des Nations Unies pour la recherche sur le désarmement UNISPACE Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique UNITRACE International Trajectory Center /...A/48/305 Français Page 9 LETTRE D’ENVOI Le 16 juillet 1993 Monsieur le Secrétaire général, J’ai l’honneur de vous faire tenir ci-joint le rapport du Groupe d’experts gouvernementaux que, conformément au paragraphe 3 de la résolution 45/55 B de l’Assemblée générale en date du 4 décembre 1990, vous avez désigné pour mener à bien l’étude sur l’application de mesures de confiance dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Ces experts gouvernementaux étaient les suivants : M. Mohamed Ezz El Din Abdel-Moneim Directeur adjoint du Département des organisations internationales Ministère des affaires étrangères Le Caire (Egypte) M. Sergey D. Chuvakhin Département de la limitation des armements et du désarmement Ministère des affaires étrangères de la Russie Moscou (Fédération de Russie) M. F. R. Cleminson Chef de la Section de la vérification et de la recherche Division du contrôle des armements et du désarmement Ministère des affaires étrangères Ottawa (Canada) M. Radoslav Deyanov Ministre plénipotentiaire Chef de la Division de la limitation des armements et du désarmement Département des organisations internationales Ministère des affaires étrangères Sofia (Bulgarie) M. Luiz Alberto Figueiredo Machado Premier Secrétaire Ministère des affaires étrangères Département de l’environnement Brasilia (Brésil) M. P. Hobwani Ministère des affaires étrangères Harare (Zimbabwe) M. C. Raja Mohan Professeur adjoint Institut des études et analyses en matière de défense New Delhi (Inde) /...A/48/305 Français Page 10 M. Pierre-Henri Pisani Conseiller spécial Direction des relations internationales Centre national d’études spatiales Paris (France) M. Archelaus R. Turrentine Bureau des affaires multilatérales Agence américaine pour la limitation des armements et du désarmement Washington (Etats-Unis d’Amérique) M. Sikandar Zaman Président de la Commission pakistanaise de recherche sur l’espace et la haute atmosphère Karachi (Pakistan) Le rapport a été établi entre juillet 1991 et juillet 1993, période au cours de laquelle le Groupe a tenu quatre sessions à New York, la première du 29 juillet au 2 août 1991, la deuxième du 23 au 27 mars 1992, la troisième du 1er au 12 mars 1993 et la quatrième du 6 au 16 juillet 1993. M. Sha Zukang et M. Wu Chengjiang, de la République populaire de Chine, ont participé en tant qu’experts, le premier à la troisième session et le second à la quatrième session du Groupe. Dans l’accomplissement de ses fonctions, le Groupe était saisi des publications et documents pertinents distribués par les membres du Groupe. Ces derniers tiennent à exprimer leur reconnaissance aux membres du Secrétariat pour l’aide précieuse qu’ils leur ont apportée. Ils tiennent en particulier à remercier M. Davinic, Directeur du Bureau des affaires du désarmement ainsi que Mme Olga Sukovic, qui a assumé les fonctions de secrétaire du Groupe. Le Groupe d’experts m’a prié en tant que Président de vous présenter en son nom le présent rapport qui a été adopté à l’unanimité. L’expert des Etats-Unis a évité de faire obstacle au consensus afin de permettre à l’étude d’être présentée sous sa forme finale, mais a fait savoir qu’il avait reçu des observations et réserves supplémentaires de son gouvernement concernant l’étude, qui seront communiquées au Secrétaire général. J’ai été informé que ces observations et réserves seraient distribuées dans un document distinct, au titre du point 70 de l’ordre du jour. Le Président du Groupe d’experts chargé de de l’étude sur l’application de mesures de confiance à l’espace extra-atmosphérique (Signé) Robert GARCIA-MORITAN Son Excellence Monsieur Boutros Boutros-Ghali Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies New York /...A/48/305 Français Page 11 AVANT-PROPOS DU SECRETAIRE GENERAL Tous les Etats ont le droit d’explorer et d’utiliser à leur avantage le milieu spatial, qui est commun à toute l’humanité. Pour la communauté internationale, l’ère spatiale présente une tâche constante : élargir ses horizons grâce à l’exploration et l’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, tout en empêchant que l’espace et les techniques spatiales soient utilisés à des fins de menace ou de destruction. Cela fait à présent près de 40 ans que les questions spatiales sont à l’ordre du jour de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Au cours de cette période, les accords internationaux dans ce domaine ont visé à empêcher la militarisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique et à assurer l’accès de tous les Etats aux avantages potentiels des techniques spatiales. La technologie est une force dynamique. Les progrès rapides et les disparités croissantes des capacités en matière de techniques spatiales ont engendré, c’était inévitable, un certain degré de méfiance et de suspicion. Il convient de se pencher sur le fait que l’on n’applique pas suffisamment les techniques spatiales à la satisfaction des besoins du développement. A mesure qu’un nombre croissant de pays participent aux activités spatiales, la nécessité d’une plus grande coopération bilatérale et multilatérale devient plus apparente et plus urgente. La coopération est essentielle si nous voulons réussir à sauvegarder l’espace à des fins pacifiques et apporter les avantages des techniques spatiales à tous les Etats. Un nouvel environnement international s’est désormais instauré. Nous assistons en cette époque d’après-guerre froide à nombre de changements spectaculaires et d’une portée considérable. Mais le monde demeure un endroit dangereux. Pour éviter les conflits fondés sur les malentendus et la méfiance, il est impératif que nous encouragions la transparence et autres mesures de confiance dans les armements, les technologies menaçantes, l’espace et dans d’autres domaines. Je trouve encourageant le fait que la communauté internationale reconnaisse de plus en plus que des mesures de confiance sont nécessaires dans les questions touchant l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Instaurer la coopération et la confiance doit représenter une priorité élevée, car la coopération et la confiance sont contagieuses. La coopération internationale en matière de techniques spatiales peut aider à préparer le terrain à la coopération dans d’autres politique, militaire, économique et social. Je suis convaincu que c’est dans cette optique et dans cet esprit que l’Assemblée générale a demandé l’étude sur l’application de mesures de confiance à l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Cette étude représente une référence utile et une ressource qui donne à penser. J’espère qu’elle aidera à harmoniser les vues, et qu’elle contribuera à instaurer un solide consensus international sur les questions spatiales. /...A/48/305 Français Page 12 Je tiens à exprimer ma sincère gratitude aux membres du Groupe d’experts pour le labeur qu’ils ont consenti pour établir le présent rapport. Je le recommande à l’Assemblée générale, et exhorte celle-ci à l’examiner avec la plus grande attention. Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies Boutros Boutros-Ghali /...A/48/305 Français Page 13 I. INTRODUCTION 1. Depuis le lancement dans l’espace, en 1957, du premier satellite artificiel, les questions spatiales sont examinées dans diverses instances de l’Organisation des Nations Unies et ses organismes apparentés. Du point de vue de la présente étude, le principal organe compétent est la Conférence du désarmement et son organe subsidiaire, le Comité spécial sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, à l’ordre du jour duquel figure depuis 1982 une question intitulée "Prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace"; ce comité consacre des débats de fond ou d’ordre général aux questions relatives à l’espace. Pour ce qui est des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace, l’organe le plus compétent est le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique de l’ONU avec son Sous-Comité juridique et son Sous-Comité scientifique et technique. Les travaux de ce comité ont contribué à l’élaboration de plusieurs instruments juridiques internationaux concernant les aspects pacifiques des utilisations de l’espace. 2. L’ère spatiale, qui a commencé il y a près de 40 ans, s’est aussi caractérisée par de rapides progrès dans le domaine des techniques spatiales et par le danger inhérent d’une course aux armements dans l’espace, source de préoccupations croissantes. En 1978, l’Assemblée générale a officiellement reconnu ces inquiétudes dans le Document final de sa dixième session extraordinaire, première session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement1, et a demandé que de nouvelles mesures soient prises et que des négociations internationales appropriées soient engagées à ce sujet. Bon nombre d’Etats Membres ont jugé nécessaire d’adopter de nouvelles mesures pour empêcher une éventuelle militarisation de l’espace. 3. Au cours des années, les Etats Membres ont examiné les questions spatiales dans les instances internationales, dans une double optique : d’une part les applications pacifiques et de l’autre la prévention d’une course aux armements. A mesure que les activités menées dans l’espace à des fins militaires et pour des raisons de sécurité nationale ont pris de l’ampleur, la crainte de nombreux Etats de voir s’engager une course aux armements dans l’espace s’est accrue. Parallèlement, on s’est efforcé de ne pas perdre de vue les avantages que pourrait avoir l’application à des fins civiles de techniques spatiales initialement mises au point dans le cadre de programmes militaires et pour des raisons de sécurité nationale. C’est dans le contexte de tels programmes qu’a été envisagée une série de réglementations propres à accroître la confiance entre les Etats de façon générale, et plus particulièrement dans certains secteurs de leurs activités spatiales. 4. En 1993, on comptait environ 300 satellites opérationnelles en orbite, dont plus de la moitié effectuaient des missions militaires ou liées à la sécurité nationale. Outre les deux principales puissances spatiales, un groupe assez important d’Etats a réussi à mener à bien, de façon autonome, des missions spatiales spécifiques. Plusieurs Etats sont dotés de capacités spatiales, qu’il s’agisse de techniques ou d’installations spécialisées. D’autre part, la grande majorité des Etats manifestent un intérêt croissant pour les activités dans l’espace et souhaitent partager les techniques en la matière. 5. Comme il n’existe pas de mécanisme d’ensemble pour empêcher une course aux armements dans l’espace, on a cherché à instaurer la confiance en privilégiant /...A/48/305 Français Page 14 l’adoption entre Etats de certaines mesures, principes directeurs ou engagements réciproques concernant les activités spatiales. Beaucoup estiment que ces mesures marqueront une étape constructive vers la prévention de la course aux armements dans l’espace. Le but recherché est d’accroître la transparence et la prévisibilité des activités spatiales en général, grâce à certaines mesures (notification préalable, vérification, suivi, codes de conduite, etc.) et de contribuer ainsi à la sécurité mondiale et régionale. 6. A sa quarante-cinquième session, le 4 décembre 1990, l’Assemblée générale a adopté deux résolutions concernant l’espace. Dans sa résolution 45/55 A intitulée "Prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace", l’Assemblée générale s’est déclarée, entre autres, convaincue "que, pour empêcher la course aux armements dans l’espace, il fallait envisager de nouvelles mesures pour parvenir à des accords bilatéraux et multilatéraux efficaces et vérifiables"; et a réaffirmé "qu’il importait, d’urgence, de prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace et que tous les Etats étaient disposés à travailler à cet objectif commun, conformément aux dispositions du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes" (ci-après dénommé Traité sur l’espace). Elle a en outre considéré "qu’il était utile d’envisager des mesures de confiance et plus de transparence et d’ouverture dans le domaine spatial" et a prié la Conférence du désarmement "de continuer à développer les domaines de convergence en vue de négociations pour la conclusion d’un ou de plusieurs accords, selon qu’il conviendrait, destinés à prévenir, sous tous ses aspects, une course aux armements dans l’espace". 7. Par la deuxième résolution, portant le numéro 45/55 B et intitulée "Les mesures de confiance et l’espace", l’Assemblée générale a prié le Secrétaire général de mener, avec l’aide d’experts gouvernementaux, la présente étude. Cette résolution se lit comme suit : "L’Assemblée générale, Consciente qu’il faut d’urgence prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace; Rappelant que, conformément aux dispositions du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes2, l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent se faire pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique, et sont l’apanage de l’humanité tout entière, Sachant que de plus en plus d’Etats s’intéressent activement à l’espace ou participent à d’importants programmes spatiaux pour l’exploration et l’exploitation de ce milieu, Consciente que l’espace est devenu à cet égard un facteur important du développement socio-économique d’un grand nombre d’Etats, outre son rôle indéniable en matière de sécurité, /...A/48/305 Français Page 15 Soulignant que l’utilisation croissante de l’espace a accru la nécessité d’une plus grande transparence ainsi que celle de mesures de confiance, Rappelant que la communauté internationale a proclamé unanimement, notamment dans les résolutions de l’Assemblée générale 43/78 H du 7 décembre 1988 et 44/116 U du 15 décembre 1989, l’importance et l’utilité de mesures de confiance, qui peuvent grandement servir la cause de la paix, de la sécurité et du désarmement, Prenant note des importants travaux qu’accomplit le Comité spécial sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace, qui aident à déterminer les domaines où peuvent être prises des mesures de confiance, Consciente de l’existence d’un certain nombre de propositions et d’initiatives concernant cette question, ce qui dénote une convergence croissante des vues, 1. Réaffirme l’importance des mesures de confiance en tant que moyen de prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace; 2. Déclare qu’elles sont applicables dans l’espace, selon des critères précis qu’il reste à définir; 3. Prie le Secrétaire général de mener, avec l’aide d’experts gouvernementaux, une étude des aspects particuliers de l’application à l’espace de diverses mesures de confiance, y compris les différentes technologies disponibles, les possibilités de définir des mécanismes appropriés de coopération internationale dans des domaines d’intérêt déterminés et autres questions, et de lui rendre compte à ce sujet à sa quarante-huitième session." 8. Après l’adoption des résolutions susmentionnées, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté deux résolutions au titre du point de l’ordre du jour intitulé "Prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace". Par sa résolution 46/33 du 6 décembre 1991, l’Assemblée générale, priant à nouveau la Conférence du désarmement "d’examiner à titre prioritaire la question de la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace", a reconnu, entre autres, "qu’il est utile d’envisager des mesures de confiance et plus de transparence et d’ouverture dans le domaine spatial" et, par sa résolution 47/51, en date du 9 décembre 1992, a constaté, entre autres, "qu’il existe une convergence de vues de plus en plus large sur l’élaboration de mesures visant à renforcer la transparence, la confiance et la sécurité dans les utilisations de l’espace". 9. Dans l’accomplissement de son mandat, le Groupe a décidé de diviser l’étude en huit chapitres. Il a en outre jugé utile de faire figurer en annexe un certain nombre de textes ayant trait à l’étude ainsi qu’une notice bibliographique. 10. Après le chapitre d’introduction, le chapitre II de la présente étude est consacré à un examen des utilisations actuelles de l’espace et des tendances qui se font jour, en insistant tout particulièrement sur les problèmes techniques en jeu, tels que les différents types de satellites et leur mission, les armes /...A/48/305 Français Page 16 antisatellites et les armes antimissiles. Pour ce qui est des nouvelles tendances, la présente étude s’est attachée plus particulièrement aux capacités spatiales des Etats, aux systèmes à double finalité et aux applications opérationnelles. 11. Le troisième chapitre porte sur le cadre juridique existant : accords multilatéraux mondiaux et accords bilatéraux portant sur les aspects tant militaires que pacifiques de l’exploration et des utilisations de l’espace, ainsi qu’un certain nombre de résolutions contenant des déclarations de principe adoptées par l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies. 12. Le quatrième chapitre traite de la question générale des mesures de confiance. Le champ d’application de ces mesures s’est considérablement élargi et regroupe notamment les contextes mondial, régional et bilatéral de la sécurité. Il s’agit en effet de répondre aux inquiétudes en matière de sécurité que soulèvent les armes classiques, ainsi que les armes nucléaires et d’autres armes de destruction massive. Dans ce chapitre, on a identifié un certain nombre de mesures propres à accroître la confiance et plusieurs critères généraux visant leur application de façon constructive. On y traite aussi de la question de leur applicabilité. 13. Le cinquième chapitre porte sur des aspects spécifiques des mesures de confiance concernant l’espace; les considérations politiques, juridiques, techniques et scientifiques dont il faut tenir compte dans l’application de ces mesures y sont analysées. On y passe en revue les possibilités qui s’offrent sur le plan technique ainsi que les difficultés dans ce domaine, qu’il s’agisse d’accroître la confiance dans le domaine spatial proprement dit mesures applicables aux opérations spatiales ou de renforcer la confiance en ce qui concerne indirectement l’espace mesures qui font appel aux techniques spatiales. 14. Au sixième chapitre, on examine certaines mesures de confiance proposées par divers gouvernements et les différents aspects de leur éventuelle application. 15. Le septième chapitre fait l’inventaire des mécanismes de coopération internationale relatifs aux mesures de confiance dans l’espace. On y appelle, entre autres, l’attention sur le rôle que jouent l’Organisation des Nations Unies, la Conférence du désarmement ainsi que certaines instances mondiales, régionales, bilatérales et autres pour ce qui est de formuler et de faire appliquer ces mesures. On y analyse également des propositions visant à créer de nouveaux mécanismes internationaux. 16. Le dernier chapitre contient les conclusions et les recommandations du Groupe d’experts. II. APERCU GENERAL 17. Le rêve de l’humanité de tirer le plus grand parti possible de l’espace en vue de promouvoir la science et le bien-être du genre humain ne s’est pas encore concrétisé et reste donc un objectif à atteindre. De grandes réalisations ont été accomplies dans le domaine des sciences spatiales, y compris dans l’observation de la Terre et de l’atmosphère et l’exploration lunaire et /...A/48/305 Français Page 17 interplanétaire, et ces réalisations constituent actuellement la base des sciences de l’environnement de l’avenir. D’importants progrès ont également été enregistrés au sujet des applications des techniques spatiales, telles que les télécommunications, la recherche et le sauvetage, la météorologie et la télédétection de la Terre à des fins diverses. L’espace est devenu un facteur important du bien-être social et économique de nombreux Etats. 18. Depuis le lancement du premier Spoutnik en 1957, l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques3, les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et d’autres pays, de plus en plus nombreux, ont utilisé l’espace à des fins militaires. Ce facteur définit le contexte dans lequel a été émise l’idée de mesures de confiance dans l’espace. La plupart des quelque 300 satellites4 actuellement exploités en orbite terrestre sont utilisés concurremment dans le cadre de missions militaires pour mener des opérations en temps de paix mais aussi, et c’est de plus en plus fréquent, pour appuyer directement les forces militaires sur la Terre. Les satellites de télécommunications, de navigation et d’observation, les satellites météorologiques et d’autres types de satellites permettent entre autres d’accroître l’efficacité des systèmes militaires terrestres. 19. La création de moyens de lancement spatial ou l’accès à de tels moyens sont indispensables pour exploiter efficacement l’espace à des fins pacifiques et commerciales et pour appuyer les dispositifs de réglementation des armements, de même que pour exploiter l’espace à des fins militaires. Il reste beaucoup à faire, grâce aux satellites et autres engins spatiaux, dans des domaines tels que les sciences spatiales, la recherche solaire et interplanétaire, la biologie spatiale et l’environnement. A. Les utilisations actuelles de l’espace extra-atmosphérique 20. L’essor de la recherche spatiale et des applications des techniques spatiales est devenu possible grâce à l’amélioration constante des systèmes de lancement, qui a été dans certains cas dictée par les besoins militaires. Il existe deux catégories de systèmes de lancement : a) Les systèmes de transport spatial réutilisables, dont la fonction première est d’assurer les vols habités et le service des infrastructures en orbite; ces systèmes doivent être le plus fiables possible eu égard à la présence d’êtres humains à bord; b) Les systèmes de lancement non récupérables, qui, en fonction de leur capacité de poussée, peuvent placer sur différents orbites des charges utiles de masses diverses. L’évolution récente observée dans le domaine du désarmement permet d’envisager l’utilisation de missiles transformés pour placer des charges utiles en orbite terrestre basse. 21. Les satellites sont généralement déployés sur quatre types d’orbite définis en fonction de leur altitude, de leur période et de leur inclinaison par rapport à l’équateur terrestre (figure I). /...A/48/305 Français Page 18A/48/305 Français Page 19A/48/305 Français Page 20 a) Les orbites terrestres basses : cette catégorie comprend les orbites dont l’altitude varie entre quelques centaines et plus d’un millier de kilomètres, quelle que soit leur inclinaison, bien que ces orbites soient en règle générale très inclinées pour assurer une couverture maximale des parties de la surface de la Terre situées sous les hautes latitudes; b) Les orbites géosynchrones : ces orbites sont à une altitude de presque 36 000 kilomètres et leur période est d’environ un jour, ce qui permet à un satellite de couvrir instantanément presque la moitié de la surface de la Terre. Elles sont utiles en matière de télécommunications, d’alerte avancée ou de collecte électronique de renseignements. Si le satellite se trouve dans le plan de l’orbite de l’équateur terrestre (inclinaison zéro), ces orbites sont appelées géostationnaires et elles permettent à un seul satellite de couvrir en permanence une zone donnée; c) Les orbites semi-synchrones : leur période est de 12 heures, et les satellites évoluent à une altitude d’environ 20 000 kilomètres. Les orbites circulaires semi-synchrones sont principalement utilisées par les satellites de navigation modernes; d) Les orbites Molniya : ces orbites constituent un sous-ensemble des orbites semi-synchrones; elles sont très elliptiques, et elles ont des périgées de quelques centaines de kilomètres et des apogées de presque 40 000 kilomètres. En règle générale, ces orbites sont inclinées à 63 degrés, et elles sont utilisées pour couvrir les régions polaires et celles qui sont situées sous les hautes latitudes. 22. Les systèmes spatiaux peuvent également être classés selon leurs fonctions, comme le montre le tableau 1. Ce point est examiné de manière plus détaillée dans les sections suivantes. Les satellites militaires, à l’instar des autres satellites, remplissent généralement deux types de fonctions : l’acquisition et la transmission d’informations. Les satellites peuvent être utilisés pour obtenir des informations concernant la disposition des forces militaires terrestres en utilisant l’imagerie ou en captant des transmissions électroniques [renseignement électronique (ELINT) et traitement du signal (SIGINT)]. D’autres domaines se prêtent à l’acquisition d’informations telles que la météorologie, l’alerte aux missiles et la détection d’explosions nucléaires. Certaines informations sont relayées par les satellites de télécommunications et de navigation. 23. Ces dernières années ont été marquées par une évolution vers une ouverture et une transparence accrues en ce qui concerne de nombreuses activités spatiales, dont certaines menées à des fins militaires. Toutefois, certains détails concernant l’exploitation et les capacités précises des satellites remplissant des missions militaires continueront probablement d’être considérés comme très secrets par les Etats auxquels appartiennent ces satellites. /...A/48/305 Français Page 21 Tableau 1 Caractéristiques générales de certaines missions spatiales typiques Mission Orbites typiques Puissance Caractéristiques/capteurs/instruments de l’engin spatial Notes A. Science Observation de l’atmosphère et de la haute atmosphère Faible altitude Forte inclinaison Faible Moyenne Capteurs optiques, infrarouge et proche infrarouge Durée de vie de 2 à 5 ans Mesure du rayonnement et du champ magnétique Elliptiques, altitude élevée et forte inclinaison Faible Magnétomètres, capteurs de rayonnement et détecteurs de particules chargées Durée de vie de 5 à 8 ans Solaire Orbites solaires, dont certaines en dehors des orbites du plan solaire Modérée Capteurs électro-optiques, magnétiques, de rayonnement et de particules, à commande thermique complexe Interplanétaire Planétaires, à effet lancepieerre Modérée Capteurs électro-optiques et de mesures du radian, systèmes spéciaux de transmission de données à longue distance Beaucoup prévoient des survols, des orbiteurs, le dépôt de sondes à la surface des planètes et le transport de systèmes analogues à ceux qui sont utilisés pour les sciences de la Terre. B. Observations de la Terre Surveillance des sols, de la végétation et des ressources en eau Faible altitude -inclinées Faible -modérée Capteurs optiques infrarouges multispectres. Radars à ouverture synthétique équipés de grandes antennes, avec liaisons de données à large bande Durée de vie de 5 à 8 ans, certaines ont une capacité de pointage hors trajectoire et de traitement des données à bord Surveillance atmosphérique et météorologique Faible altitude -inclinées Faible -moyenne Capteurs optiques, infrarouge et proche infrarouge Durée de vie de 5 à 8 ans Surveillance de l’environnement Faible altitude -inclinées Faible Capteurs pour mesurer la proportion des gaz dans l’atmosphère Durée de vie de 5 à 7 ans Surveillance du trafic aérien Moyenne altitude -inclinées Très élevée Radars spatiaux équipés de très grandes antennes Durée de vie d’au moins 5 ans /...A/48/305 Français Page 22 Mission Orbites typiques Puissance Caractéristiques/capteurs/instruments de l’engin spatial Notes C. Communications Internationale et nationale Géosynchrones, équatoriales, très elliptique, très inclinées Elevée Répéteurs et antennes multifréquences Durée de vie de 10 à 15 ans avec capacité de maintien à poste. Communications vocales, vidéo et transmission de données Système de radiodiffusion directe Géosynchrones, équatoriales Elevée Emetteurs et antennes à ondes décamétriques Diffusion directe de programmes de radio et de télévision. Durée de vie de 10 à 12 ans Mobile Géosynchrones, équatoriales Elevée Emetteurs et antennes à ondes kilométriques de grandes dimensions Par exemple M-Sat, Inmarsat Personnelle Constellation à faible altitude Faible -modérée Structure d’antenne -Satellites multiples Constellation de satellites Militaire Géosynchrones, équatoriales Elevée Emetteurs et antennes allant des ondes décimétriques aux ondes décimillimétriques, équipés de mécanismes d’encodage Durée de vie de 10 à 15 ans. Egalement utilisées pour la transmission de données Recherche et sauvetage Faible altitude Modérée Récepteurs et émetteurs capables d’effectuer des mesures par effet Doppler Capte les signaux de détresse émis par les balises D. Navigation Navigation et localisation à l’échelon mondial Moyenne altitude -inclinées Modérée Mesure précise du temps et de la fréquence Constellation de satellites se prêtant à des applications dans les domaines aéronautique et terrestre /...A/48/305 Français Page 23 24. Il faut également noter que la plupart des techniques spatiales sont d’excellents exemples de techniques dont on peut faire un double usage. Les satellites, qui sont essentiels pour bon nombre d’applications dans le civil les satellites météorologiques en sont un exemple ,sont également perçus comme d’importants multiplicateurs de force lorsqu’ils sont utilisés à des fins militaires. La technologie requise pour intercepter les satellites dans l’espace est, à certains égards, analogue à celle que nécessite l’interception des missiles balistiques ou de leurs ogives. Les connaissances techniques dans le domaine des missiles antimissiles balistiques (ABM) pourraient constituer une base technologique directe à partir de laquelle il serait possible de concevoir un dispositif antisatellite (ASAT). L’inverse n’est pas nécessairement vrai. 1. Les satellites imageurs 25. Les satellites imageurs en orbite à plusieurs centaines de kilomètres d’altitude utilisent des films, des caméras électro-optiques ou des radars pour produire des images à haute résolution de la surface de la Terre dans diverses parties du spectre. Ces images satellitaires peuvent être facilement utilisées pour repérer des objets au sol ou à la mer et, dans le cas de certains systèmes à satellites militaires à très haute résolution, pour identifier et distinguer différents types de véhicules et d’autres matériels. C’est peut-être en tant que moyens techniques nationaux (MTN) permettant de vérifier les accords de limitation des armements que la contribution de ces satellites a été la plus importante. 26. L’imagerie optique provenant des satellites civils, tels que ceux des séries LANDSAT, SPOT et COSMOS, a déjà été utilisée pour détecter certaines anomalies, comme dans le cas de l’accident de Tchernobyl (1986), et l’étendue des dommages écologiques liés à la guerre du Golfe (1991). Les satellites de reconnaissance militaire et les moyens analytiques qui leur sont associés sont généralement beaucoup plus efficaces à cet égard. 2. Les satellites d’écoute électronique 27. Les satellites d’écoute électronique sont conçus pour détecter les transmissions émises par les systèmes de communication terrestres ainsi que par les radars et les autres systèmes électroniques. L’interception de telles transmissions peut même fournir des renseignements sur le type et l’emplacement d’émetteurs à faible puissance, comme les appareils radio portatifs. Toutefois, ces satellites ne sont pas capables d’intercepter les communications acheminées par des lignes terrestres. 28. Les écoutes électroniques comprennent plusieurs catégories. Le renseignement sur les communications consiste à analyser la source et le contenu du trafic téléphonique. Bien que les communications militaires les plus importantes soient protégées au moyen de techniques de chiffrement, le traitement par ordinateur peut être utilisé pour décoder certains trafics, et des renseignements supplémentaires peuvent être obtenus en analysant les constances que les transmissions révèlent dans le temps. Le renseignement électronique est consacré à l’analyse des transmissions électroniques autres que les communications, par exemple la télémesure lors d’essais de missiles ou les émetteurs de signaux radar. /...A/48/305 Français Page 24 3. Les satellites d’alerte avancée 29. Les satellites d’alerte avancée sont équipés de capteurs infrarouges qui détectent la chaleur émise par les moteurs de fusée. Ces satellites sont utilisés pour surveiller les lancements de missiles aux fins de garantir le respect des traités et pour donner une alerte avancée en cas d’attaque aux missiles. Ils peuvent également être utilisés pour repérer les sites de lancement des missiles utilisés au combat. 4. Les satellites météorologiques 30. L’utilité, dans le civil, des satellites météorologiques est largement reconnue. Ces satellites fournissent également un appui capital aux opérations militaires, aussi bien en temps de paix qu’en temps de guerre. L’accès gratuit aux données transmises par les satellites météorologiques a été, au fil des années, un bon exemple de coopération internationale dans le domaine des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace et s’est révélé être un facteur fondamental qui a permis aux Etats d’établir de meilleures prévisions météorologiques et de mieux se préparer à d’éventuelles catastrophes naturelles. 5. Les systèmes de détection d’explosions nucléaires 31. Des satellites capables de détecter les explosions nucléaires sur la Terre et dans l’espace sont déployés depuis le début des années 60. Certains de ces satellites, de même que les satellites météorologiques et les satellites d’alerte avancée, sont équipés de plusieurs types de capteurs pour détecter l’emplacement des explosions nucléaires et évaluer leur puissance. Les informations obtenues grâce à ces satellites pourraient également être utilisées pour planifier des opérations militaires. 6. Les satellites de télécommunications 32. La communication représente un des plus vastes champs d’application des satellites modernes. Les satellites de télécommunications sont importants tant pour les applications militaires que pour les applications civiles. Ils peuvent être classés en trois catégories géosynchrones, semi-synchrones, ou non synchrones en fonction de leurs caractéristiques orbitales. Ils peuvent également être classés d’après leurs fréquences de fonctionnement, la largeur de bande ou le type de trafic ou de service qu’ils assurent. La plupart des satellites de télécommunications évoluent en orbite géostationnaire. Les satellites sont aujourd’hui un élément courant et indispensable des systèmes de télécommunications internationaux, de nombreux réseaux nationaux, et de systèmes spécialisés tels que le système de recherche et de sauvetage COSPAS-SARSAT. 7. Les satellites de navigation 33. Les satellites de navigation, qui ont été une des premières applications militaires de la technologie spatiale, figurent parmi les satellites les plus utiles aux forces militaires sur la Terre. Les avions militaires, quand ils se rendent directement sur les lieux de conflits situés à des milliers de kilomètres de leur base de départ, sont aujourd’hui guidés par ces satellites vers les avions-citernes pour se ravitailler en vol. Les satellites de navigation peuvent également les guider vers leurs objectifs avec une grande /...A/48/305 Français Page 25 précision, après quoi les avions peuvent lâcher leurs bombes avec autant de précision que des armes autoguidées beaucoup plus coûteuses. 8. Les armes antisatellites 34. Les applications des systèmes spatiaux militaires ayant acquis plus d’importance au fil du temps pour les Etats possédant les programmes spatiaux les plus ambitieux, on a commencé à s’intéresser à la mise au point d’armes antisatellites pour neutraliser le rôle que les satellites d’un adversaire en puissance pourrait jouer afin d’accroître l’efficacité au combat. 35. Des craintes ont été émises quant à la possibilité que l’utilisation d’une arme antisatellite contre un objet spatial en orbite produise des débris qui, dans certains cas, pourraient toucher d’autres objets spatiaux ou tomber sur des agglomérations, entraînant des conséquences imprévisibles. Ces craintes sont encore plus vives en ce qui concerne les conséquences écologiques d’une rentrée non maîtrisée dans l’atmosphère des restes d’un objet spatial transportant une source d’énergie nucléaire. 36. Les premières recherches visant à mettre au point un dispositif antisatellite ont été entreprises par les puissances spatiales dans les années 50. La première interception réussie effectuée par un tel dispositif a eu lieu en mai 1963 près de l’île Kwajalein dans l’océan Pacifique. Un an plus tard, des armes antisatellites à tête nucléaire ont été mises au point dans l’île Johnson. Ce programme, faisant appel au missile Thor, est arrivé à son terme en 1976, la recherche-développement ayant été axée sur les engins non nucléaires de destruction à énergie cinétique. Au début des années 80, la recherche a porté essentiellement sur la mise au point d’un projectile miniature autoguidé hypersonique à vecteur aérien, mais le programme a été interrompu en 1988. La recherche continue pour mettre au point un intercepteur de destruction à énergie cinétique basé au sol et faisant appel à un système de missile à combustible solide. 37. En même temps que les essais étaient effectués dans l’île Kwajalein, des recherches ont été menées pour mettre au point un intercepteur coorbital destiné à placer un satellite de plusieurs tonnes en orbite terrestre basse. La théorie était que, en manoeuvrant près du satellite-cible et sur la même orbite que lui, on pourrait faire détoner une charge explosive qui criblerait d’éclats l’objectif. On pensait que les satellites, qui sont fragiles, pourraient ainsi être facilement détruits. Les essais menés entre 1968 et 1982 avaient eu un succès limité (environ 70 % d’après certaines publications) lorsqu’un dispositif radar autoguidé était utilisé, et encore moins de succès lorsqu’on avait recours à un dispositif guidé par infrarouge. Le système complet était encombrant et son emploi était limité. Bien qu’il ait été très peu efficace, il a été déclaré opérationnel. Il n’a pas été mis à l’essai depuis 1982. 38. Des travaux ont également été entrepris dans le domaine des systèmes à énergie dirigée en vue de les utiliser pour des missions antisatellites. Divers types de lasers à haute énergie basés au sol, s’ils sont suffisamment concentrés et associés à un système de poursuite très précis, pourraient endommager des satellites en orbite lorsqu’ils passent au-dessus d’eux. /...A/48/305 Français Page 26 39. Il convient de noter qu’une grande partie des travaux consacrés à ces systèmes antisatellites occupent un rang de priorité peu élevé, ou ont été interrompus. Cela reflète la coopération accrue entre les deux Etats possédant les programmes spatiaux les plus ambitieux. 40. En résumé, il apparaît que la recherche liée en particulier à la mise au point d’une technologie antisatellite a été peu concluante et sporadique, bien que le concept suscite de temps à autre un regain d’intérêt. Certains aspects de ce concept continuent de soulever une vive controverse. 9. Les armes antimissiles 41. Les armes antimissiles intervenant dans la défense contre les missiles stratégiques offensifs entrent dans le cadre de la présente étude dans la mesure où elles peuvent être utilisées comme armes antisatellites, où elles sont basées dans l’espace, ou encore si elles emploient des éléments qui le sont. 42. Tout satellite qui passe dans la zone d’attaque limitée d’une arme anti-missile serait probablement aussi vulnérable en cas d’attaque que n’importe quel missile stratégique ou ogive passant dans cette zone. Dans la plupart des cas, seuls les satellites en orbite basse seraient sujets à une telle vulnérabilité théorique. 43. Toutefois, il convient de noter que les lasers de précision à haute énergie, les intercepteurs basés dans l’espace et les systèmes antimissiles à longue portée pourraient tous contribuer à étendre la zone de vulnérabilité des satellites aux systèmes antimissiles. 44. Bien que les armes antimissiles basées dans l’espace aient fait l’objet d’études sérieuses, tous les problèmes techniques associés à de telles armes n’ont pas été résolus. A l’heure actuelle, il n’existe aucun programme pour déployer des systèmes utilisant de telles armes. B. Les nouvelles tendances 45. Comme il est indiqué plus haut, l’espace continue de prendre de plus en plus d’importance aussi bien dans le domaine militaire que dans le secteur civil. Cette importance est illustrée, entre autres, par : a) le nombre croissant de pays qui cherchent des moyens d’utiliser l’espace; b) l’extension des utilisations militaires du domaine stratégique au domaine tactique; c) l’exploitation de la technologie des télécommunications à de plus grandes puissances et dans de nouvelles bandes de fréquences à des fins civiles; d) l’utilisation de plus en plus courante de l’espace à des fins commerciales et militaires. Bien que certains Etats aient réexaminé certains aspects de l’utilisation militaire de l’espace depuis la fin de la guerre froide, les principales puissances spatiales poursuivent leurs recherches dans ce domaine. 1. Les capacités spatiales des autres Etats 46. Plusieurs autres Etats ont des capacités spatiales nationales ou projettent de s’en doter. Bien que la plupart de ces programmes ou plans nationaux ne les prévoient pas à l’heure actuelle, ils pourraient être utilisés à des fins /...A/48/305 Français Page 27 militaires. Une transparence accrue des programmes spatiaux constituerait un facteur important propre à accroître la confiance entre les Etats. 47. En application des recommandations d’UNISPACE II, et sur recommandation du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique de l’ONU, le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation, sur la base de la résolution 46/45 de l’Assemblée générale en date du 9 décembre 1991, a prié les Etats Membres de présenter des rapports annuels sur leurs activités spatiales. Les rapports annuels communiqués par les Etats ont été reproduits dans le rapport du Secrétaire général présenté à l’Assemblée générale à sa quarante-septième session (A/47/383). Prenant ce rapport en considération, l’Assemblée générale a prié à nouveau le Secrétaire général, dans sa résolution 47/67, du 14 décembre 1992, de lui présenter un rapport, lors de sa quarante-huitième session, sur l’application des recommandations de la Conférence. Ces demandes concernant la présentation de rapports sur les activités spatiales nationales et l’application des recommandations d’UNISPACE apparaissent régulièrement dans les résolutions annuelles de l’Assemblée générale consacrées aux utilisations pacifiques de l’espace. 48. La description des programmes nationaux des différents Etats ne relève pas du mandat du présent groupe d’étude. La plupart de ces activités sont notamment menées à des fins de télécommunication, de météorologie, de recherche et de télédétection de la terre5. Il convient de noter que les Etats membres de l’Agence spatiale européenne (ASE) avaient décidé d’"européaniser" une plus grande partie de leurs programmes spatiaux nationaux en les intégrant dans les programmes de l’Agence6. 