A_48_305e_A_48_305s_ES
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A_48_305e.pdf (english) A_48_305s.pdf (spanish)
UNITED A NATIONS General Assembly Distr. GENERAL A/48/305 15 October 1993 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH Forty-eighth session Agenda item 70 PREVENTION OF AN ARMS RACE IN OUTER SPACE Study on the application of confidence-building measures in outer space Report by the Secretary-General 1. The General Assembly, in its resolution 45/55 B of 4 December 1990, requested the Secretary-General, with assistance of a group of governmental experts, to carry out a study on the specific aspects related to the application of different confidence-building measures in outer space, including the different technologies available, possibilities for defining appropriate mechanisms of international cooperation in specific areas of interest, and to report thereon to the Assembly at its forty-eighth session. 2. Pursuant to that resolution, the Secretary-General has the honour to submit to the General Assembly the Study on the Application of Confidence-building Measures in Outer Space (see annex). 93-44574 (E) 231093 /...A/48/305 English Page 2 ANNEX Study on the application of confidence-building measures in outer space CONTENTS Paragraphs Page Acronyms and abbreviations ............................................. 6 Letter of transmittal .................................................. 10 Foreword by the Secretary-General ...................................... 12 I. INTRODUCTION ........................................ 1 -16 13 II. OVERVIEW ............................................ 17 -55 17 A. Current uses of outer space ..................... 18 -44 17 1. Imaging satellites .......................... 25 -26 23 2. Signals intelligence satellites ............. 27 -28 23 3. Early warning satellites .................... 29 23 4. Weather satellites .......................... 30 23 5. Nuclear explosion detection systems ......... 31 24 6. Communication satellites .................... 32 24 7. Navigation satellites ....................... 33 24 8. Anti-satellite weapons ...................... 34 -40 24 9. Anti-missile weapons ........................ 41 -44 25 B. Emerging trends ................................. 45 -55 26 1. Other States’ space capability .............. 46 -48 26 2. Increasing numbers and capabilities ......... 49 -50 27 3. Dual-use systems ............................ 51 -54 27 4. Combat applications ......................... 55 28/...A/48/305 English Page 3 CONTENTS (continued) Paragraphs Page III. EXISTING LEGAL FRAMEWORK: AGREEMENTS AND DECLARATIONS OF PRINCIPLES .......................... 56 -80 29 A. Global multilateral agreements .................. 59 29 1. Outer Space Treaty .......................... 59 -60 29 2. Other global multilateral agreements ........ 61 -67 34 B. Bilateral treaties .............................. 68 -75 36 C. United Nations General Assembly resolutions on declarations of principles ...................... 76 -80 38 IV. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE CONCEPT OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES ........................ 81 -114 40 A. Characteristics ................................. 91 -103 41 B. Criteria ........................................ 104 -109 43 C. Applicability ................................... 110 -114 44 V. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE ...................................... 115 -175 46 A. Specific features of the space environment....... 117 -129 46 B. Political and legal ............................. 130 -138 48 C. Technological and scientific .................... 139 49 1. Technology and outer space .................. 144 -158 50 (a) Technology for monitoring space operations ............................. 146 -147 50 (b) Ground-based passive optical systems ... 147 -149 50 (c) Ground-based active optical systems .... 150 51 (d) Ground-based radars .................... 151 -152 51 (e) Other technical means of monitoring space characteristics .................. 153 -154 51 (f) Monitoring space weapons ............... 155 -158 52/...A/48/305 English Page 4 CONTENTS (continued) Paragraphs Page 2. Technology and confidence-building measures .................................... 159 52 (a) PAXSAT-A ............................... 163 53 (b) Satellites for monitoring terrestrial activities ............................. 163 -165 53 (c) International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) .......................... 166 53 (d) International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA) ......................... 167 54 (e) PAXSAT-B ............................... 174 -175 55 VI. CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES ........................ 176 56 A. The need for confidence-building measures in outer space ..................................... 176 -184 56 B. Proposals for specific confidence-building measures in outer space ......................... 185 -225 57 Overviews of proposals .......................... 57 1. Confidence-building measures on a voluntary and reciprocal basis ........................ 189 -193 63 2. Confidence-building measures on a contractual obligation basis ............................ 194 -203 64 3. Proposals for institutional framework ....... 204 -207 66 4. The international transfer of missiles and other sensitive technologies ................ 208 -214 67 5. Proposals for confidence-building measures in outer space within bilateral United States of America-Union of Soviet Socialist Republics negotiations ...................... 215 -219 68 6. Other proposals ............................. 220 -225 69 C. Analysis ........................................ 226 -244 71 1. General measures to enhance transparency and confidence .............................. 227 -230 71/...A/48/305 English Page 5 CONTENTS (continued) Paragraphs Page 2. Strengthening the registration of space objects and other related measures .......... 231 -235 71 3. Code of conduct and rules of the road ....... 236 -242 72 4. The international transfer of missile and other sensitive technologies ................ 243 -244 73 VII. MECHANISMS OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION RELATED TO CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE ......... 245 -293 74 A. Existing mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space .................................. 247 74 1. Global mechanisms ........................... 248 -262 74 2. Regional multilateral mechanisms ............ 263 -274 77 3. Bilateral mechanisms ........................ 275 -281 79 B. Some proposals for creating new international mechanisms ...................................... 282 -293 80 VIII. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ..................... 294 -331 84 APPENDICES I. Text of the Outer Space Treaty ..................................... 97 II. Guidelines adopted by the United Nations Disarmament Commission .. 103 III. Status of multilateral treaties relating to activities in outer space .................................................. .......... 115 Selected bibliography on technical, political and legal aspects of outer space activities ................................................. 125/...A/48/305 English Page 6 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ABM Anti-ballistic missile ABM Treaty Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty ARABSAT Arab Satellite Communication Organization ASAT Anti-Satellite BMD Ballistic missile defence CBM Confidence-building measure CCD Charge-coupled device CD Conference on Disarmament CEPT European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations COPUOS Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space COSPAS-SARSAT Space system for tracking ships in distress -search and rescue satellite EHF Extremely high frequency ELINT Electronic intelligence ENMOD Convention Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques ESA European Space Agency EUMETSAT European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites EUTELSAT European Telecommunications Satellite Organization GPALS Global protection against limited strikes GPS Global positioning system HOT LINE Agreement between the United States of America and the AGREEMENT Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on Measures to Reduce the Risk of Outbreak of Nuclear War ICBM Intercontinental ballistic missile IFRB International Frequency Registration Board /...A/48/305 English Page 7 IMO International Maritime Organization INF Treaty Treaty on the Elimination of Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles INMARSAT International Maritime Satellite Organization INTELSAT International Telecommunications Satellite Organization INTERCOSMOS Council on International Cooperation in the Study and Utilization of Outer Space INTERSPUTNIK International Organization of Space Communications IPIC Image Processing and Interpretation Centre ISI International Space Inspectorate ISMA International Satellite Monitoring Agency ISpMA International Space Monitoring Agency ITU International Telecommunication Union LIABILITY CONVENTION Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects LPAR Large phased array radar MOON AGREEMENT Agreement Governing the Activities on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies MTCR Missile Technology Control Regime NOTIFICATION OF Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist LAUNCHES AGREEMENT Republics and the United States of America on Notification of Launches of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles and Submarine-launched Ballistic Missiles NTMs National technical means of verification NUCLEAR ACCIDENT Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist AGREEMENT Republics and the United States of America on Measures to Reduce the Risk of Outbreak of Nuclear War OUTER SPACE TREATY Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies PAROS Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space /...A/48/305 English Page 8 PREVENTION OF Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist DANGEROUS MILITARY Republics and the United States of America on the ACTIVITIES Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities AGREEMENT PTBT Treaty on Banning Nuclear Weapons Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water REGISTRATION Convention on the Registration of Objects Launched CONVENTION into Outer Space RESCUE AGREEMENT Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space RIO Regional international organizations RISK REDUCTION Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist AGREEMENT Republics and the United States of America on the Establishment of Nuclear Risk Reduction Centres RV Re-entry vehicle SALT Strategic Arms Limitation Talks SIGINT Signal intelligence SIPA Satellite Image Processing Agency SLBM Submarine-launched ballistic missile SPIC Space Processing Inspectorate Centre SPOT Système Probatoire d’Observation de la Terre START-I Treaty on Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms START-II Treaty on Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms UHF Ultra-high frequency UNDC United Nations Disarmament Commission UNIDIR United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research UNISPACE United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space UNITRACE International Trajectography Centre WEU Western European Union /...A/48/305 English Page 9 WMO World Meteorological Organization WSO World Space Organization /...A/48/305 English Page 10 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 16 July 1993 Sir, I have the honour to submit herewith the report of the Group of Governmental Experts to Undertake a Study on the Application of Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space, which was appointed by you in accordance with paragraph 3 of General Assembly resolution 45/55 B of 4 December 1990. The Governmental Experts appointed were the following: Dr. Mohamed Ezz El Din Abdel-Moneim, Deputy Director Department of International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs Cairo, Egypt Mr. Sergey D. Chuvakhin Department for Arms Reduction and Disarmament Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Russia Moscow, Russian Federation Mr. F. R. Cleminson, Head Verification and Research Section Arms Control and Disarmament Division Department of External Affairs Ottawa, Canada Dr. Radoslav Deyanov, Minister Plenipotentiary Head, Arms Control and Disarmament Division Department of International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sophia, Bulgaria Mr. Luiz Alberto Figueiredo Machado, First Secretary Ministério das Relaçoes Exteriores Departamento do Meio Ambiente Brasilia, Brazil Mr. P. Hobwani Ministry of Foreign Affairs Harare, Zimbabwe Dr. C. Raja Mohan, Associate Professor Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses New Delhi, India Mr. Pierre-Henri Pisani, Special Adviser Directorate for International Relations Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales Paris, France /...A/48/305 English Page 11 Mr. Archelaus R. Turrentine Bureau of Multilateral Affairs United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency Washington, D.C., United States of America Mr. Sikandar Zaman, Chairman Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission Karachi, Pakistan The report was prepared between July 1991 and July 1993, during which period the Group held four sessions in New York: the first from 29 July to 2 August 1991; the second from 23 to 27 March 1992; the third from 1 to 12 March 1993; and the fourth from 6 to 16 July 1993. At the third session of the Group, Mr. SHA Zukang of the People’s Republic of China participated as an expert and, at the fourth session, Mr. WU Chengjiang of the People’s Republic of China participated as an expert. In carrying out its work, the Group had before it relevant publications and papers which were circulated by members of the Group. The members of the Group wish to express their appreciation for the assistance which they received from members of the Secretariat. They wish, in particular, to thank Mr. Davinic´, Director, Office for Disarmament Affairs, and Ms. Olga Sukovic, who served as Secretary of the Group. I have been requested by the Group of Experts, as its Chairman, to submit to you, on its behalf, the present report, which was unanimously approved. In not blocking consensus and allowing the study to go forward in its final form, the expert from the United States indicated that he had received additional comments and reservations from his Government regarding the study which would be conveyed to the Secretary-General. I have been informed that those comments and reservations will be circulated separately as a United Nations document under agenda item 70. (Signed) Robert GARCIA-MORITAN Chairman of the Group of Governmental Experts on the Study on the Application of Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space /...A/48/305 English Page 12 