2. Augmentation du nombre et de la capacité des satellites 49. Les années 80 ont été marquées par une augmentation du nombre de satellites militaires et par leur perfectionnement. Outre l’accroissement des capacités de prises d’images optiques, on a mis au point de nouveaux satellites d’imagerie radar qui assurent une couverture à haute résolution quelles soient les conditions météorologiques et de l’éclairage. 50. Alors que les forces armées font de plus en plus appel aux satellites, l’utilisation de ces derniers évolue vers une plus grande coordination. Par exemple, l’information obtenue grâce aux satellites météorologiques pourrait être utilisée pour programmer une observation en l’absence de nuages, et les satellites de navigation, en raison de leur précision, peuvent aider à déterminer avec exactitude la position des satellites en orbite et à leur transmettre des instructions7. 3. Les systèmes à double finalité 51. Les techniques spatiales, plus que les systèmes spatiaux, sont dans une large mesure à double usage. Les techniques employées pouvant être analogues ou identiques, le but de leur utilisation, qu’il soit militaire ou civil, est généralement identifiable, bien que cela présente parfois quelques difficultés. Les militaires peuvent également passer des contrats avec des sociétés commerciales à l’instar des autres clients, quand cela leur paraît rentable et s’il peut être satisfait à leurs exigences en matière de sécurité et de disponibilité. /...A/48/305 Français Page 28 52. Les matériels dont on peut attendre une utilisation exclusivement militaire comprennent les satellites imageurs utilisés comme moyens techniques nationaux (MTN) pour recueillir des informations, ainsi que les satellites de renseignement et d’écoute électronique. Leur fonction première est la collecte d’autres types de renseignements militaires et stratégiques. Ils peuvent également être utilisés pour repérer les objectifs à attaquer, lesquels ont plus de chances d’être stratégiques que tactiques. Les satellites d’alerte avancée peuvent également servir d’appui aux systèmes de défense antimissile balistique, en fournissant essentiellement des informations sur le lancement des missiles balistiques. Toujours est-il que bon nombre de ces satellites, en particulier les satellites imageurs, contribuent énormément à la vérification de la maîtrise des armements. Les systèmes d’imagerie commerciaux comblent actuellement le retard technologique du point de vue de la résolution, et pourront donc jouer un rôle non négligeable dans l’accroissement de la transparence à l’échelon mondial. Toutefois, ils ne peuvent encore contribuer à la vérification de la maîtrise des armements qu’en aidant à déterminer la présence d’infrastructures importantes ou en détectant une éventuelle dégradation de l’environnement. 53. Plusieurs types de matériel par exemple les satellites météorologiques à basse altitude relèvent presque tout autant du secteur civil que du domaine militaire. Les militaires mettent souvent à profit ces systèmes à double usage, qui sont physiquement assez proches et souvent fabriqués par la même entreprise. Des systèmes discrets à satellites de navigation à basse altitude, aussi bien militaires que civils, sont déployés. Le secteur civil ne peut toujours pas exploiter pleinement les capacités du système mondial de localisation (GPS) auxquelles font appel les militaires. Les cartographes militaires sont des clients importants pour ce qui est des données de télédétection disponibles dans le commerce; le secteur commercial peut maintenant disposer aussi des films à haute résolution provenant de satellites de télédétection, dont la mission première était d’établir des cartes militaires. 54. Il est clair qu’il est aujourd’hui possible d’utiliser à une échelle beaucoup plus vaste les données recueillies par des moyens militaires ou commerciaux. Il est évident que la coopération doit se développer après la disparition du monde bipolaire de la technologie spatiale. Les données rassemblées devraient être utilisées d’une manière organisée et à l’échelon mondial. 4. Les applications au combat 55. L’intégration accrue des capacités spatiales militaires dans la planification des opérations terrestres et la combinaison des différents systèmes spatiaux se sont traduites par l’élargissement du rôle de l’espace et des systèmes militaires qui y sont déployés. On l’a vu récemment dans le cadre des opérations Bouclier du désert et Tempête du désert, pour lesquelles les Etats-Unis ont largement utilisé leurs satellites d’imageries, de météorologie, d’écoute électronique, d’alerte avancée, de télécommunications et de navigation8. /...A/48/305 Français Page 29 III. LE CADRE JURIDIQUE EXISTANT : ACCORDS ET DECLARATIONS DE PRINCIPES 56. Depuis le début de l’ère spatiale, plusieurs instruments concernant les aspects tant militaires que pacifiques de l’exploration et des utilisations de l’espace ont été conclus. 57. On peut diviser en trois catégories les traités existants concernant les activités des Etats dans l’espace : les accords multilatéraux à caractère universel (voir appendice III), les accords multilatéraux régionaux et les accords bilatéraux. Par ailleurs, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté un certain nombre de résolutions contenant des déclarations de principes relatives aux activités spatiales des Etats. 58. On trouvera au tableau 2 un essai d’identification des mesures de confiance figurant dans certains de ces traités. A. Les accords multilatéraux à caractère universel 1. Le Traité sur l’espace 59. En 1967, le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes (Traité sur l’espace)9 a fixé les principes régissant les activités pacifiques des Etats dans l’espace. Aux termes de l’article premier, a) "L’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent se faire pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique; elles sont l’apanage de l’humanité tout entière"; b) l’espace extra-atmosphérique (...) "peut être exploré et utilisé librement par tous les Etats sans aucune discrimination, dans des conditions d’égalité et conformément au droit international"; c) "les recherches scientifiques sont libres dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (...) et les Etats doivent faciliter et encourager la coopération internationale dans ces recherches". L’article III précise que les activités des Etats parties au Traité doivent s’effectuer "conformément au droit international, y compris la Charte des Nations Unies, en vue de maintenir la paix et la sécurité internationales et de favoriser la coopération et la compréhension internationales". En vertu du paragraphe 1 de l’article IV, les Etats parties s’engagent, entre autres, "à ne mettre sur orbite autour de la Terre aucun objet porteur d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive, à ne pas installer de telles armes sur des corps célestes et à ne pas placer de telles armes, de toute autre manière, dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique". Le Traité dispose, en outre, que la Lune et les autres corps célestes seront utilisés exclusivement à des fins pacifiques, et il interdit l’aménagement sur les corps célestes "de bases et d’installations militaires et de fortifications, les essais d’armes de tous types et l’exécution de manoeuvres militaires" (par. 2 de l’article IV). 60. Le Traité réglemente encore d’autres questions pertinentes, comme la responsabilité internationale (art. VI), la responsabilité du point de vue international des dommages causés (art. VII), la question de la juridiction, du contrôle et des droits de propriété exercés sur les objets lancés (art. VIII), /...A/48/305 Français Page 30 Tableau 2 Mesures de confiance incluses dans certains accords multilatéraux et bilateraux de limitation des armements et de désarmement Nom de l’Accord Date et lieu de signature et d’entrée en vigueur Durée Nombre d’Etats parties Mesures de confiance A. Accords multilatéraux relatifs à l’espacea Traité sur l’interdiction partielle des essais (nucléaires) Moscou 5 août 1963 10 octobre 1963 Illimitée Droit de retrait 119 Etats parties Aucune clause sur la vérification; mais les moyens techniques nationaux ont été couramment utilisés à des fins de vérification. Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes Londres, Moscou, Washington 27 janvier 1967 10 octobre 1967 Illimitée Droit de retrait 93 Etats parties Possibilité d’observer le vol d’objets spatiaux; inspection sur place sur la Lune et autres corps célestes; consultations si une activité présente un risque potentiel pour les activités d’autres parties; obligation contractée par les parties d’informer le Secrétaire général de l’ONU quant à la nature, au déroulement, à l’emplacement et aux résultats de leurs activités dans l’espace; le Secrétaire général doit être prêt à diffuser immédiatement et effectivement ces informations; le Traité stipule que toutes les installations, matériels et engins spatiaux doivent tous pouvoir être inspectés par des représentants des autres Etats parties, sur la base de la réciprocité. Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique New York 22 avril 1968 3 décembre 1968 Non précisée Droit de retrait 69 Etats parties Enonce l’obligation de notifier tout accident à l’autorité de lancement et d’en informer le Secrétaire général de l’ONU, qui diffuse cette information. Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par les objets spatiaux New York 29 mars 1972 1er septembre 1972 Non précisée Droit de retrait 35 Etats parties La Commission de règlement des demandes tranche les questions liées aux dommages. Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique New York 14 janvier 1975 15 septembre 1976 Non précisée Droit de retrait 37 Etats parties Précise le cadre dans lequel doivent être fournis au Secrétaire général de l’ONU les renseignements concernant le nom de l’Etat de lancement, l’indicatif approprié, la date et le lieu de lancement des objets dans l’espace, les principaux paramètres de l’orbite, la fonction générale de l’objet spatial, la modification des paramètres de l’orbite après le lancement, la date de récupération de l’engin spatial. Convention internationale des télécommunications Genève Décembre 1992 Entrera en vigueur le 1er juillet 1994 Illimitée Droit de retrait 128 Etats parties L’Union assure la coopération internationale de tous ses membres en vue de l’amélioration et de l’utilisation rationnelle des télécommunications de tous types; coordonne les efforts faits pour éliminer le brouillage nuisible entre stations de radio de différents pays; encourage la coopération internationale en vue de la prestation d’une assistance technique aux pays en développement, etc. /...A/48/305 Français Page 31 Nom de l’Accord Date et lieu de signature et d’entrée en vigueur Durée Nombre d’Etats parties Mesures de confiance Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles New York 18 mai 1977 5 octobre 1978 Non précisée Droit de retrait 57 Etats parties Les Etats parties s’engagent à se consulter mutuellement et à coopérer entre eux pour résoudre tout problème qui pourrait se poser à propos de l’application des dispositions de la Convention; un comité consultatif d’experts entreprend de faire les constatations de fait appropriées et de fournir des avis autorisés concernant tout problème soulevé; en cas de violation des obligations, tout Etat partie peut déposer une plainte auprès du Conseil de sécurité. Accord régissant les activités des Etats sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes New York 18 décembre 1979 11 juillet 1984 Illimitée Droit de retrait 8 Etats parties Les Etats parties sont tenus d’informer le Secrétaire général de l’ONU de leurs activités d’exploration et d’utilisation de la Lune; les renseignements à fournir concernent le calendrier, les objectifs, les lieux de déroulement, les paramètres d’orbite et la durée de chaque mission vers la Lune; les Etats parties informent le Secrétaire général de tout phénomène qu’ils ont constaté dans l’espace, y compris la Lune; ils doivent fournir des informations sur les stations habitées ou inhabitées sur la Lune; inspections sur place par toutes les parties; celles-ci se consultent au cas où un Etat partie a lieu de croire qu’un autre Etat partie ne s’acquitte pas des obligations qui lui incombent; si ces consultations n’aboutissent pas à un règlement, l’une quelconque des parties peut demander l’assistance du Secrétaire général de l’ONU. B. Accords bilatéraux dans le domaine de l’espace Accord portant sur des mesures destinées à réduire le risque du déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire Washington 30 septembre 1971 30 septembre 1971 Illimitée URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Notification mutuelle en cas d’incidents de nature à créer un risque de déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire; mise en place de la ligne de communication directe; consultations à propos des questions soulevées par l’application de l’Accord. Accord portant sur des mesures destinées à améliorer la ligne de communication directe entre les Etats-Unis et l’URSS Washington 30 septembre 1971 30 septembre 1971 Non précisée URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Mise en place d’un système de communications par satellites destiné à accroître la fiabilité de la ligne de communication directe ("téléphone rouge"). Traité entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des républiques socialistes soviétiques concernant la limitation des systèmes de missiles antimissiles Moscou 26 mai 1972 3 octobre 1972 Illimitée Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Recours aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification et principe de non-entrave à l’utilisation de ces moyens techniques nationaux; création de la Commission consultative permanente dans le cadre de laquelle les Etats parties examinent les questions relatives au respect des obligations. Accord intérimaire entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques relatif à certaines mesures concernant la limitation des armes offensives stratégiques (Accord SALT-I) Moscou 26 mai 1972 3 octobre 1972 Cinq ans (a expiré en 1977) URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Dispositions analogues à celles du Traité concernant la limitation des systèmes de missiles antimissiles. Traité sur la limitation des essais sous-terrains d’armes nucléaires Moscou 3 juillet 1974 11 décembre 1990 Cinq ans Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Dispositions analogues à celles du Traité concernant la limitation des systèmes de missiles antimissiles et des pourparlers sur la limitation des armes stratégiques (SALT-I). /...A/48/305 Français Page 32 Nom de l’Accord Date et lieu de signature et d’entrée en vigueur Durée Nombre d’Etats parties Mesures de confiance Traité sur les explosions nucléaires à des fins pacifiques Moscou 28 mai 1976 11 décembre 1990 Cinq ans avec possibilité de renouvellement URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Moyens techniques nationaux; autorise l’accès aux sites des explosions; crée une commission consultative mixte au titre des informations nécessaires à la vérification. Accord SALT-II Vienne 18 juin 1979 N’est jamais entré en vigueur Cinq ans URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Moyens techniques nationaux; échange spontané de données dans le cadre de la Commission consultative permanente. Accord entre les Etats-Unis et l’Union des républiques socialistes soviétiques sur la création de centres de réduction du risque nucléaire Washington 15 septembre 1987 15 septembre 1987 Illimitée Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Le protocole I prévoit la notification des lancements de missiles balistiques conformément à l’article 4 de l’Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques relatif à certaines mesures destinées à réduire le risque de déclenchement de guerre nucléaire (1971), et au paragraphe 1 de l’article 6 de l’Accord entre le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis d’Amérique et le Gouvernement de l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques pour la prévention des accidents en haute mer et au-dessus de la haute mer (1972); le protocole II prévoit d’établir et d’entretenir des moyens de communication directe en fac-similé entre les centres nationaux de réduction du risque nucléaire des deux parties (un circuit par satellite INTELSAT et un circuit par satellite STATSIONAR). Traité entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques sur l’élimination de leurs missiles à portée intermédiaire et à plus courte portée Washington 8 décembre 1987 1er juin 1988 Illimitée Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Recours aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification; l’alinéa a) du paragraphe 2 confirme le principe de non-entrave avec les moyens techniques nationaux; possibilité d’effectuer des inspections intrusives. Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques sur les notifications des lancements de missiles balistiques intercontinentaux et de missiles lancés par sous-marins Moscou 31 mai 1988 31 mai 1990 Illimitée Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Notification, au moins 24 heures à l’avance, de la date, de la zone de lancement et de la zone d’impact prévues pour tout lancement d’ICBM ou de SLBM; la notification doit également indiquer les coordonnées géographiques de la zone ou des zones d’impact prévues pour les véhicules de rentrée. Accord entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques sur la prévention d’activités militaires dangereuses Moscou 2 juin 1989 1er janvier 1990 Non précisée Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Prévoit l’obligation pour les parties de notifier l’utilisation des lasers; établit et maintient des communications selon les procédures faisant l’objet de l’annexe I; établit une Commission militaire mixte dans le cadre de laquelle les parties examinent l’exécution des obligations contractées. Traité sur la réduction et la limitation des armements stratégiques offensifsb Moscou 31 juillet 1991 N’est pas encore entré en vigueur 15 ans Droit de retrait URSS, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Nombreuses inspections sur place et activités permanentes de contrôle; recours aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification; confirme le principe de non-entrave avec ces moyens; les droits et obligations concernant la notification des différentes activités sont précisés dans un protocole relatif à la notification; création d’une commission mixte de contrôle de l’exécution des obligations et d’inspection, etc. /...A/48/305 Français Page 33 Nom de l’Accord Date et lieu de signature et d’entrée en vigueur Durée Nombre d’Etats parties Mesures de confiance Traité sur une réduction et une limitation nouvelles des armements stratégiques offensifs Moscou 3 janvier 1993 N’est pas encore entré en vigueur Même limitation de durée que pour le Traité précédent Fédération de Russie, Etats-Unis d’Amérique Les dispositions du Traité sur la réduction et la limitation des armements stratégiques offensifs sont applicables au présent Traité; celui-ci établit une commission d’exécution bilatérale chargée de résoudre les questions concernant l’exécution des obligations contractées, et d’arrêter les mesures supplémentaires permettant d’améliorer l’efficacité du Traité. Note : Les passages concernant les mesures de confiance ne sont donnés qu’à titre indicatif, et non interprétatif. Le Groupe d’experts ne les reprend pas nécessairement à son compte. Le lecteur aura intérêt à consulter les documents originaux pour des informations plus détaillées. a Nombre d’Etats parties au 1er janvier 1993. b Le Traité sur la réduction et la limitation des armements stratégiques offensifs est devenu un traité multilatéral après la signature le 23 mai 1992 du Protocole de Lisbonne par le Bélarus, les Etats-Unis, la Fédération de Russie, le Kazakhstan et l’Ukraine. /...A/48/305 Français Page 34 la coopération entre les Etats parties, les consultations à engager lorsqu’une activité risque de causer une gêne potentiellement nuisible aux activités d’autres Etats parties (art. IX). Le Traité prévoit des facilités pour l’observation du vol des objets spatiaux lancés par d’autres Etats, et il dispose que "toutes les stations et installations, tout le matériel et tous les véhicules spatiaux se trouvant sur la Lune ou sur d’autres corps célestes seront accessibles, dans des conditions de réciprocité, aux représentants des autres Etats parties au Traité" (art. XII). Le texte du Traité figure à l’appendice I. 2. Autres accords multilatéraux à caractère universel 61. a) Chronologiquement, le premier traité multilatéral régissant les activités militaires des Etats dans l’espace est le Traité interdisant les essais d’armes nucléaires dans l’atmosphère, dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et sous l’eau (1963)10. Aux termes de l’article premier du Traité, chacune des parties s’engage "à interdire, à empêcher et à s’abstenir d’effectuer toute explosion expérimentale d’armes nucléaires, ou toute autre explosion nucléaire, en tout lieu relevant de sa juridiction ou de son contrôle" dans l’atmosphère, au-delà de ses limites, y compris l’espace extra-atmosphérique, ou sous l’eau, ou dans tout autre milieu. Le Traité ne prévoyant aucun mécanisme de vérification, il appartient aux Etats parties de s’acquitter de cette tâche par leurs propres moyens techniques nationaux (MTN). 62. b) L’Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (1967)11 énonce les obligations des Etats parties dans le cas où "l’équipage d’un engin spatial a été victime d’un accident, ou se trouve en détresse, ou a fait un atterrissage forcé ou involontaire" sur le territoire d’un autre Etat, et il dispose que chaque Partie contractante a) "informera immédiatement l’autorité de lancement ou, si elle ne peut l’identifier et communiquer immédiatement avec elle, diffusera immédiatement cette information par tous les moyens de communication appropriés dont elle dispose"; b) "informera immédiatement le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies à qui il appartiendra de diffuser cette information sans délai par tous les moyens de communication appropriés dont il dispose" (art. 1). Les autres dispositions énoncent de manière détaillée les obligations de l’"autorité de lancement" et les droits et obligations des autres Parties contractantes en cas d’accident, ainsi que l’obligation leur incombant d’informer le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage entreprises. 63. c) La Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux (1971)12 dispose qu’"un Etat de lancement a la responsabilité absolue de verser réparation pour le dommage causé par son objet spatial à la surface de la Terre ou aux aéronefs en vol" (art. II). Les autres articles énoncent les droits et obligations des Etats parties en cas de dommage, comme la procédure à suivre pour présenter une demande en réparation, notamment la constitution d’une commission de règlement des demandes, la responsabilité des organisations internationales qui se livrent à des activités spatiales, etc. 64. d) En vertu de la Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (1975)13, les Etats parties s’engagent, lorsqu’un objet spatial est lancé sur une orbite terrestre ou au-delà, à l’immatriculer au moyen d’une inscription sur un registre approprié et à informer le Secrétaire/...A/48/305 Français Page 35 général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies de la création d’un tel registre (art. II). Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation assure la tenue d’un registre dans lequel sont consignés les renseignements fournis conformément à l’article IV. Ledit article IV énonce les renseignements qui doivent être fournis par chacun des Etats d’immatriculation, en particulier : le nom de l’Etat ou des Etats de lancement, un indicatif approprié de l’objet spatial, la date et le territoire ou le lieu de lancement, les principaux paramètres de l’orbite, et la fonction générale de l’objet spatial. Pour plus de détails, on se reportera au chapitre VII de la présente étude. 65. e) Les instruments fondamentaux de l’Union internationale des télécommunications (UIT) sont la Constitution et la Convention adoptées en 1992 et complétées par le règlement des radiocommunications et les actes finals de la Conférence administrative mondiale des radiocommunications. L’Union a pour objet principal d’effectuer l’attribution des fréquences du spectre radioélectrique et d’assigner des fréquences, ainsi que les positions orbitales correspondantes sur l’orbite géostationnaire. Par ailleurs, tout exploitant de satellite, quelle que soit la mission assignée à celui-ci, est tenu de notifier ses projets au Comité international d’enregistrement des fréquences (IFRB), de manière à assurer un fonctionnement optimal et à éviter tout brouillage préjudiciable14. 66. f) La Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles (1978)15 interdit aux Etats parties d’utiliser à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles des techniques de modification de l’environnement ayant des effets étendus, durables ou graves, en tant que moyens de causer des destructions, des dommages ou des préjudices à tout autre Etat partie (art. I), les techniques ainsi visées étant celles qui ont pour objet de modifier grâce à une manipulation délibérée de processus naturels la dynamique, la composition ou la structure de la Terre, y compris ses biotes, sa lithosphère, son hydrosphère et son atmosphère, ou l’espace extra-atmosphérique (art. II). Les Etats parties "s’engagent à se consulter mutuellement et à coopérer entre eux pour résoudre tous problèmes qui pourraient se poser à propos des objectifs de la présente Convention ou de l’application de ses dispositions"; ces activités de consultation et de coopération "peuvent également être entreprises grâce à des procédures internationales appropriées dans le cadre de l’Organisation des Nations Unies et conformément à sa Charte". Il peut également être fait appel aux services d’un comité consultatif d’experts comme celui qui est prévu dans le paragraphe 2 de l’article V (voir le paragraphe 1 de l’article V). La composition et l’organisation des travaux du Comité consultatif d’experts font l’objet d’une annexe à la Convention. En outre, il faut tenir compte des clauses interprétatives relatives à la Convention et ayant trait aux articles I, II, III et VIII16. 67. g) L’Accord régissant les activités des Etats sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes (1979)17 a défini et développé, en ce qui concerne les activités des Etats sur la Lune et sur d’autres corps célestes, les principes énoncés dans le Traité sur l’espace. L’Accord dispose que la Lune doit être utilisée exclusivement à des fins pacifiques et il interdit tout recours à la menace ou à l’emploi de la force ou à tout autre acte d’hostilité ou menace d’acte d’hostilité sur la Lune. L’Accord confirme également qu’il est interdit aux Etats de mettre sur orbite autour de la Lune, ni sur une autre trajectoire en/...A/48/305 Français Page 36 direction ou autour de la Lune, aucun objet porteur d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive, et que sont interdits l’aménagement de bases, installations et fortifications militaires. L’Accord dispose aussi que "les Etats parties informent le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, autant qu’il est possible et réalisable, de leurs activités d’exploration et d’utilisation de la Lune". Les renseignements à fournir concernant le calendrier, les objectifs, les lieux de déroulement, les paramètres d’orbites et la durée de chaque mission vers la Lune doivent être communiqués le plus tôt possible après le début de la mission, et des renseignements sur les résultats de chaque mission doivent être communiqués dès la fin de la mission (par. 1 de l’article 5). En outre, les Etats parties informent "le Secrétaire général, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, de tout phénomène qu’ils ont constaté dans l’espace, y compris la Lune, qui pourrait présenter un danger pour la vie et la santé de l’homme, ainsi que de tous signes de vie organique" (par. 2 de l’article 5). Conformément à l’article 9, "les Etats parties peuvent installer des stations habitées ou inhabitées sur la Lune. Un Etat partie qui installe une station n’utilise que la surface nécessaire pour répondre aux besoins de la station et fait connaître immédiatement au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies l’emplacement et les buts de ladite station. De même, par la suite, il fait savoir chaque année au Secrétaire général si cette station continue d’être utilisée et si ses buts ont changé". B. Les traités bilatéraux 68. a) Le Traité entre les Etats-Unis et l’URSS concernant la limitation des systèmes de missiles antimissiles (1972)18, qui est conclu pour une durée illimitée, revêt une importance particulière du point de vue de la présente étude. Le Traité a pour objet de limiter les systèmes de missiles antimissiles (systèmes AM) et les éléments de tels systèmes conçus à l’effet d’intercepter en vol des missiles antimissiles balistiques ou leurs ogives, ce qui comprend les dispositifs de lancement AM, les missiles d’interception et les radars construits et mis en place pour servir en association avec des AM ou appartenant à un type qui a été expérimenté dans un contexte AM. L’article premier énonce le principe fondamental du Traité, qui consiste à limiter l’installation de systèmes AM à des niveaux et régions fixés d’un commun accord. Le Traité interdit de réaliser, essayer ou mettre en place des systèmes AM ou des éléments de tels systèmes qui soient basés en mer, dans l’air, sur des plates-formes terrestres mobiles ou, ce qui est extrêmement important dans le cadre de la présente étude, dans l’espace (art. 5). 69. Outre la limitation des armements, le Traité est également pertinent aux fins de la présente étude en raison des règles qu’il fixe pour le recours aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification. C’est le premier accord (avec l’accord SALT I) qui traite de la vérification par de tels moyens, comme on peut le lire au paragraphe 1 de l’article 12 qui codifie les moyens techniques nationaux de vérification et dispose que les parties doivent en disposer d’une manière compatible avec les principes généralement reconnus du droit international. En l’espèce, l’obligation de ne pas faire obstacle aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification énoncés au paragraphe 2 de l’article 12 est également importante, lesdits moyens comprenant des systèmes basés au sol et dans l’espace. Ceci s’applique aussi, implicitement, à la protection de /...A/48/305 Français Page 37 systèmes basés dans l’espace comme les satellites de reconnaissance (par. 3 de l’article 12) et donc à la protection contre toute forme d’entrave. Aussi les Parties au Traité ont-elles légitimé le recours aux satellites pour surveiller la limitation des armements et les accords de désarmement. En outre, pour promouvoir les objectifs du Traité et l’application de ses dispositions, il est créé une Commission consultative permanente dans le cadre de laquelle les Parties, entre autres choses, examineront les questions relatives au respect des obligations contractées, fourniront volontairement les renseignements que chacune d’entre elles juge nécessaire pour garantir la confiance dans l’observation des obligations contractées, examineront les questions concernant les entraves involontaires à l’utilisation des moyens techniques nationaux de vérification, étudieront toute modification de la situation stratégique affectant les dispositions du Traité, etc. 70. b) L’interdiction de faire obstacle aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification a été énoncée également dans d’autres accords entre l’URSS et les Etats-Unis. Tout comme les dispositions du Traité concernant la limitation des systèmes de missiles antimissiles, les mesures de vérification stipulées dans les Traités concernant la limitation des armes stratégiques offensives, soit SALT I de 197219 et SALT II de 197920 revêtent une importance particulière pour l’espace. En vertu du paragraphe 1, alinéa c), de l’article 9 du Traité SALT II, les Parties s’engagent à ne pas mettre au point, essayer ou installer de moyens de mise sur orbite terrestre d’armes nucléaires ou de tous autres types d’arme de destruction massive, y compris les missiles partiellement orbitaux. De son côté, le Traité START-I de 1991 dispose que chacune des Parties aura recours à des moyens techniques nationaux de vérification (par. 1 de l’article IX); chacune est enjointe de s’abstenir de faire obstacle aux moyens techniques nationaux de vérification (par. 2 de l’article IX)21. Le Traité START-II de 1993 conclu le 3 janvier 1993 entre la Fédération de Russie et les Etats-Unis stipule que les dispositions en matière de vérification du Traité START-I seront utilisées pour l’application de START-II22. 71. c) Il convient de mentionner ici quelques autres instruments bilatéraux qui présentent un intérêt pour la présente étude, même s’ils n’énoncent aucune mesure de limitation des armements ou de désarmement. Ainsi il y a l’Accord de 1971 entre les Etats-Unis et l’URSS relatif à certaines mesures destinées à réduire le risque de déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire23. Conformément à cet accord, chaque Partie s’engage à informer l’autre Partie de toute situation qui, par suite d’un accident ou d’un défaut d’autorisation, risque de déclencher une guerre nucléaire. En vertu de l’article 4, l’obligation de notifier comprend la notification à l’avance de tout projet de lancement de missiles, si ces lancements dépassent le territoire national de l’Etat de lancement en direction du territoire de l’autre Partie. Cependant, la disposition qui se rapporte le plus directement au cadre de la présente étude est contenue à l’article 3, où les Parties au Traité ont légitimé l’existence et l’utilisation de certains systèmes d’alerte par satellite à des fins militaires. 72. d) Ces deux aspects de l’Accord de 1971 ont été codifiés avec plus de précision dans un autre instrument bilatéral signé le même jour, à savoir l’Accord portant sur les mesures destinées à améliorer la ligne de communication directe entre les Etats-Unis et l’URSS (1971)24. Les progrès enregistrés depuis 1963 dans la technique des communications par satellite25 augmentaient la fiabilité offerte par les arrangements conclus à l’origine. Le nouvel Accord, /...A/48/305 Français Page 38 qui comporte une annexe où sont précisés en détail le fonctionnement, le matériel et la répartition des coûts, prévoit l’établissement de deux circuits de communication par satellite entre les Etats-Unis et l’URSS, avec un système de terminaux multiples dans chacun des deux pays. Les Etats-Unis s’engagent à fournir un circuit via le système Intelsat, et l’Union soviétique un circuit via son système Molniya II. En outre, chaque Partie a l’obligation d’informer l’autre Partie de toute modification ou de tout remplacement proposés du système de communication par satellite contenant le circuit qu’elle a fourni, dès lors que cela pourrait nécessiter des adaptations de la part des stations au sol utilisant ce système ou avoir d’autres incidences sur le maintien de la ligne de communication directe. 73. e) Afin de compléter les mesures antérieures de communication au niveau bilatéral,l’Accord entre l’URSS et les Etats-Unis sur la création de Centres pour la réduction du danger nucléaire (1987)26 et ses Protocoles I et II codifient plus avant l’utilisation de la communication par satellite dans l’intérêt de la sécurité mutuelle. La communication entre les deux pays est assurée par des liaisons directes par satellite. Ces liaisons sont utilisées pour échanger des informations et transmettre les notifications requises en vertu d’accords existants ou qui pourraient être signés concernant la maîtrise des armements et l’adoption de mesures de confiance. En vertu de l’article premier du Protocole I, les Parties doivent transmettre des notifications sur les lancements d’engins balistiques, conformément à l’article 4 de l’Accord de 1971 relatif à certaines mesures destinées à réduire le risque de déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire et au paragraphe 1 de l’article 6 de l’Accord de 1972 pour la prévention des incidents en haute mer et au-dessus de la haute mer. A cet effet, l’article premier du Protocole II prévoit l’établissement et le maintien d’un circuit de satellite INTELSAT et d’un circuit de satellite STATSIONAR en vue d’assurer la transmission de messages par télécopie entre les Centres nationaux pour la réduction du danger nucléaire créés par chacune des Parties. 74. f) Deux autres accords bilatéraux présentent un certain intérêt pour la présente étude. Il s’agit de l’Accord de 1988 concernant les notifications de lancement de missiles balistiques intercontinentaux et de missiles balistiques lancés par sous-marins27 et de l’Accord de 1989 concernant la prévention d’activités militaires dangereuses28. En vertu de l’article premier de l’Accord de 1988, chacune des Parties doit notifier au moins 24 heures à l’avance la date, l’aire de lancement et l’aire d’impact de tout lancement d’un missile balistique stratégique (missile balistique intercontinental ou missile balistique lancé par sous-marins), ainsi que les coordonnées géographiques de l’aire d’impact ou des aires de rentrée des véhicules. Les Parties conviennent également de tenir des consultations et d’examiner ensemble les questions relatives à l’application des dispositions de l’Accord. L’Accord de 1989 définit certains termes comme celui de laser et des expressions comme celle d’interférence avec les réseaux de commande et de contrôle. Il codifie également l’utilisation des lasers en temps de paix. C’est ainsi que l’article 2 dispose que chaque Partie prend toutes les mesures nécessaires pour empêcher d’"utiliser un laser de telle façon que sa radiation puisse être nocive au personnel ou endommager le matériel des forces armées de l’autre Partie". Par ailleurs, chaque Partie doit notifier à l’autre Partie son intention d’utiliser un laser (par. 2 de l’article IV). En outre, pour empêcher les activités militaires dangereuses et régler promptement tout incident, les forces /...A/48/305 Français Page 39 armées des Parties établissent et maintiennent des communications comme indiqué dans l’annexe 1 de l’Accord (par. 1 de l’article VII). Enfin, une commission militaire conjointe est créée pour examiner l’application des dispositions de l’Accord (par. 1 de l’article IX). 75. On trouve des dispositions concernant les questions ayant trait à l’espace dans un certain nombre de traités bilatéraux et régionaux conclus entre différents Etats. C. Les résolutions et déclarations de principes adoptées par l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies 76. Sur la recommandation du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté un corps de principes régissant les activités spatiales des Etats : Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (1963), Principes régissant l’utilisation par les Etats de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale (1982), Principes sur la télédétection (1986) et Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace (1992). 77. a) Le 13 décembre 1963, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté la résolution 1962 (XVIII) contenant la Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique29. Sur la base des principes énoncés dans la Déclaration, un certain nombre d’accords multilatéraux ont été négociés et conclus sous les auspices de l’Organisation des Nations Unies (comme cela a été signalé plus haut dans les sections A et B). Aux termes de la Déclaration, "Si un Etat a des raisons de croire qu’une activité ou expérience dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, envisagée par lui-même ou par ses ressortissants, risquerait de faire obstacle aux activités d’autres Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, il devra engager les consultations internationales appropriées avant d’entreprendre lesdites activités ou expériences. Tout Etat ayant des raisons de croire qu’une activité ou expérience dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, envisagée par un autre Etat, risquerait de faire obstacle aux activités poursuivies en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique peut demander que des consultations soient ouvertes au sujet de ladite activité ou expérience" (Principe 6). 78. b) Le 10 décembre 1992, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté la résolution 37/92 contenant les Principes régissant l’utilisation par les Etats de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale30. Ces principes prévoient, entre autres, que "les activités menées dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite devraient l’être d’une manière compatible avec les droits souverains des Etats" (Principe 1) et "d’une manière compatible avec le développement de la compréhension mutuelle et le renforcement des relations amicales et de la coopération entre tous les Etats et tous les peuples dans l’intérêt du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales" (Principe 3). /...A/48/305 Français Page 40 79. c) Le 3 décembre 1986, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté la résolution 41/65 contenant les Principes sur la télédétection31. Ces principes prévoient, entre autres, que les activités de télédétection "ne doivent pas être menées d’une manière préjudiciable aux droits et intérêts légitimes de l’Etat observé" (Principe IV) et que "Un Etat conduisant un programme de télédétection en informe le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies" et "il communique tous autres renseignements pertinents à tout Etat, notamment à tout pays en développement concerné par ce programme, qui en fait la demande" (Principe IX). 80. d) Le 14 décembre 1992, l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adopté la résolution 47/68 contenant les Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaire dans l’espace32. Les Principes définissent des directives et critères d’utilisation sûre des sources d’énergie nucléaires (SEN). Ils prévoient, entre autres, que les résultats de l’évaluation de sûreté des sources d’énergie nucléaires effectuée par un Etat de lancement "doivent être rendus publics avant chaque lancement et le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies doit être informé dès que possible, avant chaque lancement" (Principe 4). Par ailleurs, l’Etat de lancement, qui exploite l’objet spatial, "doit informer en temps utile les Etats concernés au cas où cet objet spatial ayant des SEN à bord aurait une avarie risquant d’entraîner le retour dans l’atmosphère terrestre de matériaux radioactifs", pareille information devant également être communiquée en temps opportun au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies "de manière à tenir la communauté internationale informée de la situation et à lui donner le temps de planifier, à l’échelon national, toutes mesures d’intervention jugées nécessaires" (Principe 5).IV. EXAMEN GENERAL DE LA NOTION DE MESURES DE CONFIANCE 81. Les mesures de confiance sont de mieux en mieux acceptées comme moyen important de réduire les soupçons et les tensions entre les nations et de renforcer la paix et la stabilité internationales. Au cours des 30 dernières années, les Etats ont pris un nombre croissant de mesures de confiance bilatérales et multilatérales. En s’appuyant sur cette riche expérience, il est possible d’évaluer dans quelle mesure l’instauration d’un climat de confiance peut servir dans le domaine de l’espace. L’étude de cette expérience accumulée montre que les mesures en question partagent un certain nombre de caractéristiques, et l’on peut en dégager des principes généraux pour les appliquer dans des situations particulières. Il est ainsi possible d’établir plusieurs critères pour étudier la mise en oeuvre de mesures de confiance dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. 82. L’importance des mesures de confiance dans l’élaboration des politiques gouvernementales en matière de sécurité n’a cessé de croître. Elles étaient à l’origine limitées à des arrangements bilatéraux portant sur les armements nucléaires stratégiques, mais elles ont récemment joué un rôle dans un cadre multilatéral en matière de forces militaires classiques. Un schéma se dégage clairement, le passage de mesures initiales qui réduisent le risque de méprise à l’élaboration de mesures plus ambitieuses qui s’appuient sur cet acquis. 83. Le système des Nations Unies a accordé une attention croissante à la contribution que les mesures de confiance pourraient apporter au renforcement de /...A/48/305 Français Page 41 la paix et de la stabilité internationales. L’expérience encourageante acquise au plan bilatéral dans certaines régions a permis d’envisager d’étendre ce processus à d’autres domaines et questions. 84. A sa première session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement, en juin 1978, l’Assemblée générale a noté ce qui suit au paragraphe 93 du Document final de la session : "Afin de faciliter le processus du désarmement, il est nécessaire de prendre des mesures et de suivre des politiques visant à renforcer la paix et la sécurité internationales et à instaurer un climat de confiance entre les Etats. L’engagement de prendre des mesures de confiance pourrait contribuer d’une manière appréciable à ouvrir la voie à de nouveaux progrès en matière de désarmement."33 85. A sa trente-troisième session ordinaire, l’Assemblée générale a adopté, le 16 décembre 1978, la résolution 33/91 B dans laquelle elle a recommandé à tous les Etats d’envisager des arrangements régionaux de nature à accroître la confiance et de communiquer au Secrétaire général leurs vues quant aux mesures de confiance qu’il juge appropriées et applicables, ainsi que les résultats de leurs efforts dans ce domaine. 86. Sur la base de ces réponses, l’Assemblée générale a approuvé, le 11 décembre 1979, la résolution 34/87 B dans laquelle elle a décidé d’entreprendre une étude détaillée sur les mesures de confiance. Un groupe de 14 experts gouvernementaux nommés pour établir cette étude a adopté son rapport par consensus le 14 août 1981. Il s’agissait de la première initiative visant à clarifier et à développer la notion de mesures de confiance dans un contexte mondial. Les experts espéraient que le rapport fournirait des directives et des conseils aux gouvernements désireux d’élaborer et de mettre en oeuvre des mesures de confiance, et souhaitaient également faire prendre conscience au public de l’importance de ces mesures pour le maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales ainsi que pour la mise en place et le renforcement d’un processus d’instauration de la confiance dans diverses régions34. 87. A sa trente-sixième session ordinaire, le 9 décembre 1982, l’Assemblée générale a adopté la résolution 36/97 F dans laquelle elle a réaffirmé l’importance des mesures de confiance et invité tous les Etats à envisager des arrangements régionaux de nature à renforcer la confiance; elle a décidé aussi de présenter l’étude détaillée sur les mesures de confiance à sa deuxième session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement. 88. A sa trente-septième session ordinaire, l’Assemblée générale a adopté la résolution 37/100 D, par laquelle elle a prié la Commission du désarmement d’envisager l’établissement de directives pour des types appropriés de mesures propres à accroître la confiance et pour l’application de ces mesures sur un plan mondial ou régional. Les Directives35 ont été finalement adoptées par la Commission le 18 mai 1988 et approuvées par l’Assemblée générale dans sa résolution 43/78 H. On en trouvera le texte à l’appendice II à la présente étude. /...A/48/305 Français Page 42 89. L’Organisation des Nations Unies reconnaît et prône les mesures de confiance comme moyen de dissiper la méfiance et de stabiliser les situations de tension, contribuant ainsi à créer un climat propice à l’adoption de mesures concrètes de désarmement et de limitation des armements. 90. Les caractéristiques des mesures de confiance, de même que les critères et les méthodes de leur mise en oeuvre, sont examinés dans les sections suivantes sur la base de l’Etude détaillée sur les mesures propres à accroître la confiance, les Directives adoptées par la Commission du désarmement des Nations Unies et des autres accords existants. A. Caractéristiques 91. Le processus d’instauration de la confiance s’engage à partir de la conviction que les autres Etats sont prêts à coopérer, et la confiance s’accroît avec le temps au fur et à mesure que les Etats montrent par leur conduite leur esprit de coopération. 92. Ce processus passe par des réductions progressives, voire par l’élimination des causes de la méfiance, de la peur, de l’incompréhension et des erreurs d’appréciation concernant les autres Etats pour ce qui est des forces militaires, des capacités à double finalité ou des activités liées à la sécurité. Ce processus part du principe que les Etats doivent être assurés que certaines activités menées dans les domaines militaire et de la sécurité par d’autres Etats ne menacent pas leur propre sécurité. 93. Les mesures de confiance sont efficaces lorsqu’elles répondent directement aux incertitudes ou aux menaces perçues dans une situation ou un environnement donné. Ainsi convient-il d’élaborer des mesures particulières pour chaque situation. 94. Le processus d’instauration de la confiance doit réaliser l’équilibre entre les méthodes de mise en oeuvre bilatérales et multilatérales. Des exemples régionaux peuvent ne pas trouver d’application au niveau mondial mais les mesures devraient être prises dans un contexte mondial en tenant compte des considérations régionales particulières. 95. L’accroissement de la confiance se fonde principalement sur la politique effective des Etats dans le domaine militaire et sur des actions concrètes qui sont l’expression d’un engagement politique dont l’importance peut être examinée, vérifiée et évaluée. La certitude naît de l’expérience de la conduite des Etats dans des situations données. Ainsi, des déclarations de principes généralement reconnus en matière de conduite internationale, des déclarations d’intention ou des promesses de changer de conduite à l’avenir sont les bienvenues mais ne suffisent pas à réduire les doutes ou les perceptions de menace. 96. Il n’est possible d’atteindre un degré plus élevé de confiance que lorsque le volume d’informations dont les Etats disposent leur permet de prévoir de façon satisfaisante et de calculer les actions et les réactions des autres Etats dans leur environnement politique. Cette capacité d’effectuer des prévisions augmente surtout selon le degré d’ouverture et de transparence dont les Etats font preuve dans la conduite de leurs affaires politiques et militaires. /...A/48/305 Français Page 43 97. Il est essentiel pour le maintien et le renforcement de la confiance que les politiques des Etats soient ouvertes, prévisibles et fiables. Conclure des accords sur des mesures de confiance précises peut aider à dissiper les soupçons et à engendrer la confiance en établissant un cadre d’une vaste gamme de contacts et d’échanges. Il est possible de réduire les préjugés et les idées fausses, qui sous-tendent la méfiance et la crainte, en multipliant les contacts personnels aux niveaux de la prise de décisions. 98. La façon la plus efficace de réduire les impressions de menace ou l’incertitude est de mettre en oeuvre de façon méthodique, continue et complète des mesures de confiance acceptées. Les Etats peuvent donner la preuve du sérieux et de la crédibilité de leur engagement à réduire la méfiance en appliquant de façon fiable de telles mesures. 99. L’instauration de la confiance est un processus dynamique qui s’accélère avec le temps, car l’expérience accumulée en matière d’interdépendance constructive nourrit la confiance et conduit de ce fait à de nouvelles mesures de confiance. 100. Il ressort de ce qui précède que l’on passe habituellement d’engagements généraux peu contraignants à des engagements plus spécifiques. Cette évolution conduit en fin de compte à l’élaboration progressive d’un ensemble de mesures qui renforcent la sécurité des Etats. a) Un moyen de renforcer la confiance est d’accroître la qualité et la quantité des informations échangées sur les activités et capacités militaires; b) Un autre moyen de renforcer la confiance et la prévisibilité est d’élargir la portée des mesures de confiance; c) Un autre moyen encore est de renforcer l’engagement à l’égard du processus lui-même. Les mesures unilatérales non obligatoires devraient être suivies de mesures réciproques, débouchant sur des engagements politiques mutuels de prendre des mesures susceptibles de devenir ultérieurement des obligations juridiquement contraignantes. 101. Les mesures de confiance ont principalement des effets politiques et psychologiques et, bien qu’étroitement liées aux mesures de limitation des armements, elles ne peuvent pas toujours être considérées comme telles, c’est-à-dire comme limitant ou réduisant les forces armées. L’accroissement de la confiance peut plutôt avoir des effets positifs sur l’évaluation subjective des intentions et des attentes d’autres Etats. 102. Les mesures de confiance peuvent faciliter la signature d’accords concrets en matière de désarmement et de limitation des armements. Elles peuvent compléter de tels accords et, partant, constituer un moyen important de réduire les tensions internationales. Dans le cadre des négociations sur le désarmement et la limitation des armements, de telles mesures peuvent devenir l’un des éléments de l’accord lui-même et faciliter l’application de l’accord et des dispositions relatives à la vérification. 103. Les mesures de confiance ne peuvent remplacer la réalisation de progrès concrets en matière de limitation et de réduction des armements. La méfiance et /...A/48/305 Français Page 44 l’appréhension qui découlent des progrès effrénés et incessants tant qualitatifs que quantitatifs réalisés en matière d’armements priment sur la contribution des initiatives prises pour accroître la confiance. B. Critères d’application 104. Pour appliquer efficacement les mesures de confiance, il convient d’analyser avec soin, en vue de les définir très clairement, les facteurs qui renforcent ou diminuent la confiance dans telle ou telle situation. 105. Il est fondamental d’évaluer avec précision l’application des mesures convenues afin d’assurer le renforcement optimal de la prévisibilité et de la confiance. Il est donc essentiel de définir avec la plus grande précision possible les détails des mesures de confiance convenues. 106. Il convient donc de disposer de critères clairs pour juger la conduite des Etats. Ces critères sont indispensables aux Etats pour orienter leurs propres activités, et aussi pour évaluer celles des autres Etats. Le renforcement de la confiance découle de l’adéquation de la conduite des Etats par rapport aux critères acceptés et établis. 107. Le besoin de clarté implique aussi que les critères acceptés doivent pouvoir être aisément vérifiés par les parties intéressées. Les procédures de vérification peuvent en elles-mêmes contribuer à l’instauration de la confiance. 108. Prendre des mesures de confiance requiert le consensus des Etats participants. C’est un produit de la volonté politique des Etats, qui exercent librement leur souveraineté, pour accepter des mesures concrètes visant à mettre en oeuvre les principes légitimes et universels de la conduite à l’égard des autres Etats. Cette décision implique que les Etats s’engagent à appliquer certaines mesures d’une certaine façon. Le respect des principes de légalité des Etats souverains et de la sécurité intégrale et équilibrée sont des conditions essentielles pour les Etats qui participent au processus d’instauration de la confiance. 109. Des mesures de confiance données doivent être applicables à des capacités militaires particulières et convenir aux caractéristiques techniques des systèmes militaires en question. Elles doivent tenir compte des aspects des techniques et systèmes militaires qui sont les plus directement liés aux préoccupations des Etats concernés en matière de sécurité. De même, elles doivent tenir compte de la spécificité géographique et physique du lieu où elles doivent être appliquées. C. Application 110. Les mesures de confiance s’appliquent à trois catégories d’Etats : ceux qui participent directement à des activités susceptibles d’engendrer méfiance ou tension, les Etats qui sont touchés par les politiques appliquées dans le domaine militaire ou le domaine de la sécurité, et les Etats qui sont partie prenante du fait qu’ils encouragent le processus d’instauration de la confiance. /...A/48/305 Français Page 45 111. Les mesures de confiance diffèrent selon qu’elles constituent des devoirs ou des interdictions et selon que l’obligation consiste à fournir des informations ou à limiter certaines activités. 112. Ces mesures se répartissent en trois grandes catégories, selon les activités concernées : a) Les activités encouragées sont celles qui encouragent les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace dans l’intérêt de toute l’humanité, par exemple l’exploration et les découvertes scientifiques. Elles comprennent également les mesures par lesquelles les Etats démontrent que leurs intentions et leurs capacités ne sont ni hostiles ni agressives. Ces mesures, qui peuvent être appliquées de façon continue, comprennent des échanges d’informations et de personnel, y compris des données sur les effectifs militaires et leurs caractéristiques; b) Les activités autorisées englobent toute la gamme des activités qui ne sont pas expressément interdites sans être spécifiquement encouragées. Elles comprennent des mesures qui réduisent les appréhensions des Etats concernant les risques que présentent certaines activités militaires. En particulier, les mesures qui visent à réduire les craintes d’une attaque surprise peuvent comprendre la communication d’informations concernant les activités militaires et les activités connexes; c) Les activités interdites sont celles qui sont prohibées au titre de divers éléments du régime juridique international actuel, comme la mise en place d’armes de destruction de masse dans l’espace. Les mesures qui renforcent ces interdictions comprennent celles qui visent, dans des circonstances particulières ou d’une façon générale, à limiter la portée ou la nature de certaines catégories d’activités ou à les prohiber. Ces mesures se distinguent des mesures traditionnelles de désarmement et de limitation des armements, en ce sens que ce qui est limité n’est pas tant les capacités ou le potentiel des forces que l’activité des forces armées. 113. L’interdiction de certaines catégories d’activités permet d’accroître la confiance, notamment : a) Des activités qui n’ont pas encore été menées et qui ne sont pas envisagées à l’heure actuelle, confirmant les normes de conduite en vigueur et maintenant pour l’avenir la validité desdites normes; b) Des activités qui pourraient sinon être menées dans une région ou un environnement donné, y compris les activités menées dans des zones névralgiques comme les régions frontalières; c) Les activités qui ne seraient menées qu’au moment où les relations politiques ou militaires se détériorent. 114. De telles mesures peuvent limiter certaines options militaires, mais elles ne peuvent remplacer des mesures plus concrètes de maîtrise des armements et de désarmement qui limiteraient et réduiraient directement les capacités militaires. /...A/48/305 Français Page 46 V. CARACTERISTIQUES DES MESURES VISANT A RENFORCER LA CONFIANCE DANS L’ESPACE EXTRA-ATMOSPHERIQUE 115. Pour généraliser l’application des principes universels qui sont à la base des mesures de confiance dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, il faut tenir compte des caractéristiques uniques du milieu et de la technologie spatiaux. L’expérience, qu’ont jusqu’ici permis d’acquérir différentes initiatives bilatérales et régionales visant à renforcer la confiance, pourrait servir au lancement d’initiatives analogues. 116. Le milieu spatial présente un certain nombre de caractéristiques qui le distinguent des autres milieux pour lesquels des mesures de confiance ont été mises en oeuvre. A. Les caractéristiques spécifiques du milieu spatial 117. L’espace extra-atmosphérique est à la fois proche et lointain : lointain car difficile d’accès, et lointain aussi du fait que même l’espace stratosphérique circumterrestre est de dimensions gigantesques comparées à celles de notre planète et proche car situé à des distances relativement courtes de tous les Etats, qui n’en sont séparés que par quelques centaines de kilomètres. 118. L’espace est un milieu qui peut être tout à la fois particulièrement rude et particulièrement accueillant. Le vide spatial peut être fatal pour les êtres humains non protégés et ne cesse de poser de nouveaux problèmes pour l’exploitation d’engins spatiaux et la réalisation d’expériences dans l’espace. De même, les rayonnements émis par l’espace sont bien plus dangereux que les rayonnements terrestres. En outre, les météorites naturels et les débris qui résultent des activités spatiales humaines font courir aux êtres vivants et au matériel des risques qui n’ont rien de comparable avec ceux qui existent sur la Terre. De plus, il faut protéger les engins spatiaux et (lorsqu’ils sont habités) leurs occupants contre les basses températures qui règnent à l’ombre de la Terre ou dans l’espace lointain, et contre les températures très élevées auxquelles l’on s’expose lorsque l’on opère en plein soleil. Par contre, l’espace peut aussi être un milieu particulièrement accueillant. Une fois en orbite et après avoir échappé aux contraintes du lancement et de la traînée atmosphérique, les engins spatiaux peuvent se composer de structures énormes et fragiles qui se seraient rapidement effondrées si elles avaient été érigées à la surface de la Terre ou propulsées à très grande vitesse dans l’atmosphère. 119. Il ne faut à une fusée que quelques minutes pour emporter un engin spatial et le placer en orbite terrestre basse. Une fois en orbite, un satellite pourra se déplacer à une vitesse de plus de 25 000 kilomètres à l’heure et faire le tour de la planète jusqu’à 16 fois par jour, offrant ainsi un moyen unique d’observation de la Terre. En outre, un engin spatial placé sur orbite pourra, sans aucune force d’appoint, se maintenir pendant des années, voire des décennies, sur une trajectoire donnée, définie uniquement par les forces de la gravitation et du rayonnement. 120. Ces caractéristiques posent des problèmes techniques uniques en leur genre à tous ceux qui voudraient atteindre et exploiter le milieu spatial. En effet, pour circuler et opérer dans l’espace, il faut surmonter un certain nombre de/...A/48/305 Français Page 47 problèmes techniques et financiers auxquels même les pays les plus riches et les plus avancés sur le plan technique ont du mal à faire face et que la plupart des nations de la planète sont absolument incapables de résoudre. 121. Cela étant, classés selon leurs capacités spatiales, les Etats du monde peuvent se ranger en au moins trois catégories. Jusqu’ici seules deux nations, les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et la Fédération de Russie, possèdent la gamme entière des petits et gros lanceurs, des engins spatiaux habités et non habités ainsi que des capacités spatiales militaires et civiles actuellement disponibles. 122. Un nombre croissant d’autres Etats possèdent quelques-unes, mais non pas l’ensemble de ces capacités. Il s’agit généralement de capacités de lancement et de compétences dans les domaines de la conception et de la fabrication de satellites scientifiques et autres satellites d’application. Le reste des Etats, qui forment la grande majorité, ne sont pas des puissances spatiales, n’appartiennent à aucune des deux catégories susmentionnées et ne tirent parti de l’espace que grâce aux capacités spatiales d’autres pays. 123. Dans le même temps, les Etats qui participent directement ou indirectement aux activités menées dans l’espace ont vu leur nombre et leurs capacités croître régulièrement depuis 1957, et l’on a tout lieu de s’attendre à ce que cette progression se poursuive au cours des prochaines décennies. 124. Le Groupe a noté que certains Etats estimaient qu’il fallait, compte tenu notamment du nouveau climat politique mondial, revoir, dès que possible, certains aspects du marché spatial actuel. 125. Les propositions qui ont été avancées aux fins de renforcer la confiance portent essentiellement sur des mesures visant à atténuer les craintes que suscite l’éventualité d’une attaque surprise ou d’un conflit armé imprévu. La question fondamentale que l’on se pose lorsqu’il s’agit d’appliquer ces mesures est précisément de savoir quels problèmes de sécurité posés par les activités et la technologie spatiales il convient de résoudre. 126. Pour pouvoir répondre à cette question, il importe de bien mesurer la valeur relative des mesures de confiance dans l’espace, d’une part, et celle de la coopération spatiale, de l’autre. En effet, la coopération spatiale qui, en elle-même, peut renforcer la confiance internationale pourrait donc être considérée comme une mesure visant à renforcer la confiance. 127. Les mesures de confiance peuvent aider à remédier au problème que posent les capacités d’intrusion des activités menées dans l’espace extraatmosphhérique En effet, l’accès à l’espace donne la possibilité de surveiller à des fins civiles et militaires très diverses tous les points de la Terre. Cette capacité d’intrusion, même lorsqu’elle ne met pas en jeu des armements, peut engendrer la méfiance. C’est ainsi que les mesures de confiance peuvent servir à garantir que l’espace extra-atmosphérique n’est pas utilisé contre les pays non dotés de moyens spatiaux. Une plus grande transparence des activités militaires et des autres activités pourrait amener des changements positifs dans les domaines militaire, économique et social. 128. D’un autre point de vue, l’un des dangers qui risque à l’avenir de mettre en péril la stabilité pourrait venir non seulement des systèmes spatiaux /...A/48/305 Français Page 48 militaires dans leur ensemble, mais aussi des armes spatiales. C’est pourquoi il faudrait examiner de manière plus approfondie les conséquences que pourrait avoir la mise au point des nouveaux systèmes militaires conçus pour être déployés dans l’espace. 129. L’efficacité des mesures de confiance dans l’espace dépend de toute une série d’autres facteurs. C’est ainsi que les opérations de vérification sont une composante essentielle du renforcement de la confiance. Si l’espace rend ces vérifications compliquées, il les facilite aussi. Les vastes distances qu’il couvre et les technologies complexes auxquelles font appel les systèmes spatiaux peuvent poser problème pour ce type d’opérations. En revanche, l’espace, qui est le plus transparent des milieux, est ouvert dans toutes les directions, et les techniques spatiales se prêtent parfaitement aux opérations de vérification. Comme certains systèmes spatiaux peuvent servir à des fins à la fois civiles et militaires, il n’est pas toujours facile de différencier ces deux types d’utilisation. B. Les aspects politiques et juridiques 130. Sur le plan politique, le renforcement de la confiance dans l’espace passe obligatoirement par l’application des principes universels qui régissent les activités de coopération internationale et les pratiques des Etats dans le domaine spatial. 131. Les efforts entrepris pour élaborer des mesures de confiance ont pour but spécifique de prévenir la course aux armements dans l’espace. Toutefois, ils pourraient aussi viser d’autres objectifs. 132. Ces objectifs, dont la réalisation permettrait de répondre aux préoccupations exprimées par différents groupes d’Etats, sont essentiellement axés autour des points suivants : possibilité d’accéder à l’espace, transfert de technologie devant permettre un tel accès et problèmes de stabilité aux niveaux régional et mondial. Comme les pays et la communauté internationale tendent de plus en plus à faire appel aux techniques spatiales pour répondre à leurs besoins économiques et sociaux, il importe de plus en plus que les activités spatiales puissent se dérouler dans des conditions sûres. Tous ces problèmes sont dus aux très grandes disparités qui existent entre les capacités spatiales des Etats. 133. Dans le passé, les activités spatiales des principales puissances spatiales semblaient conçues, du moins en partie, en fonction des objectifs stratégiques que chacun de ces Etats paraissait poursuivre dans le cadre de liens stratégiques bilatéraux. Pendant tout le temps qui s’est écoulé entre le moment où les négociations relatives au Traité sur les missiles anti-missiles ont démarré, à savoir au début des années 70, et la date des tous derniers pourparlers consacrés aux problèmes de défense et à l’espace et dont les derniers ont eu lieu en octobre 1991, ce sont ces liens bilatéraux stratégiques qui de toute évidence ont été privilégiés. Or, depuis 1989, ces relations ont subi des bouleversements importants, et il semblerait que certaines des activités des principales puissances spatiales, et en particulier celles qui sont consacrées à des fins militaires, aient été restructurées et réduites, et que ces changements soient dus en partie à des considérations de coût, à des raisons techniques et aux contraintes juridiques existantes. /...A/48/305 Français Page 49 134. Un autre élément dont il importe également de tenir compte est l’augmentation continue du nombre de pays dont les capacités dans les domaines liés à l’espace vont en croissant. Ce phénomène a des répercussions mondiales et régionales, et il reste maintenant à examiner les incidences que, d’un point de vue stratégique, économique ou écologique, il pourrait avoir sur l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique. 135. Par ailleurs, on ne sait toujours pas si les nouvelles puissances spatiales s’intéresseront essentiellement aux utilisations scientifiques et aux autres applications civiles ou, au contraire, privilégieront les applications militaires, comme le font actuellement les grandes puissances spatiales. La réponse à cette question dépendra en partie du degré de coopération internationale qui prévaudra dans le domaine spatial et de la nature des intérêts stratégiques des Etats concernés. 136. Les Etats non dotés de capacités spatiales veulent obtenir l’assurance que les capacités des grandes puissances spatiales ne seront en aucune façon utilisées contre eux. En outre, ces Etats tiennent à ce que l’espace ne soit exploité qu’à des fins exclusivement pacifiques. 137. Le Traité sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique et les autres traités dont il est fait état au chapitre III prévoient un certain nombre de mesures que l’on pourrait considérer comme susceptibles de renforcer la confiance. S’agissant de l’aspect juridique du problème, deux thèses s’affrontent actuellement : les tenants de la première voient dans le régime juridique actuel un cadre de mesures visant à renforcer la confiance dans l’espace qui devrait faire l’objet d’un réexamen continu; les partisans de la seconde considèrent quant à eux que le régime juridique actuel est insuffisant, mérite un examen plus approfondi, et que l’élaboration de mesures visant à renforcer la confiance dans l’espace faciliterait l’application des traités existants. 138. Il reste maintenant à déterminer si les mesures en question devraient faire l’objet d’un traité distinct ou d’un instrument spécifique. En tout état de cause, il faudrait définir avec davantage de précision certains termes juridiques et en élaborer d’autres, de manière à tenir compte, d’une part, de la situation politique et, d’autre part, des innovations techniques et scientifiques qui se produisent dans le domaine de l’espace extra-atmosphérique. C. Les aspects technologiques et scientifiques 139. Les incidences technologiques des mesures propres à accroître la confiance dans l’espace sont doubles, certaines se rapportant aux technologies pouvant aider à aider à accroître la confiance dans l’espace, et les autres à celles qui peuvent remplir la même fonction à partir de ce milieu. 140. Certaines activités propres à renforcer la confiance dans l’espace pourraient nécessiter une gamme de technologies qui permettent de surveiller les activités spatiales et d’accroître la transparence des opérations spatiales. A l’heure actuelle, alors que certaines de ces activités font l’objet d’accords internationaux, comme la publication préalable et les procédures de notification pour toutes les stations spatiales conformément aux réglementations de l’Union internationale des télécommunications, de nombreuses activités ne sont pas visées par des accords internationaux spécifiques. /...A/48/305 Français Page 50 141. L’accroissement de la confiance à partir de l’espace peut être renforcé par des systèmes divers capables de surveiller les activités militaires terrestres aux fins d’appuyer les régimes actuels et futurs en matière de confiance, de désarmement et de limitation des armements. 142. De nombreux systèmes spatiaux ont intrinsèquement un double potentiel, c’est-à-dire qu’ils peuvent remplir des fonctions aussi bien militaires que civiles. La technologie utilisée pour lancer les satellites est analogue, à bien des égards, à celle qui est utilisée pour les missiles balistiques à longue portée. Les satellites permettant de surveiller les ressources naturelles peuvent également fournir des images présentant un intérêt pour les militaires chargés de la planification. En outre, les satellites de télécommunications, les satellites météorologiques et beaucoup d’autres types de satellites sont utiles aussi bien au secteur militaire qu’au domaine civil. 143. Les applications multiples de la technologie spatiale ont plusieurs conséquences spécifiques. Certaines opérations spatiales, qui ne sont pas toutes militaires, produisent des débris artificiels qui peuvent constituer un danger pour les autres satellites. Qui plus est, certains types de missions spatiales, aussi bien militaires que civiles, pourraient nécessiter l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires. L’application des clauses en matière d’information contenues dans la résolution 47/68 de l’Assemblée générale pourrait apaiser les inquiétudes dans le domaine de la sécurité suscitées par l’utilisation de telles sources dans l’espace. L’interdiction complète des sources d’énergie nucléaires risque de ne pas être acceptable, mais il reste sans doute nécessaire d’accroître l’information et l’ouverture dans ce domaine pour dissiper les craintes concernant la sécurité. 1. Technologie et espace 144. Les considérations technologiques offrent un certain nombre de possibilités pour l’application de mesures de confiance dans l’espace, tout en fixant des limites pratiques. Elles concernent aussi bien la nature des activités spatiales que les moyens d’observer celles-ci. 145. Les activités spatiales peuvent être divisées en plusieurs phases : lancement, orbites de transfert, déploiements, vérification et opérations. Classer un satellite avec précision d’après sa fonction finale, avant qu’il ne devienne opérationnel, peut s’avérer difficile. Toutefois, quand ils sont sur orbite, les satellites présentent généralement des caractéristiques propres aux engins spatiaux remplissant leur fonction particulière, et celle-ci est ainsi généralement identifiée. Les satellites de télécommunications relaieront des transmissions radioélectriques caractérisées par une puissance, une gamme de fréquences et une polarisation spécifiques. Les satellites utilisés pour la météorologie et pour surveiller les ressources à l’aide de moyens optiques, ainsi que les satellites d’imagerie pour le renseignement et d’alerte avancée en cas de lancements de missiles, utiliseront tous des systèmes optiques possédant des ouvertures de dimensions diverses et transmettront une grande quantité de données. Les satellites radar, tant civils que militaires, déploieront de grandes antennes de transmission et de réception, émettant des signaux radioélectriques caractéristique du radar, associés à des données à grande vitesse. Les satellites de renseignement électronique peuvent déployer des antennes de réception distinctives. Enfin, tous les types de satellites /...A/48/305 Français Page 51 transmettent aux stations terriennes des signaux de télémesure présentant des constantes qui leur sont propres. a) Les techniques relatives à la surveillance des opérations spatiales 146. Depuis 1957, les Etats-Unis et l’Union soviétique ont déployé une vaste gamme de systèmes pour surveiller les activités spatiales36. Ces systèmes devaient, entre autres, donner l’alerte en cas d’attaque aux missiles stratégiques. Le nombre croissant de satellites sur orbite a cependant accentué la nécessité de suivre les nouveaux lancements et les désintégrations imminentes de satellites, pour éviter de confondre ces événements avec des lancements de missiles hostiles. Qui plus est, l’élargissement du champ des opérations militaires dans l’espace a fait de la poursuite et de la caractérisation des systèmes spatiaux une mission importante en soi. 147. Les systèmes de poursuite des satellites, aussi bien optiques que radar, figurent parmi les techniques de détection militaires les plus perfectionnées et les plus coûteuses. Les radars de poursuite dans l’espace ont en règle générale une portée et une sensibilité de 10 à 100 fois supérieures à celles des radars utilisés pour la poursuite d’aéronefs ou d’objectifs de surface. Par ailleurs, les systèmes de poursuite optique utilisent des télescopes que seuls ceux des plus grands observatoires astronomiques civils dépassent en puissance. b) Les systèmes optiques passifs basés au sol 148. Les premiers systèmes de poursuite des satellites, qui restent les moins coûteux, utilisent la lumière du soleil réfléchie par les engins spatiaux. Visibles dans le ciel avant l’aube ou après le crépuscule, les plus grands engins spatiaux en orbite basse, tels que les stations spatiales ou les satellites imageurs de renseignement, sont comparables aux étoiles les plus brillantes, et de nombreux autres satellites en orbite basse sont visibles à l’oeil nu37. Même les satellites évoluant à des altitudes géosynchrones sont visibles au moyen d’instruments optiques relativement peu puissants, dans des conditions d’éclairage optimal38. 149. La possibilité d’observer les satellites au moyen d’un télescope dépend principalement de l’ouverture de la surface optique primaire de la lunette, ainsi que des propriétés du dispositif utilisé pour former l’image. Des télescopes munis de miroirs pouvant atteindre quatre mètres de diamètre ont été utilisés pour suivre les satellites. A l’origine, les caméras utilisées à cette fin employaient des systèmes à film, mais ces derniers ont été remplacés récemment par des dispositifs à couplage de charges (CCD). Ceux-ci permettent une lecture instantanée de l’image et évitent d’avoir à traiter les films, ce qui prend du temps. Ces caméras électroniques, associées à des dispositifs de traitement de l’image, ont permis à des télescopes scientifiques à ouverture moyenne (quelques mètres) d’obtenir des images reconnaissables de grands engins spatiaux en orbite basse39. c) Les systèmes optiques actifs basés au sol 150. Bien que la plupart des détecteurs optiques utilisent la lumière réfléchie du soleil ou le rayonnement infrarouge pour suivre les satellites, les /...A/48/305 Français Page 52 détecteurs optiques actifs sont de plus en plus utilisés. En illuminant l’objectif au moyen d’un rayonnement laser cohérent, ces systèmes peuvent prendre des images de satellites qui, la nuit, ne sont pas illuminés par la lumière du soleil, ou d’objectifs qui pourraient être invisibles durant la journée en raison de la luminosité du ciel. L’utilisation de l’illumination active permet également de mesurer directement la distance à laquelle se trouve l’objectif et facilite la caractérisation de la structure du satellite. d) Les radars basés au sol 151. Les systèmes radar basés au sol ont été utilisés depuis la fin des années 50 pour suivre les satellites civils et militaires40. Les radars présentent plusieurs avantages par rapport aux systèmes de poursuite optique, dont la capacité d’observer les objectifs et de mesurer la distance à laquelle ils se trouvent, indépendamment des conditions météorologiques et de l’illumination naturelle. Aujourd’hui, les Etats-Unis et la Communauté d’Etats indépendants déploient de vastes réseaux de radars qui suivent les satellites et remplissent d’autres fonctions, telles que la détection des attaques aux missiles. 152. 152 A mesure que la technologie des radars a progressé, le problème a pris une nouvelle dimension. Les grands radars perfectionnés à éléments en phase utilisés d’aujourd’hui peuvent remplir plusieurs fonctions. Ils peuvent donner une alerte avancée en cas d’attaque de missiles ou de bombardiers. Ils peuvent suivre les satellites et autres objets spatiaux et observer des essais de missiles pour obtenir des informations à des fins de surveillance. Ils constituent également un élément essentiel de la génération actuelle des systèmes ABM, qui permettent de donner l’alerte initiale en cas d’attaque, de faciliter la conduite des combats, de distinguer les véhicules de rentrée des leurres, et de guider les intercepteurs vers leurs objectifs. e) Les caractéristiques des autres moyens techniques de surveillance de l’espace 153. Alors que ces différents systèmes de collecte de données, dont un grand nombre a été conçu à d’autres fins, peuvent accroître la transparence des opérations spatiales, certaines activités militaires dans l’espace pourraient nécessiter l’application de techniques spécialement étudiées pour inspirer suffisamment de confiance quant à leur nature précise. 154. La présence de sources d’énergie nucléaires et de nombreuses armes spatiales à bord des satellites pourrait être déterminée au moyen d’une inspection, avant le lancement, de toutes les charges utiles. f) La surveillance des armes spatiales 155. Lorsqu’on étudie les systèmes de surveillance des armes spatiales, trois critères s’appliquent. Heureusement, les systèmes de collecte des données techniques nécessaires et les autres moyens propres à accroître la transparence devraient être disponibles durant la période au cours de laquelle des activités présentant un intérêt doivent se produire. /...A/48/305 Français Page 53 156. Deuxièmement, le coût de la surveillance peut représenter un gros obstacle à la vérification. Les mécanismes de vérification qui appellent de grandes dépenses pour produire des données présentant peu d’intérêt ont de faibles chances de bénéficier d’un appui suffisant. 157. Troisièmement, les systèmes de collecte de données techniques n’ont pas besoin d’être efficaces au point de reproduire les systèmes anti-missiles qu’ils sont censés limiter. Les mécanismes de vérification prévoyant des rendez-vous spatiaux de satellites d’inspection avec d’autres satellites pour déterminer la présence, ou l’absence, d’activités interdites pourraient être difficiles à distinguer des systèmes antisatellites proscrits. De même, il pourrait être difficile de distinguer les grands capteurs munis de télescopes à infrarouge basés dans l’espace et utilisés à des fins de vérification, des capteurs qui pourraient constituer la base d’un système ABM conçu pour faciliter la conduite des combats. 158. L’efficacité d’un laser (sa "luminosité") dépend de l’ouverture de son miroir ainsi que de la puissance et de la longueur d’onde de son faisceau. Alors que l’ouverture du miroir peut être contrôlée par des moyens divers, on ne sait pas très bien si les techniques dont on dispose actuellement permettent de contrôler plus que le faisceau opérationnel principal. Il faudra peut-être attendre encore 10 ans avant que les instruments voulus pour contrôler la puissance et la longueur d’onde des dispositifs laser ne soient disponibles. 159. Par exemple, la mise au point et le déploiement dans l’espace de nouveaux capteurs spécialisés conçus pour surveiller des limites telles que la luminosité des lasers pourraient nécessiter jusqu’à 10 ans à partir du moment où la décision est prise. Cela étant, on pourrait envisager des mesures concertées, telles que la création de stations de surveillance à l’échelon national, car elles pourraient être appliquées beaucoup plus tôt. 160. Tous les satellites civils et militaires sont placés sur orbite au moyen de lanceurs qui peuvent être observés par des satellites d’alerte avancée. Les installations et activités de lancement sont surveillées par des satellites imageurs. Tous les satellites sur orbite peuvent être suivis par divers radars et caméras basés au sol. 161. Des essais antisatellites et d’autres essais apparentés menés contre un point dans l’espace en l’absence d’un objectif ne fourniraient pas suffisamment de garanties en ce qui concerne la précision sans erreur requise pour les mécanismes de destruction par impact utilisant l’énergie cinétique. Les manoeuvres des intercepteurs à énergie cinétique peuvent être distinguées des activités des autres satellites. En outre, les flux de données de télémesure provenant des satellites sont surveillés par les capteurs basés dans l’espace. Compte tenu des conditions uniques requises pour la mise à l’essai des armes à énergie cinétique, celles-ci pourraient être facilement surveillées de diverses manières. 