Foreword by the Secretary-General All States have the right to explore and beneficially use our common space environment. For the international community, the constant challenge of the space age has been to expand human horizons through the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, while also preventing space and space technology from being used for threatening or destructive purposes. Outer space issues have been on the United Nations agenda for nearly four decades now. During that time, international agreements on outer space have aimed at preventing the militarization of outer space, and ensuring access by all States to the potential benefits of space-related technology. Technology is a dynamic force. Rapid developments and growing disparities in space technology capabilities have inevitably generated a certain degree of mistrust and suspicion. The insufficient application of space technologies to development needs to be addressed. As more and more countries have become involved in space activities, the need for greater bilateral and multilateral cooperation has become urgently apparent. Cooperation is essential if we are to succeed in safeguarding outer space for peaceful purposes and bring the benefits of space technology to all States. A new international environment has now been created. The post-cold-war era has witnessed many dramatic and far-reaching changes. But the world remains a dangerous place. To avoid conflicts based on misperceptions and mistrust, it is imperative that we promote transparency and other confidence-building measures -in armaments, in threatening technologies, in space and elsewhere. I am encouraged by the growing international recognition of the need for confidence-building measures on issues involving outer space. Building cooperation and confidence must be a high priority, for confidence and cooperation are contagious. International cooperation in space technology can help to pave the way for further cooperation in other areas -political, military, economic and social. I believe that it was with this intent and in this spirit that the General Assembly requested the study on confidence-building measures in outer space. The study is a useful reference and a thought-provoking resource. I hope that it will help to harmonize views, and that it will contribute to building a strong international consensus on outer space issues. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the Group of Experts for their work in preparing the present report. I commend the report to the General Assembly, and urge that it be given close consideration. Boutros Boutros-Ghali Secretary-General United Nations/...A/48/305 English Page 13 I. INTRODUCTION 1. Since the launching of the first man-made satellite into outer space in 1957, outer space questions have been discussed in various forums of the United Nations and its related organizations. From the point of view of this study, the main relevant organ is the Conference on Disarmament (CD) and its subsidiary body, the Ad Hoc Committee on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space, which has had on its agenda since 1982 an item entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space" and which has been examining, through substantive and general consideration, issues relevant to outer space. As far as peaceful uses of outer space are concerned, the most relevant body is the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS), with its Legal Subcommittee, and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee. The deliberations of COPUOS contributed to the conclusion of several international legal instruments concerning the peaceful aspects of the uses of outer space. 2. The space age, which began nearly four decades ago, has also been characterized by a rapid development in the field of space technology and by the inherent dangers of an arms race in outer space causing increased concerns. In l978, the General Assembly formally recognized such concerns in the Final Document of its tenth special session, the first special session devoted to disarmament, 1/and called for additional measures to be taken and appropriate international negotiations to be held on that issue. Many Member States considered it necessary to take further measures to preclude the possibility of the militarization of outer space. 3. Over the years, Member States have pursued two separate set of outer space interests in international forums -those related to peaceful application and those related to the prevention of an arms race. As the scope of military and national security activities in outer space has grown, so have concerns by many States about the risk of an arms race in outer space. At the same time, there has been an attempt to keep in perspective the potential benefits of applying to civil purposes space technologies initially developed under military and national security programmes. It is in connection with military and related security activities that proposals have been made on a set of rules whose purpose would be to increase confidence among States generally and particularly in specific areas of their space activities. 4. In l993, there were about 300 operational satellites in orbit, more than half of them with military or national security-related missions. In addition to the two main space Powers, there is a large group of States that have achieved self-sufficiency with specific space missions. Also, there are a number of States that have space-related capabilities in specialized technologies or facilities, while there is a growing interest by the vast majority of States that would like to participate in the activities in outer space and to share space technology. 5. In view of the absence of full-scale arrangements to prevent an arms race in outer space, interest has grown in building confidence through acceptance of certain measures, guidelines or commitments among States regarding space-related activities. Many believe that such measures would constitute a constructive move towards the prevention of an arms race in outer space. The purpose of such /...A/48/305 English Page 14 measures is to obtain greater transparency and predictability in space activities in general, through such measures as prior notification, verification, monitoring, code of conduct; thus, contributing to global and regional security. 6. At its forty-fifth session, on 4 December 1990, the General Assembly adopted two resolutions concerning outer space. By resolution 45/55 A entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space", the General Assembly expressed its conviction, inter alia, "that further measures should be examined in the search for effective and verifiable bilateral and multilateral agreements in order to prevent an arms race in outer space", and reaffirmed "the importance and urgency of preventing an arms race in outer space and the readiness of all States to contribute to that common objective, in conformity with the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies" (further referred to as Outer Space Treaty). It further recognized "the relevance of considering measures in confidence-building and greater transparency and openness in space", and requested the Conference on Disarmament "to continue building upon areas of convergence with a view to undertaking negotiations for the conclusion of an agreement or agreements, as appropriate, to prevent an arms race in outer space in all its aspects". 7. By the second resolution 45/55 B, entitled "Confidence-building measures in outer space", the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to carry out, with the assistance of governmental experts, the present study. It reads as follows: "The General Assembly, "Conscious of the importance and urgency of preventing an arms race in outer space, "Recalling that, in accordance with the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, 2/the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind, "Aware of the fact that more and more States are taking an active interest in outer space or participating in important space programmes for the exploration and exploitation of that environment, "Recognizing, in this context, the relevancy space has gained as an important factor for the socio-economic development of many States, in addition to its undeniable role in security issues, "Emphasizing that the growing use of outer space has increased the need for more transparency as well as confidence-building measures, "Recalling that the international community has unanimously recognized the importance and usefulness of confidence-building measures, which can/...A/48/305 English Page 15 significantly contribute to the promotion of peace and security and disarmament, in particular through General Assembly resolutions 43/78 H of 7 December 1988 and 44/116 U of 15 December 1989, "Noting the important work being carried out by the Ad Hoc Committee on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space of the Conference on Disarmament, which contributes to identifying potential areas of confidence-building measures, "Aware of the existence of a number of different proposals and initiatives addressing this subject, which attests to a growing convergence of views, "1. Reaffirms the importance of confidence-building measures as means conducive to ensuring the attainment of the objective of the prevention of an arms race in outer space; "2. Recognizes their applicability in the space environment under specific criteria yet to be defined; "3. Requests the Secretary-General to carry out, with the assistance of government experts, a study on the specific aspects related to the application of different confidence-building measures in outer space, including the different technologies available, possibilities for defining appropriate mechanisms of international cooperation in specific areas of interest and so on, and to report thereon to the General Assembly at its forty-eighth session." 8. After the adoption of the above-mentioned resolutions, the United Nations General Assembly has adopted two resolutions under the agenda item entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space". By resolution 46/33 of 6 December 1991, the Assembly again requested the Conference on Disarmament "to consider as a matter of priority the question of preventing an arms race in outer space", recognized, inter alia, "the relevance of considering measures on confidence-building and greater transparency and openness in space" and, by resolution 47/51 of 9 December 1992, recognized, "the growing convergence of views on the elaboration of measures designed to strengthen transparency, confidence and security in the uses of outer space." 9. In fulfilling its mandate, the Group decided to divide the study into eight chapters. In addition, it considered it useful to include as annexes a number of texts relevant to the study, as well as a selected bibliography. 10. After this introductory chapter, chapter II of the present study considers the current uses of outer space and emerging trends with special emphasis on the technical problems involved, such as different types of satellites and their missions, anti-satellite weapons and anti-missile weapons. When it refers to emerging trends, emphasis is put on States’ space capabilities, dual-use systems and combat applications. 11. The third chapter deals with the existing legal framework: global multilateral agreements and bilateral agreements concerning both military and peaceful aspects of the exploration and uses of outer space, as well as with a /...A/48/305 English Page 16 number of resolutions containing declarations of principles adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. 12. The fourth chapter addresses the overall question of confidence-building measures. Such measures have found increasing application in a wide range of contexts, including global, regional and bilateral security environments. They have been used to address security concerns raised by conventional weapons, as well as nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. A number of common characteristics of confidence-building measures are identified, and several broad criteria are noted for their successful implementation. Also, the applicability of such measures is considered. 13. The fifth chapter covers specific aspects of confidence-building measures as they apply to outer space. Political, legal, technological and scientific considerations are analysed with regard to their implementation. Technological opportunities and constraints are identified both for confidence-building in space, that is, those measures pertaining to space operations, as well as confidence-building from space, that is, measures that use space technology. 14. The sixth chapter addresses specific confidence-building measures in outer space that have been proposed by various Governments, and considers various aspects of their potential implementation. 15. The seventh chapter reviews the range of mechanisms of international cooperation related to confidence-building measures in outer space. This includes the role of the United Nations, the Conference on Disarmament, as well as some other global, regional, bilateral and other forums for their development and implementation. It also addresses some proposals for creation of new international mechanisms. 16. The final chapter contains the conclusions and recommendations of the Expert Group. /...A/48/305 English Page 17 II. OVERVIEW 17. The dream of humanity to make the fullest possible use of outer space for the development of science and the well-being of humankind has not yet been fulfilled and thus remains a purpose to be achieved. There have been major achievements in space sciences including the Earth and atmospheric observational sciences, and lunar and interplanetary exploration, and these are becoming the basis of environmental sciences of the future. There have been significant achievements as well in space applications such as communications, navigation, search and rescue, meteorology, and Earth-remote sensing for many purposes. Space has become an important factor in the social and economic well-being of many States. 18. Since the launch of the first sputnik in 1957, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 3/the United States and a growing number of other countries have used space for military purposes. This fact determines the context in which the idea of confidence-building measures in outer space has been developed. Most of the approximately 300 satellites 4/currently operational in Earth orbit are used in conjunction with military missions both for peacetime operations and increasingly directly in support of military forces on Earth. Communication, navigation, observation, weather and other satellites help, inter alia, to increase the effectiveness of terrestrial military systems. 