2. La technologie et les mesures de confiance 162. Tout en pouvant faire l’objet de mesures de surveillance et de confiance, les systèmes spatiaux permettent également de contribuer à l’application de ces mêmes mesures. Les satellites peuvent être utilisés pour surveiller d’autres/...A/48/305 Français Page 54 satellites, ainsi que l’évolution de la situation sur la Terre. Bien que cette dernière application figure au nombre des missions réservées aux satellites imageurs et aux autres satellites de renseignement examinés plus haut, il a également été proposé de mettre au point des satellites spécialement à cette fin. Pour certains pays, la transparence à l’égard des capacités de lancement est une question importante. a) PAXSAT-A 163. Le concept canadien PAXSAT-A, mis au point en 1987-1988, est le résultat d’une étude de faisabilité concernant la possibilité pour un engin spatial spécialisé de fournir des informations sur un autre engin spatial; le concept PAXSAT-B (examiné ci-après) a été conçu pour surveiller les activités au sol à partir de l’espace41. 164. PAXSAT-A concerne la vérification de la mise à poste des armes dans l’espace, d’où la nécessité de déterminer discrètement la fonction et l’objet du satellite. Les détecteurs du programme doivent fonctionner de manière complémentaire, en combinant par exemple l’image de l’antenne radar d’un satellite avec des données relatives à la longueur d’onde de fonctionnement du radar, ce qui fournit une indication de la résolution du satellite et de sa couverture du sol. La masse du satellite visé peut être évaluée à partir de données sur l’ouverture du propulseur et des observations radar des accélérations du satellite après des mises à feu de durée déterminée, lesquelles pourraient être surveillées au moyen de détecteurs infrarouges. 165. Au début, le réseau PAXSAT-A pourrait comprendre deux satellites opérationnels et un satellite de rechange placés sur des orbites très inclinées à des altitudes situées entre 500 et 2 000 kilomètres. Par la suite, un satellite supplémentaire pourrait être placé sur une orbite semi-synchrone, et un autre sur une orbite géosynchrone. b) Les satellites pour la surveillance des activités terrestres 166. Les satellites imageurs et les autres satellites de renseignement ont largement contribué à la limitation des armements. Toujours est-il que, jusqu’ici, les satellites utilisés pour vérifier la limitation des armements ont rempli cette fonction en sus de leur mission première, c’est-à-dire la collecte de renseignements militaires tactiques et stratégiques. Plusieurs propositions ont toutefois été formulées pour le déploiement de satellites qui serviraient expressément à vérifier la limitation des armements. Ces satellites pourraient apporter une contribution positive aux initiatives visant à accroître la confiance sur les plans régional et mondial, dans le cadre d’arrangements institutionnels spécifiques. c) L’Agence internationale de satellites de contrôle (AISC) 167. En 1978, à la première session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale consacrée au désarmement, la France a présenté une proposition appelant à la création d’une Agence internationale de satellites de contrôle (AISC) pour la vérification, à l’échelon international, des accords de désarmement et de limitation des armements et pour la surveillance des situations de crise42. /...A/48/305 Français Page 55 Cette proposition a débouché sur une étude d’un groupe d’experts, consacrée aux incidences de la création d’une telle agence43. 168. Il était envisagé que l’application du concept de l’AISC se déroule en trois phases : a) Phase I : création d’un Centre de traitement et d’interprétation des images (CTI) utilisant les images transmises par les satellites civils et les autres satellites nationaux aux fins de formation et d’exploitation; b) Phase II : création au sol d’un réseau de 10 stations spécialisées pour la réception des données communiquées par les satellites, qu’ils soient civils ou non; c) Phase III : lancement et mise en exploitation de trois engins spatiaux spécialisés de l’AISC. 169. La phase initiale de cette proposition a par la suite été proposée par la France à la troisième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale consacrée au désarmement en juin 1988, sous le titre Agence de traitement des images satellitaires (ATIS)44. La fonction principale de l’Agence devait correspondre à celle de l’AISC dans sa phase initiale, à savoir la collecte et le traitement des données transmises par les satellites civils et la communication des résultats des analyses aux Etats Membres. Cette fonction pourrait contribuer à la vérification des accords de désarmement et de limitation des armements en vigueur, à l’établissement des faits avant la conclusion de nouveaux accords, à la surveillance des situations de crise et des accords de dégagement, ainsi qu’à la prévention et à la gestion des catastrophes et des risques naturels majeurs. L’Agence pourrait servir de centre pour la formation d’experts en photo-interprétation ainsi que de centre de recherche pour le développement de ces applications. d) L’Agence internationale de surveillance de l’espace (AISE) 170. A la troisième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale consacrée au désarmement, en 1988, l’Union soviétique a proposé de créer une Agence internationale de surveillance de l’espace (AISE)45 qui fournirait à la communauté internationale des informations concernant l’observation des arrangements multilatéraux dans le domaine du désarmement et la réduction des tensions sur le plan international, et qui permettrait également de surveiller la situation militaire dans les zones de conflit. De l’avis de l’Union soviétique, le fait de mettre à la disposition d’une organisation internationale les résultats de la surveillance effectuée au moyen des systèmes à satellites nationaux constituerait un pas important vers la promotion de la confiance et de la transparence dans les relations entre Etats. 171. Outre les aspects liés à la politique militaire, les activités de l’AISE pourraient intéresser nombre d’Etats, car elle pourrait leur fournir des données satellite aux fins du développement économique. 172. L’AISE pourrait se voir attribuer les fonctions suivantes : a) La collecte d’informations au moyen de la surveillance spatiale; /...A/48/305 Français Page 56 b) L’examen des demandes provenant de l’ONU et des différents Etats concernant l’étude des services d’information qui pourraient les aider à évaluer le respect des arrangements et des accords internationaux relatifs au règlement des guerres et des situations de crise locales; c) L’élaboration de recommandations sur les modalités applicables à l’utilisation des moyens de surveillance de l’espace aux fins du contrôle ou de la vérification des traités et accords futurs. 173. Le concept de l’AISE peut être appliqué avec succès à condition d’aller de l’avant et d’établir des bases politique, juridique et technique solides pour la mise en oeuvre des étapes ultérieures. a) Dans un premier temps, un centre de traitement et d’interprétation des images spatiales serait créé en tant que principal organe technique de l’AISE. Compte tenu de la diversité des données transmises par les sources nationales de surveillance de l’espace, il est particulièrement important de disposer d’un moyen universel pour convertir les données provenant de sources diverses en un système d’information géographique intégré aux fins de traitement et d’analyse ultérieurs. L’obligation de fournir un tel dispositif pourrait incomber aux Etats Membres possédant les ressources financières et technologiques nécessaires pour le créer; b) Dans un deuxième temps, les activités de l’AISE seraient consacrées à la création d’un réseau de récepteurs de données basés au sol, destiné à recevoir, par des voies fonctionnant quasiment en temps réel, des données, communiquées par les Etats Membres possédant des moyens de surveillance de l’espace46. e) PAXSAT-B 174. Le programme canadien de recherche PAXSAT-B concerne la possibilité d’utiliser les technologies spatiales pour vérifier des accords de maîtrise des forces classiques dans une région limitée, telle que l’Europe47. Le contexte politique et militaire supposé était le même que celui de PAXSAT-A. Le programme PAXSAT-B devait fournir des données dans le cadre de deux scénarios : a) Dans le cas le plus critique, il s’agissait de détecter une action de rupture ou un déploiement soudain et de faire en sorte que le satellite ait accès à n’importe quel point de la région dans les 36 heures; b) Dans le cas le moins critique, il s’agissait d’inspecter l’ensemble de la zone visée par le traité en 30 à 40 jours. 175. Compte tenu des conditions météorologiques de l’Europe, le satellite d’inspection devait être équipé d’un capteur radar imageur tout-temps, susceptible de faire échec à des contre-mesures de camouflage rudimentaires. /...A/48/305 Français Page 57 VI. MESURES DE CONFIANCE DANS L’ESPACE A. La nécessité de mesures de confiance dans l’espace 176. Les préoccupations suscitées par l’évolution récente des activités spatiales, ainsi que la nécessité de prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace expliquent l’importance potentielle des mesures de confiance dans l’espace. 177. Plusieurs Etats ont fait état de nombreux problèmes de sécurité soulevés par les orientations présentes et potentielles des activités militaires spatiales. Certains de ces problèmes sont liés entre eux et leur portée peut être mondiale et régionale. 178. Les préoccupations des Etats n’ont pas seulement trait à la militarisation de l’espace, mais viennent aussi plus particulièrement du risque qu’il ne devienne un véritable "arsenal". A l’heure actuelle, il n’y a pas d’armes déployées dans l’espace, et la quasi-totalité de la communauté mondiale veut avoir la certitude qu’il n’y en aura jamais. Les systèmes de défenses antimissiles balistiques et d’armes antisatellites sont l’une des causes premières de ces préoccupations. Ces systèmes sont susceptibles de menacer des satellites sur orbite, y compris ceux qui jouent un rôle important dans le maintien de la stabilité stratégique. 179. Une deuxième préoccupation est suscitée par l’utilisation croissante de systèmes militaires spatiaux pour appuyer des combats terrestres, et par les fortes différences de potentiel des systèmes d’armes modernes. Aujourd’hui, les satellites militaires jouent un rôle de plus en plus important sur les champs de bataille. 180. Une autre préoccupation a pour origine la prolifération à travers le monde des techniques missilières. Tout en admettant qu’un Etat a légitimement le droit de se doter d’une capacité balistique à des fins pacifiques, de nombreux Etats pensent que ces capacités risquent d’être utilisées à des fins militaires, par exemple pour des activités spatiales que l’on pourrait juger hostiles envers d’autres Etats. 181. De tous ces problèmes naît une inquiétude, qui est de voir les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace de plus en plus limitées par des considérations militaires. Jusqu’à présent, les missions spatiales menées simultanément n’ont donné lieu dans la plupart des cas qu’à des interférences relativement mineures. Toutefois, le développement futur des programmes militaires spatiaux pourrait limiter les possibilités de coopération internationale concernant les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace. 182. On n’est cependant pas encore parvenu à un accord sur le point de savoir si le régime international régissant actuellement l’espace est approprié ou non. Certes, son importance a été admise, mais des incertitudes subsistent. Ainsi, certains Etats parties au Traité de 1967 sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique tiennent à ce que le Traité ne s’oppose à aucune activité militaire dans l’espace à l’exception de la mise en orbite d’armes nucléaire ou autres armes de destruction massive. D’autres font valoir que le Traité, en prescrivant /...A/48/305 Français Page 58 l’utilisation pacifique de l’espace, interdit l’application de systèmes militaires spatiaux pour appuyer des combats sur la Terre. 183. Comme il est indiqué au Chapitre IV, le régime juridique international actuellement appliqué à l’espace couvre au moins trois catégories d’activités spatiales. Les activités qui sont interdites par diverses dispositions du régime juridique, telles que la mise sur orbite d’armes de destruction massive, les activités qui sont encouragées, c’est-à-dire celles qui favorisent les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace au bénéfice de toute l’humanité, comme l’exploration et la découverte scientifiques, les activités qui sont autorisées, c’est-à-dire toutes celles qui, sans être formellement interdites, ne sont pas expressément encouragées. Ces grandes distinctions ont peut-être été appropriées aux premiers temps de l’âge de l’espace, mais il n’est pas évident que l’on puisse en tirer des principes directeurs adéquats pour les décennies à venir. Devant le développement des capacités spatiales et l’augmentation du nombre de pays intervenant activement dans l’utilisation de l’espace, il faudra peut-être élaborer de nouvelles normes internationales de comportement. 184. L’élargissement progressif de la gamme des activités spatiales et le nombre croissant des pays ayant accès à l’espace justifient la mise au point graduelle de nouvelles normes internationales régissant les activités spatiales. Vu le temps qu’il faut pour mener à terme les négociations préalables à tout nouveau traité multilatéral relatif aux activités spatiales, il serait utile d’élaborer une série de mesures de confiance pour accélérer le processus. B. Propositions de mesures de confiance spécifiques dans l’espace 185. Au cours des dernières décennies, plusieurs Etats ont proposé de très nombreuses mesures relatives à la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace. Dès 1957, au Sous-Comité de la Commission du désarmement, le Canada, les Etats-Unis, la France et le Royaume-Uni avaient demandé une étude technique sur les caractéristiques d’un système d’inspection chargé de s’assurer que l’envoi d’objets dans l’espace n’ait pas d’autres fins qu’exclusivement pacifiques et scientifiques48. 186. Certaines des propositions faites au cours des 10 dernières années visent directement la limitation des armements et l’interdiction de l’envoi d’armes dans l’espace et d’activités connexes. Plusieurs autres propositions ont trait aux mesures de confiance dans ce domaine. Certaines initiatives concernant la limitation des armements contiennent elles aussi des dispositions garantissant une plus grande transparence des activités et présentent donc un intérêt dans le contexte présent49. 187. On trouvera au tableau 3 une présentation schématique des propositions faites au cours des 10 dernières années en ce qui concerne les mesures de confiance. Ces propositions se répartissent en plusieurs catégories, dont les suivantes : a) Les propositions visant à accroître la transparence des opérations spatiales sur un plan général; /...A/48/305 Français Page 59 Tableau 3 Propositions concernant des mesures de confiance et de sécurité examinées par le Comité spécial sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace A. Mesures de confiance Nature des mesures proposées Principal objectif Mesures Moyens Facultative/Réciproque (1989) Transparence dans le domaine du droit international relatif à l’espace et des activités menées dans ce milieu Degré de compréhension des Etats des obligations découlant des traités et respect par eux de ces obligations Partage de l’information en ce qui concerne leurs activités actuelles et prévues dans l’espace Diffusion d’informations par : La voie diplomatique dans le cadre de la Conférence du désarmement Le Secrétaire général de la Conférence du désarmement Obligation contractuelle Code de conduite et règles régissant la circulation des objets spatiaux ("code de la route") Droit international : Améliorer les normes juridiques existantes en matière de transparence Espace et activités : Etablir une série de normes que les Etats suivraient pour exécuter leurs propres activités dans l’espace ou se déterminer par rapport à celles des autres Réduire les risques de collision accidentelle, prévenir les incidents, prévenir la poursuite rapprochée sur une même orbite et diffuser des renseignements plus fiables sur la circulation des engins spatiaux Mise à jour permanente, en cas de manoeuvres ou de déviation, des éléments d’orbite déclarée au moment de l’immatriculation Maintenir une distance minimale entre deux satellites placés sur la même orbite (afin d’éviter non seulement les collisions accidentelles, mais aussi la poursuite rapprochée sur une même orbite, qui est une condition préalable à la mise en place de systèmes de mines spatiales) Surveillance du passage rapproché (afin de réduire le risque de collision ou de brouillage) Elargissement de la Convention sur l’immatriculation en ce qui concerne les informations concernant les lancements prévus par les Etats Etablissement d’un mécanisme de demandes d’explication en cas d’incidents ou d’activités suspectes Identification des zones d’exclusion sous la forme de deux zones sphériques se déplaçant avec chaque satellite : 1) une zone de proximité permettant de préciser l’emplacement de chaque objet spatial en orbite réciproque, ainsi que la capacité de chaque objet de se déplacer par rapport aux autres, et 2) une zone d’approche plus vaste, avec notification obligatoire de la traversée de la zone Centre international de notification des lancements Notification des lancements de missiles balistiques et des dispositifs de lancement Création d’un centre international sous les auspices de l’Organisation des Nations Unies Rassemblement et analyse de données sur les lancements Centre international de trajectographie (1989) Rassembler des données permettant de mettre à jour l’immatriculation Surveiller les objets spatiaux Effectuer des calculs en temps réel des trajectoires des objets spatiaux Création d’un centre international de trajectographie et mise en place d’un dispositif de consultation Données fournies par chaque Etat concernant ses propres satellites ou les satellites qu’il a repérés. Mise à jour permanente des informations sur les orbites et les manoeuvres Agence de traitement des images satellitaires (1989) Rassembler des données pour faciliter la vérification des accords de désarmement et centraliser l’échange de données, l’établissement de certains faits, tels que les estimations des forces, avant de conclure des accords de désarmement Contrôler le respect des accords de dégagement (conflits locaux) Prévention des catastrophes naturelles et mesures prises pour y faire face; programmes de développement Création à peu de frais d’un organisme de traitement, de gestion, d’analyse et de diffusion de données Rassemblement et traitement des données obtenues à l’aide des satellites civils existants, puis diffusion de ces données auprès des membres de l’Agence Source : extrait d’une étude de l’INURD intitulée "Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for International Security", UNIDIR/92/77 (publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : GV.92.0.30), p. 100. /...A/48/305 Français Page 60 B. Mesures de confiance et de sécurité se rapportant à un code de conduite applicable aux activités spatiales des Etats Code de conduite applicable aux activités spatiales des Etats Mesures envisagées pour améliorer la transparence des activités avant le lancement Mesures relevant d’un "code de la route" Mesures nécessaires pour vérifier le respect d’un code de conduite Premier paquet Quatrième paquet Septième paquet Dixième paquet Notification annuelle d’intention Règles concernant la notification de changement d’orbite Règles concernant le droit d’inspection Contrôle de la circulation dans l’espace Deuxième paquet Cinquième paquet Huitième paquet Onzième paquet Notification finale Règles concernant les débris spatiaux Règles concernant la définition de zones d’exclusion Mesures "institutionnelles" Troisième paquet Sixième paquet Neuvième paquet Inspection sur place des satellites avant le lancement Règles concernant les manoeuvres dans l’espace Règles concernant les consultations Source : Extrait du document CD/OS/WP.58 (établi à partir des propositions des Etats membres de la Conférence qui participent aux travaux du Comité spécial sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace. /...A/48/305 Français Page 61 C. Arrangements institutionnels éventuels Caractéristique Agence internationale de satellite de contrôle France 1978 Organisation mondiale de l’espace URSS 1985 PAXSAT A Canada 1986 Inspectorat spatial international Union soviétique 1988 Agence internationale de surveillance spatiale Union soviétique 1988 Centre international de trajectographie France 1989 Agence de traitement des images satellitaires France 1989 Centre international de notification des lancements France 1993 Type Proposition Proposition Concept Proposition Proposition Proposition Proposition Proposition Portée Mondiale : traités existants et futurs (nombre illimité de traités concernant tous types d’armes et de systèmes d’armes) Mondiale : promouvoir la coopération mondiale dans le domaine de l’espace Traité concernant spécifiquement la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace (nombre illimité de traités) Traité spécifique sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace : interdiction de placer des armes quelconques dans l’espace Mondiale : traités existants et futurs (nombre illimité de traités concernant tous types d’armes et de systèmes d’armes) Mondiale : tous les Etats possédant ou exploitant des satellites; accords futurs Mondiale : membres de l’Agence Mondiale : nouvel instrument international sur un régime de notification préalable des lancements d’engins spatiaux et de missiles balistiques Objectifs Contrôle; vérification (dans le cadre d’arrangements spéciaux) Coopération en matière de communication, navigation, sauvetage, prévision météorologique, etc. Vérification (dans le cadre d’arrangements spéciaux) Vérification Contrôle; vérification (dans le cadre d’arrangements spéciaux) Contrôle de la trajectoire des engins sur orbite terrestre Rassembler et traiter les données obtenues par les satellites civils existants; faire fonction de centre de recherche; former des spécialistes nationaux de l’interprétation des images spatiales; Renforcer la coopération et la transparence dans l’espace Application : contrôle et/ou vérification (selon les besoins) Limitation des armements et désarmements; organisations internationales régionales s’occupant de questions de sécurité; règlement des différends Coordination des différentes utilisations pacifiques de l’espace Limitation des armements et désarmement Limitation des armements et désarmement Limitation des armements et désarmement; organisations internationales régionales s’occupant de questions de sécurité; mesures de confiance; règlement des différends; catastrophes naturelles; autres situations d’urgence Mesures de confiance; fournir la preuve de sa bonne foi en cas d’une collision présumée délibérée Mesures de confiance et de sécurité; contrôle du respect des accords de dégagement dans le cadre de conflits en cours Notification, mesures de confiance, transparence Méthode Télédétection (espace vers Terre) Télésondage de la Terre par des moyens géophysiques et à l’aide d’engins interplanétaires automatiques Télédétection (espace vers espace) Inspections sur place Télédétection (espace vers Terre) Rassemblement de données grâce aux satellites des Etats; dispositifs de poursuite et informatiques à haut rendement Rassembler des données grâce à des détecteurs au sol et de satellite Recevoir des informations; créer une banque de données; fournir des informations Fonction Moyens techniques nationaux; satellites de l’Agence Communication, sauvetage, étude et préservation de la biosphère terrestre; exploitation de nouvelles sources d’énergie, etc. Satellites PAXSAT (les moyens techniques nationaux des Etats parties peuvent fournir certaines données) Equipes permanentes d’inspection; équipes d’inspection ponctuelle Moyens techniques nationaux; possibilité d’utiliser les satellites de l’Agence internationale de satellites de contrôle Rassembler des données pour mettre à jour les immatriculations; contrôler les objets spatiaux; effectuer des calculs en temps réel des trajectoires des objets spatiaux Traiter des données de télémaintenance; contrôler la qualité des données; techniques de photointerprrétatio et d’interprétation assistée par ordinateur Fournir des informations en utilisant les capacités de détection mises spontanément à disposition par les Etats Produit Fourniture de données de contrôle/vérification par satellite Diffuser des données scientifiques et techniques Fourniture de données de vérification par satellite Vérification spécifique du traité Fourniture de données de contrôle/vérification par satellite Fourniture de données à stocker, qui ne sont pas publiées Diffuser des données à diffusion restreinte ou non Fournir des informations grâce à la banque de données Source : Etude de l’INURD intitulée Prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace, UNIDIR/86/08 (publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : GV.86.0.2), p. 137; et documents CD/PV.377, CD/937 et CD/OS/WP.59. /...A/48/305 Français Page 62 b) Les propositions visant expressément à augmenter le nombre d’informations concernant les satellites sur orbite; c) Les propositions visant à établir des règles de comportement régissant les opérations spatiales; d) Les propositions relatives au transfert international de technologies spatiales et balistiques; 188. Il n’entre pas dans le cadre de la présente étude d’étudier toutes les propositions, officielles et non officielles, qui ont été faites. On se contentera donc, dans la présentation ci-après, d’examiner les propositions soumises aux différentes instances du désarmement, dont la Conférence du désarmement, la Commission du désarmement de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, la Première Commission de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies, ainsi, notamment, que certaines propositions bilatérales avancées dans le cadre des négociations entre les Etats-Unis et l’Union soviétique. Selon une étude de l’UNIDIR50, ces propositions se répartissent entre les catégories visées aux paragraphes suivants : 1. Mesures de confiance sur une base de réciprocité librement consentie 189. Il serait possible de convenir de certains arrangements non appelés à l’origine à constituer un traité. Tout arrangement de cette nature se présenterait sous la forme de propositions non contraignantes que les Etats appliqueraient dans un esprit de réciprocité. Une telle approche, si elle est acceptée, prouverait un comportement coopératif et contribuerait à établir une confiance réciproque. 190. Formulant une proposition de cet ordre, le Pakistan avait suggéré, en 1986, que la Conférence sur le désarmement "devrait demander aux puissances spatiales de fournir des renseignements sur les activités qu’elles poursuivent ou projettent dans l’espace et d’indiquer qu’elles comprennent et respectent les obligations qui leur incombent en vertu des traités pertinents51". 191. En 1989, la Pologne a présenté une proposition, selon laquelle des mesures seraient adoptées par la Conférence du désarmement elle-même, qui recevrait des Etats participants les informations propres à améliorer la transparence des activités spatiales52. Ces mesures, qui n’étaient pas censées être juridiquement contraignantes prévoiraient notamment ce qui suit : a) Un droit positif relatif à l’espace il s’agit de réaffirmer l’importance du droit spatial; d’en appeler à tous les Etats pour qu’ils agissent conformément à ce droit; de demander à tous les Etats non encore parties aux accords concernant l’espace d’envisager leur adhésion à ces instruments internationaux; de suggérer à tous les Etats parties aux traités et accords multilatéraux relatifs à l’espace de reconnaître la juridiction de la Cour internationale de justice dans tous les différends soulevés par l’interprétation et l’application de ces instruments; b) La transparence dans les activités spatiales il s’agit pour les pays d’échanger volontairement des informations sur leurs activités spatiales, telles que les activités menées à des fins militaires ou liées au domaine militaire; de /...A/48/305 Français Page 63 notifier au préalable le lancement d’objets spatiaux; d’envoyer des observateurs dans le cadre du lancement d’objets spatiaux, de la préparation d’autres activités spatiales, ou de la participation à ces dernières, notamment à celles ayant des fonctions militaires ou liées au domaine militaire (dans un esprit de réciprocité et de bonne volonté); et de fournir toute information jugée utile pour 1) renforcer la confiance et 2) réduire les malentendus; c) Destination des informations les informations sont adressées aux autres membres de la Conférence du désarmement, soit par les voies diplomatiques, soit par l’intermédiaire du Secrétaire général de la Conférence du désarmement; elles sont accessibles à tous les Etats. 192. La Pologne a proposé d’autres mesures, au titre desquelles les membres de la Conférence du désarmement, et notamment les pays dotés de capacités dans le domaine spatial, devraient s’accorder à reconnaître qu’en acceptant volontairement d’accroître la transparence on contribuerait à réduire les malentendus entre les Etats. 193. En 1991, la France s’est déclarée "prête à examiner favorablement une mesure prévoyant des visites d’évaluation sur le site de lancement, voire sur le site de contrôle en orbite d’un engin spatial immatriculé", et a clairement dit que les mesures prévoyant de telles visites devraient avoir lieu sur une base volontaire et que "seul l’Etat ayant expressément accepté de faire l’objet d’une telle inspection pourrait être visité53". 2. Mesures de confiance sur une base contractuelle ayant force obligatoire 194. Les mesures de confiance sur une base contractuelle ont fait l’objet de plusieurs propositions différentes. C’est ainsi qu’en 1986 le Pakistan a exposé que ces mesures pourraient comprendre, entre autres : des négociations visant à parvenir à un accord provisoire ou partiel en vue de la conclusion d’un traité international appelé à compléter le Traité sur la limitation des systèmes de missiles antimissiles; un moratoire concernant la mise au point, les essais et le déploiement d’armes antisatellites; et l’immunité des objets spatiaux54. 195. On pourrait ajouter aux propositions ci-dessus des propositions visant la création d’une agence spatiale internationale et/ou d’un centre international de trajectographie. a) Code de conduite et code de la route dans l’espace 196. Les deux expressions, code de conduite et code de la route, ont été utilisées l’une pour l’autre dans les débats consacrés aux mesures de confiance lors de la Conférence du désarmement. Au sens vrai du terme, un code de conduite dans l’espace consiste en une série de normes destinées à orienter le comportement des Etats en ce qui concerne leurs propres activités et/ou celles des autres. Le code de la route, parfois appelé règles de comportement, vise toutefois soit le processus conduisant à un accord sur ces normes, soit les normes elles-mêmes. Le code de la route serait donc une partie du code de conduite. 197. La France, par exemple, a préconisé l’objectif d’un code de bonne conduite consistant à "assurer la sécurité des activités spatiales tout en prévenant /...A/48/305 Français Page 64 l’utilisation de l’espace à des fins agressives". Elle a déclaré en outre qu’"il importe surtout de pouvoir distinguer à tout moment un incident d’origine fortuite ou accidentelle du résultat d’une agression déterminée. A cette fin, il est proposé d’élaborer un ensemble de règles de comportement55". On pourrait ainsi, à partir de ces deux notions utilisées comme points de référence, établir des mesures destinées à accroître la sécurité des objets spatiaux et la prévisibilité des activités spatiales. 198. L’Allemagne56 a souvent fait valoir que les négociations sur ces deux notions devraient, pour plusieurs raisons, être menées sous les auspices de la Conférence du désarmement. L’Allemagne voit dans un code de conduite spatiale un mécanisme permettant de réduire les erreurs d’interprétation sur les activités spatiales et les collisions fortuites avec d’autres objets spatiaux. A son avis, le code permettrait une plus grande transparence en ce qui concerne les accidents dans l’espace, et fournirait aux Etats un moyen supplémentaire de consultation réciproque en cas de tels incidents. 199. L’Allemagne a de son côté suggéré plusieurs domaines où il y aurait lieu d’établir des règles spécifiques. Il s’agirait notamment de prévoir la renonciation mutuelle à prendre des mesures de nature à entraver le fonctionnement des objets spatiaux d’autres Etats; l’établissement de distances minimales entre les objets spatiaux; l’imposition de limitations de vitesse pour les objets spatiaux qui se rapprochent l’un de l’autre ainsi que pour le passage rapproché à grande vitesse et la poursuite; des restrictions concernant le survol à très basse altitude par des vaisseaux spatiaux habités ou non habités; des prescriptions strictes concernant la notification par avance de lancements, l’octroi d’un droit d’inspection, ou des limitations à ce droit; et la création de zones d’exclusion57. 200. On a dit parfois que les diverses mesures susmentionnées constituaient une sorte de code de la circulation pour les objets spatiaux. 201. Ces mesures ont été officiellement proposées en 1989 par la France, dans le cadre de sa proposition relative à l’immunité des satellites58. Toutefois, la proposition française ne visait pas à être restrictive; elle portait essentiellement sur la mise au point de règles de comportement destinées aux véhicules spatiaux dans le but de a) réduire le risque de collisions accidentelles, b) prévenir les incidents, c) prévenir les poursuites co-orbitales à faible distance, et d) assurer une meilleure connaissance de la circulation spatiale en appliquant les règles suivantes : a) Une actualisation régulière, à l’occasion de manoeuvres ou de dérives, des paramètres d’orbites déclarés lors de l’immatriculation; b) Le respect de distances minimales entre deux satellites placés sur une même orbite, afin d’éviter non seulement les collisions accidentelles, mais aussi les poursuites co-orbitales à faible distance, qui sont un préalable nécessaire pour le système des mines spatiales; c) La surveillance des croisements à faible distance, pour limiter les risques de collision ou d’interférence. /...A/48/305 Français Page 65 202. En 1991, la France, dans un document de travail59, a exposé que ces règles pourraient être appliquées par le biais des mesures suivantes : a) Un élargissement de la Convention sur l’immatriculation, concernant l’information sur les lancements prévus par les Etats; b) Une procédure de demande d’explication en cas d’incidents ou d’activités suspectes; c) La définition de zones d’exclusion, sous forme de deux zones sphériques se déplaçant avec chaque satellite : une zone de proximité servant à délimiter l’emplacement en orbite réciproque de chaque objet spatial, ainsi que la capacité de déplacement des objets les uns par rapport aux autres; et une zone dite d’approche, plus large, le passage à travers cette zone devant être obligatoirement notifié. b) Espace ouvert 203. Outre les propositions faites lors de la Conférence du désarmement, certaines délégations ont fait valoir qu’une large gamme de mesures de confiance destinées à renforcer la transparence et la sécurité dans les activités spatiales contribuerait valablement à établir un climat de confiance réciproque. La notion d’espace ouvert a été présentée comme une approche possible à cet effet, et elle vise à établir graduellement un climat de confiance. Il faut entendre par là que l’on parviendrait à un accord sur une mesure particulière, prévoyant par exemple l’échange de données, à partir de quoi on établirait progressivement la confiance, afin de parvenir à un accord sur une mesure visant plus directement la limitation des armements. L’Union soviétique a proposé60 que cette notion soit étudiée par la Conférence du désarmement, les mesures les plus importantes à prendre pour donner corps à cette notion étant à son avis les suivantes : le renforcement de la Convention de 1975 sur l’immatriculation; l’élaboration d’un "code de la route" ou "code de conduite"; l’utilisation des moyens d’observation spatiale dans l’intérêt de la communauté internationale; et la création d’un inspectorat spatial international. 3. Propositions concernant un cadre institutionnel 204. Plusieurs propositions ont porté sur la création de mécanismes différents applicables aux activités spatiales, dont le fonctionnement pourrait également contribuer à renforcer et/ou à susciter la confiance dans les activités spatiales. a) Le Centre international de trajectographie (UNITRACE) 205. En juillet 1989, la France a proposé la création d’un Centre international de trajectographie (UNITRACE)61 et mis sur pied dans le cadre d’un accord sur l’immunité des satellites et faisant éventuellement partie du Secrétariat de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Le Centre serait ouvert à tous les Etats détenteurs ou utilisateurs de satellites qui voudraient en devenir membres. La France a exposé que le Centre, dont l’objectif principal serait clairement limité au suivi de la trajectoire des engins spatiaux, pourrait jouer un rôle fondamental dans l’établissement de la confiance entre les Etats. Le Centre aurait donc pour fonctions principales : la collecte des données de mise à jour /...A/48/305 Français Page 66 des immatriculations, le suivi des objets spatiaux et le calcul en temps réel de toutes les trajectoires d’objets spatiaux. En outre, pour s’acquitter dûment de ses fonctions, le Centre devrait demander constamment des informations mises à jour sur les orbites et les manoeuvres. Dans sa proposition, la France a reconnu que l’existence d’une telle base de données permettrait d’aboutir à un niveau accru de transparence, mais elle a également admis que les caractéristiques d’une collecte de données de cette nature impliquent que l’on prenne sérieusement en considération la protection des informations techniques et militaires. b) L’Agence de traitement des images satellitaires (ATIS) 206. En 1989, la France a proposé la création d’une Agence de traitement des images satellitaires (ATIS)62, qui correspondrait à la première phase envisagée pour la création d’une agence internationale de satellites de contrôle. Toutefois, dans sa proposition, la France a clairement expliqué que l’ATIS "serait un mécanisme de confiance et ne serait pas destinée à constituer l’embryon d’un système de vérification à compétence universelle placé auprès des Nations Unies". Au contraire, il faut considérer l’ATIS comme une agence qui serait créée dans le cadre des mesures de confiance et de sécurité. Conçue comme une agence de faible coût, elle viserait trois objectifs. Le premier serait de réunir et de traiter des données obtenues à partir de satellites existants, puis de les diffuser à ses membres. Le deuxième serait de servir d’unité ou de centre de recherche chargé de a) recenser des configurations satellitaires capables de contribuer à l’application de programmes multilatéraux, civils ou militaires, et b) concevoir divers accords possibles. Le troisième objectif serait de former des experts nationaux capables d’interpréter des images spatiales et d’évaluer dans quelle mesure il serait possible avec des satellites de suivre et de vérifier la limitation des armements et le désarmement. 207. A la 3e session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies, consacrée au désarmement, qui s’est tenue en 1988, l’Union soviétique a proposé la création d’une Agence internationale de surveillance spatiale (AISS), qui a été étudiée ultérieurement plus à fond lors de la Conférence du désarmement (voir, pour plus de détails, chap. V)63. Selon cette proposition, l’Agence aurait pour fonctions principales de : rassembler des informations provenant de la surveillance spatiale; fournir à l’Organisation des Nations Unies et aux Gouvernements intéressés des informations qui pourraient être utiles pour régler les conflits locaux et les situations de crise; étudier des recommandations sur l’emploi des moyens de surveillance spatiale afin de contrôler la mise en oeuvre des accords futurs. 4. Le transfert international de technologies missilières et autres techniques "névralgiques" 208. Devant les préoccupations suscitées par la prolifération des armes nucléaires et autres armes de destruction massive, ainsi que par la prolifération des systèmes de lancement de ces armes, notamment des missiles balistiques à longue portée, on s’est efforcé tout particulièrement de mettre en place des mécanismes de transfert international de technologies missilières et autres techniques "névralgiques". /...A/48/305 Français Page 67 209. En 1987, un groupe d’Etats64, préoccupé par la prolifération de certains systèmes balistiques capables de lancer des armes de destruction massive, ont décidé la mise en place d’un Régime de contrôle des technologies missilières (MTCR). Ce régime a pour objectif principal de limiter la prolifération de certains missiles, ainsi que celle de composantes et technologies spécifiques. Il ne repose pas sur un traité officiel. Il signifie au contraire que chaque partie a pris unilatéralement des mesures appropriées pour adopter et appliquer certains principes directeurs communs. Depuis 1987, d’autres pays, dont un certain nombre de pays en développement ayant d’importants programmes balistiques ou spatiaux, ont adopté les principes directeurs du Régime et déclaré qu’ils en appuyaient les objectifs65. 210. Le système international de maîtrise des fournitures, concernant la prolifération des missiles balistiques et des missiles de croisière a fait l’objet d’un certain nombre de propositions. 211. Dans le cadre du MTCR, mis au point pour enrayer la prolifération de certains types de missiles et de la technologie missilière, la France a précisé qu’il : "ne devrait être qu’une étape vers un accord plus général : élargi géographiquement, mais contrôlé et applicable à tous. Celui-ci fixerait des règles favorisant la coopération spatiale civile en écartant les dangers d’un détournement de la technologie au profit de la constitution d’une capacité balistique militaire. Il s’agirait ... de parvenir à une situation dans laquelle coopéreraient, dans un cadre assurant la sécurité, l’ensemble des Etats qui souhaitent, pour leur développement, accéder à l’espace."66 212. En 1991, l’Argentine et le Brésil ont proposé une série de règles fondamentales concernant le transfert international de techniques "névralgiques", qui répondaient à cette préoccupation. Ces deux pays ont signalé ce qui suit : "Toute réglementation des courants de techniques "névralgiques" ne sera universelle et capable de produire des mécanismes internationaux de contrôle réellement efficaces que si elle tient compte du fait que, pour un grand nombre de pays, l’accès à ces techniques à des fins pacifiques répond à leurs intérêts et à leurs besoins. Il paraît justifié de dire que la communauté des nations respectera d’autant mieux les règles visant à limiter l’emploi de ces techniques pour la production d’armes de destruction massive qu’elle comprendra que, loin de faire obstacle à la diffusion de connaissances scientifiques et techniques à des fins pacifiques, ces règles l’encouragent."67 213. Parmi les directives proposées, on peut citer les suivantes : "Le développement de la coopération internationale dans le domaine de la science et de la technique renforce la confiance des Etats. Les disparités de traitement qui existent dans ce domaine et les différences dans l’accès aux techniques de pointe peuvent entraîner une détérioration de la confiance entre Etats. /...A/48/305 Français Page 68 Puisque ces techniques peuvent être utilisées à la fois à des fins pacifiques et pour la production d’armes de destruction massive, elles ne sauraient être définies comme intrinsèquement mauvaises. C’est le but de leur utilisation qui fait qu’elles ont ou n’ont pas d’incidences sur la sécurité. Un système de contrôles internationaux applicables aux produits, services et procédés relevant de ces techniques doit être conçu essentiellement comme un régime de surveillance, et non comme un mécanisme qui restreint les transferts légitimes68." 214. Cette approche générale va dans le sens d’un certain nombre d’autres propositions faites dans le but de revoir l’actuel régime international de transferts de technologie, compte tenu du nouveau contexte politique mondial. 5. Propositions de mesures de confiance dans l’espace, dans le cadre des négociations bilatérales Etats-Unis-URSS 215. Un nombre important de mesures de transparence et de prévisibilité ont été examinées lors des pourparlers bilatéraux sur la défense et l’espace entre les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et l’Union soviétique69. Ces mesures ont compris : a) Des échanges annuels de données, des réunions d’experts, des exposés d’information, des visites de laboratoires, des observations d’essais et des notifications des satellites antimissiles d’essai. b) Une proposition d’un "double essai d’application", chaque partie démontrant ses mesures respectives de prévisibilité. c) Une proposition visant à la conclusion d’un accord indépendant sur ces mesures, qui interviendrait quel que soit l’état des négociations sur des limitations précises des essais et du déploiement de dispositifs antimissiles. 216. Parmi les mesures concrètes prises dans le cadre de ces initiatives, il faut signaler qu’en décembre 1989, des spécialistes soviétiques ont visité en Californie et dans le Nouveau-Mexique plusieurs installations techniques des Etats-Unis. 217. Bien que ces mesures aient été envisagées dans un contexte bilatéral, le Sri Lanka a suggéré, en 1986, qu’elles pourraient faire utilement l’objet d’une application multilatérale70 : "La proposition de la délégation des Etats-Unis relative aux ’laboratoires ouverts’ pourrait être développée dans un comité spécial de la Conférence de désarmement, toutes les délégations fournissant des informations..." 218. En 1988, le Pakistan a suggéré de son côté que ces informations, outre qu’elles apporteraient des renseignements détaillés sur la nature de la charge avant chaque lancement, devraient être vérifiées : "... sur l’aire de lancement par un organisme international ... cet organisme pourrait être mis sur pied dans le but de vérifier les /...A/48/305 Français Page 69 données concernant la fonction des objets spatiaux et de fournir ainsi à la communauté internationale des informations fiables sur les activités dans l’espace, en particulier celles qui revêtent un caractère militaire71." 219. A la réunion au Sommet tenue en juin 1992 entre les Présidents des Etats-Unis et de la Fédération de Russie, ceux-ci ont publié une déclaration commune sur un Système de protection mondiale dans laquelle ils ont précisé qu’ils poursuivaient leur examen des avantages que pourrait offrir un système de protection mondiale contre les missiles balistiques, tout en convenant qu’il était important d’étudier le rôle que la défense pourrait jouer dans la protection contre les attaques limitées de missiles. Les deux Présidents étaient d’avis que leurs deux nations devaient s’associer à leurs alliés et aux autres Etats intéressés pour mettre au point la définition d’un tel système en tant qu’élément d’une stratégie globale de lutte contre la prolifération des missiles et des armes de destruction massive72. 6. Autres propositions 220. En 1985, l’Union soviétique a suggéré d’aborder le problème de la coopération internationale en matière de technologie spatiale sous un angle plus large en proposant la création d’une Organisation spatiale mondiale chargée de coordonner et de promouvoir la coopération mondiale dans le domaine spatial73. Le programme de travail aurait les orientations suivantes : a) Communication, navigation, sauvetage de victimes sur la planète Terre, dans l’atmosphère et dans l’espace; b) Télésondage de la Terre à des fins d’exploitation agricole des ressources de la terre, de mise en valeur des mers et des océans; c) Etude et préservation de la biosphère terrestre; d) Mise en place d’un service mondial de prévision météorologique et notification des catastrophes naturelles; e) Mise en valeur de nouvelles sources d’énergie et mise au point de matériaux et technologies nouveaux; f) Exploration de l’espace et des corps célestes par des méthodes géophysiques et au moyen de véhicules spatiaux interplanétaires non habités74. 221. En août 1987, l’Union soviétique a proposé la création d’un Inspectorat spatial international. Cette proposition a été ultérieurement affinée75 sur les bases suivantes : "L’inspection sur place immédiatement avant le lancement constitue le moyen le plus simple et le plus efficace de s’assurer que les objets lancés et déployés dans l’espace ne sont pas des armes, ni ne sont équipés d’armes d’aucune sorte." 222. Parmi les mesures proposées dans le cadre de l’Inspectorat spatial international, on peut citer les suivantes : /...A/48/305 Français Page 70 a) La transmission préalable par l’Etat recevant à l’Inspectorat spatial international d’informations sur chaque lancement prochain, y compris la date et l’heure du lancement, le type de lanceur, les paramètres de l’orbite et des renseignements généraux sur l’objet spatial qui doit être lancé; b) La présence permanente de groupes d’inspection sur tous les polygones de lancement d’objets spatiaux en vue de vérifier tous les objets de ce type quels que soient les vecteurs; c) La mise en route de l’inspection ... jours avant l’installation de l’objet à lancer dans l’espace sur le lanceur ou sur tout autre vecteur; d) La réalisation d’inspections dans des installations de stockage, entreprises industrielles, laboratoires et centres d’essai convenus; e) La vérification de lancements non déclarés à partir de plates-formes de lancement non déclarées au moyen d’inspections extraordinaires sur place76. 223. Bien que la proposition concernant un Inspectorat spatial international ait été avancée dans le cadre d’un accord visant à interdire toutes les armes spatiales, cette approche pourrait également, du point de vue soviétique, être retenue comme base d’une initiative indépendante visant à renforcer la transparence et la prévisibilité. 224. On a avancé que les questions relatives à l’espace pourraient faire l’objet d’échanges de vues dans certaines négociations, régionales et multilatérales, concernant la limitation des armements et le désarmement. 225. Le dixième Sommet des chefs d’Etat ou de gouvernement des pays non alignés, qui s’est tenu à Jakarta en septembre 1992, a préconisé "l’institution d’un système multilatéral de contrôle par satellites placé sous les auspices de l’ONU" qui garantirait un accès équitable à l’information au profit de tous les Etats77. C. Analyse 226. Bien que chacune de ces propositions permette clairement de comprendre les possibilités d’établissement de la confiance dans l’espace, il reste un certain nombre de problèmes à traiter plus en détail. 1. Mesures générales destinées à renforcer la transparence et la confiance 227. A partir de l’expérience acquise dans d’autres domaines terrestres, il semble fort approprié d’appliquer des mesures supplémentaires visant à augmenter le nombre d’informations relatives aux activités spatiales présentes et futures. Les dispositions envisagées lors des pourparlers bilatéraux sur la défense et l’espace dans le but d’améliorer la prévisibilité constituent un précédent de bon augure. 228. Deux aspects du problème méritent toutefois une attention supplémentaire. Le premier concerne la question de savoir si ces mesures de confiance se présentent comme des dispositions que chaque Etat est libre d’appliquer s’il en /...A/48/305 Français Page 71 décide ainsi, ou si elles constituent des obligations juridiquement contraignantes imposées à tous les Etats. Nombre de ces mesures pourraient certes contribuer efficacement à démontrer publiquement le caractère de certaines activités spatiales d’un Etat, mais il reste à voir jusqu’à quel point les Etats seraient disposés à aller dans cette voie, s’il n’y a pas de réciprocité générale. De l’avis de certains Etats, il est nécessaire de protéger une certaine confidentialité des activités spatiales et c’est là un facteur dont il faut tenir compte. 229. La seconde question a trait à la nature des activités que l’on peut dévoiler. Sous un certain angle, ces mesures de transparence permettraient de démontrer qu’il n’est mené aucune activité spatiale qui soit interdite. D’un autre point de vue, ces mesures pourraient servir à diminuer les risques de mauvaise compréhension ou de mauvaise perception concernant la présence d’armes dans l’espace et d’autres activités spatiales. 230. Bien que nombre des mesures de confiance qui ont été proposées pourraient être appliquées dans chacun des contextes, un accord sur le contexte à prendre en considération pourrait avoir des conséquences importantes pour le lancement et l’application de ces mesures. 2. Renforcement de l’immatriculation des objets spatiaux et autres mesures correspondantes 231. Une révision et un renforcement des dispositions de la Convention sur l’immatriculation est, de l’avis de certains Etats, un des moyens de renforcer le régime juridique spatial international régissant les activités militaires et autres dans l’espace. 232. La proposition concernant le Centre international de trajectographie soulève elle aussi quelques problèmes de fonctionnement. La France a signalé, en 1989, que : "... indiquer par exemple la position exacte d’un satellite d’observation signifie révéler du même coup l’objet précis de cette surveillance. Comment alors concilier les contraintes de secret avec le recueil de toutes les informations nécessaires sur les trajectoires satellitaires?"78 233. Si tel est peut-être le cas des satellites imageurs de renseignement dotés de systèmes optiques, qui doivent modifier leurs orbites pour survoler directement une zone visée, les satellites imageurs plus perfectionnés ne sont pas tenus de le faire. Toutefois, la question de la confidentialité des informations orbitales continue de soulever des préoccupations, étant donné que la notification d’un prochain survol pourrait donner suffisamment de temps pour se dissimuler à l’observation spatiale. 234. La France a en outre proposé que : "... le regroupement de ces informations dans un système informatique fonctionnant en ’boîte noire’ pourrait constituer une solution appropriée ... (le Centre) ... recevrait et conserverait, sans les /...A/48/305 Français Page 72 diffuser, les données d’orbites communiquées lors des immatriculations et actualisées lors des modifications ultérieures de trajectoires."79 235. Toutefois, étant donné le secret qui entoure aujourd’hui les orbites des satellites de renseignement, il est indispensable que ce centre garantisse un degré suffisant de protection concernant ces informations. La situation peut évoluer, à mesure que croîtra la confiance entre les principales puissances spatiales, lesquelles, grâce à leurs dispositifs perfectionnées de poursuite, permettraient la vérification réciproque des données transmises au Centre. En tout état de cause, il semblerait que les puissances spatiales aient intérêt à communiquer des données concernant leurs satellites, en échange de l’immunité de ces derniers. 3. Code de conduite et code de la route 236. Les zones d’exclusion doivent répondre aux dispositions du Traité sur l’espace atmosphérique. Ces zones devraient être établies dans un contexte multilatéral et envisagées d’une façon fonctionnelle. 237. On s’est demandé s’il était nécessaire de prévoir un régime à part pour garantir l’immunité de certains types de satellites. On a fait valoir que : "... il existait déjà des instruments juridiques internationaux pour assurer l’immunité des satellites. Ces instruments interdisaient l’emploi de la force contre les satellites sauf dans les cas de légitime défense. De fait, ces accords internationaux allaient au-delà des propositions considérées, car ils interdisaient aussi bien la menace du recours à la force contre les satellites. En revanche, si ces propositions visaient à empêcher les pays d’agir contre les satellites, dans des cas indubitables de légitime défense, alors elles compromettaient le Traité sur l’espace, la Charte des Nations Unies et le droit inhérent aux Etats souverains de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour se protéger en cas de menace de l’emploi de la force."80 238. La question de savoir quel est précisément le type de satellite à qui on garantirait l’immunité doit être étudiée plus à fond. Il a été déjà signalé que :"... les informations recueillies par les satellites de reconnaissance et de surveillance ont été également utilisées pour appuyer des opérations militaires. Cependant, si les fonctions remplies par les satellites de reconnaissance et de surveillance sont aussi inoffensives qu’on les représente parfois, on peut se demander pourquoi ces possibilités resteraient le monopole des puissances spatiales. Ne faudrait-il pas confier les activités de surveillance et de reconnaissance des satellites à une agence internationale afin de surveiller le respect des accords de désarmement?"81 239. Il serait peut-être plus facile, tout au moins dans un premier temps, de parvenir à un accord international garantissant une protection adéquate des satellites s’il s’agit de satellites détenus ou exploités par une organisation internationale que s’il s’agit de types spécifiques de satellites. /...A/48/305 Français Page 73 240. Un des problèmes que posent les propositions concernant l’octroi de l’immunité vient de ce que de nombreux systèmes spatiaux ont des applications multiples. Les satellites militaires peuvent accomplir des missions variées selon le contexte opérationnel, tandis que d’autres satellites peuvent s’acquitter de fonctions aussi bien militaires que civiles. 241. Les satellites imageurs de renseignement sont utilisés pour vérifier le respect des obligations conventionnelles en matière de limitation des armements, auquel cas ils bénéficient généralement d’un statut privilégié. Mais ces mêmes satellites peuvent également aider à la localisation d’armements sur la Terre, et cette application est cause d’une certaine ambivalence dans la communauté internationale et incite à mettre au point des armes antisatellites. Il est difficile de voir comment on pourrait octroyer l’immunité à un satellite lorsqu’il vérifie l’application d’obligations conventionnelles, et refuser de la lui octroyer quelques minutes plus tard quand il sert à localiser des armements sur la Terre. 242. On pourrait par ailleurs se demander si les déclarations relatives à l’immunité sont valables tant que des Etats sont en possession de moyens d’attaquer et de détruire des satellites. L’existence de capacités antisatellites performantes enlève beaucoup de la portée de ces déclarations. La France a proposé d’octroyer l’immunité juridique à tous les satellites incapables d’interférence active avec d’autres objets, c’est-à-dire aux satellites qui ne visent qu’à la stabilisation, par opposition à ceux qui peuvent faire l’objet d’utilisations agressives dans l’espace82. 4. Le transfert international de technologies missilières et autres techniques "névralgiques" 243. Dans le passé, la question de l’augmentation des armes spatiales a été essentiellement discutée dans un contexte Est-Ouest, contexte qui a été fortement modifié depuis les changements spectaculaires intervenus dans l’environnement international. Désormais, la question se pose de plus en plus dans un contexte beaucoup plus large. Les préoccupations de certains pays face à la prolifération de technologies missilières et autres technologies névralgiques exigent des arrangements internationaux appropriés. 244. De nouveaux arrangements internationaux adéquats concernant le transfert de technologies spatiales pourraient apporter un certain nombre de solutions, face aux préoccupations concernant la sécurité que soulèvent chez un certain nombre d’Etats les technologies à double utilisation. /...A/48/305 Français Page 74 VII. MECANISMES DE COOPERATION INTERNATIONALE CONCERNANT L’APPLICATION DE MESURES DE CONFIANCE DANS L’ESPACE 245. Dans sa résolution 45/55 B, qui définit le mandat du Groupe d’étude, l’Assemblée générale a reconnu que l’espace était "devenu un facteur important du développement socio-économique d’un grand nombre d’Etats" et demandé au Groupe d’examiner, entre autres, "les possibilités de définir des mécanismes appropriés de coopération internationale dans des domaines d’intérêt déterminés et autres questions". 246. Dans certains domaines de coopération, les priorités varient d’un Etat et d’une région à l’autre. Aux fins de l’étude, la coopération internationale est envisagée dans un sens large et comprend la coopération relative aux mesures de confiance dans l’espace. Deux catégories de mécanismes internationaux sont donc examinées dans le présent chapitre : les mécanismes existants et les propositions visant à créer de nouveaux mécanismes. A. Les mécanismes existants dans le domaine de la coopération internationale dans l’espace 247. Il existe trois catégories de mécanismes internationaux en matière de coopération dans l’espace : les mécanismes mondiaux, régionaux et bilatéraux. 1. Les mécanismes mondiaux de coopération internationale dans l’espace 248. L’ONU s’occupe des questions relatives à l’espace depuis le début de l’ère spatiale, principalement dans le cadre de deux grands domaines d’activité : les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace et la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace. 249. L’intérêt croissant porté aux utilisations pacifiques de l’espace a abouti à la création en 1959 du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, qui a été chargé de faire rapport à l’Assemblée générale sur divers aspects des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace, notamment : a) les activités de l’ONU et de ses institutions spécialisées; b) la diffusion de données sur la recherche spatiale; c) la coordination des programmes de recherche nationaux; d) la conclusion de nouveaux arrangements internationaux visant à faciliter la coopération internationale dans l’espace dans le cadre du système des Nations Unies; e) et les problèmes juridiques pouvant résulter de l’exploration de l’espace. Les rapports annuels du Comité sont examinés par la Commission politique spéciale de l’Assemblée. 250. Depuis lors, le Comité et ses deux sous-comités -l’un chargé des questions juridiques et l’autre des questions scientifiques et techniques -sont parvenus à élaborer cinq instruments internationaux contenant des principes généraux relatifs à l’exploration et à l’utilisation de l’espace, au sauvetage des astronautes et au retour des objets lancés dans l’espace, à la responsabilité pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux, à l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace et aux activités menées sur la Lune et d’autres corps célestes. 251. L’ordre du jour du Comité de l’espace comprend notamment les questions ci-après83 : a) les moyens d’assurer que l’espace continue d’être utilisé à des /...A/48/305 Français Page 75 fins pacifiques; b) les travaux de son Sous-Comité scientifique et technique et de son Sous-Comité juridique; c) l’application des recommandations de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique; d) les retombées bénéfiques de la technologie spatiale; etc. (Pour plus de détails, voir le chapitre III ci-dessus.) 252. Outre l’élaboration des accords susmentionnés, l’Assemblée générale, sur la recommandation du Comité, a adopté les principes ci-après : a) Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique [résolution 1962 (XVIII)]; b) Principes régissant l’utilisation par les Etats de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe (résolution 37/92); c) Principes sur la télédétection (résolution 41/65); et d) Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace (résolution 47/68). 253. Afin de contribuer à l’utilisation de l’espace à des fins pacifiques, l’ONU a organisé deux conférences spéciales sur la question. La première Conférence des Nations Unies sur les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique84, a été organisée en 1968 afin d’examiner les avantages pratiques de l’exploration de l’espace et de la recherche spatiale, et la mesure dans laquelle les puissances non spatiales pourraient participer aux activités spatiales dans un cadre institutionnel. La deuxième Conférence, connue sous le nom d’UNISPACE 8285, qui s’est tenue à Vienne en août 1982, a notamment recommandé des directives concernant l’utilisation croissante des techniques spatiales; demandé la création d’un service international d’information spatiale, composé initialement d’un annuaire des sources d’information et des services de données accessibles à tous les Etats. La Conférence a également examiné la question de l’utilisation de l’espace et dit qu’il était essentiel de prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace pour que les Etats continuent de coopérer dans le domaine de l’exploration et des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace. 254. Parallèlement aux activités de l’ONU relatives aux utilisations pacifiques de l’espace, la question de la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace figure à l’ordre du jour de l’Assemblée générale depuis le début des années 50. Dès 1957, des propositions ont été faites dans le cadre de la Conférence du désarmement86 en vue de mettre en place un système d’inspection garantissant que les objets lancés dans l’espace le seraient à des fins exclusivement pacifiques. Le désir de la communauté internationale de prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace a été exprimé, comme indiqué précédemment, par l’Assemblée générale dans le Document final qu’elle a adopté en 1978, lors de sa dixième session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement, qui indiquait que "pour empêcher la course aux armements dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, de nouvelles mesures devraient être prises et des négociations internationales appropriées devraient être engagées, conformément à l’esprit du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes" (par. 80). 255. La question de la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace figure à l’ordre du jour de l’Assemblée générale depuis 1982. Diverses résolutions ont été adoptées, demandant à la Conférence du désarmement d’examiner la question de la négociation d’accords efficaces et vérifiables en /...A/48/305 Français Page 76 vue de prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace ou d’examiner d’urgence la question de la négociation d’un accord interdisant les systèmes antisatellite. 256. Depuis 1982, la Conférence du désarmement, seul organe de négociation multilatéral sur la question, a à son ordre du jour un point relatif à la "prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace (extra-atmosphérique)". Toutefois, du fait de divergences de vues concernant la formulation d’un mandat, ce n’est qu’en 1985 qu’elle a pu créer un comité spécial87 doté d’un mandat lui permettant d’étudier, dans un premier temps, dans le cadre d’un examen général quant au fond, les questions se rapportant à ce sujet. 257. Le Comité spécial examine, depuis sa création, les trois domaines ci-après relevant de son mandat : a) Les questions se rapportant à la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace; b) Les accords en vigueur régissant les activités spatiales; et c) Les propositions existantes et les initiatives futures concernant la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace. Certains Etats ont, dans le cadre du Comité, recommandé l’adoption de plusieurs propositions visant à renforcer la confiance en tant que contribution à la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace. 258. L’ONU assume plusieurs autres fonctions se rapportant aux activités spatiales des Etats. Ainsi, le Secrétaire général a été désigné comme dépositaire de la Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (1975); de la Convention de 1977 sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou à toutes autres fins hostiles; et de l’Accord de 1979 régissant les activités des Etats sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes. 259. Conformément à la Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique88, les Etats parties se sont engagés à tenir un registre central et à communiquer au Secrétaire général de l’ONU des informations sur les objets spatiaux qu’ils auront lancés. En application des articles III et IV, l’obligation de signaler les lancements d’objets spatiaux et la structure du système uniforme à maintenir par le Secrétaire général sont exposées comme suit : 1. Chaque Etat d’immatriculation fournit au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, dès que cela est réalisable, les renseignements ci-après concernant chaque objet spatial inscrit sur son registre : a) Le nom de l’Etat ou des Etats de lancement; b) L’indicatif approprié ou le numéro d’immatriculation de l’objet spatial; /...A/48/305 Français Page 77 c) La date et le territoire ou lieu de lancement; d) Les principaux paramètres de l’orbite, y compris : i) La période nodale; ii) L’inclinaison; iii) L’apogée; iv) Le périgée; e) La fonction générale de l’objet spatial. 2. Chaque Etat d’immatriculation peut de temps à autre communiquer au Secrétaire général des renseignements supplémentaires concernant un objet spatial inscrit sur son registre; 3. Chaque Etat d’immatriculation informe le Secrétaire général, dans toute la mesure possible et dès que cela est réalisable, des objets spatiaux au sujet desquels il a antérieurement communiqué des renseignements et qui ont été mais qui ne sont plus sur une orbite terrestre. 260. Dans le cadre des mécanismes multilatéraux, on mentionnera deux organisations supplémentaires : l’Organisation internationale de télécommunications par satellites (1971) et l’Organisation internationale des télécommunications maritimes par satellites (1976). 261. L’Organisation internationale de télécommunications par satellites (INTELSAT) est une coopérative commerciale constituée de 124 pays, propriétaire et exploitante d’un système mondial de satellites de télécommunications utilisé par plus de 170 pays dans toutes les parties du monde pour leurs communications internationales et par plus de 30 pays pour leurs communications intérieures. INTELSAT assure depuis 1965 des services pour les télécommunications publiques au moyen d’une série de satellites dénommée INTELSAT I à VI. En juillet 1992, le segment spatial du réseau INTELSAT se composait de 18 satellites INTELSAT V, V-A et VI, placés sur l’orbite des satellites géostationnaires au-dessus de l’océan Atlantique, de l’océan Pacifique et de l’océan Indien. INTELSAT VII, qui constitue à présent le satellite commercial de télécommunications le plus avancé sur le plan technique, sera lancé en 199389. 262. L’Organisation internationale des télécommunications maritimes par satellites (INMARSAT) a été créée sur l’initiative de l’Organisation maritime internationale (OMI). La Convention portant création d’INMARSAT et l’Accord d’exploitation y relatif ont été adoptés en septembre 1976 et sont entrés en vigueur en juillet 1979. INMARSAT a été créée pour satisfaire aux exigences de fiabilité des communications nécessaires aux fins de la navigation maritime internationale. Différents amendements à l’acte constitutif, visant à renforcer la capacité d’INMARSAT d’assurer des services de télécommunications aéronautiques par satellites sont entrés en vigueur le 13 octobre 1989. D’autres amendements ont été adoptés par l’Assemblée des parties en janvier 1989 pour permettre à l’organisation d’assurer des communications mobiles terrestres, mais ils ne sont pas encore entrés en vigueur. Les activités d’INMARSAT doivent /...A/48/305 Français Page 78 être poursuivies à des fins exclusivement pacifiques. Son secteur spatial peut être utilisé par les navires, les aéronefs et les usagers terrestres mobiles de tous les pays, sans discrimination en fonction de la nationalité. Au 31 mai 1993, 67 Etats étaient parties à la Convention90. 2. Mécanismes multilatéraux régionaux 263. Parallèlement aux efforts déployés dans le cadre du système des Nations Unies et de la Conférence du désarmement, il existe divers autres instruments internationaux régissant les activités spatiales des Etats d’une région donnée et sur la base desquels une coopération intensive s’est développée. 264. L’Organisation internationale de télécommunications spatiales (INTERSPOUTNIK) a été créée en 1971 par un accord signé en novembre 1971, qui est entré en vigueur en juillet 1972, afin de répondre à la demande de différents pays en matière de communications téléphoniques et télégraphiques, d’échanges de programmes de radio et de télévision, et de transmission par satellite d’autres types d’informations, dans le but de promouvoir la coopération politique, économique et culturelle. Les pays ci-après ont été membres d’INTERSPOUTNIK : Afghanistan, Bulgarie, Cuba, Hongrie, Laos, Mongolie, Pologne, République démocratique allemande, République populaire démocratique de Corée, Roumanie, Tchécoslovaquie, URSS, Viet Nam et Yémen démocratique. L’organisation est actuellement dans une période de transition et il est envisagé de l’exploiter sur une base purement commerciale91. 265. La Conférence spatiale européenne, réunie à Bruxelles, a approuvé le texte de la Convention portant création de l’Agence spatiale européenne (ASE). Les Etats Membres sont l’Allemagne, l’Autriche, la Belgique, le Danemark, l’Espagne, la France, l’Irlande, l’Italie, la Norvège, les Pays-Bas, le Royaume-Uni, la Suède et la Suisse. La Finlande est membre associé et le Canada coopère étroitement avec l’Agence. Aux termes de la Convention, l’ASE a pour mission d’assurer et de promouvoir, à des fins exclusivement pacifiques, la coopération entre les Etats européens dans les domaines de la recherche et de la technologie spatiales et de leurs applications spatiales, en vue de leur utilisation à des fins scientifiques et pour les systèmes opérationnels d’applications spatiales92. 266. En avril 1967, un programme de coopération globale entre les pays socialistes a été élaboré aux fins de l’utilisation pacifique de l’espace, qui s’est par la suite dénommé Conseil de coopération internationale pour l’étude et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (INTERCOSMOS). Le statut juridique de la coopération multilatérale, entre ces pays, dans le cadre du programme INTERCOSMOS, a été défini lors de la signature, à Moscou en juillet 1976, d’un accord de coopération dans le domaine de l’exploration et des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique qui a pris effet en mars 1977. Les activités conjointes menées dans le cadre d’INTERCOSMOS ont porté sur cinq domaines principaux : la physique spatiale, y compris les sciences des matériaux; la météorologie spatiale; la biologie et la médecine spatiales; les communications spatiales; et la téléobservation de la Terre. Dix pays (Bulgarie, Cuba, Hongrie, Mongolie, Pologne, République démocratique allemande, Roumanie, Tchécoslovaquie, URSS et Viet Nam) ont participé au programme. Son statut futur et les modalités d’une coopération éventuelle sont à présent à l’étude93. /...A/48/305 Français Page 79 267. Les membres de la Ligue des Etats arabes ont créé l’Organisation arabe de télécommunications par satellite (ARABSAT), lorsqu’ils ont adopté la Charte d’ARABSAT signée en avril 1976. Vingt et un pays arabes sont membres du service de communications d’ARABSAT. Son objectif principal est d’établir et de maintenir un système de télécommunications pour la région arabe94. 268. Il existe en Afrique un cadre d’activités dans le domaine de la télédétection (formation, échange de données, etc.) établi conformément aux résolutions adoptées par l’Organisation de l’unité africaine et la Commission économique des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique, et coordonné par l’Organisation africaine de cartographie et de télédétection. 269. L’Organisation européenne des télécommunications par satellites (EUTELSAT) a été créée en mai 1977 par 17 administrations européennes des télécommunications ou organismes privés d’exploitation agréés, membres de la Conférence européenne des administrations postales et des télécommunications (CEPT). L’organisation a acquis sa forme définitive le 1er septembre 1985 lors de l’entrée en vigueur d’une convention internationale et d’un accord d’exploitation signé par 26 Etats européens. EUTELSAT comprend aujourd’hui 36 Etats membres95. 270. L’Organisation européenne de satellites météorologiques (EUMETSAT) est un organisme intergouvernemental fondé par 16 Etats membres européens et leurs services météorologiques. La Convention EUMETSAT est entrée en vigueur le 19 juin 1986. L’objectif principal consiste à mettre en place, exploiter et utiliser des systèmes européens de satellites météorologiques opérationnels en tenant compte dans toute la mesure du possible des recommandations de l’Organisation météorologique mondiale (OMM)96. 271. L’Union de l’Europe occidentale (UEO) est un exemple d’effort régional visant à mettre en oeuvre des mesures de confiance dans le domaine de l’espace. Elle a récemment décidé de réserver un montant de 10 millions d’ECU pour le financement d’un centre de télédétection à Torejon (Espagne). 272. L’accord entre l’Espagne, la France et l’Italie visant à élaborer et à exploiter en commun les satellites imageurs de renseignement HELIOS est un autre exemple d’arrangement sous-régional qui renforce la confiance dans l’espace entre les parties. 273. La deuxième Conférence spatiale des Amériques, tenue à Santiago (Chili) du 26 au 30 avril 1993, a adopté une déclaration soulignant la nécessité d’établir une coopération régionale et internationale dans le domaine des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace. Les participants ont également identifié des domaines concrets et des projets spécifiques de coopération entre les Etats de la région et avec les Etats d’autres régions. 274. Le premier Atelier Asie-Pacifique sur la coopération multilatérale dans le domaine des techniques spatiales et de leurs applications, qui s’est tenu à Beijing (Chine) en décembre 1992, a formulé diverses recommandations soulignant la nécessité d’une coopération régionale et internationale dans le domaine des techniques spatiales et de leurs applications, et proposé d’identifier, lors de sa prochaine réunion, des projets de coopération multilatérale pouvant être exécutés par les Etats de la région Asie-Pacifique. /...A/48/305 Français Page 80 3. Mécanismes bilatéraux 275. Comme il a déjà été indiqué, les négociations entre les Etats-Unis et l’Union soviétique ont abouti à plusieurs accords fondamentaux relatifs à leurs activités militaires dans l’espace, notamment le Traité de 1972 concernant la limitation des systèmes anti-missiles balistiques97. Le Traité ABM prévoit notamment la création d’une commission consultative permanente américanosoviéétiqu afin de promouvoir ses objectifs et sa mise en oeuvre. Les modalités concernant la création de la Commission figurent dans le Mémorandum d’accord entre le Gouvernement américain et le Gouvernement soviétique relatif à la création d’une commission consultative permanente98, en date du 21 décembre 1972. 276. La Commission consultative permanente a servi de cadre pour la coopération entre les Etats-Unis et l’Union soviétique en vue de promouvoir et d’appliquer les accords signés dans le contexte de SALT-I et SALT-II99. Le Traité de 1987 sur les forces nucléaires à portée intermédiaire (FNI) prévoit la création d’une commission de vérification spéciale100. 277. Sur la base du Traité sur la réduction et la limitation des armes stratégiques offensives (START-I)101, une commission mixte pour le respect des dispositions et les inspections a été créée. Sur la base du Protocole y relatif, signé à Lisbonne en mars 1992, des représentants du Bélarus, du Kazakhstan, de l’Ukraine et de la Fédération de Russie participeront aux travaux de la Commission. 278. Sur la base du Traité sur une réduction et une limitation nouvelles des armements stratégiques offensifs (START II)102, la Fédération de Russie et les Etats-Unis ont créé une commission bilatérale d’application pour régler les questions relatives au respect des obligations assumées. 279. En outre, plusieurs accords concernant essentiellement le renforcement de la confiance entre les deux principales puissances spatiales, comme l’Accord portant sur des mesures destinées à réduire le risque de déclenchement d’une guerre nucléaire (1971); l’Accord sur le "téléphone rouge" (1971); l’Accord sur la création de centres de réduction du risque nucléaire (1987); et l’Accord sur la notification (1989) prévoient la notification, le contrôle, la vérification et la création de différents mécanismes ou le recours à certains mécanismes existants (comme les réseaux INTELSAT et STATSIONAR à satellites) qui concernent la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace. 280. Le dernier accord en date conclu entre les Etats-Unis et la Fédération de Russie (17 juin 1992) sur la coopération spatiale entre les deux pays prévoit un vaste cadre de coopération concernant les activités spatiales. 281. Diverses formes de coopération internationale sur des questions spatiales connexes sont prévues dans d’autres accords bilatéraux entre divers Etats de différentes régions. B. Propositions concernant la création de nouveaux mécanismes de coopération internationale dans l’espace 282. Si l’examen des mécanismes existant aux niveaux mondial, régional et bilatéral en matière de coopération internationale dans l’espace fait apparaître /...A/48/305 Français Page 81 une vaste coopération entre les Etats, aucun des mécanismes susmentionnés, même ceux de caractère mondial, ne couvre tous les aspects des activités spatiales. De ce fait, plusieurs propositions ont été faites, visant à élargir les mécanismes existants ou à en créer de nouveaux. 283. La plupart des propositions avancées sont liées à la surveillance ou à la vérification des accords de limitation des armements existants ou futurs ou font une partie de propositions plus étendues se rapportant aux activités des Etats dans l’espace. Comme la surveillance et la vérification peuvent figurer dans un accord international sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace, elles peuvent en même temps contribuer au renforcement de la confiance et, partant, à la promotion de la coopération entre Etats. 284. Il est évident que tout mécanisme de contrôle ou de vérification d’accords de limitation des armements ou de désarmement posera des problèmes très complexes impliquant de nombreuses procédures, comme la surveillance Terre-espace, espace-espace, espace-Terre, air-sol et sur place. Un réseau si développé devrait nécessairement viser à renforcer la confiance. 285. Parmi les plans les plus largement débattus, figurent les propositions françaises et soviétiques examinées au chapitre V ci-dessus. A la première session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale consacrée au désarmement, en juin 1978, la France a présenté une proposition détaillée concernant la création d’une agence internationale de satellites de contrôle103. L’un des principaux éléments de cette proposition portait sur le contrôle des accords existants et futurs en matière de désarmement et de sécurité, vraisemblablement par le biais d’arrangements spéciaux entre les parties contractantes et l’Agence. La France a proposé que l’Agence soit créée par étapes. En 1981, cette proposition a fait l’objet d’une étude des Nations Unies, intitulée "Les incidences de la création d’une agence internationale de satellites de contrôle"104 dans laquelle ont été examinés les missions et services nécessaires à l’Agence, sa structure organisationnelle et les incidences techniques, juridiques et financières de sa création. 286. A la deuxième session extraordinaire que l’Assemblée générale a consacrée au désarmement en 1988, l’Union soviétique a proposé de charger la Conférence du désarmement d’engager des négociations détaillées sur la création d’une agence internationale de surveillance spatiale105. La proposition soviétique se fondait sur les mêmes principes que celle de la France mais elle en différait sur plusieurs points. L’URSS proposait de créer l’Agence en deux étapes : la première serait consacrée à la formation du personnel et à la structuration de l’Agence elle-même, période durant laquelle des informations seraient fournies par les Etats possédant des moyens de surveillance spatiale et il serait créé un centre de traitement et d’interprétation des images spatiales. La deuxième étape serait principalement consacrée à la mise en place du secteur terrien par la création d’un réseau de points de réception des données106. 287. En mars 1988, l’Union soviétique a proposé la création d’un inspectorat spatial international107 chargé de vérifier le non-déploiement dans l’espace d’armes d’aucune sorte. Cet organe étant fondé sur le principe des inspections sur place avant le lancement d’objets spatiaux, l’interdiction envisagée viserait les systèmes d’armes équipés pour lancer des attaques au sol, dans /...A/48/305 Français Page 82 l’atmosphère terrestre ou dans l’espace, "quels que soient les principes physiques sur lesquels ils sont fondés". 