19. The development of and/or access to a space launch capability is essential to the effective exploitation of space or peaceful and commercial purposes and in support of the arms regulation processes, as well as for military purposes. Much remains to be done, through satellites and other forms of space craft, in areas of space science, solar and interplanetary research, space biology, environmental and other purposes. A. Current uses of outer space 20. The development of space research and applications was made possible by the constant improvement of available launching systems, in some cases driven by military needs. Two categories of launch systems exist: (a) Reusable space transport systems the primary function of which is to assure manned flights and service of in-orbit infrastructures; their reliability must be the highest possible, taking into account the human presence on-board; (b) Expendable launching systems which according to their capacity in terms of thrust can put into different orbits payloads of varying masses. The recent evolution witnessed in the field of disarmament enables one to envisage the use of converted missiles to put payloads into low-Earth orbit. 21. Satellites typically are deployed in four types of orbits, which are defined by their altitude, period and inclination to the Earth’s equator (figure 1). /...A/48/305 English Page 18 Figure I. Representative satellite orbits All simple satellite orbits involve elliptical motion in a plane fixed in celestial space and passing through the centre of mass of the system (typically Earth), while the Earth rotates beneath the spacecraft and its orbit. /...A/48/305 English Page 19 A Low Earth orbit B Circular semisynchhronou orbit C Elliptic semisynchhronou orbit D Geosynchronous orbit Figure II. Representative satellite orbits All simple satellite orbits involve elliptical motion in a plane fixed in celestial space and passing through the centre of mass of the system (typically Earth), while the Earth rotates beneath the spacecraft and its orbit. /...A/48/305 English Page 20 (a) Low Earth orbits include those with altitudes of a few hundred to over 1,000 kilometres, which may be of any inclination, although typically such orbits are at high inclinations in order to maximize coverage of high-latitude portions of the Earth’s surface; (b) Geosynchronous orbits are at an altitude of nearly 36,000 kilometres, and have a period of about one day, permitting a satellite to view instantaneously nearly half the Earth’s surface. Such orbits are useful for communications, early warning or electronic intelligence collection. If the satellite is in the orbit plane of the Earth’s equator (zero inclination), such orbits are called geostationary, and provide single satellite full-time coverage of an area; (c) Semi-synchronous orbits have a period of 12 hours, with satellites at an altitude of about 20,000 kilometres. Circular semi-synchronous orbits are primarily used by modern navigation satellites; (d) Molniya orbits are a subset of semi-synchronous orbits, which are highly elliptical, having low points (perigees) of a few hundred kilometres, and high points (apogees) of nearly 40,000 kilometres. Those orbits typically have inclinations of 63 degrees, and are used for coverage of polar and high-latitude regions. 22. Space systems may also be categorized by the functions they serve, as illustrated in table 1 and discussed in more detail in the following sections. As with other satellites, military satellites generally perform two types of functions: acquisition of information; and transmission of information. Satellites can be used to acquire information concerning the disposition of terrestrial military forces using imagery or by picking up electronic transmissions (electronic intelligence or ELINT, and signal intelligence or SIGINT). Other information acquisition functions include weather, missile alerting, and nuclear explosion detection. Certain information is relayed by communications and navigation satellites. 23. In recent years, there has been a trend towards greater openness and transparency with regard to many space activities, including a number that serve military purposes. Nevertheless, it should be recognized that some details on the precise capabilities and operations of satellites with military missions are likely to continue to be considered highly classified by States to which they belong. 24. It also must be noted that most space technologies are prime examples of technologies which have a dual-use potential. Satellites, which are essential in many applications in the civil sector, for example weather satellites, are also seen as significant force-multipliers when used for military purposes. The technology required to intercept satellites in space is, in some respects, similar to that required to intercept ballistic missiles or their warheads. Expertise in the anti-ballistic missile (ABM) field, could constitute a direct technological basis from which to design an ASAT capability. The reverse is not necessarily true. /...A/48/305 English Page 21 Table 1. General characteristics of some typical space missions Mission Typical orbits Power Space craft features/sensors/instruments Notes A. Science Atmospheric and upper atmospheric observation Low altitude High inclination Low Medium Optical near infrared and infrared sensors Life of 2-5 years Radiation and magnetic field measurement Elliptical, high altitude and high inclination Low Magnetometers, radiation sensors charged particle detectors Life of 5-8 years Solar Solar orbits some out of solar plane orbits Moderate Electro-optical, radiation, magnetic and particle sensors, with complex thermal control Inter-planetary Planetary, sling-shots Moderate Electro-optical, radian measurement sensors, special long-distance data transmission systems Many include fly-bys, orbiters, landers, carrying similar systems as Earth science systems B. Earth observations Land, vegetation and water resources monitoring Low altitude inclined Low-moderate Optical infrared, multi-spectral sensors Synthetic Aperture Radars with large antennas, with wide band data links Life of 5-8 years, some have off-track pointing capability, some have onbooar data Atmospheric and meteorological monitoring Low altitude inclined Low-medium Optical, near infrared and infrared sensors Life of 5-8 years Environmental monitoring Low altitude inclined Low Sensors to measure constituent gases in atmosphere Life of 5-7 years Air traffic monitoring Medium altitude inclined Very high Space-borne radars with very large antennas Life of 5 or more years /...A/48/305 English Page 22 Mission Typical orbits Power Space craft features/sensors/instruments Notes C. Communications International and domestic Highly elliptical, highly inclined Geo-Syn equatorial High Multi-frequency transponders and antennas 10-15 year life with station-keeping capabilities -voice, data and video communications Direct Broadcasting System Geo-Syn equatorial High High-frequency transmitters and antennas Direct broadcast of radio and TV programmes 10-12 years of life Mobile Geo-Syn equatorial High Large low-frequency transmitters and antennas e.g. M-Satellite of INMARSAT Personal Low-altitude constellation Low-moderate Ant. config. multiple satellites Constellation of satellites Military Geo-Syn equatorial High UHF to EHF frequency transmitters and antennas, with encryption mechanism Life of 10-15 years. Also used for data transmission Search and rescue Low altitude Moderate Receivers and transmitters with doppler effect measurement capabilities Picks up signals from an activated beacon, when beacon-carrier is in emergency D. Navigation Navigation and global positioning Medium altitude inclined Moderate Precision time and frequency measurement Constellation of satellites, providing aircraft and land applications /...A/48/305 English Page 23 1. Imaging satellites 25. Imaging satellites, orbiting at altitudes of several hundred kilometres, make use of film, electro-optical cameras or radars, to produce high resolution images of the surface of the Earth in various regions of the spectrum. Such satellite imaging can be readily used to detect objects on the ground or at sea and, in the case of some military satellite systems of highest resolution, to identify and distinguish between different types of vehicles and other equipment. Perhaps their most significant applications have been as national technical means (NTM) of verifying arms limitation agreements. 26. Use of optical imagery from civilian satellites, such as LANDSAT, SPOT and the COSMOS series, have already been used to detect certain anomalies as in the case of the Chernobyl accident (1986) and the extent of environmental concerns in terms of the Gulf War (1991). Military reconnaissance satellites and their associated analytical capabilities are generally much more effective in this regard. 2. Signals intelligence satellites 27. Signals intelligence satellites are designed to detect transmissions from terrestrial communications systems, as well as radars and other electronic systems. The interception of such transmissions can provide information on the type and location of even low power transmitters, such as hand-held radios. However, these satellites are not capable of intercepting communications carried over land lines. 28. Signals intelligence consists of several categories. Communications intelligence is directed at the analysis of the source and content of message traffic. While most important military communications are protected by encryption techniques, computer processing can be used to decrypt some traffic, and additional intelligence can be derived from analysis of patterns of transmissions over time. Electronic intelligence is devoted to analysis of non-communications electronic transmissions. This would include telemetry from missile tests, or radar transmitters. 3. Early warning satellites 29. Early warning satellites carry infrared sensors that detect the heat from a rocket’s engines. These satellites are used for monitoring missile launches to ensure treaty compliance, as well as providing early warning of missile attack. They can also be used to locate the launch sites of missiles used in combat operations. 4. Weather satellites 30. The civil usefulness of weather satellites is generally recognized. They also provide vital support to military operations both in peace and in war. The cost-free access to data from weather satellites has been a fine example of international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space throughout the /...A/48/305 English Page 24 years and has proved to be fundamental in helping States develop better weather forecasting and in increasing natural disaster preparedness. 5. Nuclear explosion detection systems 31. Since the early 1960s satellites which are capable of detecting nuclear explosions on the Earth and in space have been deployed. Some of those satellites, along with weather and early warning satellites, carry several types of sensors to detect the location of nuclear explosions and to evaluate their yield. The information from these satellites could be also used for the purpose of planning military operations. 6. Communications satellites 32. Communication represents one of the most widespread applications of modern satellites. Communication satellites are important both for military and civil applications. These satellites may be classified into three categories, according to their orbital characteristics: they are geosynchronous, semi-synchronous or non-synchronous. They may also be classified by their operating frequencies, bandwidth or by the type of traffic and service provided. Most communication satellites are in the geostationary Earth orbit. Satellites are today a routine and vital element of the international telecommunication systems, as well as many national networks, and in specialized systems, such as the international COSPAS-SARSAT search and rescue system. 7. Navigation satellites 33. Navigation satellites were one of the earliest military applications of space technology, and are among the most useful to military forces on Earth. Military aircraft now use navigation satellites to guide them to aerial tankers for inflight refuelling as they fly non-stop from their home bases to conflicts thousands of miles away. They can also use navigation satellites to guide them to their targets with pinpoint precision, where they can drop their bombs with an accuracy that will rival that of much more expensive "smart" weapons. 8. Anti-satellite weapons 34. As the applications of military space systems have increased in importance over time for States with the most active space programmes, interest has grown in developing anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons to counter the contributions that a potential adversary’s satellites might make to its combat effectiveness. 35. Any use of an anti-satellite weapon against an orbiting space object is feared to produce debris that in some cases could affect other space objects or may also fall over populated areas, with unpredictable consequences. This concern is more vivid vis-à-vis the environmental consequences of an uncontrolled re-entry in the atmosphere of the remains of a space object carrying a nuclear power source. /...A/48/305 English Page 25 36. Early research into the development of an ASAT capability was initiated by the space Powers in the 1950s. The first successful ASAT intercept took place near Kwajalein Island in the Pacific Ocean in May 1963. A year later, nucleartipppe ASATs became operational on Johnson Island. This programme, based on the Thor rocket, ended in 1976 and emphasis on research and development shifted to non-nuclear, kinetic-kill mechanisms. In the early 1980s, research focused on the developments of an air-launched hypersonic miniature homing vehicle, but the programme was frozen in 1988. Research continues on a ground-based kinetic-kill interceptor based on a solid fuel missile system. 37. Parallel in time to the project, which involved the Kwajalein Island testing, research was undertaken to develop a co-orbital interceptor designed to place a multi-ton satellite in low Earth orbit. The theory was that, by manoeuvring close to a satellite target and co-orbiting with it, an explosive charge could be detonated, which would shower the target with shrapnel. Satellites which are delicate, it was reasoned, could be readily destroyed by this method. Testing between 1968 to 1982 had limited success (approximately 70 per cent as mentioned in some publications) when using a radar homing device and much less when a heat-seeking homing device was used. The entire system was cumbersome and limited in employment. Although of marginal effectiveness, it was declared operational. The system has not been tested since 1982. 38. Work has also been carried out on the use of directed energy systems for ASAT missions. Various types of ground-based high-energy lasers, if sufficiently focused and coupled with highly accurate tracking, might be able to damage satellites in orbit as they pass overhead. 