288. La proposition canadienne PAXSAT108 (satellite de paix) utilise pour la vérification des techniques de télédétection à partir de l’espace. Comme indiqué au chapitre V plus haut, elle a deux applications potentielles : PAXSAT A et PAXSAT B. Dans le premier cas, PAXSAT serait associé à des accords sur l’espace impliquant des capacités de télédétection spatiale. Utilisant des technologies non classées, la recherche sur PAXSAT A a pour objet de concevoir un satellite pouvant déterminer avec précision si d’autres objets en orbite peuvent servir d’armes spatiales (comme les armes ASAT) ou avoir une capacité offensive. PAXSAT B, par contre, fait partie d’un projet de recherche canadien qui doit être associé avec des accords demandant une observation au sol à l’échelle régionale. La recherche sur PAXSAT comprend également la mise en place d’une base de données, probablement sur les objets spatiaux visés par l’application A et sur les forces et armes classiques visées par l’application B. 289. En 1989, la France a proposé la création d’un centre de trajectographie international109. Comme il aurait pour but d’alerter les Etats concernés en cas de menace d’incident, et de fournir des preuves de bonne foi ou de mauvaise foi en cas d’accident, ce centre devrait répondre au critère de transparence et disposer en permanence d’informations à jour sur les trajectoires des objets spatiaux. En même temps, pour être accepté par les Etats possédant des satellites, un tel centre devrait pouvoir observer un certain degré de confidentialité concernant les activités militaires dans l’espace. Sous les auspices du Secrétariat de l’ONU, il aurait les fonctions suivantes : a) Collecte de données pour la tenue à jour des immatriculations; b) Surveillance des objets spatiaux; c) Calcul en temps réel de toutes les trajectoires possibles. 290. Considérant que l’application des accords régionaux sur la confiance et la sécurité pourrait utiliser plus largement les images satellitaires, la France était prête à contribuer à la création et à l’exploitation d’agences régionales chargées de la transparence dans trois domaines : a) Assistance à la formation de photo-interprètes; b) Etude de la structure et de la dimension possibles des installations de réception (technique) qui pourraient être mises à la disposition des Etats participant à de telles agences; c) Examen plus approfondi de la question de l’accès aux données et aux informations satellitaires et discussions avec d’autres pays produisant des images spatiales, afin de décider éventuellement de communiquer aux agences régionales, sur leur demande, les informations dont elles ont besoin pour s’acquitter de ces tâches. 291. A la quarante-septième session de l’Assemblée générale, la France a indiqué qu’elle allait proposer une mesure visant à renforcer la confiance en rendant/...A/48/305 Français Page 83 obligatoire la notification préalable du lancement de missiles balistiques et de fusées porteuses de satellites ou d’autres objets spatiaux. Cette mesure, si elle est adoptée, sera complétée par la création d’un centre international, sous les auspices de l’ONU, chargé de collecter et d’exploiter les données reçues110. 292. La France a exposé sa proposition dans un document de travail qu’elle a soumis au Comité spécial sur la prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace de la Conférence du désarmement, le 12 mars 1993111. Elle a notamment proposé de mettre en place, par le biais d’un nouvel instrument international qui pourrait être négocié à la Conférence du désarmement, un régime de notification préalable des tirs de lanceurs spatiaux et de missiles balistiques. Ce régime devrait être complété par la création d’un centre international de notification qui serait chargé d’assurer la centralisation et la rediffusion des données collectées, afin d’accroître la transparence des activités spatiales. Ce centre, qui serait créé sous les auspices de l’ONU et qui en dépendrait juridiquement, pourrait prendre la forme d’une division du Bureau des affaires de désarmement du Secrétariat de l’ONU. Cet organe aurait pour fonction principale de recevoir les notifications des lancements de missiles balistiques et des tirs de lanceurs spatiaux qui lui seraient transmises par les Etats parties. Il recueillerait les informations fournies par les Etats sur les lancements effectivement réalisés. Les Etats disposant de capacités de détection seraient invités à communiquer au Centre, sur une base volontaire, des données relatives aux tirs constatés; et il mettrait, par le biais d’une banque de données, ces informations à la disposition de la communauté internationale. 293. La création d’une organisation spatiale mondiale112 a été proposée par l’Union soviétique en 1985 en tant que mécanisme plus vaste pour la coopération internationale. Les fonctions proposées pour cet organisme sont mentionnées en détail au chapitre VI.VIII. CONCLUSIONS ET RECOMMANDATIONS 294. Depuis l’adoption par l’Assemblée générale de la résolution 45/55 B, une évolution politique radicale a amené en peu de temps un nouveau climat international, qui permet d’envisager des mesures de confiance concernant l’espace. L’activité spatiale offre une nouvelle carrière à la coopération mondiale, régionale et bilatérale. 295. Le Groupe d’experts a conclu que cette évolution, jointe au développement technologique, avait non seulement conservé tout leur intérêt aux mesures de confiance dans l’espace, mais créé en outre un environnement dans lequel elles trouveraient facilement à s’appliquer. 296. Pour le Groupe d’experts, il est désormais avéré que les missions et les opérations spatiales comportent en puissance d’importants avantages scientifiques, écologiques, économiques et sociaux, politiques et autres, et que le milieu extra-atmosphérique doit être au service de l’avancement de l’humanité. C’est pourquoi les Etats sont de plus en plus nombreux à vouloir étendre leurs activités spatiales, certains considérant leur volet militaire comme important. Or, les activités spatiales doivent être conduites de manière à renforcer la paix et la sécurité internationales. /...A/48/305 Français Page 84 297. Le Groupe a conclu que les expériences spatiales ont dans tous les domaines des retombées de plus en plus appréciables, et qu’elles intéressent donc de plus en plus les aspects stratégiques et civils de la vie terrestre. L’utilisation de l’espace offre aussi en puissance les moyens d’accroître et d’envenimer, mais aussi d’apaiser, les tensions entre Etats. 298. Le Groupe d’experts constate qu’une bonne part de l’intérêt que la vaste majorité des Etats portent à l’espace tient encore à la possibilité d’y déployer un armement. Certaines autres activités militaires ne laissent pas non plus d’inquiéter. La question de l’accès aux technologies de l’espace et aux avantages qui en dérivent est en train de devenir pour l’écrasante majorité des pays une considération décisive, qui appelle une réponse précise en termes de mesures de confiance. 299. Le droit qu’a tout Etat d’explorer et d’exploiter l’espace pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de toute l’humanité est un principe juridique universellement accepté. Tous les Etats ont le devoir et la responsabilité de faire qu’il s’exerce conformément au droit international, dans l’intérêt de la paix, de la sécurité et de la coopération internationales. 300. Le Traité sur l’espace, pierre angulaire du droit international en la matière, a été adopté en 1967, avant donc que les techniques spatiales ne soient largement utilisées en télécommunication, avant l’apparition des systèmes de télédétection, et avant que les applications spatiales ne se diffusent dans une grande partie des infrastructures et des capacités civiles des Etats. Le progrès rapide de la technologie spatiale oblige à rester constamment attentif à la nécessité d’actualiser ou de compléter le droit international actuel. 301. Le Groupe d’experts conclut donc qu’il faudra peut-être, le cas échéant, élaborer davantage l’encadrement juridique pour faire face à l’innovation et susciter auprès de tous un nouvel intérêt pour qu’il soit mis en application. De ce point de vue, il a été indiqué au Groupe d’experts qu’il fallait élaborer un cadre de promotion de la coopération et de la confiance entre les Etats. 302. L’apport que représente l’activité spatiale pour le développement national et régional et pour la bonne intelligence entre les peuples est d’autant plus conséquent que cette activité se déroule dans un environnement sûr, à l’abri des menaces de l’extérieur. Il faut également rappeler que les inquiétudes des Etats peuvent trouver un aliment dans la crainte des avantages militaires ou économiques que peut donner l’espace, et dans la difficulté de bénéficier des fruits de l’activité spatiale à des conditions économiques. 303. Parmi les circonstances à prendre en considération, le Groupe d’experts ajoute aux niveaux d’avancement et de compétence des nations l’équilibre global et régional. Comme les activités spatiales et les activités militaires terrestres sont complémentaires, on peut envisager certaines mesures propres à inspirer confiance à certains Etats ou groupes d’Etats voisins en cas de tension. Le Groupe constate que, parce qu’elles offrent une vue globale de la planète, les techniques spatiales de pointe ont donné l’impression que n’importe quel point de la Terre pouvait être atteint à partir de l’espace. Il considère donc que tous les Etats peuvent et doivent participer à l’instauration au niveau mondial de la confiance entre Etats en matière d’espace. /...A/48/305 Français Page 85 304. Le Groupe d’experts pense que les applications de la technologie spatiale sont par nature ambivalentes, et que la dualité des techniques les plus avancées ne doit pas être considérée comme un mal en soi. C’est la façon dont ces techniques sont utilisées qui les rend dangereuses ou inoffensives. Mais comme le renforcement unilatéral ou le développement accéléré des capacités d’un Etat peuvent faire naître des soupçons chez les autres Etats, le Groupe d’experts est d’avis que tout gain sur ce plan doit éventuellement s’accompagner d’un train de mesures de confiance, allant dans le sens de la transparence et de l’ouverture. Ce renforcement peut également se faire sous le couvert de dispositions prises internationalement pour éviter que les capacités en question ne soient détournées à des fins interdites. 305. Il pourrait aussi y avoir cette crainte, aux motifs aussi bien militaires qu’économiques, qu’un Etat qui aurait obtenu des données révélatrices de la faiblesse ou de la situation courante d’un autre Etat ne les exploite au détriment de celui-ci. Certains pays craignent que les mesures de transparence en matière spatiale ne compromettent leur sécurité nationale. Ces mesures doivent donc être conçues de manière à concilier le besoin de confiance internationale et la nécessité de protéger les intérêts nationaux en matière de sécurité. 306. Mais il n’y a pas que les préoccupations que l’on peut identifier directement, il y a aussi celles que font naître les disparités de l’attachement que les Etats portent aux mesures de confiance. Le Groupe d’experts conclut qu’il faut accorder l’attention qu’il mérite au contrôle de l’application effective de ces mesures, et utiliser à bon escient les dispositions de vérification qui pourraient être prévues. 307. Le Groupe d’experts a examiné dans toute leur diversité les moyens techniques et matériels qu’exige une mission spatiale (construction du véhicule lui-même et du lanceur, opérations de lancement et, notamment, de poursuite radar, fonctionnement du véhicule pendant sa vie utile). Il apparaît que beaucoup d’Etats se sont spécialisés, par choix ou par nécessité, dans certains domaines, et qu’ils s’en remettent à d’autres pour compléter leurs spécialités et répondre à leurs autres besoins. Le Groupe d’experts voit dans cette circonstance un paramètre important de la problématique des mesures de confiance. 308. Le Groupe d’experts juge qu’il faut tenir compte des disparités de compétence entre les Etats lorsque l’on envisage les mesures de confiance qui pourraient être prises à l’égard de l’espace. Pour l’instant, seuls les Etats-Unis et la Fédération de Russie ont à leur disposition la panoplie complète des techniques et des matériels qui les rendent autonomes, quelle que soit la mission à laquelle on songe. Vient ensuite le groupe plus nombreux des Etats qui sont devenus autonomes pour certaines missions spatiales particulières. Il y a enfin le troisième groupe, relativement fourni, d’Etats qui disposent de techniques ou d’installations spécialisées qui pourraient s’appliquer à l’espace, mais qui n’ont pas la véritable autonomie spatiale. Ce dernier groupe comprend les pays qui ont fait directement l’expérience de l’espace et qui disposent de programmes en cours de réalisation, ainsi que ceux qui pourraient en peu de temps appliquer aux missions spatiales ou à une de leurs composantes des techniques dont ils disposent, par exemple celle des missiles. /...A/48/305 Français Page 86 309. Tous les Etats ont des intérêts légitimes dans l’espace, et beaucoup tirent profit de l’activité spatiale. Certains d’entre eux possèdent et exploitent même des biens spatiaux ou liés à l’espace, mais leur participation à l’activité spatiale reste fortement ou totalement tributaire des décisions commerciales ou politiques d’autres Etats. 310. Les disparités de compétence entre ces groupes et entre Etats, l’impossibilité de participer à l’activité spatiale sans l’aide d’autrui, le niveau incertain du transfert de technologies spatiales, et l’impossibilité d’obtenir des données spatiales vraiment intéressantes, sont autant de raisons de défiance entre les Etats. Elles ne sont peut-être pas propices à la prévention de la course aux armements dans l’espace. Cela étant, le Groupe d’experts conclut qu’il faut régler les questions d’accessibilité et d’exploitabilité de l’espace si l’on veut promouvoir la coopération et la confiance entre les Etats. 311. Le Groupe d’experts fait remarquer que l’autonomie spatiale pour tous n’est ni technologiquement ni économiquement faisable dans l’avenir prévisible. Il conclut que la coopération internationale est le grand moyen de faire valoir le droit qu’a chaque nation d’atteindre l’objectif légitime qui est d’assurer la technologie spatiale à son développement et à son bien-être. La coopération, qui signifie que d’autres nations participent à la réalisation des objectifs nationaux, suppose que l’on fait confiance aux capacités d’autrui et aux politiques qui permettent d’en profiter soi-même. 312. Le Groupe d’experts conclut qu’il faudrait envisager pour l’espace des mesures de confiance complétant celles qui concernent les activités et les accords militaires terrestres, ce qui permettrait d’inscrire dans un cadre plus large les mécanismes d’instauration et de maintien de la confiance. 313. Le Groupe d’experts constate que certains Etats sans capacité militaire spatiale s’inquiètent que d’autres Etats en soient dotés et en fassent usage. Par exemple, on pourrait vouloir donner à certaines capacités spatiales un effet de levier en cas de conflit, régional ou autre. Les satellites pourraient fournir des données exploitables dans telle ou telle situation militaire. Un surcroît de transparence pourrait donc apaiser ces inquiétudes et y substituer la confiance pour tout ce qui touche aux techniques et aux capacités spatiales. 314. Le Groupe est d’avis que les mesures que les Etats prendraient pour améliorer la confiance entre eux pourraient faire disparaître certaines préoccupations actuelles. La transparence aiderait à dissiper les soupçons et donc à éliminer certaines des contraintes qui pèsent sur la coopération internationale. Les inquiétudes auxquelles les capacités spatiales donnent naissance doivent également être apaisées par des mesures de désarmement et de contrôle des armements et d’accroissement des transferts de technologie, mais sans que soient stérilisés la croissance et le développement de la technologie spatiale civile. A cet égard, il faut aussi songer aux mesures de confiance du point de vue des arrangements régionaux en matière de sécurité. 315. Le Groupe d’experts s’est demandé comment un Etat pouvait faire progresser sa technologie spatiale (développement endogène, transfert de technologie, assistance technique) pour en franchir rapidement les différentes étapes et porter ses propres aptitudes au niveau souhaité. Il a conclu que la coopération /...A/48/305 Français Page 87 internationale était un facteur important de l’avancement de la technologie spatiale. 316. Le Groupe d’experts est d’avis que les mesures de confiance visant précisément la dualité de la technologie spatiale favoriseraient la coopération internationale. Il faut encourager l’utilisation de cette technologie, en garantissant que les avantages qui en découlent seront accessibles en vertu d’arrangements nationaux et internationaux empêchant qu’ils ne soient détournés à des fins illicites. 317. Le Groupe d’experts a envisagé l’élaboration d’un accord international interdisant les armes dans l’espace, pour conclure que l’idée méritait d’être poursuivie. Il reste d’autre part que, vu la nouvelle situation politique internationale, beaucoup d’Etats jugent que le moment est venu d’entreprendre des négociations générales pour définir un accord international de démilitarisation de l’espace. Ces Etats pensent qu’un tel accord serait en lui-même une mesure de confiance, parmi les plus efficaces. 318. Le Groupe d’experts a constaté l’importance que prennent de plus en plus les systèmes spatiaux comme aides à la diplomatie internationale. Il souligne le potentiel qu’offrent ces systèmes, capables de rendre l’Organisation plus efficace en matière de diplomatie préventive, de gestion des crises, de règlement des différends internationaux et de solution des conflits. Il estime que c’est là une fonction importante de ces systèmes, sous l’angle de la promotion de la confiance et de la stabilité dans les relations internationales. 319. Les recommandations du Groupe de travail ont pour point de départ la résolution 45/55 B de l’Assemblée générale, le Traité sur l’espace, ainsi que les principes de la transparence et de la prévisibilité, certaines exigences de comportement, et la coopération internationale, dont s’occupent surtout la Conférence du désarmement, la Commission du désarmement de l’ONU et le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique. 320. Le Groupe d’experts recommande avant tout que les Etats parties s’en tiennent strictement aux dispositions du Traité sur l’espace et des autres conventions sur le même sujet conclues sous les auspices des Nations Unies, car par certains aspects ces instruments sont favorables à la confiance entre Etats. Les résolutions des Nations Unies qui s’inspirent des mêmes principes, et qui sont universellement approuvées, peuvent également favoriser la confiance. 321. Le Groupe d’experts recommande que les mécanismes bilatéraux et multilatéraux actuels, notamment ceux que coiffent les Nations Unies, conservent leur rôle dans l’examen et l’éventuelle élaboration de mesures de confiance précises, sous l’angle particulier de la prévention de la course aux armements dans l’espace. Il conseille également de prier la Conférence du désarmement de poursuivre sa réflexion sur les moyens de prévenir un tel phénomène. S’il devenait nécessaire de négocier de nouvelles mesures, notamment des mesures propres à instaurer la confiance dans l’espace, la Conférence du désarmement serait un bon endroit pour en débattre. 322. Le Groupe d’experts recommande que le Sous-comité juridique du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace, dans le cadre du travail qui lui a été confié sur le régime international de l’espace, reste attentif notamment à la/...A/48/305 Français Page 88 Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, de manière à se tenir au courant de l’évolution technique et informé des besoins qui se présenteraient en matière de transparence et de prévisibilité. 323. Le Groupe d’experts recommande de réexaminer, à la lumière des événements actuels et futurs, les propositions de l’Agence internationale de satellites de contrôle et de l’Agence internationale de surveillance de l’espace. Il s’est demandé s’il était possible de créer un registre international des véhicules et des missions, où seraient consignées leurs données orbitales et fonctionnelles et qui recevrait des communications des centres de poursuite des Etats Membres; il estime que la question mérite d’être approfondie, dans la mesure où elle peut intéresser l’instauration de la confiance. 324. Le Groupe d’experts recommande de faire fond sur les mécanismes actuels d’alerte en cas d’accident ou de panne de véhicule spatial, et de réfléchir au rôle que l’ONU pourrait jouer dans ce domaine. Il faudrait creuser l’idée d’un système d’alerte international. 325. Le Groupe d’experts recommande que les Etats qui disposent de systèmes de télédétection les utilisent conformément à la résolution 41/65 de l’Assemblée générale, et qu’ils favorisent et facilitent le plus large accès possible, sans exclusive et à un prix raisonnable, de la communauté internationale aux données qu’ils en obtiennent, en tenant compte des besoins des pays en développement et des pays en transition. 326. Le Groupe d’experts recommande de garder à l’examen les propositions et les principes relatifs à un "Code de la route" de l’espace, qui pourrait faire partie d’un train de mesures de confiance. Il faudrait y tenir compte d’éléments comme la manoeuvrabilité de l’engin spatial, les orbites concurrentes et la prévisibilité des trajectoires proches. 327. Le Groupe d’experts envisage d’évaluer l’utilité de mécanismes institutionnels visant à encourager la coopération spatiale entre Etats y compris de transfert international de technologies spatiales en tenant compte des soucis légitimes qu’inspirent les techniques ambivalentes. Il recommande en outre d’envisager de donner à tous les Etats accès à l’espace à des fins pacifiques, à un prix coûtant ou à des conditions commerciales normales; les Etats qui auraient besoin d’aide à ce titre devraient utiliser les formes de coopération technique qui s’y prêtent, les besoins des pays en développement et des pays en transition recevant l’attention voulue. 328. Le Groupe d’experts recommande que le Comité des utilisations s’interroge sur les rouages de la coordination des activités spatiales internationales : exploration interplanétaire, suivi écologique, météorologie, la télédétection, secours en cas de catastrophe, atténuation des effets des catastrophes, opérations de sauvetage, formation du personnel, retombées... Ce travail de réflexion pourrait s’orienter utilement sur des solutions postulant une participation universelle comme celle de l’"Organisation mondiale de l’espace". 329. Le Groupe d’experts a pris note de l’opinion selon laquelle l’ambivalence de certaines techniques spatiales et le caractère international des questions débattues à propos de la course aux armements dans l’espace et de l’utilisation /...A/48/305 Français Page 89 pacifique de celui-ci invitent à instaurer des relations de travail entre la Conférence du désarmement et le Comité des utilisations et devraient inciter l’Assemblée générale à agir pour favoriser ces relations. 330. Le Groupe d’experts conclut que des mesures de confiance en matière spatiale seraient un grand pas sur la voie de la prévention de la course aux armements spatiaux et de l’utilisation pacifique de l’espace par tous les Etats. 331. Le Groupe d’experts espère que le présent rapport offrira d’utiles références aux travaux de la Conférence du désarmement et de son Comité spécial de l’espace, de la Commission du désarmement de l’ONU et du Comité des Nations Unies d’utilisation pacifique de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, sans compter les autres organismes internationaux qui s’occupent des affaires de l’espace et des questions traitées dans ce travail. Notes 1 Voir Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, dixième session extraordinaire, Supplément No 4 (A/S-10/4), sect. III. 2 Résolution 2222 (XXI) de l’Assemblée générale, annexe. 3 Le nom "Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques" est utilisé pour les événements antérieurs à décembre 1991; le nom "Fédération de Russie" a été utilisé pour les événements qui ont eu lieu après cette date. 4 Le terme "satellite", tel qu’il est utilisé ici, n’exclut pas la référence à d’autres formes d’engins spatiaux : "station spatiale", "navette spatiale", "laboratoire spatial", etc. 5 Voir Coopération internationale touchant les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique Activités des Etats Membres, note du Secrétariat (A/AC.105/505 et Add.1 à 3). 6 Activités spatiales des Nations Unies et d’autres organismes internationaux (publications des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : F.92.I.30, p. 156 et 157. 7 Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for International Security, UNIDIR, Documents de travail, No 15 (publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : GV.E.92.0.30). 8 World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI, Yearbook 1992, Oxford University Press, 1992, p. 509 à 530. 9 Adopté par l’Assemblée générale le 13 décembre 1966 dans la résolution 2222 (XXI) où il figure en annexe, ouvert à la signature le 27 janvier 1967, le Traité est entré en vigueur le 10 octobre 1967. Son texte figure dans Activités spatiales..., op. cit., p. 261 à 266. /...A/48/305 Français Page 90 10 Le Traité a été signé le 10 octobre 1963 et est entré en vigueur le même jour. Son texte figure dans Status of Multilateral Arms Regulations and Disarmament Agreements, 4e édition, 1992 (publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente E.93.IX.11), vol. I, p. 33. 11 L’Accord a été adopté par l’Assemblée générale le 19 décembre 1967 dans la résolution 2345 (XXII) et est entré en vigueur le 3 décembre 1968. Son texte figure dans Activités spatiales ..., op. cit., p. 266 à 270. 12 Adoptée par l’Assemblée générale le 29 novembre 1971 dans la résolution 2777 (XXVI), où elle figure en annexe, et ouverte à la signature le 29 mars 1972, la Convention est entrée en vigueur le 1er septembre 1972. Son texte figure ibid., p. 270 à 278. 13 La Convention a été adoptée par l’Assemblée générale le 12 novembre 1974 dans la résolution 3235 (XXIX), où elle figure en annexe, et est entrée en vigueur le 15 septembre 1976. Son texte figure ibid., p. 278 à 282. 14 Une version révisée de la Constitution et de la Convention de l’Union internationale des télécommunications (Genève, 1992) a été adoptée à la Conférence plénipotentiaire supplémentaire (APP-92). Les nouveaux textes entreront en vigueur le 1er juillet 1994. A cette date, la Constitution et la Convention de Genève abrogeront la Convention de Nairobi (1982), laquelle est toujours en vigueur, et se substitueront à elle. Voir la Convention de l’Union internationale des télécommunications, Nairobi, 1982, Secrétariat général de l’UIT, Genève, ISBN 92-61-01651-0; la Convention et la Constitution de Nice, signées le 30 juin 1989, ne sont pas entrées en vigueur. Union internationale des télécommunications, Secrétariat général, Genève, 1989, PP-89/FINACTS/CONVO1E1.TXS. 15 La Convention a été signée le 18 mai 1977 et est entrée en vigueur le 5 octobre 1978. Son texte figure dans Status ..., op. cit., vol. I, p. 217. 16 Ces clauses interprétatives ne figurent pas dans la Convention, mais on les trouve dans les comptes rendus des négociations et elles ont été intégrées dans le rapport transmis par la Conférence du Comité du désarmement à l’Assemblée générale en septembre 1976. Leur texte figure ibid., vol. I, p. 231. 17 Adopté par l’Assemblée générale dans la résolution 34/68 où il figure en annexe, l’Accord a été ouvert à la signature le 18 décembre 1979 et est entré en vigueur le 11 juillet 1984. Son texte figure dans Activités spatiales ..., op. cit., p. 283 à 291. 18 Le Traité a été signé le 26 mai 1972 et est entré en vigueur le 3 octobre 1972. Son texte figure dans Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, Edition 1990, U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Washington, p. 157 à 161. 19 L’Accord SALT-I a été signé le 26 mai 1972 et est entré en vigueur le 3 octobre 1972. Son texte figure ibid., p. 169 à 176. /...A/48/305 Français Page 91 20 Le Traité SALT-II a été signé le 18 juin 1979, mais il n’est jamais entré en vigueur. Son texte figure ibid., p. 267 à 300. 21 Le Traité START-I a été signé le 31 juillet 1991, mais il n’est pas encore entré en vigueur. Il a été complété par le Protocole de Lisbonne, qui a été signé le 23 mai 1992 par le Bélarus, les Etats-Unis, la Fédération de Russie, le Kazakhstan et l’Ukraine. Le texte du Traité a été publié comme document de la Conférence sur le désarmement sous la cote CD/1192, et le texte du Protocole sous la cote CD/1193. 22 Le Traité START-II a été signé par la Fédération de Russie et les Etats-Unis d’Amérique le 3 janvier 1993, son entrée en vigueur étant subordonnée à l’entrée en vigueur du Traité START-I. Le texte du Traité a été publié comme document de la Conférence du désarmement sous la cote CD/1194. 23 L’Accord a été signé et est entré en vigueur le 30 septembre 1971. Son texte figure dans Arms Control ..., op. cit., p. 120 et 121. 24 L’Accord a été signé et est entré en vigueur le 30 septembre 1971. Son texte figure ibid., p. 124 à 128. 25 Les Etats-Unis et l’URSS étaient convenus en 1963 d’établir entre eux une ligne de communication directe pour les périodes de crise. L’Accord dit du "téléphone rouge" prévoyait un circuit télégraphique par fil doublé d’un circuit radiotélégraphique. Le texte du Mémorandum d’accord suivi d’une annexe du 20 janvier 1963 figure ibid., p. 34 à 36. 26 L’Accord a été signé et est entré en vigueur le 15 septembre 1987. Son texte figure ibid., p. 338 à 344. 27 L’Accord a été signé et est entré en vigueur le 31 mai 1988. Son texte figure ibid., p. 457 et 458. 28 L’Accord a été signé le 12 juin 1989 et est entré en vigueur le 1er janvier 1990. Le texte de l’Accord, de ses annexes et des déclarations faites en relation avec l’Accord figure comme document de la Conférence du désarmement sous la cote CD/943, en date du 4 août 1989. 29 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, dix-huitième session, Supplément No 15 (A/5515), p. 15 et 16. 30 Ibid., trente-septième session, Supplément No 51 (A/37/51), p. 122 et 123. 31 Ibid., quarante et unième session, Supplément No 53 (A/41/53), p. 120 et 121. 32 Voir Résolutions et décisions adoptées par l’Assemblée générale au cours de la première partie de sa quarante-septième session (15 septembre-23 décembre 1992). 33 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, dixième session extraordinaire, Supplément No 4 (A/S-10/4). /...A/48/305 Français Page 92 34 Etude détaillée sur les mesures propres à accroître la confiance, publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : F.82.IX.3. 35 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quinzième session extraordinaire, Supplément No 3 (A/S-15/3). 36 Jasani, Buphendra, "Military Space Activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook 1978 (Taylor and Francis, Londres, 1978); DeVere, G. T., et Johnson, N. L., "The NORAD Space Network", Spaceflight, juillet 1985, vol. 27, p. 306 à 309; North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD Space Detection and Tracking System", fiche d’information, 20 août 1982. 37 King-Hele, Desmond, Observing Earth Satellites, (Macmillan, Londres, 1983). 38 Manly, Peter, "Television in Amateur Astronomy", Astronomy, décembre 1984, p. 35 à 37. 39 Le télescope de 2,3 mètres situé à Kitt Peak (Arizona) a été utilisé pour produire des images du télescope spatial Hubble (McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared Astronomy: Pixels to Spare", Sky & Telescope, juillet 1991, p. 31 à 35) et de la station spatiale Mir ("Satellite Trackers Bag Soviet Space Station, ibid., décembre 1987, p. 580). 40 Jackson, P., "Space Surveillance Satellite Catalog Maintenance", document AIAA 90-1339, 16 avril 1990. 41 "PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", Canada, Affaires extérieures, Verification Brochure, No 2, 1987, 1988, p. 97 à 102. 42 "Allocation de S. E. M. Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, Président de la République française", A/S-10/PV.3, 25 mai 1978. 43 "Etude des incidences de la création d’une agence internationale de satellites de contrôle rapport du Secrétaire général", A/AC.206/14, 6 août 1981. 44 France, "Document de travail L’espace au service de la vérification proposition d’agence de traitement des images satellitaires", CD/945, CD/OS/WP.40, 1er août 1989. 45 Déclaration de M. E. A. Chevardnadze, Ministre des affaires étrangères de l’URSS, à la troisième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale consacrée au désarmement, A/S-15/PV.9. 46 CD/OS/WP.39. 47 "PAXSAT Concept", Verification Brochure, op. cit., p. 97 à 102. 48 Les Nations Unies et le désarmement, 1945-1970, publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : F.70.IX.1, p. 175. /...A/48/305 Français Page 93 49 Voir tableau 3. 50 Prevention of an Arm Race in Outer Space: A Guide to the Discussion in the Conference on Disarmament, UNIDIR/91/79 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.91.0.17), p. 107 à 128. 51 CD/708. 52 CD/941. 53 CD/1092. 54 CD/708. 55 CD/1092. 56 CD/PV.218, 345 et 516. 57 Ibid. 58 CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35. 59 CD/1092. 60 CD/PV.560. 61 CD/937 et 570. 62 CD/945 et 937. 63 CD/OS/WP.39. 64 Les pays participant à l’origine au MTCR sont les suivants : Allemagne, Canada, Etats-Unis, France, Italie, Japon et Royaume-Uni. The Arms Control Reporter, 1993, 706.A.2. 65 Au 31 décembre 1992, les pays ci-après avaient décidé de participer au MTCR (par ordre chronologique) : Espagne, Australie, Danemark, Belgique, Pays-Bas, Luxembourg, Norvège, Autriche, Finlande, Suède, Nouvelle-Zélande, Grèce, Irlande, Portugal et Suisse. Ibid. 66 France, "Plan de maîtrise des armements et de désarmement présenté par la France", CD/1079, 3 juin 1991. 67 Argentine et Brésil, "Transfert international de techniques ‘névralgiques’ document de travail", A/CN.10/145, 25 avril 1991. 68 Ibid. 69 Etats-Unis d’Amérique, "Déclaration au Comité spécial de la Conférence du désarmement", dans document CD/1087 du 8 juillet 1991. /...A/48/305 Français Page 94 70 Déclaration de M. Dhanapala, représentant du Sri Lanka, CD/PV.354, 8 avril 1986. 71 Déclaration de M. Ahmad, représentant du Pakistan, CD/PV.460, 26 avril 1988. 72 CD/1162. 73 CD/PV.332, p. 22, 22 août 1985. 74 Ibid. 75 Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques, "Création d’un système international de vérification du non-déploiement dans l’espace d’armes d’aucune sorte", CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19, 17 mars 1988. 76 Ibid. 77 Dixième Conférence des chefs d’Etat ou de gouvernement des pays non alignés, Jakarta, 1er-6 septembre 1992, Document final, p. 35, Organisation des Nations Unies, document A/47/675-S/24816. 78 France, Document de travail intitulé "Prévention d’une course aux armements dans l’espace : propositions concernant la surveillance et la vérification ainsi que l’immunité des satellites", CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35, 31 juillet 1989, souligné dans l’original. 79 Ibid. 80 Déclaration du représentant des Etats-Unis d’Amérique devant le Comité spécial, le 2 août 1988, dans document CD/905, CD/OS/WP.28, 21 mars 1989. 81 Déclaration de M. Ahmad, représentant du Pakistan, CD/PV.413, 16 juin 1987. 82 CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35, 31 juillet 1989. 83 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quarante-huitième session, Supplément No 20 (A/48/20). 84 L’exploration spatiale et ses applications : Mémoires présentés à la Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Vienne, 14-27 août 1968, publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : F.69/I/16, vol. I et II. 85 A/CONF.101/10 et Corr.1 et 2. 86 Les Nations Unies et le désarmement, 1945-1970, publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : 70.IX.1, p. 66 à 68. 87 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quarantième session, Supplément No 27 (A/40/27). /...A/48/305 Français Page 95 88 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, seizième session, A/RES/1721(XVI), 20 décembre 1961, Annexe B. 89 Activités spatiales de l’ONU et des organisations internationales, Examen des activités et des ressources de l’ONU, de ses institutions spécialisées et d’autres organisations internationales concernant les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace, A/AC.105/521, publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : E.92.I.30, p. 164 à 173. 90 Ibid., p. 179 à 185. 91 Ibid., p. 174 à 175. 92 Ibid., p. 135 à 164. 93 Ibid., p. 175 à 178. 94 Ibid., p. 185 et 186. 95 Ibid., p. 187 et 188. 96 Ibid., p. 188 à 190. 97 Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, United States Arm Control and Disarmament Agency, 1990 Edition, p. 157 à 161. 98 Ibid., p. 175 et 176. 99 Ibid., p. 169 à 176 et 267 à 291. 100 Ibid., p. 350 à 362. 101 Le Traité et les documents y relatifs ont été publiés dans les Accords sur la maîtrise des armements et le désarmement : START, Treaty Between the United States of America and the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (United States Arms Control Agency), 1990, Washington. 102 Le texte du Traité a été publié comme document de la Conférence du désarmement (CD/1194). 103 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, dixième session extraordinaire, A/S-10/AC.1/7, 1er juin 1978. 104 A/AC.206/14, publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : F.83.IX.3. 105 Ibid., A/S-15/34. 106 CD/OS/WP.39, 2 août 1989. 107 CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19 du 17 mars 1988. /...A/48/305 Français Page 96 108 Canada, Affaires extérieures, "PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", Verification Brochures No 2, 1987. 109 CD/937 et CD/PV.570. 110 Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quarante-septième session, séances plénières, 8e séance, déclaration de M. R. Dumas, le 23 septembre 1992. 111 "Mesures de confiance dans l’espace, notification du lancement d’objets spatiaux et de missiles balistiques", CD/OS/WP.59. 112 La proposition a été faite à la Conférence du désarmement le 22 août 1985, CD/PV.332, p. 23. /...A/48/305 Français Page 97 APPENDICE I Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extraatmosphhérique y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes*************** Les Etats parties au présent Traité, S’inspirant des vastes perspectives qui s’offrent à l’humanité du fait de la découverte de l’espace extra-atmosphérique par l’homme, Reconnaissant l’intérêt que présente pour l’humanité tout entière le progrès de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Estimant que l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique devraient s’effectuer pour le bien de tous les peuples, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique, Désireux de contribuer au développement d’une large coopération internationale en ce qui concerne les aspects scientifiques aussi bien que juridiques de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Estimant que cette coopération contribuera à développer la compréhension mutuelle et à consolider les relations amicales entre les Etats et entre les peuples. Rappelant la résolution 1962 (XVIII), intitulée "Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique", que l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adoptée à l’unanimité le 13 décembre 1963, Rappelant la résolution 1884 (XVIII), qui engage les Etats à s’abstenir de mettre sur orbite autour de la Terre tous objets porteurs d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive et d’installer de telles armes sur des corps célestes, résolution que l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adoptée à l’unanimité le 17 octobre 1963, Tenant compte de la résolution 110 (II) de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies en date du 3 novembre 1947, résolution qui condamne la propagande destinée ou de nature à provoquer ou à encourager toute menace à la paix, toute rupture de la paix ou tout acte d’agression, et considérant que ladite résolution est applicable à l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Convaincus que le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, contribuera à la réalisation des buts et principes de la Charte des Nations Unies, *************** Résolution 2222 (XXI) de l’Assemblée générale, annexe. /...A/48/305 Français Page 98 Sont convenus de ce qui suit : Article I L’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent se faire pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique; elles sont l’apanage de l’humanité tout entière. L’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, peut être exploré et utilisé librement par tous les Etats sans aucune discrimination, dans des conditions d’égalité et conformément au droit international, toutes les régions des corps célestes devant être librement accessibles. Les recherches scientifiques sont libres dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et les Etats doivent faciliter et encourager la coopération internationale dans ces recherches. Article II L’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, ne peut faire l’objet d’appropriation nationale par proclamation de souveraineté, ni par voie d’utilisation ou d’occupation, ni par aucun autre moyen. Article III Les activités des Etats parties au Traité relatives à l’exploration et à l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent s’effectuer conformément au droit international, y compris la Charte des Nations Unies, en vue de maintenir la paix et la sécurité internationales et de favoriser la coopération et la compréhension internationales. Article IV Les Etats parties au Traité s’engagent à ne mettre sur orbite autour de la Terre aucun objet porteur d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive, à ne pas installer de telles armes sur des corps célestes et à ne pas placer de telles armes, de toute autre manière, dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Tous les Etats parties au Traité utiliseront la Lune et les autres corps célestes exclusivement à des fins pacifiques. Sont interdits sur les corps célestes l’aménagement de bases et installations militaires et de fortifications, les essais d’armes de tous types et l’exécution de manoeuvres militaires. N’est pas interdite l’utilisation de personnel militaire à des fins de recherche scientifique ou à toute autre fin pacifique. N’est pas interdite non plus l’utilisation de tout équipement ou installation nécessaire à l’exploration pacifique de la Lune et des autres corps célestes. /...A/48/305 Français Page 99 Article V Les Etats parties au Traité considéreront les astronautes comme des envoyés de l’humanité dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et leur prêteront toute l’assistance possible en cas d’accident, de détresse ou d’atterrissage forcé sur le territoire d’un autre Etat partie au Traité ou d’amerrissage en haute mer. En cas d’un tel atterrissage ou amerrissage, le retour des astronautes à l’Etat d’immatriculation de leur véhicule spatial devra être effectué promptement et en toute sécurité. Lorsqu’ils poursuivront des activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et sur les corps célestes, les astronautes d’un Etat partie au Traité prêteront toute l’assistance possible aux astronautes des autres Etats parties au Traité. Les Etats parties au Traité porteront immédiatement à la connaissance des autres Etats parties au Traité ou du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies tout phénomène découvert par eux dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, qui pourrait présenter un danger pour la vie ou la santé des astronautes. Article VI Les Etats parties au Traité ont la responsabilité internationale des activités nationales dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, qu’elles soient entreprises par des organismes gouvernementaux ou par des entités non gouvernementales, et de veiller à ce que les activités nationales soient poursuivies conformément aux dispositions énoncées dans le présent Traité. Les activités des entités non gouvernementales dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent faire l’objet d’une autorisation et d’une surveillance continue de la part de l’Etat approprié partie au Traité. En cas d’activités poursuivies par une organisation internationale dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, la responsabilité du respect des dispositions du présent Traité incombera à cette organisation internationale et aux Etats parties au Traité qui font partie de ladite organisation. Article VII Tout Etat partie au Traité qui procède ou fait procéder au lancement d’un objet dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et tout Etat partie dont le territoire ou les installations servent au lancement d’un objet, est responsable du point de vue international des dommages causés par ledit objet ou par ses éléments constitutifs, sur la Terre, dans l’atmosphère ou dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, à un autre Etat partie au Traité ou aux personnes physiques ou morales qui relèvent de cet autre Etat. Article VIII L’Etat partie au Traité sur le registre duquel est inscrit un objet lancé dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique conservera sous sa juridiction et son contrôle ledit objet et tout le personnel dudit objet, alors qu’ils se trouvent dans /...A/48/305 Français Page 100 l’espace extra-atmosphérique ou sur un corps céleste. Les droits de propriété sur les objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris les objets amenés ou construits sur un corps céleste, ainsi que sur leurs éléments constitutifs, demeurent entiers lorsque ces objets ou éléments se trouvent dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique ou sur un corps céleste, et lorsqu’ils reviennent sur la Terre. Les objets ou éléments constitutifs d’objets trouvés au-delà des limites de l’Etat partie au Traité sur le registre duquel ils sont inscrits doivent être restitués à cet Etat partie au Traité, celui-ci étant tenu de fournir, sur demande, des données d’identification avant la restitution. Article IX En ce qui concerne l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, les Etats parties au Traité devront se fonder sur les principes de la coopération et de l’assistance mutuelle et poursuivront toutes leurs activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, en tenant dûment compte des intérêts correspondants de tous les autres Etats parties au Traité. Les Etats parties au Traité effectueront l’étude de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et procéderont à leur exploration de manière à éviter les effets préjudiciables de leur contamination ainsi que les modifications nocives du milieu terrestre résultant de l’introduction de substances extra-terrestres et, en cas de besoin, ils prendront les mesures appropriées à cette fin. Si un Etat partie au Traité a lieu de croire qu’une activité ou expérience envisagée par lui-même ou par ses ressortissants dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, causerait une gêne potentiellement nuisible aux activités d’autres Etats parties au Traité en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, il devra engager les consultations internationales appropriées avant d’entreprendre ladite activité ou expérience. Tout Etat partie au Traité ayant lieu de croire qu’une activité ou expérience envisagée par un autre Etat partie au Traité dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, causerait une gêne potentiellement nuisible aux activités poursuivies en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, peut demander que des consultations soient ouvertes au sujet de ladite activité ou expérience. Article X Pour favoriser la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, conformément aux buts du présent Traité, les Etats parties au Traité examineront dans des conditions d’égalité les demandes des autres Etats parties au Traité tendant à obtenir des facilités pour l’observation du vol des objets spatiaux lancés par ces Etats. La nature de telles facilités d’observation et les conditions dans lesquelles elles pourraient être consenties seront déterminées d’un commun accord par les Etats intéressés. /...A/48/305 Français Page 101 Article XI Pour favoriser la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, les Etats parties au Traité qui mènent des activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, conviennent, dans toute la mesure où cela est possible et réalisable, d’informer le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, de la nature et de la conduite de ces activités, des lieux où elles sont poursuivies et de leurs résultats. Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies devra être prêt à assurer, aussitôt après les avoir reçus, la diffusion effective de ces renseignements. Article XII Toutes les stations et installations, tout le matériel et tous les véhicules spatiaux se trouvant sur la Lune ou sur d’autres corps célestes seront accessibles, dans des conditions de réciprocité, aux représentants des autres Etats parties au Traité. Ces représentants notifieront au préalable toute visite projetée, de façon que les consultations voulues puissent avoir lieu et que le maximum de précautions puissent être prises pour assurer la sécurité et éviter de gêner les opérations normales sur les lieux de l’installation à visiter. Article XIII Les dispositions du présent Traité s’appliquent aux activités poursuivies par les Etats parties au Traité en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, que ces activités soient menées par un Etat partie au Traité seul ou en commun avec d’autres Etats, notamment dans le cadre d’organisations intergouvernementales internationales. Toutes questions pratiques se posant à l’occasion des activités poursuivies par des organisations intergouvernementales internationales en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, seront réglées par les Etats parties au Traité soit avec l’organisation internationale compétente, soit avec un ou plusieurs des Etats membres de ladite organisation qui sont parties au Traité. Article XIV 1. Le présent Traité est ouvert à la signature de tous les Etats. Tout Etat qui n’aura pas signé le présent Traité avant son entrée en vigueur conformément au paragraphe 3 du présent article pourra y adhérer à tout moment. 2. Le présent Traité sera soumis à la ratification des Etats signataires. Les instruments de ratification et les instruments d’adhésion seront déposés auprès des Gouvernements des Etats-Unis d’Amérique, de l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques et du Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, qui sont, dans le présent Traité, désignés comme étant les gouvernements dépositaires. /...A/48/305 Français Page 102 3. Le présent Traité entrera en vigueur lorsque cinq gouvernements, y compris ceux qui sont désignés comme étant les gouvernements dépositaires aux termes du présent Traité, auront déposé leurs instruments de ratification. 4. Pour les Etats dont les instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion seront déposés après l’entrée en vigueur du présent Traité, celui-ci entrera en vigueur à la date du dépôt de leurs instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion. 5. Les gouvernements dépositaires informeront sans délai tous les Etats qui auront signé le présent Traité ou y auront adhéré de la date de chaque signature, de la date du dépôt de chaque instrument de ratification du présent Traité ou d’adhésion au présent Traité, de la date d’entrée en vigueur du Traité ainsi que de toute autre communication. 6. Le présent Traité sera enregistré par les gouvernements dépositaires conformément à l’Article 102 de la Charte des Nations Unies. Article XV Tout Etat partie au présent Traité peut proposer des amendements au Traité. Les amendements prendront effet à l’égard de chaque Etat partie au Traité acceptant les amendements dès qu’ils auront été acceptés par la majorité des Etats parties au Traité, et par la suite, pour chacun des autres Etats parties au Traité, à la date de son acceptation desdits amendements. Article XVI Tout Etat partie au présent Traité peut, un an après l’entrée en vigueur du Traité, communiquer son intention de cesser d’y être partie par voie de notification écrite adressée aux gouvernements dépositaires. Cette notification prendra effet un an après la date à laquelle elle aura été reçue. Article XVII Le présent Traité, dont les textes anglais, chinois, espagnol, français et russe font également foi, sera déposé dans les archives des gouvernements dépositaires. Des copies dûment certifiées du présent Traité seront adressées par les gouvernements dépositaires aux gouvernements des Etats qui auront signé le Traité ou qui y auront adhéré. EN FOI DE QUOI les soussignés, dûment habilités à cet effet, ont signé le présent Traité. FAIT en trois exemplaires, à Londres, Moscou et Washington, le vingt-sept janvier mil neuf cent soixante-sept. /...A/48/305 Français Page 103 APPENDICE II Directives pour des types appropriés de mesures propres à accroître la confiance et pour l’application de ces mesures sur un plan mondial et régionala La Commission a élaboré les directives ci-après concernant des types appropriés de mesures propres à accroître la confiance qu’elle soumet à l’Assemblée générale pour examen à sa quarante et unième session, conformément à la résolution 39/63 E du 12 décembre 1984. Le texte des directives est accepté sur tous les points. La Commission souhaite attirer tout particulièrement l’attention sur le paragraphe 1.2.5 des directives, où il est souligné qu’en raison de l’accumulation des données d’expérience concernant les mesures propres à accroître la confiance, il faudra peut-être établir de nouvelles directives à un stade ultérieur, si l’Assemblée générale prend une décision en ce sens. Lors de l’élaboration des directives, toutes les délégations, bien que convaincues de l’intérêt et du rôle capital des mesures propres à accroître la confiance, ont été conscientes de l’importance primordiale des mesures de désarmement et de la contribution unique que seul le désarmement peut apporter à la prévention de la guerre, notamment de la guerre nucléaire. Certaines délégations auraient souhaité que les critères et caractéristiques d’une approche régionale en ce qui concerne les mesures propres à accroître la confiance aient fait l’objet d’un exposé plus détaillé. 1. Généralités 1.1 Mandat 1.1.1 La Commission du désarmement a rédigé les présentes directives relatives aux mesures propres à accroître la confiance en application de la résolution 37/100 D adoptée par consensus, dans laquelle l’Assemblée générale a prié la Commission du désarmement "d’envisager l’établissement de directives pour des types appropriés de mesures propres à accroître la confiance et pour l’application de ces mesures sur un plan mondial ou régional", et des résolutions 38/73 A et 39/63 E, dans lesquelles elle est priée de poursuivre et de conclure ses travaux et de présenter en outre à l’Assemblée, lors de sa quarante et unième session, un rapport contenant les principes directeurs en question. 1.1.2 Dans l’établissement de ces directives, la Commission du désarmement a tenu compte, entre autres, des documents ci-après de l’Organisation des Nations Unies : Document final de la dixième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale, première session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement (résolution S-10/2); résolutions adoptées par consensus par l’Assemblée générale sur cette question (résolutions 34/87 B, 35/156 B, 36/57 F, 37/100 D et 38/73); réponses reçues des /...A/48/305 Français Page 104 gouvernements informant le Secrétaire général de leurs vues sur la question des mesures propres à accroître la confiance et de leurs données d’expérience en la matièreb; Etude détaillée sur les mesures propres à accroître la confiancec, effectuée par un groupe d’experts gouvernementaux; et propositions présentées par les pays à la douzième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée généraled, deuxième session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement. La Commission du désarmement a également tenu compte des vues exprimées par les délégations lors de ses sessions annuelles de 1983, 1984 et 1986 et consignées dans les documents de session pertinents. 1.2 Contexte politique 1.2.1 Ces directives ont été conçues à une époque où, de l’avis universel, il est particulièrement opportun et nécessaire de s’employer à renforcer la confiance entre Etats. La détérioration de la situation internationale, le recours permanent à la menace ou à l’emploi de la force et l’accroissement de l’arsenal militaire international, ainsi que leurs corollaires, l’intensification des risques de conflagration, des tensions politiques et de la méfiance, et une perception plus aiguë du danger de guerre, qu’elle soit classique ou nucléaire, suscitent une préoccupation commune. Parallèlement, le monde a de plus en plus conscience du caractère inacceptable de la guerre à notre époque et de l’interdépendance de tous les Etats en matière de sécurité. 1.2.2 Cette situation exige que la communauté internationale s’emploie d’urgence à empêcher la guerre, en particulier la guerre nucléaire selon les termes du Document final de la dixième session extraordinaire, la tâche la plus pressante et la plus urgente à l’heure actuelle consiste à en écarter la menace et à adopter des mesures concrètes de désarmement pour prévenir une course aux armements dans l’espace et mettre fin à celle qui se déroule sur Terre, pour limiter, réduire et finalement éliminer les armes nucléaires et renforcer la stabilité stratégique et s’attache également à réduire les affrontements politiques et à instaurer des rapports stables et fondés sur la coopération dans tous les domaines des relations internationales. 1.2.3 L’importance d’un processus d’accroissement de la confiance portant sur tous les domaines précités est de plus en plus manifeste dans ce contexte. Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance, en particulier lorsqu’elles sont appliquées généralement, peuvent contribuer notablement à renforcer la paix et la sécurité et favoriser et faciliter l’adoption de mesures de désarmement. 1.2.4 A l’heure actuelle, ces possibilités sont déjà étudiées dans certaines régions et sous-régions du monde, où les Etats /...A/48/305 Français Page 105 intéressés tout en restant conscients de la nécessité d’une action mondiale et de mesures de désarmement conjuguent leurs forces pour contribuer, en élaborant et en appliquant des mesures propres à accroître la confiance, à l’accroissement de la stabilité des relations et de la sécurité, à l’élimination des interventions extérieures et au renforcement de la coopération dans leurs zones. Les présentes directives ont été rédigées compte tenu de ces intéressantes données d’expérience; elles visent également à les renforcer et à appuyer d’autres tentatives aux niveaux régional et mondial. Elles n’excluent évidemment pas l’application simultanée d’autres mesures propres à renforcer la sécurité. 1.2.5 Les présentes directives font partie d’un processus dynamique dans le temps. Elles visent à contribuer à accroître l’utilité des mesures propres à accroître la confiance et à en élargir l’application; toutefois, en raison de l’accumulation des données d’expérience pertinentes, il faudra peut-être établir de nouvelles directives à un stade ultérieur, si l’Assemblée générale prend une décision en ce sens. 1.3 Sujet traité 1.3.1 Mesures propres à accroître la confiance et désarmement 1.3.1.1 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance ne sauraient se substituer aux mesures de désarmement, ni constituer un préalable à celles-ci ou les reléguer au second plan. Néanmoins, la possibilité de créer des conditions favorables à un progrès dans le domaine du désarmement en adoptant de telles mesures doit être pleinement exploitée dans toutes les régions du monde, du fait qu’elles peuvent faciliter l’adoption de mesures de désarmement et qu’elles ne l’entravent nullement. 1.3.1.2 Des mesures efficaces de désarmement et de limitation des armements, qui limitent ou réduisent directement le potentiel militaire, sont particulièrement propres à accroître la confiance; tel est spécialement le cas des mesures de désarmement nucléaire. 1.3.1.3 Les dispositions du Document final de la dixième session extraordinaire relatives au désarmement, et notamment au désarmement nucléaire, ont également une portée considérable sur le plan de l’accroissement de la confiance. 1.3.1.4 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance peuvent être élaborées et appliquées de façon autonome en vue de contribuer à la création des conditions favorables /...A/48/305 Français Page 106 à l’adoption de nouvelles mesures de désarmement ou, ce qui est tout aussi important, de mesures parallèles liées à d’autres mesures spécifiques dans le domaine du désarmement et de la limitation des armements. 1.3.2 Portée des mesures propres à accroître la confiance : mesures militaires et non militaires 1.3.2.1 La confiance dépend d’un ensemble de facteurs interdépendants d’ordre tant militaire que non militaire, et il faut emprunter des voies diverses pour surmonter la peur, l’appréhension et la méfiance entre les Etats et faire régner la confiance. 1.3.2.2 Comme la confiance porte sur un vaste ensemble d’activités tenant aux rapports entre les Etats, il est indispensable d’adopter une démarche globale et de développer la confiance dans les domaines politique, militaire, économique, social, humanitaire et culturel. Il s’agit d’éliminer les tensions politiques, de progresser dans la voie du désarmement, de remodeler le système économique international, d’éliminer la discrimination raciale ainsi que toute forme d’hégémonie, de domination et d’occupation étrangère. Il importe que le processus d’instauration de la confiance contribue, dans tous ces domaines, à réduire la méfiance et à renforcer la confiance entre les Etats en restreignant et finalement en éliminant les causes possibles de malentendus ainsi que d’erreurs d’interprétation et d’appréciation. 1.3.2.3 Nonobstant la nécessité d’engager un vaste processus d’instauration de la confiance et conformément au mandat de la Commission du désarmement, les présente directives relatives aux mesures propres à accroître la confiance visent essentiellement les problèmes militaires et les questions de sécurité, d’où les caractéristiques propres de ces directives. 1.3.2.4 Dans de nombreuses régions du monde, les phénomènes économiques et autres ont des effets si directs sur la sécurité d’un pays qu’ils ne peuvent être dissociés des questions de défense et des problèmes militaires. Les mesures concrètes à caractère non militaire qui présentent un intérêt direct pour la sécurité nationale et pour la survie des Etats relèvent donc pleinement des directives en question. En pareil cas, les mesures militaires et non militaires se complètent et se renforcent mutuellement sur le plan de l’instauration de la confiance. /...A/48/305 Français Page 107 1.3.2.5. Il incombera aux pays de chaque région de déterminer quelle est la combinaison appropriée des différents types de mesures concrètes à prendre, selon l’idée qu’ils se font de la sécurité ainsi que de la nature et de la gravité des menaces existantes. 2. Directives pour des types appropriés de mesures propres à accroître la confiance et pour l’application de ces mesures 2.1 Principes 2.1.1 Le strict respect des dispositions de la Charte des Nations Unies et des engagements énoncés dans le Document final de la dixième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale (résolution S-10/2), dont le bien-fondé a été unanimement et catégoriquement réaffirmé par tous les Etats Membres à la douzième session extraordinaire de l’Assemblée générale, deuxième session extraordinaire consacrée au désarmement, présente une importance primordiale pour la sauvegarde de la paix, la survie de l’humanité et pour la réalisation d’un désarmement général et complet sous contrôle international efficace. 2.1.2 En particulier, et à titre de préalable au renforcement de la confiance entre les Etats, il faut veiller au respect rigoureux des principes ci-après qui sont consacrés dans la Charte des Nations Unies : a) Le non-recours à la force ou à la menace de la force contre l’intégrité territoriale ou l’indépendance politique de tout Etat; b) La non-intervention et la non-ingérence dans les affaires intérieures des Etats; c) Le règlement pacifique des différends; d) L’égalité souveraine des Etats et l’autodétermination des peuples. 2.1.3 Le strict respect des principes et des priorités du Document final de la dixième session extraordinaire présente une importance particulière pour le renforcement de la confiance entre les Etats. 2.2 Objectifs 2.2.1 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance ont pour objectif final de renforcer la paix et la sécurité internationales et de contribuer à la prévention de toutes les guerres, en particulier la guerre nucléaire. /...A/48/305 Français Page 108 2.2.2 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance doivent contribuer à la création des conditions favorables au règlement pacifique des problèmes et différends internationaux existants ainsi qu’à l’amélioration et la promotion de relations internationales fondées sur la justice, la coopération et la solidarité; ces mesures doivent aussi faciliter le règlement de toute situation qui risque de créer des tensions internationales. 2.2.3 L’un des grands objectifs des mesures propres à accroître la confiance est de donner effet aux principes qui sont universellement reconnus, et tout particulièrement à ceux qui sont énoncés dans la Charte des Nations Unies. 2.2.4 En contribuant à créer un climat propre à freiner la course aux armements et à diminuer progressivement l’importance de l’élément militaire, des mesures propres à accroître la confiance devraient notamment faciliter et promouvoir le processus de limitation des armements et de désarmement. 2.2.5 Un des objectifs majeurs est de réduire, voire d’éliminer les causes de méfiance, de peur, de malentendus et d’erreurs d’appréciation en ce qui concerne les activités militaires et les intentions d’autres Etats, facteurs qui risquent de donner le sentiment d’une sécurité compromise et de justifier la poursuite des politiques d’armement sur le plan mondial aussi bien que régional. 2.2.6 Un objectif essentiel de ces mesures est de réduire les risques de méprises ou d’erreurs dans les opérations militaires, d’aider à prévenir les affrontements militaires ainsi que les préparatifs de guerre secrets, réduire le risque d’attaques surprise et de déclenchement accidentel d’une guerre; et, enfin, de donner une forme effective et concrète à l’engagement solennel de toutes les nations de s’abstenir de recourir à la menace ou à l’usage de la force sous toutes ses formes et de renforcer la sécurité et la stabilité. 2.2.7 Etant donné la prise de conscience accrue de l’importance de leur mise en oeuvre, elles peuvent en outre faciliter la vérification de l’application des accords de limitation des armements et de désarmement. De surcroît, le strict respect des obligations et des engagements en matière de désarmement et les efforts de coopération déployés pour élaborer et appliquer des mesures efficaces de vérification à cet égard mesures satisfaisantes pour toutes les parties en cause et déterminées en fonction des objectifs, de la portée et de la nature de l’accord correspondant ont en eux-mêmes une influence considérable sur l’instauration d’un climat de confiance. /...A/48/305 Français Page 109 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance ne sauraient toutefois remplacer les mesures de vérification, qui sont un élément important des accords de limitation des armements et de désarmement. 2.3 Caractéristiques 2.3.1 La confiance dans les relations internationales est fondée sur la croyance en la volonté de coopération des autres Etats. Elle se renforcera dans la mesure où, par leur comportement, les Etats démontreront leur intention de pratiquer une politique non agressive et coopérative. 2.3.2 Le renforcement de la confiance exige un consensus des Etats participant au processus. Les Etats doivent donc décider en toute liberté et souveraineté s’il y a lieu de mettre en marche un processus d’instauration de la confiance et, dans l’affirmative, déterminer quelles mesures doivent être prises et comment doit se dérouler le processus. 2.3.3 L’accroissement de la confiance est un processus graduel consistant à prendre toutes les mesures concrètes et efficaces qui traduisent des engagements politiques et qui sont militairement significatives et qui visent à progresser dans la voie du renforcement de la confiance et de la sécurité, à atténuer les tensions et à contribuer à la limitation des armements et au désarmement. A chaque étape de ce processus, les Etats doivent pouvoir mesurer et évaluer les résultats obtenus. Le respect des dispositions convenues doit être vérifié en permanence. 2.3.4 Les engagements politiques associés à des mesures concrètes leur donnant expression et effet sont d’importants moyens d’accroître la confiance. 2.3.5 L’échange ou la fourniture de renseignements sur les forces armées et les armements ainsi que sur les activités militaires joue un rôle important dans le processus de limitation des armements et de désarmement et d’accroissement de la confiance. Un tel échange ou une telle fourniture pourrait promouvoir la confiance entre Etats et réduire les malentendus dangereux au sujet des intentions des Etats. Les renseignements échangés ou communiqués au sujet de la limitation des armements, du désarmement et de l’accroissement de la confiance devraient être vérifiables, selon les dispositions prévues à cet effet dans les arrangements, accords ou traités respectifs. 2.3.6 Un modèle universel détaillé étant manifestement peu pratique, les mesures propres à accroître la confiance devraient être adaptées aux situations. L’efficacité d’une mesure concrète sera d’autant plus grande qu’elle sera adaptée au sentiment de /...A/48/305 Français Page 110 menace ou aux impératifs de la confiance dans une situation ou une région donnée. 2.3.7 Si, dans une situation donnée, les circonstances et le principe de la non-diminution de la sécurité le permettent, les mesures propres à accroître la confiance pourraient, selon un processus progressif et lorsque cela est souhaitable et approprié, aller plus loin et, sans être capables en elles-mêmes de réduire les potentiels militaires, pourraient imposer certaines limites aux options militaires. 2.4 Application 2.4.1 Afin d’appliquer au mieux les mesures propres à accroître la confiance, les Etats qui adoptent ou qui acceptent de telles mesures devraient analyser soigneusement et définir avec le plus de précision possible les facteurs qui agissent favorablement ou négativement sur la confiance entre Etats dans une situation donnée. 2.4.2 Etant donné que les Etats doivent être à même d’examiner, d’évaluer et d’assurer l’application de ces mesures, il est indispensable de définir précisément et clairement toutes les modalités des mesures déjà prises. 2.4.3 L’application d’une seule mesure propre à accroître la confiance ne peut venir à bout d’idées fausses et de préjugés, acquis sur un grand nombre d’années. Ce n’est qu’en adoptant une attitude cohérente et en y restant fidèle qu’un Etat peut apporter la preuve de son sérieux, de sa crédibilité et de sa fiabilité, sans lesquels le processus de l’instauration de la confiance ne saurait aboutir. 2.4.4 Il faudrait appliquer les mesures propres à accroître la confiance de manière à garantir le droit de chaque Etat à une sécurité non diminuée et à assurer qu’aucun Etat, individuellement ou en groupe, n’obtient d’avantages par rapport aux autres à quelque stade que ce soit du processus d’instauration de la confiance. 2.4.5 L’instauration de la confiance est un processus dynamique : l’expérience acquise et la confiance établie grâce à l’application de mesures antérieures, librement adoptées dans une large mesure et relativement peu importantes sur le plan militaire, peuvent faciliter l’adoption de nouvelles mesures plus ambitieuses. Le rythme du processus d’application des mesures souhaitables, qu’il s’agisse de leur échelonnement dans le temps ou de leur portée, dépend des circonstances. Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance devraient être aussi larges que possible et être appliquées le plus rapidement possible. S’il est possible, dans une situation donnée, d’appliquer dans un /...A/48/305 Français Page 111 premier temps des mesures ambitieuses, il semblerait qu’il faille normalement utiliser un processus progressif. 2.4.6 Les obligations nées d’accords sur des mesures propres à accroître la confiance doivent être remplies de bonne foi. 2.4.7 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance devraient être appliquées à la fois aux niveaux mondial et régional. Les approches régionales et mondiales ne sont pas contradictoires, mais plutôt complémentaires et interdépendantes. Compte tenu des interactions entre les conjonctures aux niveaux mondial et régional, un progrès à un niveau contribue à la réalisation d’un progrès à l’autre niveau; cependant, l’un ne constitue pas pour l’autre une condition préalable. Lorsque l’on envisage de prendre des mesures propres à accroître la confiance dans une région donnée, il faudrait pleinement tenir compte de la situation particulière de la région sur les plans politique, militaire et autres. Les mesures visant à accroître la confiance dans un contexte régional devraient être adoptées à l’initiative et avec l’accord des Etats de la région intéressée. 2.4.8 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance peuvent prendre diverses formes. Elles peuvent être acceptées en tant qu’obligations juridiquement contraignantes, auquel cas elles s’imposent aux parties en tant qu’élément du droit des traités. Elles peuvent également être acceptées par le biais d’engagements politiquement obligatoires. On peut aussi envisager de rendre ces dernières mesures contraignantes en droit international. 2.4.9 Les Etats devraient, dans la mesure du possible et selon qu’il convient, prévoir des procédures et des mécanismes pour l’examen et l’évaluation des progrès réalisés dans l’application des mesures propres à accroître la confiance. Dans les cas où cela est possible, on pourrait se mettre d’accord sur des calendriers pour faciliter une telle évaluation sur les plans tant qualitatif que quantitatif. 2.5 Mise en place, perspectives et possibilités offertes 2.5.1 En donnant un caractère plus contraignant aux mesures propres à accroître la confiance, on ferait oeuvre très utile du point de vue qualitatif, car on rendrait tout le processus plus crédible et plus fiable; il convient de rappeler que cela vaut également pour des engagements pris dans le domaine du désarmement. Il faudrait donc que des mesures librement adoptées et unilatérales fassent place au plus tôt à des dispositions politiquement obligatoires, réciproques et équilibrées, qui pourraient, le moment venu, être transformées en obligations juridiquement contraignantes. /...A/48/305 Français Page 112 2.5.2 Une mesure propre à accroître la confiance peut être progressivement renforcée au point de devenir un modèle de comportement. Appliquée systématiquement et uniformément durant une longue période, et assortie de l’avis juridique requis, une mesure obligatoire sur le plan politique peut donc créer une obligation relevant du droit international coutumier. De cette façon, le processus d’accroissement de la confiance peut progressivement contribuer à l’élaboration de nouvelles normes du droit international. 2.5.3 Les déclarations, notamment les déclarations d’intention, qui ne créent pas en elles-mêmes l’obligation pour les Etats de prendre des mesures spécifiques mais qui peuvent contribuer favorablement à l’instauration d’un climat de plus grande confiance mutuelle, devraient être concrétisées par des accords portant sur des mesures spécifiques. 2.5.4 Les occasions de mettre en place des mesures propres à accroître la confiance sont multiples. On trouvera ci-après un aperçu des principales possibilités à cet égard, dont les Etats pourraient s’inspirer pour identifier celles qui sembleraient particulièrement indiquées. 2.5.4.1 Les mesures propres à accroître la confiance sont particulièrement nécessaires en période de tension et de crise politiques car elles peuvent avoir un effet de stabilisation très efficace. 2.5.4.2 Les négociations sur la limitation des armements et le désarmement peuvent offrir une occasion particulièrement importante d’adopter des mesures propres à accroître la confiance. Ces mesures, si elles sont intégrées dans l’accord envisagé lui-même ou si des accords supplémentaires sont conclus, peuvent aider les parties à atteindre les buts et les objectifs de leurs négociations et de leurs accords en créant un climat de coopération et de compréhension, en facilitant l’introduction de clauses adéquates de vérification, acceptables pour tous les Etats concernés et correspondant à la nature, à la portée et à l’objet de l’accord, et en favorisant une application sûre et crédible des accords signés. 2.5.4.3 L’envoi, conformément aux objectifs de la Charte des Nations Unies, de forces de maintien de la paix dans une région ou l’arrêt des hostilités entre les Etats peut constituer une occasion particulière. 2.5.4.4 Les conférences chargées d’examiner les accords de limitation des armements pourraient aussi fournir l’occasion d’envisager l’adoption de mesures propres à accroître la confiance, à condition que celles-ci /...A/48/305 Français Page 113 ne soient en rien préjudiciables aux objectifs visés par les accords; les critères d’une telle démarche devraient être convenus par les parties aux accords. 2.5.4.5 Les accords passés entre Etats dans d’autres domaines des relations internationales offrent beaucoup d’autres occasions encore dans les secteurs politique, économique, social et culturel, notamment par exemple lorsqu’il s’agit d’entreprendre des projets de développement en commun, en particulier dans les zones frontière. 2.5.4.6 Des mesures propres à renforcer la confiance, ou tout au moins une déclaration d’intention stipulant que de telles mesures seront adoptées dans l’avenir, pourraient figurer dans toute autre forme de déclaration politique sur les objectifs que poursuivent deux Etats ou plus. 2.5.4.7 Puisque c’est surtout en abordant sous un angle multilatéral les questions de sécurité internationale et de désarmement que l’on accroît la confiance sur le plan international, l’Organisation des Nations Unies peut contribuer à renforcer la confiance en assumant le rôle central qui est le sien en matière de paix et de sécurité internationales et de désarmement. Les organismes des Nations Unies et d’autres organisations internationales pourraient contribuer à favoriser comme il convient le processus de renforcement de la confiance. En particulier, l’Assemblée générale et le Conseil de sécurité peuvent le faire nonobstant les tâches qui leur incombent dans le domaine du désarmement proprement dit en adoptant des décisions et recommandations proposant aux Etats des mesures propres à renforcer la confiance et en leur demandant de les adopter et de les mettre en oeuvre. Le Secrétaire général peut également, conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies, contribuer utilement à instaurer la confiance en suggérant des mesures concrètes à cette fin ou en fournissant ses bons offices, en particulier lorsque surgit une crise, pour favoriser la mise en place des procédures voulues. 2.5.4.8 Conformément au point IX de l’ordre du jour qu’elle a adopté le "décalogue" et sans préjuger de son rôle de négociation dans tous les secteurs définis dans cet ordre du jour, la Conférence du désarmement pourrait identifier et mettre au point des mesures propres à renforcer la confiance, dans la perspective des accords sur le désarmement et sur la limitation des armements qui sont eux-mêmes négociés au sein de la Conférence. /...A/48/305 Français Page 114 Notes a Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quinzième session extraordinaire, Supplément No 3 (A/S-15/3), p. 23 à 35. b A/34/416 et Add.1 à 3, A/35/397. c Publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente : F.82.IX.3. d Voir A/S-12/AC.1/59. /...A/48/305 Français Page 115 APPENDICE III Etat des traités multilatéraux relatifs aux activités dans l’espacea TRAITESTraité d’interdiction partielle des essais (1963) Traité sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique (1967) Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (1968) Convention sur la responsabilité (1972) Convention sur l’immatriculation (1975) Convention internationale des télécommunications (1992) b Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles (1977) Accord sur la Lune (1979) ABREVIATIONS a Ratification, adhésion, succession (sans réserves, avec réserves, clarifications ou déclarations) b Signé; non ratifié c Déclaration d’acceptation /...A/48/305 Français Page 116 Etat des traités multilatéraux relatifs aux activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique Etats ou entités signataires ou parties Traité d’interdiction partielle des essais Traité sur l’espace extraatmospphériqu Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmospphériqu Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention internationale des télécommunications Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles Accord sur la Lune Afghanistan a a b a Afrique du Sud a a a b Albanie a a b Algérie b b b a Allemagne a a a a a b a Antigua-et-Barbuda a a a a a a Arabie saoudite a a b Argentine a a a a b b a Australie a a a a a b a a Autriche a a a b a b a a Bahamas a a a b Bahreïn b Bangladesh a a a Barbade a a b Bélarus a a a a a b Belgique a a a a a b Bénin a a a b a Bhoutan a b Bolivie a b b b Botswana a b a a b Brésil a a a a b a Brunéi Darussalam b Bulgarie a a a a a b a Burkina Faso b a b Burundi b b b b b Cambodge b Cameroun b b a b Canada a a a a a b a Cap-Vert a b a Chili a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 Français Page 117 Etats ou entités signataires ou parties Traité d’interdiction partielle des essais Traité sur l’espace extraatmospphériqu Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmospphériqu Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention internationale des télécommunications Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles Accord sur la Lune Chine a a a a b Chypre a a a a a b a Colombie a b b b b Comores b Costa Rica a b b Côte d’Ivoire a b Croatie b Cuba a a a a b a Danemark a a a a a b a Djibouti b Egypte a a a b b a El Salvador a a a b b Emirats arabes unis b Equateur a a a a Espagne a a a a b a Estonie b Etats-Unis d’Amérique a a a a a b a Ethiopie b b b b Fédération de Russie a a a a a b a Fidji a a a a b Finlande a a a a b a France a a a a b b Gabon a a a b Gambie a b a b b Ghana a b b b b a Grèce a a a a b a Grenade b Guatemala a b a b Guinée b Guinée-Bissau a a a /...A/48/305 Français Page 118 Etats ou entités signataires ou parties Traité d’interdiction partielle des essais Traité sur l’espace extraatmospphériqu Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmospphériqu Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention internationale des télécommunications Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles Accord sur la Lune Guinée équatoriale a a Guyana b a Haïti b b b b Honduras a b b b Hongrie a a a a a b a Iles Salomon a Inde a a a a a b a b Indonésie a b b Iran (République islamique d’) a b a a b b b Iraq a a a a b Irlande a a a a b a Islande a a a b b a Israël a a a a b Italie a a a a b a Jamahiriya arabe libyenne a a Jamaïque a a b b Japon a a a a a b a Jordanie a b b b b Kenya a a a b Koweït a a a a b a Laos a a a a a Lesotho b b b Lettonie b Liban a a a b b b Libéria a b b Liechtenstein a b Lituanie b Luxembourg a b b a b b Madagascar a a a b Malaisie a b b b /...A/48/305 Français Page 119 Etats ou entités signataires ou parties Traité d’interdiction partielle des essais Traité sur l’espace extraatmospphériqu Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmospphériqu Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention internationale des télécommunications Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles Accord sur la Lune Malawi a b a Maldives a Mali b a a b Malte a b a b Maroc a a a a b b b Maurice a a Mauritanie a b Mexique a a a a a b a Monaco b b Mongolie a a a a a b a Myanmar a a b b Népal a a a b b Nicaragua a b b b b b Niger a a a a a b Nigéria a a a b Norvège a a a b b a Nouvelle-Zélande a a a a b a Oman b b Ouganda a a b Pakistan a a a a a b a a Panama a b a b Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée a a a a b a Paraguay b a Pays-Bas a a a a a b a a Pérou a a a b a b Philippines a b b b b a Pologne a a a a a b a Portugal b a b b Qatar b République arabe syrienne a a a a b b /...A/48/305 Français Page 120 Etats ou entités signataires ou parties Traité d’interdiction partielle des essais Traité sur l’espace extraatmospphériqu Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmospphériqu Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention internationale des télécommunications Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles Accord sur la Lune République centrafricaine a b b b République de Corée a a a a a b a République de Moldova b République populaire démocratique de Corée b a République dominicaine a a b a République fédérale tchèque et slovaquec a a a a a b a République-Unie de Tanzanie a b b Roumanie a a a a b a b Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord a a a a a b a Rwanda a b b b Saint-Marin a a a b Saint-Siège b b b Samoa occidental a Sao Tomé-et-Principe a Sénégal a b a b Seychelles a a a a a Sierra Leone a a b b b Singapour a a a a b b Slovénie b Somalie b b b Soudan a b Sri Lanka a a a b a Suède a a a a a b a Suisse a a a a a b a Suriname b Swaziland a a b Tchad a b Thaïlande a a a b Togo a a a Tonga a a a /...A/48/305 Français Page 121 Etats ou entités signataires ou parties Traité d’interdiction partielle des essais Traité sur l’espace extraatmospphériqu Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmospphériqu Convention sur la responsabilité Convention sur l’immatriculation Convention internationale des télécommunications Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou toutes autres fins hostiles Accord sur la Lune Trinité-et-Tobago a b Tunisie a a a a b a Turquie a a b b b Ukraine a a a a a b a Uruguay a a a a a b a Venezuela a a b a b Viet Nam a b a Yémen a a a b a Yougoslavie a b a a a Zaïre a b b b b Zambie a a a a b Zimbabwe b Organisations Agence spatiale européenne c c c Organisation européenne des télécommunications par satellites c a Etats signataires ou Etats parties au 1er janvier 1993. b Les Etats parties figurant dans le tableau sont ceux qui ont signé la Constitution et la Convention de l’Union internationale des télécommunications (Genève, 1992). La Convention de Nairobi (1982), qui est encore en vigueur, compte 128 Etats parties. Vingt-deux Etats seulement ont ratifié la Constitution de Nice ou y ont adhéré. c Le 1er janvier 1993, deux Etats indépendants sont nés : la République tchèque et slovaque. /...A/48/305 Français Page 122 BIBLIOGRAPHIE SELECTIVE RELATIVE AUX ASPECTS TECHNIQUES, POLITIQUES ET JURIDIQUES DES ACTIVITES SPATIALES Note du Secrétariat 1. Lors du débat du Groupe d’experts gouvernementaux chargé d’entreprendre une étude de l’application à l’espace de mesures de confiance, il a été demandé au Secrétariat de fournir, à titre préliminaire et en tant que première phase du processus de collecte de données, une bibliographie touchant les aspects techniques et juridiques des activités spatiales. 