39. It should be noted that much of the work on these ASAT systems has now become of lower priority, or has been terminated. This reflects the more cooperative relationship between the two States with the most active space programmes. 40. In summary, it appears that research specifically related to developing ASAT technology has been inconclusive and sporadic, although interest in the concept resurfaces from time to time. Aspects of this concept continue to be a subject of considerable controversy. 9. Anti-missile weapons 41. Anti-missile weapons involved in defending against offensive strategic missiles are relevant to this study to the degree that they represent a potential residual ASAT capability, are based in space, or employ space-based components. 42. Any satellite that passes through the limited attack zone of an anti-missile weapon would probably be as vulnerable to attack as would any strategic missile or warhead passing through that zone. In most instances, only satellites in low-orbit would be subject to such theoretical vulnerabilities. 43. It should be noted, however, that accurate high-energy lasers, space-based interceptors, and long-range anti-missiles systems could all contribute to extending the zone of vulnerability of satellites to anti-missile systems. /...A/48/305 English Page 26 44. While space-based anti-missile weapons have been under serious study, not all of the technical challenges associated with such weapons have been solved. At present, there are no known programmes to deploy systems involving such weapons. B. Emerging trends 45. Outer space continues to assume a growing importance both for military and civilian activities, as discussed earlier in the section. The importance is illustrated, inter alia, by: (a) a growing number of countries exploring ways to use outer space; (b) military uses spreading from strategic to tactical purposes or missions; (c) communications technology for civilian purposes operating at higher powers and in new frequency bands; and (d) an increasing commonality of use of outer space between commercial and military applications. Although since the end of the cold war some aspects of military use of outer space by some powers has been reconsidered, research in this field is continued by the leading space countries. 1. Other States space capabilities 46. A number of other States have or are planning to develop national space capabilities. While at present most of these national programmes or plans do not envision a military component, military capabilities could be built upon those programmes. Increased transparency in space programmes, including these programmes, would be an important factor in building confidence among States. 47. In implementing the recommendations of UNISPACE II, and on the recommendation of COPUOS, the United Nations Secretary-General, on the basis of United Nations General Assembly resolution 46/45 of 9 December 1991, requested Member States to submit annual reports on their space activities. The annual reports submitted by States were reproduced in the report of the Secretary-General submitted to the General Assembly at its forty-seventh session (A/47/383). Taking into account that report, the Assembly again requested the Secretary-General, under resolution 47/67 of 14 December 1992, to report to it at its forty-eighth session on the implementation of the recommendations of the Conference. Those requests pertaining to reporting on national space activities and on the implementation of recommendations of UNISPACE appear as regular items in the United Nations General Assembly annual resolutions on peaceful uses of outer space. 48. Describing the national programmes of individual States is beyond the mandate of this Study Group. Most of these activities are carried out for purposes such as telecommunications, meteorology, research and remote sensing of the Earth and other activities. 5/It is worth noting that Member States of the European Space Agency (ESA) had decided to "Europeanize" a greater part of their national space programmes by integrating them into Agency programmes. 6//...A/48/305 English Page 27 2. Increasing numbers and capabilities 49. During the 1980s, there was an expansion in the number and sophistication of military satellites. In addition to an increase in optical imaging capabilities, new radar imaging satellites were introduced that provide high resolution coverage under all weather and lighting conditions. 50. Just as armed forces are increasingly more dependent on satellites, those satellites are used more and more in a coordinated manner; for instance, information from weather satellites might help programming for cloud-free observation, or navigation satellites because of their precision can assist in accurate determination of satellite in-orbit location and control. 7/3. Dual use systems 51. Space technologies are to a large extent of dual use in their application, as to a lesser degree are the systems. While the technologies employed may be similar or identical, the purpose for which they are employed -military or civil -is normally identifiable, albeit sometimes with some difficulty. The military may also contract with commercial corporations in a manner similar to other customers when it appears cost-effective to do so and where their security and availability requirements can be met. 52. Roles likely to be exclusively military include imaging satellites employed as national technical means (NTM) for intelligent purposes as well as SIGINT and ELINT collectors. Their primary purpose is the collection of other types of military and strategic intelligence. They have a potential, as well, to locate targets for attack. These are more likely to be strategic than tactical targets. Early warning satellites can be used in the interest of ballistic missile defences, specifically providing information on the launching of ballistic missiles. Nevertheless many of these satellites, particularly imaging satellites, contribute significantly to the function of arms control verification. Commercial imaging systems are closing the technology gap in terms of resolution, and therefore may contribute significantly in increasing future transparency on a global basis. They do not yet have the capability to contribute to arms control verification in other than a support role in determining presence of major infrastructures and monitor possible environmental degradations. 53. There are a number of areas, low altitude weather satellites for example, that are based on nearly equal civil and military capabilities. Physically quite similar and often made by the same company, the military often make use of both systems. Discrete military and civilian low altitude navigational satellite systems are deployed. The military use of full Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities, however, remain unavailable to civilian users. The military mapping community is a leading customer for commercially available remote sensing data and high resolution remote sensing film products, which are apparently derived from satellites whose primary mission was initially military map-making, is now becoming available to the commercial sector. /...A/48/305 English Page 28 54. It is clear that a considerable potential now exists to make use of data gathered by military or commercial means on a broader basis. Clearly, in the post bi-polar world of space technology, cooperative efforts must be developed. Data collected should be utilized in an organized manner and on a global basis. 4. Combat applications 55. The increased integration of military space capabilities with terrestrial military planning and that of space systems with each other have resulted in the expanding role of space and military space systems. One recent example of this was the Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm where United States satellites for imaging, signals intelligence, early warning, weather, communications and navigation were extensively used. 8//...A/48/305 English Page 29 III. EXISTING LEGAL FRAMEWORK: AGREEMENTS AND DECLARATIONS OF PRINCIPLES 56. Since the beginning of the space era, several international instruments concerning both military and peaceful aspects of the exploration and uses of outer space have been concluded. 57. The existing treaties concerning activities of States in outer space could be divided into three categories: global multilateral agreements (see appendix III), regional multilateral agreements and bilateral agreements. In addition, the General Assembly of the United Nations has adopted a number of resolutions containing declarations of principles concerning the space activities of States. 58. An attempt to identify several confidence-building components in some of these treaties is made in table 2. A. Global multilateral agreements 1. Outer Space Treaty 59. The 1967 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (Outer Space Treaty) 9/established the principles governing peaceful activities of States in outer space. According to article I, the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be (a) "carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind"; (b) "shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law"; and (c) "there shall be freedom of scientific investigation, ... and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigations". Further, activities of States Parties to this Treaty shall be carried out "in accordance with international law, including the United Nations Charter, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding" (art. III). In article IV, paragraph 1, the States Parties undertake, inter alia, not to place "in orbit around the Earth any object carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner". The Treaty further provides that the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes, and forbids "the establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any kind of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies" (art. IV, para. 2). /...A/48/305 English Page 30 TABLE 2 CBMsIN SOME MULTILATERAL AND BILATERAL ARMS LIMITATION AND DISARMAMENT AGREEMENTS (a) MULTILATERAL AGREEMENTS RELATED TO OUTER SPACE a/Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? PTBT Moscow 5 August 1963 10 October 1963 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 119 States Parties No verification clauses; but NTMs have been routinely used for verification purposes. Outer Space Treaty London, Moscow, Washington 27 January 1967 10 October 1967 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 93 States Parties Opportunity to observe the flight of space objects; onsiit inspection on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies; consultations if an activity is potentially harmful to those of others; an obligation to inform the United Nations Secretary-General of the nature, conduct, locations and results of their activities in outer space; the Secretary-General should be prepared to disseminate such information immediately and effectively; stipulates that all installations, equipment and space vehicles shall be open to representatives of other States Parties, on condition of reciprocity. Rescue Agreement New York 22 April 1968 3 December 1968 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 69 States Parties Specifies an obligation to notify the launching authority in case of accident; notify the United Nations Secretary-General about it; the Secretary-General shall disseminate the information received. Liability Convention New York 29 March 1972 1 September 1972 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 35 States Parties Questions arising from damage are solved through a Claim Commission. Registration Convention New York 14 January 1975 15 September 1976 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 37 States Parties Stipulates the framework for reporting to the United Nations Secretary-General information regarding name of launching State; appropriate designator; date and location of the launching of objects in space; basic orbital parameters, general function; changes in orbital parameters after launch, recovery date of the spacecraft. /...A/48/305 English Page 31 Table 2 (continued) Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? ITU Convention Geneva December 1992 Enters into force on 1 July 1994 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 128 States Parties The Union maintains and extends international cooperation among all members for the improvement and rational use of telecommunications of all kinds; coordinates efforts to eliminate harmful interference between radio stations of different countries; fosters international cooperation in the delivery of technical assistance to the developing countries, etc. ENMOD Convention New York 18 May 1977 5 October 1978 Unspecified Right to withdrawal 57 States Parties Consultation and cooperation among parties in solving problems concerning the implementation of the Convention; a Consultative Committee of Experts may undertake to make appropriate finding of facts and provide expert views relevant to any problem raised; in case of a breach of obligations, any State Party may lodge a complaint with the Security Council. Moon Agreement New York 18 December 1979 11 July 1984 Unlimited Right to withdrawal 8 States Parties Requires informing the United Nations Secretary-General of activities concerned with the exploration and use of the Moon; the required information should include: the time, purposes, locations, orbital parameters and duration of each mission to the Moon; shall inform the Secretary-General of any phenomenon they discovered in outer space, including the Moon; information on manned or unmanned stations on the Moon; on-site inspection by all parties; consultation in case a State Party believed unfulfilment of obligations, and if such consultation does not result in settlement, any party may seek the assistance of the United Nations Secretary-General. Note: The extracts regarding confidence-building measures are for illustrative not interpretative purposes. They do not represent a judgement or endorsement by the Group of Experts. Readers are advised to refer to the original documents for additional detail. /...A/48/305 English Page 32 (b) BILATERAL AGREEMENTS RELATED TO OUTER SPACE Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? Nuclear Accident Agreement Washington 30 September 1971 30 September 1971 Unlimited USSR, USA Mutual notification in case of accidental incident involving a risk of outbreak of nuclear war; establishment of Direct Communication Link; consultations to consider questions relating to implementation of the Agreement. Hot Line Agreement Washington 30 September 1971 30 September 1971 Unspecified USSR, USA Provides the establishment of a satellite communication system to increase reliability of the Direct Communication Link. ABM Agreement Moscow 26 May 1972 3 October 1972 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for verification measures by National Technical Means (NTMs), as well as establishing the principle of non-interference with NTMs; establishment of a Standing Consultative Commission to consider question concerning compliance. SALT-I Moscow 26 May 1972 3 October 1972 Five years (Expired in 1977) USSR, USA Provisions similar to those in the ABM Treaty. TTBT Moscow 3 July 1974 11 December 1990 Five years Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Similar to those in the ABM Treaty and SALT-I. PNET Moscow 28 May 1976 11 December 1990 Five years, with possibility of extension USSR, USA NTMs; allows access to sites of explosions; establishes Joint Consultative Commission for information necessary for verification. SALT-II Vienna 18 June 1979 Has never entered into force Five years USSR, USA NTMs; voluntary data exchange within the framework of Standing Consultative Commission. /...A/48/305 English Page 33 Name of Agreement Place and date of signature Entry into force Duration Number of States Parties What confidence-building measures does it have? Nuclear Risk Reduction Centres Washington 15 September 1987 15 September 1987 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Protocol I provides for notification of ballistic missile launches under Article 4 of the 1971 Nuclear Accident Agreement, and under paragraph 1 of Article 6 of the 1972 Prevention of Incidents on and over High Seas Agreement; Protocol II provides for the establishment and maintenance of facsimile communications between each party’s Nuclear Risk centres (an INTELSAT satellite circuit and a STATSIONAR satellite circuit). INF Treaty Washington 8 December 1987 1 June 1988 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for verification measures by NTMs; paragraph 2, subparagraph (a) confirms the principle of non-interference with NTMs; provides intrusive on-site inspections. Notification of Launches Moscow 31 May 1988 31 May 1990 Unlimited Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for notification, not less than twenty-four hours in advance, of planned date, launch area, and area of impact for any launch of an ICBM or SLBM; including the geographic coordinates of the planned impact area or areas of the RVs. Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities Moscow 2 June 1989 1 January 1990 Unspecified Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Stipulates an obligation of the Parties to notify use of a laser; establishes and maintains communications as provided in its annex I; establishes a Joint Military Commission to consider questions of compliance with obligations. START-T b/Moscow 31 July 1991 Has not entered into force 15 years Right to withdrawal USSR, USA Provides for extensive on-site inspections and continuous monitoring activities; use of NTMs of verification; confirms the principle of non-interference with such means; rights and obligations concerning notification of different activities are elaborated in a Notification Protocol; establishes a Joint Compliance and Inspection Commission, etc. START-II Moscow 3 January 1993 Has not entered into force As long as START-I Right to withdrawal FR, USA Provides that the provisions of the START Treaty shall be used for implementation of this Treaty; establishes a Bilateral Implementation Commission for resolving questions related to compliance with the obligations assumed, and to agree on additional measures to improve effectiveness of the Treaty. a/Number of States Parties as of 1 January 1993. b/The START-I Treaty was converted into a multilateral treaty by the signing of the Lisbon Protocol on 23 May 1992 by Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United States. /...A/48/305 English Page 34 60. The Treaty regulates some other relevant questions, such as international responsibility (art. VI), international liability for damage due to such activities (art. VII), the question of jurisdiction, control and ownership over launched objects (art. VIII), cooperation among the States Parties, consultations in case of potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties (art. IX); there is an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by other States (art. X); and "all stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on Moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on the basis of reciprocity" (art. XII). The text of the Treaty is reproduced in appendix I. 2. Other global multilateral agreements 61. (a) The first global multilateral treaty regulating military activities of States in outer space is the 1963 Treaty on Banning Nuclear Weapons Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water (PTBT). 10/Under article I of the Treaty, the States Parties have undertaken "to prohibit, to prevent, and not to carry out any nuclear weapons test explosions, or any other nuclear explosion, at any place under its jurisdiction or control" in the atmosphere; beyond its limits, including outer space; or under water, or any other environment. The Treaty does not provide a verification mechanism and it is left to the States Parties to do so by their own national technical means (NTMs). 62. (b) The 1967 Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space 11/stipulates obligations of the States Parties in case that "the personnel of a spacecraft have suffered accident, or experiencing conditions of distress or have made an emergency or unintended landing" in territory of another State, and that they shall (a) "notify the launching authority or, if it cannot identify and immediately communicate with the launching authority, immediately make a public announcement by all appropriate means of communication at its disposal;" and (b) "notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who should disseminate the information without delay by all appropriate means of communication at his disposal" (art. l). The remaining provisions regulate in details the obligations of the "launching authority" and the obligations and rights of the other contracting Parties involved in such accidents, as well as further obligations of the Parties to notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations on steps undertaken regarding their search and rescue operations. 63. (c) The 1971 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects 12/provides that "a launching State shall be absolutely liable to pay compensation for damage caused by its space object on the surface of the Earth or to aircraft flight" (art. II). The remaining articles elaborate the obligations and rights of States Parties in the event of damage, such as the procedure to claim compensation, including the establishment of a claim commission, liability of international organizations which conduct space activities, etc. 64. (d) Under the 1975 Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space, 13/States Parties undertake an obligation that they shall, when a space object is launched into Earth orbit or beyond, register such objects in an /...A/48/305 English Page 35 appropriate register and inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the establishment of such a register (art. II). The Secretary-General shall maintain a Register in which the information furnished in accordance with article II shall be recorded. Article IV enumerates the information that shall be furnished by each State of registry, such as name of the launching State or States; an appropriate designator of the space object; date and territory or location of launch; basic orbital parameters, and general function of the space object. For more details, see chapter VII of this study. 65. (e) The basic instruments of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) are the Constitution and the Convention as adopted in 1992 and complemented by the Radio Regulations and the Final Acts of the World Administrative Radio Conferences. The main role of the Union is to allocate bands of the radio frequency spectrum, to allot radio frequencies and any associated orbital positions on the geostationary orbit. In addition, each satellite operator, irrespective of the mission of the satellite, has to notify the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) of its plans, thus ensuring an optimal functioning as well as avoiding harmful interference. 14/66. (f) The l978 Convention on the Prohibition of Military or Any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques 15/(ENMOD Convention) prohibits military or any other hostile use of environmental modification techniques having widespread, long-lasting or severe effects as the means of destruction, damage or injury to any other State Party (art. I) and defines these techniques as those changing -through deliberate manipulation of natural processes -the dynamics, composition or structure of the Earth, including its biota, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere, or of outer space (art. II). The States Parties have undertaken "to consult each another and to cooperate in solving problems which may arise in relation to the objectives of, or in the application of the provisions of, the Convention"; such consultations and cooperation may also be undertaken through appropriate international procedures within the framework of the United Nations and in accordance with its Charter, as well as of a Consultative Committee of experts as provided for in paragraph 2 of article V (art. V, para. 1). The composition and the procedure of the work of the Consultative Committee of Experts are elaborated in an annex to the Convention. In addition, Understandings Regarding the Convention (related to arts. I, II, III and VIII) are relevant for the interpretation of the Convention. 16/67. (g) The 1979 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies 17/has further elaborated the principles established under the Outer Space Treaty concerning States’ activities on the Moon and other celestial bodies. The Moon shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and the Agreement prohibits any threat or use of force or any hostile act or threat of hostile act on it. It also confirms the obligations of States not to place in orbit around or other trajectory to or around the Moon objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other weapons of mass destruction, nor to establish military bases, installations and fortifications. The Moon Agreement also requires that "States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of their activities concerned with the exploration and use of the Moon". The required information shall include the time, purposes, locations, orbital parameters and duration of each mission to/...A/48/305 English Page 36 the Moon as soon as possible after launching, while information on the results of each mission, upon its completion (art. 5, para. 1). In addition, the States Parties "shall inform the Secretary-General, as well as the public and the international scientific community, of any phenomenon they discover in outer space, including the Moon, which could endanger human life or health, as well as of any indication of organic life" (art. 5, para. 2). Under article 9, "States Parties may establish manned and unmanned stations on the Moon. A State Party establishing a station shall use only that area which is required for the needs of the station and shall immediately inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the location and purposes of that station. Subsequently, at annual intervals that State shall likewise inform the Secretary-General whether the station continues in use and whether its purposes have changed." B. Bilateral treaties 68. (a) The 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (ABM Treaty), 18/signed between the USSR and the United States, is of unlimited duration, and is of special significance to the study. The objective of the Treaty is to limit ABM systems and their components designed to intercept strategic ballistic missiles or their warheads in flight. This includes ABM launchers, interceptors, and radars constructed and developed for an ABM role or tested in an ABM mode. Article 1 sets forth the basic principle of the Treaty, namely to limit the deployment of ABM systems to agreed levels and regions. The Treaty bans the development, testing, and deployment of ABM systems and/or their components that are sea-based, mobile land-based, air-based, and, the most important in the context of the study, space-based (art. 5). 69. Apart from weapon limitation, the ABM Treaty is also relevant to the study because of the norms it has established on the use of NTMs for verification purposes. This is the first agreement (along with the SALT I agreement) to refer to verification by these means, as may be seen from article l2, paragraph l, which codifies national means of verification and specifies that they shall be carried out in a manner consistent with generally recognized principles of international law. Here the concept of non-interference with NTMs (art. 12, para. 2) is also important since NTMs include ground and space-based systems. This concept also implicitly includes the protection of such space-based systems as reconnaissance satellites (art. l2, para. 3) and thus protection against any form of interference. Legitimacy was therefore given by the Parties to the Treaty to their satellite activities for monitoring arms limitation and disarmament agreements. In addition, to promote the objectives and implementation of the provisions of the Treaty, a Standing Consultative Commission is established, within the framework of which the Parties will consider, inter alia, questions concerning compliance with the obligations assumed; provide on voluntary basis such information as either Party considers necessary to assure confidence in compliance with the obligations assumed; questions involving unintended interference with NTMs of verification, possible changes in the strategic situation that have a bearing on the provisions of the Treaty, etc. 70. (b) Non-interference with NTMs has also been stipulated in other USA/USSR agreements. Like the provisions of the ABM Treaty, the verification measures in the 1972 Strategic Arms Limitation Talks SALT I Agreement 19/and the 1979 /...A/48/305 English Page 37 Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty SALT II 20/are of special relevance to outer space. According to the provisions of article 9, paragrah l (c) of SALT II Treaty the development, testing or deployment of systems for placing into Earth orbits nuclear weapons or any other kind of weapons of mass destruction, including fractional orbital missiles, are prohibited. The 1991 START-I Treaty also provides that "each Party shall use national technical means of verification" (art. IX, para. l); each is enjoined, too, "not to interfere with the national technical means of verification" (art. IX, para. 2). 21/The 1993 START-II Treaty of 3 January 1993 between the Russian Federation and the United States provides that the verification provisions of START-I Treaty shall be used for the implementation of this Treaty. 