2. Un grand nombre d’ouvrages ont déjà été publiés sur la question de l’espace et ce nombre augmente rapidement. Bien que l’on se soit efforcé de sélectionner des ouvrages représentatifs de divers points de vue sur la question, la présente bibliographie ne saurait être considérée comme une liste exhaustive des publications relatives aux techniques spatiales et aux aspects juridiques des activités menées par les Etats dans l’espace qui existent actuellement. En particulier, cette liste préliminaire est loin de mentionner tous les ouvrages publiés dans des langues autres que l’anglais. 3. Les vues exprimées dans les publications énumérées dans le présent document sont exclusivement celles de leurs auteurs. Le fait qu’un ouvrage figure dans la présente bibliographie n’implique aucune approbation de son contenu. 1. Articles Adams, Peter, "New group to examine proliferation of satellites", EW Technology, Defense News, 5 février 1990, p. 33. , "U.S., Soviets edge closer to rewritten ABM Treaty at defense and space talks", Defense News, 21 août 1989. "Administration sets policy on Landsat continuity", LANDSAT DATA USERS NOTES, Earth Observation Satellite Company, vol. 7, No 1, printemps 1992, p. 4. "Advanced missile warning satellite evolved from smaller spacecraft", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 janvier 1989, p. 45. "AF Weapons Laboratory examines laser ASAT questions", SDI Monitor, 14 septembre 1990, p. 209 à 211. Aftergood, Steve, David W. Hafemeister, Oleg F. Prilutsky, Joel R. Primack et Stanislav N. Rodionov, "Nuclear power in space", Scientific American, juin 1991, vol. 264, No 6, p. 42 à 47. "Air Force wants to update spacetrack", Electronics, 6 janvier 1977, p. 34. "Allied Milspace", Military Space, 19 novembre 1990, p. 5. "Allies, US explore space cooperation", Military Space, 19 novembre 1990, p. 1 à 3. /...A/48/305 Français Page 123 Anson, Peter, "The Skynet Telecommunication Programme", Colloque Activités spatiales militaires, Association aéronautique et astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989, p. 143 à 159. Anthony, Ian (ed), "The Co-ordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls", Arms Export Regulations, Oxford University Press : Institut international de recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, 1991, p. 207 à 211. , "The missile technology control regime", Arms Export Regulations, Oxford University Press : Institut international de recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, 1991, p. 219 à 227. "Argentina develops Condor solid-propellant rocket, Aviation Week and Space Technology, juin 1985, p. 61. Asker, James R., "U.S. draws blueprints for first lunar base", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 31 août 1992, p. 47 à 51. Aubay, P. H. et J. B. Nocaudie, "Surveillance terrestre", Colloque Activités spatiales militaires, Association aéronautique et astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989, p. 143 à 159. "Australian-Asian cooperation increases in telecommunications", Space Policy, vol. 8, 1er février 1992, p. 96. "Australian Defence may launch own satellite", C and C Space and Satellite Newsletter, 8 juin 1990, p. 1 et 2. "Avco puts together laser radar for strategic defense", Space News, 30 juillet 1990. Ball, Desmond, Austsralia’s Secret Space Programmes, Canberra Paper on Strategy and Defense, No 43 (Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canaberra, 1988), 103 pages. et Helen Wilson (eds.), Australia and Space (Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992). Badurkin, V., "Mukachev radar facility prompts local protests", FBIS-Sov, 7 mars 1990, p. 2 et 3. Bates, Kelly, "SDIO’s Cooper says U.S. could deploy strategic defense system for $40 billion", Inside the Pentagon, 20 décembre 1990, p. 10 et 11. Beatty, J. Kelly, "The GEODSS difference", Sky and Telescope, mai 1982, p. 469 à 473. Bennet, Ralph, "Brilliant pebbles", Reader’s Digest, septembre 1989, p. 128 à 132. Bernard Raab, "Nuclear-powered infrared surveillance satellite study", Inter-Society Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 1977, Fairchild Space and Electronics Company, Germantown, Maryland. /...A/48/305 Français Page 124 Bertotti, Bruno et Luciano Anselmo, The Problem of Debris and Military Activities in Space, Representanza Permanente d’Italia presso la Conferenza del Disarmo, 6 août 1991. Beusch, J., et al., "NASA debris environment characterization with the Haystack radar", AIAA Paper 90-1346, 16 avril 1990. Bhatia, A., "India’s space program -Cause for concern?", Asian Survey, octobre 1985, p. 1017. Bhatt, S., "Space Law in the 1990s", International Studies, vol. 26, No 4, octobre 1989, p. 323 à 335. Bobb, Dilip et Amarnath K. Menon, "Chariot of fire", India Today, 15 juin 1989, p. 28 à 32. Bosco, Joseph A., "International Law regarding outer space -an overview", Journal of Air Law and Commerce, printemps 1990, p. 609 à 651. Boulden, Jane, "Phase I of the Strategic Defense Initiative: Current Issues, Arms Control and Canadian National Security", Issue Brief, Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, No 12, août 1990. Bourely, Michael G., "La production du lanceur Ariane", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi, 1981, p. 279 à 314. Brankli, Hank, "Weather satellite photos and the Vietnam War", Naval History, printemps 1991, p. 66 à 68. "Brazil plans to launch its own satellites in the 1990s", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 juillet 1984, p. 60. "Brazil’s space age begins", Interavia, décembre 1984, No 12. "Brazil Aiming for self-sufficiency in orbit", Space World, octobre 1985, p. 29. Brooks, Charle D., "S.D.I.: A New Dimension for Israël", Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, vol. 11, No 4, hiver 1986, p. 341 à 348. "Canada studies PAXSATS for arms control", Military Space, 31 août 1987, p. 1 à 3. Chandrashekar, S., "An assessment of Pakistan’s missile programme", 1992, non paru. , "Export controls and proliferation: an Indian perspective, 1992, à paraître. , "Missile technology control and the Third World", Space Policy, novembre 1990, p. 278 à 284. /...A/48/305 Français Page 125 Charles, Dan, "Spy Satellites: Entering a new era", Science, 24 mars 1989, p. 1541 à 1543. Chayes and Chayes, "Testing and development of ’exotic’ systems under the ABM Treaty: the great reinterpretations caper", Harvard Law Review, No 1956, 1986. Chen, Yanping, "China’s space policy: a historical review", Space Policy, vol. 7, No 2, mai 1991, p. 116 à 128. Chen, Zhiqiang, "Sun Jiadong taking about China’s space technology", Military World, janvier/février 1990, p. 34 à 38. "China/Brazil Space Talks", Aerospace Daily, 10 août 1987, p. 219. Chosh, S. K., "India’s space program and its military implications, Agence Defence Journal, septembre 1981. Clark, Phillip, "Soviet worldwide ELINT satellites", Jane’s Soviet Intelligence Review, juillet 1990, p. 330 à 332. Cleminson, Frank R. et Pericles Gasparini Alves, "Space weapon verification: a brief appraisal", Verification of Disarmament or Limitation of Armaments: Instruments, Negociations, Proposals, Serge Sur (ed.), UNIDIR, New York, 1992, p. 177 à 206. , "PAXSAT and progress in arms control", Space Policy, mai 1988, p. 97 à 102. Cohen, William S., "Limited defences under a modified ABM Treaty", Disarmament, vol. XV, No 1, 1992, p. 13 à 27. Condom, P., "Brazil aims for Self-sufficiency in space, Interavia, janvier 1984, No 1, p. 99 à 101. "Congress splits on Milspace budget", Military Space, 25 septembre 1989, p. 2. Corradini Alessandro, "Consideration of the question of international arms transfer by the United Nations", Transparency in International Transfers, Disarmament Topical Paper 3, Département des affaires de désarmement de l’ONU, New York, publication des Nations Unies. Couston, M., "Vers un droit des stations spatiales", Revue française du droit aérien et spatial, 1990, No 1. Covault, Craig, "New missile warning satellite to be launched on the first Titan 4", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 janvier 1989, p. 34 à 40. , "USAF missile warning satellites providing 90-sec. Scud Attack Alert", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 janvier 1990, p. 60 et 61. , "Soviet military space operations developing longer life satellites", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 avril 1990, p. 44 à 49. /...A/48/305 Français Page 126 , "Maui optical station photographs external tank reentry breakup", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 juin 1990, p. 52 et 53. , "Russia seeks joint space test to build military cooperation", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 mars 1992, p. 18 et 19. Cox David, et al., "Security cooperation in the Arctic: a Canadian response to Murmansk", Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 24 octobre 1989. "Crisis shows need for better tactical satellite communications", Aerospace Daily, 31 janvier 1991, p. 174. Daly, P., "GLONASS status", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 septembre 1987, p. 108. Danchik, Robert, et al., "The Navy navigation satellite system (TRANSIT)", Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest, vol. 11, Nos 1 et 2, 1990, p. 97 à 101. de Briganti, Giovanni, "West Germany reverses stance on reconnaissance satellites", Space News, 9 avril 1990. , "Budget reveals slower growth for military space programs", Defense News, 3 décembre 1990, p. 14. de Selding, Peter, "Defense Minister says no to French radar spy satellite", Space News, 12 mars 1990. , "UK Minister balks at call for European spy satellite", Space News, 16 juillet 1990, p. 1 et 20. DeVere, G. T., et Johnson, N. L., "The NORAD space network", Spaceflight, juillet 1985, vol. 27, p. 306 à 309. Domke, M., "Kostendämpfungsstrategie: integration ziviler und militärischer produktion neuer technologien", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft und Frieden, 4/1991, p. 26 à 31. Du, Shuhua, "The Outer Space and the Moon Treaties", Verification of Current Disarmament and Arms Limitation Agreements: Ways, Means and Practices, UNIDIR, New York, publication des Nations Unies, 1991. Dudney, Robert S., "The force forms up", Air Force Magazine, février 1992, p. 23. "European space industry eyes spy sats", Military Space, 23 avril 1990, p. 5 et 6. "Expert says no blessing for SDI deployment", FBIS-Sov, 91-023, 21 octobre 1991, p. 1. "Experts map out European satellite plan", Military Space, 9 avril 1990, p. 7. /...A/48/305 Français Page 127 Falkenheim, Peggy L., "Japan and arms control: Tokyo’s response to SDI and INF",Aurora Papers, No 6, Ontario: The Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 1987. Finney, A. T., "Tactical uses of the DSCS III communications system", NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium, 16-19 octobre 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Foley, Theresa, "Raytheon proposes rail-mobile radar for midcourse SDI sensing", Aviation Week & Space Technology, 11 janvier 1988, p. 22 à 24. "Foreign Milspace", Military Space, 28 janvier 1991, p. 4. "French Milspace", Military Space, 5 décembre 1988, p. 5. "French study military recon satellite", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 janvier 1973, p. 15. Fujita Yasuki, "Recent developments in the peaceful utilization of space", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, mars 1992, p. 1. Furniss, Tim, "UK studies new military satellite plan", Flight International, 7 octobre 1989, p. 4. , "Iraq plans to launch two science satellites", Flight International, 21 février 1990, p. 20. "Gadhafi: Libya needs space power", Space News, 25 juin 1990, p. 2. "General Dynamics wins MLV II competition", Aerospace Daily, 4 mai 1988, p. 185 et 186. George, E. V., "Diffraction-limited imaging of Earth satellites", Energy and technology Review, août 1991, p. 29. Gettins, Hal, "Shepherd touching off interservice row", Missiles and Rockets, 7 mars 1960, p. 21 à 28. Gilmartin, Trish, "Pentagon Advisory Panel Chairman urges gradual evolutionary approach to SDI", Defense News, 25 juillet 1988, p. 30. Goldblat, Josef, "The ENMOD Convention Review Conference", Disarmament, vol. VII, No 2, été 1984, p. 107 à 118 (La Conférence de révision de la Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement). Goure, D., "Soviet radars: the eyes of Soviet defenses", Military Technology, No 5, 1988, p. 36 à 38. Graham, C. P., "Brazilian space programme -an overview", Space Policy, février 1991, p. 72 à 76. /...A/48/305 Français Page 128 Granger, Ken, Geographic Information and Remote Sensing Technologies in the Defence of Australia, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Green, David, "UK Space Policy a problem of culture", Space Policy, vol. 3, No 4, novembre 1987, p. 277 à 279. Grossman, Elaine, "Small and light ’brilliant eyes’ could replace three SDI surveillance systems", Inside the Army, 28 mai 1990, p. 15. Gullikstad, Espen, "Finland", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press : Institut international de recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, 1991, p. 59 à 63. , "Sweden", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press : Institut international recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, 1991, p. 147 à 155. Halperin, Emmanuel, "Israël et les missiles", Politique internationale, No 44, 1989, p. 251 à 256. He, Changchui, "The development of remote sensing in China", Space Policy, vol. 5, No 1, février 1989, p. 65 à 75. "Helios to deliver imagery to 3 nations", Military Space, 21 novembre 1988, p. 1 à 3. Henize, Karl, "Tracking artificial satellites and space vehicle", Advances in Space Science, Academic Press, New York, 1960, vol. 2. Howell, Andreas, "The challenge of space surveillance", Sky and Telescope, juin 1987, p. 584 à 588. Hua-bao, Lin, "The Chinese recoverable satellite program", quarantième Congrès de la Fédération internationale d’astronautique, 7-12 octobre 1989, Malaga (Espagne), IAF-89-426. "Hughes, Martin et Rockwell selected for GBI Program", SDI Monitor, 31 août 1990, p. 197 et 198. Hughes, Peter C., Satellites Harming Other Satellites, Arms Control Verification Occasional Paper No. 7, Ottawa: Arms Control and Disarmament Division, External Affairs and International Trade, Canada, juillet 1991. Hurwith, Bruce A., "Israel and the law of outer space", Israel Law Review, vol. 22, No 4, été-automne 1988, p. 457 à 466. Iguchi, Chikako, "International cooperation in lunar and space development: Japan’s role", Space Policy, vol. 8, No 3, août 1992, p. 256 à 267. "India’s space policy", Space Policy, novembre 1987, p. 326 à 334. "Indigenous missile", Asian Defense Journal, septembre 1985. /...A/48/305 Français Page 129 "Industrial view on European space based verification", presentation at Dornier, Dornier Deutsche Aerospace, Friedrichshafen, 18 février 1992. "Industry Observer", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 juin 1977, p. 11. "International space", Military Space, 9 avril 1990, p. 5. "Invasion tip", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 6 août 1990, p. 15. "Iraqi space launch more modest than claimed", Flight International, 20 décembre 1989, p. 4. Israeli satellite launch sparks concerns about Middle East missile build-up, Aviation Week and Space Technology, 26 septembre 1988, p. 21. "Israel hints at plans to launch spy satellite", Defense News, 11 mars 1999, p. 9. Jackson, P., "Space surveillance satellite catalog maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 avril 1990. "Japan plans satellite", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 16 septembre 1989. Jasani, Buphendra, "Military space activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978, Londres, Taylor and Francis, 1978. , et al., "Share satellite surveillance", The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, mars 1990, p. 15 et 16. et Larsson, Christer, "Security implications of remote sensing", Space Policy, février 1988, p. 48. Jeambrun, Georges, "La politique de contrôle des satellites français (1990-2000)", Défense nationale, 43e année, février 1987, p. 129 à 139. Karp, Aaron, "Space technology in the Third World: commercialization and the spread of ballistic missiles", Space Policy, mai 1986, p. 157 à 168. , "Ballistic-missile proliferation in the Third World", World Armament and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1989, Oxford University Press, p. 287 à 318. , "Ballistic-missile proliferation", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Institut international de recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, Oxford University Press, 1991, p. 327 à 329. Kawachi, Masao, Toyohiko Ishii et Koichi Ijichi. "The Space Flyer Unit", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, mars 1992. Kenden, A., "Military maneuvers in synchronous orbit", Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, février 1983, vol. 36, p. 88 à 91. /...A/48/305 Français Page 130 Kiernan, Vincent, "Air Force begins upgrades to satellite scanning telescope", Space News, 23 juillet 1990, p. 8. , "Air Force alters GPS signals to aid troops", Space News, 24 septembre 1990, p. 1 et 35. , "Officials: changing world heightens demand for Milstar", Space News, 8 octobre 1990, p. 8. , "US Congress slashes Milstar funding, orders shift of system to tactical users", Space News, 22 octobre 1990, p. 3 et 37. , "DMSP Satellite launched to aid troops in Middle East", Space News, 10 décembre 1990, p. 6. , "Pentagone prepares for ASAT flight testing in 1996", Space News, 5-18 août 1991, p. 23. Kirton, John, "Canadian Space Policy", Space News, vol. 6, No 1, février 1990, p. 61 à 73. Klass, Philip, "Inmarsat decision pushes GPS to forefront of Civ Nav-Sat field", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 janvier 1991, p. 34 et 35. "Krasnoyarsk radar dismantling in full swing", FBIS-Sov, 10 octobre 1990, p. 1. Kubbing, B. W., "The SDI Agreement between Bonn and Washington: review of the first four years", Space Policy, août 1990, p. 231 à 247. Langberg, Mike, "Lockheed fights for Milstar as Cold War thaw threatens", San Jose Mercury News, 14 janvier 1991, p. 1C et 6C. Lawler, Andrew, "Taiwan seeks start on $400 million plan to enter space arena", Space News, 19 février 1990, p. 1 et 36. , "Brazil chafes at missile curbs", Space News, vol. 2, No 35, 14-20 octobre 1991, p. 1 et 20. , "South Korea plans to build, launch satellites", Space News, 25 juin 1990, p. 1 et 20. "Le Traité germano-américain sur l’IDS", Bruxelles : GRIP, No 103, novembre 1986. Lee, Yishane, "South Korea, Taiwan gear up to enter satellite era", Space News, 24 septembre 1990, p. 7. Leitenberg, M., "Satellite launchers -and potential ballistic missiles -on the commercial market", Current Research on Peace and Violence, 1981, No 2, p. 115 à 128. Leopold, George, "Canada, US to begin talks on joint space-based radar", Defense News, 26 juin 1989, p. 9. /...A/48/305 Français Page 131 "Lessons of the Gulf War", Trust and Verify, No 18, mars 1991, p. 1 et 2. "Les satellites d’observation : un instrument européen pour la vérification du désarmement", Assemblée de l’Union de l’Europe occidentale, Commission technique et aérospatiale, Colloque, Rome, 27-28 mars 1990. "Libya offers to finance Brazilian missile project", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 6 février 1988, p. 201. "Libya wants CSS-2", Flight International, 14 mai 1988, p. 6. Lindsey, George, "Surveillance from space: a strategic opportunity for Canada, Working Paper 44, Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, juin 1992. Liu Ji-yuan et Min Gui-rong, "The Progress of astronautics in China", Space Policy, vol. 3, No 2, mai 1987, p. 141 à 147. "LLNL space imaging tests slated for Maui telescope", Space News, 19 février 1990, p. 12. Lockwood, Dunbar, "Verifying START: from satellites to suspect sites", Arms Control Today, vol. 20, No 8, octobre 1990, p. 13 à 19. Lopes, Roberto, "A satellite deal with Iraq", Space Markets, vol. 3, 1989, p. 191. Lygo, Raymond, "The UK’s future in space", Space Policy, vol. 3, No 4, novembre 1987, p. 281 à 283. "Magnavox prepares for GPS buildup", Military Space, 25 septembre 1989, p. 3 à 5. Mahnken, T. G., "Why Third World space systems matter", Orbis, automne 1991, p. 563 à 579. Maitra, Ramtanu, "India’s space program: boosting industry", Fusion, vol. 7, No 4, juillet/août 1985, p. 53 à 58. Manly, Peter, "Television in amateur astronomy", Astronomy, décembre 1984, p. 35 à 37. Marov, Mikail Ya., "The new challenge for space in Russia", Space Policy, vol. 8, No 3, août 1992, p. 269 à 279. Matte, Nicolas, "The Treaty banning nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water (10 octobre 1963) and peaceful uses of outer space", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. IX, 1984, p. 391 à 414. McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared Astronomy: pixels to spare", Sky and Telescope, juillet 1991, p. 31 à 35. /...A/48/305 Français Page 132 Mehmud, Salim, "Pakistan’s space programme", Space Policy, vol. 5, No 8, août 1989, p. 217 à 225. "Meteor 2-20, after being stored on orbit, begins transmission", Aerospace Daily, 19 novembre 1990, p. 302. Middleton, B. S. et E. F. Cory, "Australian space policy", Space Policy, vol. 5, No 1, février 1989, p. 41 à 46. Milhollin G., "India’s missiles with a little help from our friends", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, novembre 1989, p. 31 à 35. Monserrat Filho, Jose, "Foguetes Proibidos", O Globo, 24 juin 1992, p. 6. "MTCR-Update: June-December 1991", Missile Monitor, No 2, printemps 1992. NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium, 16-19 octobre 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Naval Space Command, "NAVSPASUR News Release", NAVSPASURINST 5780.1, 11 juillet 1983. "Navy satellites approach critical replacement stage", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 mars 1988, p. 46 et 51. Norman, Colin, "Cut price plan offered for SDI deployment", Science, 7 octobre 1988, p. 24 et 25. North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD space detection and tracking system", Factsheet, 20 août 1982. Osborne, Freleigh, "PAXSAT space-based remote sensing for arms control verification", IEEE Electro/88, Boston, MA, 10-12 mai 1988, Professional Program Session Record 24. "OSD puts USAF space radar plan on hold, OSD studies nonspace options", Inside the Air Force, 7 décembre 1990, p. 10 et 11. Ospina, Sylvia, "Project CONDOR, the Andean regional satellite system key legal considerations", Space Communication and Broadcasting, 1989, vol. 6, p. 367 à 377. "Pakistan steps up its space program", Space World, mai 1985, p. 33. Paolini, Jérôme, "French military space policy and European cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 4, No 3, août 1988, p. 201 à 210. "PAXSAT could monitor space arms treaty", Military Space, 14 septembre 1987, p. 6 et 7. /...A/48/305 Français Page 133 Payne, Jay H., "A limited antiballistic missile system", Ohio: Department of the Air Force, Air University, Air Force Institute of Technology, Defense Technical Information Center, 1990, p. 2.13 à 2.24. Pederson, Kenneth S., "Thoughts on international space cooperation and interests in the post-Cold War world", Space Policy, vol. 8, No 3, août 1992, p. 205 à 219. Perry, Geoffrey, "Pupil projects involving satellites", Space Education, vol. 1, 1984, p. 320. Piazzano, Piero, "Cosi un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, (numéro spécial), No 120, avril 1991, p. 16 à 25. Pike, Gordon, "Chinese launch services: a user’s guide, Space Policy, vol. 7, No 2, mai 1991, p. 103 à 115. Pike, John, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Institut international de recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, Oxford University Press, 1991, p. 49 à 84. , Sarah Lang et Eric Stambler, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992, Institut international de recherches pour la paix de Stockholm, 1991, p. 121 à 146. Politi, Alessandro, "Italy plans military satellite network for early warning, reconnaissance", Defense News, 7 janvier 1991, p. 3 et 31. "Portuguese balk at US radar, leaving US with blind spot", Space News, 9 octobre 1989, p. 4. Potter, M., "Swords into ploughshares: missiles into commercial launchers", Space Policy, vol. 7, No 2, mai 1991, p. 146 à 150. Rains, Lon, "Soviets launch first ELINT spy satellite since 1988", Space News, 29 mai 1990. Rajan, Y. S., "Benefits from space technology: a view from a developing country, Space Policy, vol.4, No 3, août 1988, p. 221 à 228. Rankin, Robert, "Iraq still gets US satellite weather photos", The Philadelphia Inquirer, 22 janvier 1991, p. 9-A. Rennow, Hans-Henrik, "The information revolution II: satellites and peace", The World Today, Londres, juin 1989, p. 97 à 99. "Requests for proposals -Air Force Space Technology Center", SDI Monitor, 25 mai 1990, p. 125. "RFP for two more DSP satellites to be released Jan. 31", Aerospace Daily, 23 janvier 1991, p. 125. /...A/48/305 Français Page 134 Richelson, J., The U.S. Intelligence Community, Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, 1985, p. 140 à 143. Richelson, Jeffrey, "The future of space reconnaissance", Scientific American, janvier 1991, p. 38 à 44. Richter, Andrew, North American Aerospace Defence Cooperation in the 1990s: Issues and Prospects, Department of National Defense, Canada, Operational Research and Analysis Establishment, Extra-Mural Paper No. 57, juillet 1991. Risse-Kappen, Thomas, "Star Wars controversy in West Germany", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, vol. 43, No 6, juillet/août 1987, p. 50 à 52. Rossi, Sergio A., "La politica militare spaziale Europea e l’Italia", Afari Esteri, anno XIX, No 76, automne 1987, p. 521 à 533. Rubin, Uzi, "Iraq and the ballistic missile scare", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, vol. 46, No 8, octobre 1990, p. 11 à 13. Saint-Lager, Olivier de, "L’organisation des activités spatiales françaises : une combinaison dynamique du secteur public et du secteur privé", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi, 1981, P. 475 à 487. Salvatori, Nicoletta, "Cosi un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, (numéro spécial), No 120, avril 1991, p. 109 à 121. "Satellite intelligence", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 25 février 1991, p. 13. "Satellite trackers bag soviet space station", Sky and Telescope, décembre 1987, p. 580. Scheffran, Jiirgen et Aaron Karp, "The national interpretation of the missile technology control regime -the US and German experience", Controlling the Development and Spread of Military Technology: Lessons from the Past and Challenges for the 1990s, Vu University Press, Amsterdam, 1992, p. 235 à 251. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Verification and risk for an anti-satellite weapons ban", Bulletin of Peace Proposals, vol. 17, No 2, 1986, p. 165 à 173. , "Dual use of missile and space technologies", to be published in G. Neuneck, O. Ischebeck, Missile Technologies, Proliferation and Concepts for Arms Control, Hamburg, 1992, p. 1 à 16. , Startbahn für den Weltraumkrieq? -der ASAT-Test und die osterinsel", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft & Frieden, No 4, 1985. Scott, William B. et Stanley W. Kandebo, "NASA-AMES proposal could challenge NASP", Aviation Weak and Space Technology, 14 septembre 1992, p. 27 et 30. "SDI constellation grows in brilliance", Military Space, 14 janvier 1991, p. 3 et 4. /...A/48/305 Français Page 135 "SDIO plans to buy 4600 brilliant pebble interceptors", Defense Daily, 13 février 1990, p. 231. "SDIO retools for limited threats", SDI Monitor, 21 décembre 1990, p. 281 et 282. "SDIO works up three limited-strike protection plans", SDI Monitor, 18 janvier 1991, p. 21. "Secret images for Japan", Aviation Week and Space Technologies, 9 mars 1992, p. 11. Shastri, R., "The spread of ballistic missiles and its implications", Strategic Analysis, mai 1988, p. 157 à 168. "Shuttle-deployed Syncom IV-5 arrives on station, begins testing", Aerospace Daily, 19 janvier 1990, p. 110. Simpson, John, Philip Acton et Simon Crowe, "The Israeli satellite launch: capabilities, intentions and implications", Space Policy, Vol. 5, No 2, mai 1989, p. 117 à 128. "Sluggers pinch hit for Army GPS", Military Space, 24 septembre 1990, p. 1 et 8. Smith, David, "The Defense and space talks: moving towards non-nuclear strategic defenses", Nato Review, vol. 28, No 5, octobre 1990, p. 17 à 21. "South Korea needs to develop spy satellite", Defense Daily, 26 novembre 1990, p. 312. "Soviet Union launches military navigation satellite", Aerospace Daily, 20 septembre 1990, p. 471. "Soviets announce failure of early warning satellite", Aerospace Daily, 28 juin 1990, p. 518. "Soviets confirm Cosmos 1900 difficulties", Aerospace Daily, 16 mai 1988, p. 252. "Soviets launch Mir resupply vehicle, two satellites", Aerospace Daily, 2 octobre 1990, p. 5. "Soviets reject transition to strategic defenses Hadley", Defense Daily, 22 mars 1990, p. 458. "Space surveillance contracts expected", Defense Electronics, juin 1984, p. 19. "Space surveillance deemed inadequate", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 juin 1980, p. 249 à 259. "SSTS cCost drivers identified", Military Space, 29 septembre 1986, p. 3. /...A/48/305 Français Page 136 Sta. Romana, Elpidio R., "Japan, SDI and the Pacific", Foreign Relations, p. 105 à 123. Stares, Paul B., "The military uses of space after the Cold War", Australia and Space, Desmond Ball et Helen Wilson (eds), Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Surikov, Boris, "Krasnoyarsk radar station’s future considered", FBIS-Sov, 27 mars 1990, p. 2 et 3. "Surveillance system to monitor soviet ASATs", Defense Electronics, mars 1983, p. 16. "Swift development of China’s missiles and space technology: an interview with Mr. Liu Jiyan, Vice-Minister of the Ministry of the Aerospace Industry of China", CONMILIT, vol. 3, No 182, 1992, p. 45 à 52. Taylor, Trevor, "SDI the British response", Star Wars and European Defence, Hans Günter Brauch (ed.), Houndmills, Macmillan Press, 1987, p. 129 à 149. , "Britain’s response to the strategic defence initiative", International Affairs, vol. 62, No 2, printemps 1986, p. 217 à 230. Teitelbaum, Sheldon, "Israel and Star Wars: the shape of things to come", New Outlook, vol. 28, No 5/6, mai/juin 1985, p. 59 à 62. "The JDW Interview", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 9 février 1991, p. 200. "Third World countries are increasing their Interest in space", SDI Monitor, 7 décembre 1990, p. 275. Thomas, Paul, "Space Traffic Surveillance", Space/Aeronautics, novembre 1967, p. 75 à 86. Thomas, Raju G. C., "India’s nuclear and space programs: defence or development?", World Politics, vol. 38, No 2, janvier 1986, p. 315 à 342. "Transcarpathian Oblast radar project mothballed", FBIS-Sov, 22 août 1990, p. 51. "TRW to develop $33-million USAF space surveillance network", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 mai 1978, p. 24 et 25. Turner, R., "Brazil says missile technology controls hamper launch industry", Defense News, 24 juillet 1989, p. 18. Ulsamer, Edgar, "ESD: enhancing effectiveness electronically", Air Force Magazine, juillet 1978, p. 49. "USAF Asat test advances 1959 aircraft launch data", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 29 août 1983, p. 22. /...A/48/305 Français Page 137 "US increasing coverage of soviet space launches", Defense Daily, 15 avril 1986, p. 251. "U.S. upgrading ground-based sensors", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 juin 1980, p. 239 à 241. van Reeth, George et Kevin Madders, "Reflections of the quest for international cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 8, No 3, août 1992, p. 221 à 231. Vohra, Ruchita, "Iraq joins the missile club: impact and implications", Strategic Analysis, vol. 13, No 1, avril 1990, p. 59 à 68. von Welck, Stephan F., "India space program", Space Policy, vol. 3, No 4, novembre 1987, p. 326 à 334. , "The export of space technology: prospects and dangers", Space Policy, août 1987, p. 221 à 231. Weeb, Richard L., "Estimating the life cycle cost of the space exploration initiative", Space Policy, vol. 8, No 1, février 1992. Wells, Damon R. et Daniel E. Hastings, "The US and Japanese space programmes: a comparative study", Space Policy, vol. 7, No 3, août 1991, p. 233 à 256. Williamson, Mark, "The UK Parliamentary Space Committee", Space Policy, vol. 8, No 2, mai 1992, p. 159 à 165. Wilson, A., "Non-US launcher systems for the next decade", Interavia, No 7, juillet 1988, p. 687. Wood, Lowell, "Concerning advanced architectures for strategic defense", Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Preprint UCRL-98424, 13 mars 1988. , "Brilliant pebbles missile defense concept advocated by Livermore scientist", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 13 juin 1988, p. 151 à 155. Wu, Guoxiang, "China’s space communication goals", Space Policy, vol. 4, No 1, février 1988, p. 41 à 45. Yang, Chunfu, "China’s LONG MARCH series carrier rockets", Military World, mai 1989, p. 20 à 25. Zaloga, Steven, "Soviet Air Defence Missiles, Jane’s Information Group, Coulsdon, Surrey, 1989, p. 118 à 148. Zaloga, Steve, "Soviet radars draw opposition", Armed Forces Journal International, juin 1990, p. 21. Zhukov, G. et Y. Kolosov, International Space Law, 1984. Zorpette, Glenn, "Kwajalein’s new role", IEEE Spectrum, mars 1989, p. 64 à 69. /...A/48/305 Français Page 138 2. Ouvrages, études et rapports Anti-satellite weapons, countermeasures, and arms control, Office of Technology Assessment, report No OTA-ISC-281, septembre 1985. Atlas de géographie de l’espace, sous la direction de Fernand Verger, Sides-Reclus, 1992. Balaschak, M. et al., Assessing the comparability of dual-use technologies for ballistic missile development, Cambridge, Ma, Center for International Studies, juin 1981. Ball, Desmond, A Base for debate, Londres, Allen & Unwin, 1987. Berman, R.P. et Baker, J.C., Soviet strategic forces, Washington, D.C., Brookings, 1982. Birkholz, M. et al., Die Bundesrepublik als Heimlicher Waffenexporteur, Berlin, Arbeitskreis Physik und Rüstung, 1983. Brauch, Hans Günter, Henny J. Van Der Graaf, John Grin et Wim A. Smit (eds.), Controlling the development and spread of military technology: lessons from the past and challenges for the 1990s, Amsterdam, Vu University Press, 1992, 406 pages. Bunn, Matthew, Foundation for the future: The ABM Treaty and national security, Washington D.C., The Arms Control Association, 1990. Carus, W.S., Ballistic missiles in modern conflict, Praeger, 1991. Chays, Antonia H. et Paul Doty (eds.), Defending Deterrence: managing the ABM Treaty regime into the 21st Century, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Cochran, C. D., D. M. Gorman et J. D. Dumoulin (eds.), Space Handbook, Air University Press, janvier 1985. Cochran, T. B., W. M. Arkin, R. S. Norris et J. I. Sands, Nuclear Weapons Databook: Soviet Nuclear Weapons, vol. IV, New York, Harper & Row Publishers, 1989. Colloque : Activités spatiales militaires, Association aéronautique et astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989, 382 pages. Christol, C., The Modern international law of outer space, 1982. Disarmament: problems related to outer space, UNIDIR, New York, publications des Nations Unies, 1987, 190 pages. Dolye, Stephen, Civil uses of outer space: implications for international security, UNIDIR, New York, 1991. /...A/48/305 Français Page 139 Dorn, Walter, Peace-keeping satellites: the case for international surveillance and verification, Dundas, Peace Research Institute, 1989, Peace Research Reviews, 187 pages. Gasparini Alves, Pericles, Prevention of an arms race in outer space: a guide to discussions at the Conference on Disarmament, UNIDIR, New York, 1991, 203 pages. Gatland, K., Space technology, New York, Harmony Books, Fourth Edition, 1984. Gold, D., SDI The US Strategic Defense Initiative and the implications of Israel’s participation, Tel Aviv, Center for Strategic Studies, Memorandum No. 16, décembre 1985. Gummett, P. et J. Reppy (eds.), The Relations between defence and civil technologies, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988. Hecht, J., Beam weapons the next arms race, Plenum Press, 1984. Hord, R.M., CRC Handbood of Space Technology: status and projections, Boca Raton, Florida, 1985. Huang, Z., Long March launch vehicles in the 1990s, in F. Sharokhi, et. al., Space commercialization: launch vehicles and programs, Washington, D.C.: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 1990, p. 1 à 6. Jasani, Bhupendra, Space and international security, London, Royal United Services Institute, 70 pages. , (ed.), Peaceful and non-peaceful uses of space: problems of definition for the prevention of an arms race, UNIDIR, New York, 1991. , Space weapons and international security, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. , Outer space battlefield of the future?, London, Taylor & Francis, 1978. Johnson, Nicholas L. (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs, Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1989. . (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs, Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1990. . et Darren S. McKnight, Artificial space debris, Malabar, Orbit Book Company, 1987. King-Gele, Desmond, Observing Earth satellites, Londres, Macmillan, 1983. Krige, John, The Preshistory of ESRO: 1959/1960, European Space Agency, HSR-1, juillet 1992. /...A/48/305 Français Page 140 "Le Grandi Esplorazioni nel mondo sopra de noi", Airone Spazio, (numéro spécial) No 120, avril 1991. Long, F. A., D. Hafner et J. Boutwell (eds.), Weapons in space, New York, W. W. Norton & Company, 1986. Milton, Fenner A., M. Scott Davis et John A. Parmentola, Making space defense work, Washington, D.C., Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Nolan, Janne E., Trappings of power: ballistic missiles in the Third World, Washington, D.C., The Brookings Institution, 1991, 209 pages. Outer Space in the 1990s: the role of arms control, security, technical and legal implications, Proceedings of the Symposium held on November 11-13, 1992, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, Montreal, McGill University, 258 pages. Raiten, E., K. Tsipis, Conventional antisatellite weapons, Program in Science and Technology for International Security, Cambridge, Ma, MIT, mars 1984. Reijnen, G.C.M. et W. de Graff, The Pollution of outer space, in particular of the geostationary orbit, Dordrecht, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989. Richelson, Jeffrey, The U.S. intelligence community, Cambridge, Ma, Ballinger, 1985. , America’s secret eyes in space, New York, Harper & Row, 1990. Rudert, R., K. Schichl et S. Seeger, Atomraketen als Entwicklungshilfe, Marburg, 1985. Seiler, A., Die Entstehung und Entwicklung von Eureka, Berlin, Diplomarbeit, 1988. Sofaer, Abraham D., The ABM Treaty, Part I: treaty language and negotiating history, 11 mai 1987. , The ABM Treaty, Part II: ratification process, 12 mars 1987. , The ABM Treaty, Part III: Subsequent Practice, 9 septembre 1987. Space Log: 1957-1991, International Space Year, 1992, TRW, 1992. Space-strike arms and international security, Report of the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace Against the Nuclear Threat, Moscou, octobre 1985. Steinberg, G. M., Satellite reconnaissance: the role of informal bargaining, New York, Praeger, 1982. /...A/48/305 Français Page 141 Space Surveillance for arms control and verification: options, proceedings of the Symposium held on October 21-23, 1988, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, Montreal, McGill University, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, 1988. Stanyard, Roger, World satellite survey, London, LLoyd’s Aviation Department, 1987. Stares, Paul, The Militarization of space: US policy 1945-84, Ithaca, New York, Cornell University Press, 1985, 117 pages. Stutzle, W., B. Jasani et R. Cowen (eds.), The ABM Treaty: to defend or not to defend, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. Sutton, G.P., Rocket propulsion elements, New York, etc., John Wiley, 1986. Swahn, Johan, Open skies for all the prospects for international satellite surveillance, Gothenburg, Technical Peace Research Unit, janvier 1989, Chalmers University of Technology, 74 pages. -----