22/71. (c) Some other bilateral instruments which, although they do not stipulate arms limitation or disarmament measures, have some relevance to the study should be mentioned here. One is the l97l USA/USSR Agreement to Reduce the Risk or Outbreak of Nuclear War. 23/Under this Agreement, each Party undertakes to notify the other in the event of an accidental or unauthorized incident that might cause a nuclear war. In article 4, the notification requirement includes advance notice of planned launches in the case that any such launches extend beyond the national territory of the launching Party and in the direction of the other Party. However, it is article 3 that is more directly relevant to the context of the study, since the Parties of that Treaty legitimized the existence and the use of certain satellite systems for military purposes. 72. (d) These two aspects of the l97l Agreement were further codified in another bilateral instrument signed on the same day -namely, the 1971 Agreement on Measures to Improve the USA-USSR Direct Communication Link. 24/The advances in satellite communications technology that had occurred since 1963 25/offered the possibility of greater reliability than the arrangements originally agreed upon. The Agreement, with its annex detailing the specifics of operation, equipment, and allocation of costs, provides for the establishment of two satellite communications circuits between the USA and the USSR, with a system of multiple terminals in each country. The United States is to provide one circuit via the Intelsat system, and the Soviet Union a circuit via its Molniya II system. In addition, each Party shall be responsible for providing to the other Party notification of any proposed modification or replacement of the communication satellite system containing the circuit provided by it that might require accommodation by Earth stations using that system or that might otherwise affect the maintenance of the Direct Line Communication Link. 73. (e) With the view to supplement earlier measures of communication at the Government-to-Government level, the l987 USA/USSR Nuclear Risk Reduction Centres Agreement 26/and its Protocols I and II, further codify the use of satellite communication in the interest of mutual security. Communication between the two countries is based on direct satellite links. These links are used for the exchange of information and for notifications as required under certain existing and possible future arms control and confidence-building agreements. Protocol I, article 1, calls for notification of ballistic missile launches under article 4 of the 197l Nuclear Accident Agreement and under paragraph 1 of article 6 of the 1972 Prevention of Incidents on and Over High Sea Agreement. To achieve this, Protocol II, article 1, stipulates the establishment and maintenance of an INTELSAT satellite circuit and a STATSIONAR satellite circuit /...A/48/305 English Page 38 to provide facsimile communication among each Party’s national Nuclear Risk Centres. 74. (f) Two other bilateral agreements with some bearing on the subject of the study are the l988 Agreement on Notification of Launches of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles and Submarine-launched Ballistic Missiles 27/and the l989 Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities Agreement. 28/Article 1 of the l988 Agreement stipulates that each Party shall provide notification, no less than 24 hours in advance, of the planned date, launch area, and area of impact for any launch of a strategic ballistic missile (ICBM or SLBM), as well as the geographic coordinates of the planned impact area or areas of the reentry vehicles. The Parties further agree to hold consultations, as mutually agreed, to consider questions relating to implementation of the provisions of the Agreement. In the l989 Agreement, words and terms such as lasers and interference with command and control networks are defined. This Agreement also codifies the use of lasers in peacetime. Article 2 stipulates, for example, that each Party shall take the necessary measures directed towards preventing the use of "a laser in such a manner that its radiation could cause harm to personnel or damage to equipment of the armed forces of the other Party". There is also an obligation of the Parties to notify each other in case of such use of a laser (art. IV, para. 2). Further, for the purpose of preventing dangerous military activities, as well as expeditiously resolving any incident, the Parties shall establish and maintain communications as provided in annex 1 to this Agreement (art. VII). In addition, a Joint Military Commission is established to consider questions of compliance with the obligations assumed under the Agreement (art. IX). 75. A number of bilateral and regional treaties were concluded among different States containing provisions concerning space-related matters. C. United Nations General Assembly resolutions on declarations of principles 76. On recommendation of COPUOS, the General Assembly has adopted a number of sets of principles governing the space activities of States: the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space (1963); the Principles Governing the Use of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting (1982); the Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Space (1986); and the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space (1992). 77. (a) On 13 December 1963, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 1962 (XVIII) containing the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and the Use of Outer Space. 29/On the basis of the principles contained in the Declaration, a number of multilateral agreements were negotiated and concluded under the auspices of the United Nations (as indicated in sections A and B above). The Declaration provides, inter alia, that "If a State has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State /...A/48/305 English Page 39 which has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by another State would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment" (Principle 6). 78. (b) On 10 December 1982, the General Assembly adopted resolution 37/92 containing the Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting. 30/It provides, inter alia, that "activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be carried out in a manner compatible with the sovereign rights of States" (Principle 1); and "in a manner compatible with the development of mutual understanding and the strengthening of friendly relations and cooperation among all States and peoples in the interest of maintaining international peace and security" (Principle 3). 79. (c) On 3 December 1986, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 41/65 containing Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Space. 31/These Principles provide, inter alia, that remote sensing activities "shall not be conducted in a manner detrimental to the legitimate rights and interests of the sensed State" (Principle IV) and that "a State carrying out a programme of remote sensing shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations" and shall "make available any other relevant information to the greatest extent feasible and practicable to any other State, particularly any developing country that is affected by the programme, at its request" (Principle IX). 80. (d) On 14 December 1992, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 47/68 containing the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space. 32/The Principles define guidelines and criteria for the safe use of nuclear power sources. They provide, inter alia, that the results of safety assessment of nuclear power sources carried out by a launching State "shall be made publicly available prior to each launch, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations shall be informed on how States may obtain such results of the safety assessment as soon as possible prior to each launch" (Principle 4). Also, the launching State operating "a space object with nuclear power sources on board shall in a timely fashion inform States concerned in the event this space object is malfunctioning with a risk of re-entry of radioactive materials on the Earth"; such information shall be also transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations "so that the international community will be informed of the situation and will have sufficient time to plan for any national response activities deemed necessary" (Principle 5). /...A/48/305 English Page 40 IV. GENERAL CONSIDERATION OF THE CONCEPT OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES 81. Confidence-building measures are increasingly accepted as an important element in reducing suspicion and tension between nations and enhancing international peace and stability. Over the past three decades, States have initiated a growing number of bilateral and multilateral confidence-building measures. This rich history of experience can provide the basis for an evaluation of the potential contribution of confidence-building in the space arena. A review of this history reveals a number of common characteristics of such measures, as well as guidelines for their applicability to particular circumstances. Thus several criteria can be identified for considering the implementation of confidence-building measures in outer space. 82. Confidence-building measures have also played an increasing role in the security planning of States. While initially limited to bilateral arrangements pertaining to strategic nuclear weapons, they have more recently found application in a multilateral context relating to conventional military forces. A clear pattern emerges of initial measures reducing the risk of misperception leading to the further development of more elaborate measures building on this positive experience. 83. The United Nations system has given increasing attention to the potential contribution of confidence-building measures to strengthening international peace and stability. The positive experience that has emerged in a bilateral context and in certain regions has formed a basis for the potential extension of this process to other areas and subjects. 84. At its First Special Session devoted to disarmament in June 1978, the General Assembly noted in paragraph 93 of the Final Document of the session that:"In order to facilitate the process of disarmament, it is necessary to take measures and pursue policies to strengthen international peace and security and to build confidence among States. Commitment to confidence-building measures could significantly contribute to preparing for further progress in disarmament." 33/85. At its thirty-third regular session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 33/91 B on 16 December 1978, calling on all States to consider regional arrangements for confidence-building and to inform the Secretary General on views and experience on appropriate and feasible confidence-building measures. 86. Based on these replies, the General Assembly approved resolution 34/87 B on 11 December 1979, calling for the preparation of a comprehensive study of confidence-building measures. The group of 14 governmental experts appointed to carry out this study, adopted its report by consensus on 14 August 1981. The study represented the first attempt to clarify and develop the concept of confidence-building measures in a global context. The experts expressed the hope that the report would provide guidelines and advice to Governments that intended to introduce and implement confidence-building measures. They also hoped to promote public awareness of the importance of such measures for the /...A/48/305 English Page 41 maintenance of international peace and security, as well as for developing and fostering a process of confidence-building in various regions. 34/87. At its thirty-sixth regular session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 36/97 F of 9 December 1982, by which it reaffirmed the importance of confidence-building measures and invited all States to consider regional arrangements for confidence building. It also called for the submission of the Comprehensive Study on Confidence-Building Measures to the General Assembly at its second special session devoted to disarmament. 88. At its thirty-seventh regular session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 37/100 D, by which it requested the Disarmament Commission to consider the elaboration of guidelines for appropriate types of confidencebuilldin measures and for the implementation of such measures on a global or regional level. The Guidelines 35/were finally adopted by the Commission on 18 May 1988 and endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 43/78 H. The Guidelines are reproduced in appendix II to this study. 89. Confidence-building measures have been acknowledged and advocated by the United Nations as a means for dispelling mistrust and stabilizing situations of tension, thus contributing to create a favourable climate for the conclusion of effective disarmament and arms limitation measures. 90. On the basis of the Comprehensive Study on Confidence-Building Measures, the Guidelines adopted by the United Nations Disarmament Commission and other existing agreements, the following common characteristics and criteria for their implementation and applicability are discussed. A. Characteristics 91. The process of confidence-building emerges from the belief in the cooperative predisposition of other States. Confidence increases over time as the conduct of States indicates their willingness to engage in cooperative behaviour. 92. The process of building confidence between States evolves through step-bystte reductions and even elimination of the causes of mistrust, fear, misunderstanding and miscalculation with regard to relevant military and/or dual-use capabilities of other States, as well as their other security-related activities. This process is premised on the recognition of States’ need for reassurance that certain military or security-related activities of other States do not threaten their own security. 93. The effectiveness of confidence-building measures depends on the extent to which they directly respond to the specific perceptions of uncertainty or threat in a particular situation or environment. Thus specific measures must be tailored to specific circumstances. 94. The confidence-building process must strike a balance between bilateral and multilateral applications. Regional examples may not find global applications, but such measures should have a global context with specific regional considerations. /...A/48/305 English Page 42 95. Improved confidence is based primarily on practical military policy carried out by States and on concrete actions that express a political commitment whose significance can be examined, verified and assessed. The development of certainty evolves from experience with the conduct of States in specific situations. Thus proclamations of generally accepted principles of international behaviour, declarations of intent, or pledges of future behaviour are welcomed, but may not be sufficient for reducing suspicion or perceptions of threat. 96. A higher degree of confidence can be achieved only when the amount of information that States command enables them to predict satisfactorily and to calculate the actions and reactions of other States within their political environment. The level of such predictability increases the degree of openness and transparency with which States are prepared to conduct their political and military affairs. 97. The openness, predictability and reliability of the policies of States are essential for the maintenance and strengthening of confidence. Agreements on specific confidence-building measures can help to allay suspicions and to engender trust by creating the framework for a wide range of contacts and exchanges. Prejudices and misconceptions, which are the basis for mistrust and fear, can be alleviated through expanded personal contacts at levels of decision-making. 98. Reductions in perceptions of threat or conditions of uncertainty are most effectively achieved through the consistent, continuous, and complete implementation of accepted confidence-building measures. The reliability, seriousness and credibility of the commitment of States to the process of reducing mistrust is demonstrated through their dependable implementation of such measures. 99. Confidence-building is a process whereby the accumulation of greater experience of positive interactions forms the basis for greater trust and thereby for further measures of confidence-building. This is a dynamic process, accelerating over time. 100. Thus, this process usually proceeds from general commitments of a less restraining nature to more specific commitments, eventually leading to the progressive elaboration of a comprehensive network of measures enhancing the security of States. (a) One means of developing confidence is to enhance the quality and quantity of information exchanged on military activities and capabilities. (b) Another means of furthering the development of trust and predictability involves the expansion of the scope of confidence-building measures. (c) Another means of strengthening confidence-building is increasing the degree of commitment to the process. Voluntary unilateral measures should be reciprocated, leading to mutually established political commitments, thence to measures that may subsequently be developed into legally binding obligations./...A/48/305 English Page 43 101. Confidence-building measures have primarily political and psychological effects and, although closely related, cannot always be considered as arms limitation measures by themselves in the sense of limiting or reducing armed forces. Rather, improved confidence can have a positive impact on the subjective estimation of the intentions and expectations of other States. 102. Confidence-building measures can contribute to progress in concrete disarmament and arms limitation agreements. They can supplement disarmament and arms limitation agreements, and thus can become an important avenue for progress in reducing international tensions. In the context of disarmament and arms limitation negotiations, such measures may form part of an agreement itself, facilitating implementation and verification provisions. 103. Confidence-building measures cannot substitute for concrete progress in limiting and reducing armaments. In the face of unconstrained increases in the number of weapons, or of continued improvements in the capabilities of weapons, the distrust and apprehension that is created will outweigh the contribution of confidence-building initiatives. B. Criteria 104. The effective implementation of confidence-building measures requires careful analysis in order to determine with a high degree of clarity those factors that will support or undermine confidence in specific situations. 105. Accurate assessment of the implementation of agreed measures is fundamental to contribute fully to the development of predictability and trust. Thus it is essential that the details of agreed confidence-building measures should be defined with as much precision and detail as possible. 106. Thus the process of confidence-building requires clear criteria by which States’ behaviour may be judged. These criteria are necessary both so that States may guide their own activities and so that States may evaluate the activities of others. The development of confidence proceeds from the extent to which States’ behaviour is consistent with such accepted and established criteria. 107. The requirement for clarity also implies that accepted criteria will be readily verified by interested and affected parties. Verification procedures in and of themselves can contribute to the building of confidence. 108. The initiation of confidence-building measures requires the consensus of participating States. It is the product of the political will of States, in a free exercise of sovereignty, to accept practical measures to implement legitimate and universal principles of international conduct. This decision involves commitments as to which measures are to be implemented and the form of the implementation. Observation of the principles of sovereign equality and undiminished and balanced security are essential conditions for those States participating in the confidence-building process. 109. Specific confidence-building measures must be applicable to specific military capabilities and relevant to the particular technological /...A/48/305 English Page 44 characteristics of military systems. The measures must take into account those aspects of military technologies and systems which are most relevant to the security concerns of interested and affected States. Similarly, confidencebuilldin measures must take into account the unique characteristics of the geographical and physical environment in which they are to be implemented. C. Applicability 110. Confidence-building measures are applicable to three categories of States: (a) those that are direct participants in activities that may be the source of mistrust or tension; (b) other States that are affected by military or security policies of those in the first category; and (c) those States that are involved in encouraging further development of the confidence-building process. 111. Confidence-building measures differ according to whether they constitute positive responsibilities or negative constraints. They also differ as to whether the obligation involves an exchange of information or a constraint on activities. 112. Such measures have been divided into three broad categories, according to the activities to which they are applied: (a) Encouraged activities are those that promote the peaceful uses of space for all human-kind, such as scientific exploration and discovery. These also include measures by which States demonstrate that their intentions and capabilities are not hostile or aggressive. Such measures, which may be implemented on a continuing basis, involve exchanges of information and personnel, including data on force levels and characteristics; (b) Permitted activities encompass the full range of those not explicitly prohibited, though not specifically encouraged. They include measures that reduce the apprehensions States may have concerning the combat potentials of particular military activities. In particular, measures which are intended to reduce concerns about surprise attack may include notification of military behaviour and related activities; (c) Prohibited activities are those forbidden by various elements of the present international legal regime, such as the placement of weapons of mass destruction in space. Measures that strengthen these prohibitions include those that seek to limit or prohibit the scope or nature of certain classes of activities, either under particular circumstances or in general. These measures differ from traditional disarmament and arms limitation measures in that it is the activity of forces, rather than the capabilities or potentials of the forces, that are limited or prohibited. 113. There are other categories of activities, too, whose prohibition will build confidence. These are: -Activities that have not yet taken place and are not currently contemplated, confirming existing norms of behaviour and extending these norms into the future. /...A/48/305 English Page 45 -Activities that might otherwise take place in a particular region or environment, including activities in particularly sensitive areas such as border regions. -Activities that would only be conducted at a stage of deteriorating political or military relations. 114. Such measures may place limitations on some military options, but they cannot replace more concrete arms control and disarmament measures which would directly limit and reduce military capabilities. /...A/48/305 English Page 46 V. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE 115. The extension of universal principles of confidence-building measures to outer space must take into account the unique characteristics of the space environment and space technology. Bilateral and regional experience to date with confidence-building initiatives may contribute to the elaboration of further initiatives. 116. There are a number of aspects of the space environment that distinguish it from other environments in which confidence-building measures have previously been implemented.A. Specific features of the space environment 117. Outer space is both distant and nearby. It is distant because it is difficult to access, and because the extent of even stratospheric space dwarfs terrestrial dimensions. It is nearby in that no State is more than a relatively short distance from outer space, which lies only a few hundred kilometres above every nation. 118. Outer space is simultaneously a uniquely harsh environment and one that is uniquely benign. The vacuum of space is fatal to unprotected humans and presents novel challenges for experimentation as well as the basic operation of objects in space. Similarly, hazards are posed by the radiation in space, which far exceeds that of Earth. In addition, natural meteoroids and debris from human space activities create dangers to equipment and living creatures that have little parallel on Earth. The spacecraft must protect both itself and its occupants (if any) from the low temperatures of the Earth’s shadow or of deep space, as well as from the high temperatures produced by high-power operations in full sunlight. Yet space is also a uniquely benign environment. Once in orbit, free of the extreme stresses of launch and air-drag, spacecraft may deploy enormous and delicate structures that would quickly collapse if erected on the Earth’s surface or released at high velocities through the atmosphere. 119. A rocket takes only a few minutes to take a spacecraft from the Earth’s surface to low Earth orbit. Once there, a satellite moves at more than 25,000 kilometres each hour, circling the globe up to 16 times a day and providing a unique vehicle for observations of Earth. Further, a spacecraft in orbit above the atmospheric drag regime, will continue unimpeded on its gravitation-and radiation-appointed trajectory for years, even decades. 120. These environmental characteristics present unique technological problems to those who wish to reach and utilize the space environment. The technical difficulties and financial burdens of entering and operating in space challenge even the most technically advanced and wealthiest countries and far exceed the capacity and resources of most States. 121. Consequently, countries may be divided according to their space capabilities into at least three categories. So far only two nations, the United States and the Russian Federation, possess the full range of small and/...A/48/305 English Page 47 large launch vehicles, piloted and unmanned spacecraft, and military and civilian space proficiencies that are currently attainable. 122. A growing number of other States possess some but not all of these capabilities, typically launching capacities and competence in the design, manufacturing and operation of satellites for research and other applications. The vast majority of countries that remain are not space Powers of this order and derive their benefits from the exploitation of space only through the capabilities of others. 123. At the same time, the number of countries that participate directly or indirectly in activities in space has steadily increased since 1957, as have their capabilities. There is every reason to expect these trends to continue in the decades to come. 124. The Group notes the view of some States that there is a need to adjust certain aspects of the present space market as soon as possible, especially in the new global political climate. 125. Confidence-building proposals have focused largely on measures intended to reduce concerns about surprise attack or inadvertent war. One fundamental issue in applying confidence-building to outer space is precisely what security issues posed by space activities and technology are to be addressed. 126. This calls for understanding the relative value of space-related confidence-building measures and cooperation in space projects. Space cooperation itself can strengthen international confidence and may be considered a confidence-building measure. 127. Confidence-building measures can respond to the intrusive character of outer space activities. Access to space gives space-faring nations access to all points on Earth for a wide variety of civilian and military applications. This intrusive capability, even where it does not involve weapons, can generate mistrust. Thus, confidence-building measures could function to provide assurances that outer space activity is not being used against non-space countries. Greater openness in military and other space activities may be a positive development not only in the military sphere, but in the economic and social spheres as well. 128. From another perspective, one of the future threats to stability may be not only military space systems generally, but space weapons in particular. The implications of developing new military systems designed to be deployed in space should be studied further. 129. The application of confidence-building measures to space activities is affected by a variety of other factors, too. The verification of compliance is an essential component of confidence-building. Space presents both challenges and opportunities for verification. The vast distances of space, and the sophisticated technologies of space systems can make verification complex. At the same time, space is the most transparent of environments, open in all directions, and the technologies lend themselves to verification. Since some space systems may be used for both civilian and military purposes, differentiating between the two is not always easy. /...A/48/305 English Page 48 B. Political and legal 130. The political basis for confidence-building in space derives from the application of universal principles of international cooperation and State practice to the outer space environment. 131. The prevention of an arms race in outer space is one of the specific objectives of the efforts to elaborate confidence-building measures in outer space. Other objectives, however, may also be relevant to this process. 132. Such other objectives arise from the concerns of different groups of States and are based primarily on the possibility of having access to space, the implementation of technology transfers to enable such access, and matters of regional and global stability. The growing dependence of the national and international communities on space technology for economic and social purposes increases the necessity for all activities in space to take place in a safe environment. These concerns derive from the great differences in capabilities among differing categories of States. 133. In the past, the outer space activities of the major space Powers appeared to be predicated, in part at least, on the strategic objectives that each of these nations seemed to pursue in terms of their bilateral strategic relationship. Since the ABM Treaty negotiations of the early 1970s to the most recent Defense and Space Talks (the last rounds of which took place in October 1991), emphasis on their bilateral strategic relationship was obvious. With the significant changes in this bilateral relationship since 1989, some of the activities of each in the space environment particularly for military purposes, appear to have been reframed and restrained, at least in part by considerations related to cost, technological capacity and existing legal constraints. 134. Another important consideration in this regard is the fact that the number of nations with growing capacities in fields related to outer space is increasing. This has global as well as regional implications and its significance for the use of outer space from a strategic, economic or environmental perspective remain to be seen. 135. Whether the new space Powers will be mainly interested in scientific and other civilian activities rather than military applications, like the current leading space Powers also remains an open question. The answer may depend in part on the extent of international cooperation in space, as well as the nature of their strategic interests. 136. The non-space Powers want assurances that the major space Powers will not use their space capabilities against non-space countries in any way. In addition, these States are concerned that space be used exclusively for peaceful purposes. 137. The Outer Space Treaty and the other treaties dealt with in chapter III include some measures that may be considered confidence-building components. There are currently two points of view in terms of the legal regime: first, that the existing legal regime represents a framework of confidence-building /...A/48/305 English Page 49 measures in outer space that calls for continuous review; second, that the existing legal regime is not sufficient and should be examined further. In the latter case, the elaboration of confidence-building measures in outer space would facilitate the application of existing treaties. 138. Whether confidence-building measures in outer space could be a subject of a separate treaty or that of a special instrument remains to be determined. In any case, there is still a need for a more precise definition of legal terms and the development of some others to fulfil the requirements of the political situation on the one hand, and on the other, technological and scientific developments in outer space. C. Technological and scientific 139. The technological implications of confidence-building measures in outer space are twofold. They concern those technologies that can be used in support of confidence-building in space and those that can be used for confidence-building from space. 140. Some confidence-building activities in space may require a range of technologies that can be used both to monitor space activities and to enhance the transparency of space operations. At present, while some space activities are the subject of international agreements, such as the advance publication and notification procedures for all satellite stations pursuant to International Telecommunication Union regulations, many space activities are not covered by specific international agreements. 141. Confidence-building from space can be enhanced by various systems that can monitor terrestrial military activities in support of both existing and prospective confidence-building measures and disarmament and arms limitation regimes. 142. Many space systems have inherent dual capabilities: they have the potential to perform both military and civilian functions. The technology used to launch satellites is similar in many aspects to that used for long-range ballistic missiles. Satellites used for monitoring natural resources can also provide images of interest to military planners, while communications, weather, and many other types of satellites are useful for both military and civilian purposes. 143. The multiple applications of space technology have several specific consequences. Some space operations, including but not limited to military operations, produce artificial debris in space that can become a danger to other satellites. In addition, nuclear-power sources may be required for some types of space missions, both military and civilian. Compliance with the information clauses contained in General Assembly resolution 47/68 could allay anxieties concerning the safety of using such devices in outer space. Although a complete ban on such power sources may not be acceptable, the provision of more information, as well as greater openness may be needed to alleviate security concerns. /...A/48/305 English Page 50 1. Technology and outer space 144. Technological considerations provide a number of opportunities for the implementation of confidence-building measures in space, while also placing a number of practical limitations on space operations. The technological considerations pertain to both the nature of activities in space, as well as to the means of observing these activities. 145. Activities in space may be divided into several phases, such as launch, transfer orbits, deployments, check-out, and operations. Before becoming operational, the full classification of a specific satellite in terms of its final function may be difficult. However, while operating in orbit, satellites generally exhibit characteristics that are unique to spacecraft performing a particular function. Consequently this function at least can usually be identified. Communications satellites will relay radio-frequency transmissions with specific power, frequency coverage and polarization characteristics. Satellites used for meteorological and optically based resource monitoring functions, as well as those used for imaging intelligence and early warning of missile launches, will all use optical systems with apertures of various sizes, and transmit large quantities of data when sensing. Radar satellites, both civilian and military, will deploy large transmitting and receiving antennas that emit distinctive radio-frequency signals, coupled with high-speed data. Electronic intelligence satellites may deploy distinctive receiving antennas. Finally, all types of satellites transmit to ground stations distinguishing telemetry patterns. (a) Technology for monitoring space operations 146. Since 1957, the United States and the Soviet Union have deployed a wide range of systems for monitoring space activities. 36/One mission of these systems has been to provide warnings of strategic missile attacks. But the growing number of satellites in orbit has increased the necessity of keeping track both of new launches and the impending decays of satellites so as to avoid confusing these events with hostile missile launches. In addition, the increasing scope of military space operations has made the tracking and characterization of space systems a significant mission in its own right. 147. Satellite tracking systems, both optical and radar, are among the most sophisticated and expensive military sensor technologies. Spacetrack radars typically have ranges and sensitivities 10-100 times greater than radars for tracking aircraft or surface targets. Moreover, optical tracking systems use telescopes that rival all but the largest civilian astronomical observatories. (b) Ground-based passive optical systems 148. The earliest form of satellite tracking systems, still the least expensive, rely on sunlight reflected off a spacecraft. Visible against the pre-dawn or post-dusk sky, the largest low orbiting spacecraft, such as space stations or imaging intelligence satellites, are comparable to the brighter stars in the sky, while many other low-orbiting satellites are visible to the naked eye. 37/Even satellites at geosynchronous altitudes are visible with relatively modest optics under optimal lighting conditions. 38//...A/48/305 English Page 51 149. The capability of a telescope to observe satellites is primarily a function of the aperture of its primary optical surface, as well as the properties of the means used to form the image. Telescopes with mirrors up to four metres in diameter have been used for satellite tracking. Initially, satellite tracking cameras used film systems; more recently, electronic charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have replaced them. CCDs provide an instantaneous read-out of the image, avoiding the time-consuming processing required by film systems. These electronic cameras, coupled with image-processing devices, have enabled scientific telescopes of modest apertures of a few metres to obtain recognizable images of large spacecraft in low orbits. 39/(c) Ground-based active optical systems 150. Although most optical sensors rely on reflected sunlight or emitted infrared energy for satellite tracking, active optical sensors are finding increasingly application. By illuminating a target with coherent laser radiation, these systems can image satellites that are not illuminated by sunlight at night, as well as targets that may be obscured by sky-glow during daylight hours. The use of active illumination also permits direct measurement of the range of the target, as well as facilitating the characterization of the satellite’s structure. (d) Ground-based radars 151. Ground-based radar systems have been used since the late 1950s to track civilian and military satellites. 40/Radars have several advantages over optical tracking systems, including the ability to observe targets and to measure their range in all weather and independently of natural illumination. Today the United States and the Commonwealth of Independent States both deploy extensive networks of radars that perform the satellite tracking function, as well as other tasks, such as the detection of missile attacks. 152. As radar technology has advanced, the problem has taken on a new dimension. Today’s modern and sophisticated large-phased array radars (LPARs) can serve many functions. They can provide early warning of missile or bomber attacks. LPARs can track satellites and other objects in space and observe missile tests to obtain information for monitoring purposes. They are also an essential component of present generation ABM systems, providing initial warning of an attack and battle management support, distinguishing reentry vehicles from decoys, and guiding interceptors to their targets. (e) Other technical means of monitoring space characteristics 153. Although these various information collection systems -many of which have been constructed for other purposes -can enhance the transparency of space operations, some military space activities may require the application of special techniques developed to provide adequate confidence concerning their precise nature. 154. The presence of nuclear-power sources and many space weapons on satellites could be determined by pre-launch inspections of all satellite payloads. /...A/48/305 English Page 52 (f) Monitoring space weapons 155. Three criteria are applicable to the consideration of systems for monitoring space weapons. First, the technical collection systems required to enhance transparency, as well as other means to this end, should be available during the time-frame in which activities of concern are likely to occur. 156. Second, the cost of monitoring may be a major obstacle to verification. Schemes that require vast expenditure and produce much data of little interest are unlikely to generate adequate support. 157. Third, technical collection systems should not be so powerful that they reproduce the anti-missile systems that they may be intended to limit. Verification schemes that require inspection satellites to rendezvous with other satellites in order to determine the presence or absence of prohibited activities may be difficult to distinguish from prohibited anti-satellite systems. Similarly, large space-based infrared telescope sensors used for verification may be difficult to distinguish from sensors that would form the basis for an ABM battle management system. 158. The performance of a laser (its "brightness") is a function of the aperture of its mirror and the power and wavelength of the laser beam. While the mirror aperture can be monitored by a variety of means, it is not clear that the technology currently available can check more than the main operational beam. Machinery adequate to monitoring the power and wavelength of lasers may not be available for another decade. 159. For example, the development and deployment of entirely new specialized space-based sensors for monitoring factors such as laser brightness may require as much as 10 years after a decision to produce such a device. Given this situation, cooperative measures such as in-country monitoring stations might be considered, since they could be deployed much sooner. 160. Civilian and military satellites are all placed in orbit by launch vehicles that can be observed by early warning satellites. Launching facilities and activities are monitored by imaging satellites. All orbiting satellites can be tracked by a variety of ground based radars and cameras. 161. ASAT and related tests against a point in space without benefit of a target would not provide adequate assurance in tests for the error-free accuracy required by kinetic energy impact kill mechanisms. The intercept manoeuvres of kinetic energy interceptors are distinguishable from the activities of other satellites. Further, telemetry streams from satellites are subject to monitoring by space-based sensors. Consequently, because of their unique testing requirements, kinetic energy weapons could be readily monitored by various means. 2. Technology and confidence-building measures 162. While space systems may be a subject of monitoring and confidence-building, they can also contribute to this process. Satellites can be used to monitor other satellites, as well as terrestrial developments. While this latter /...A/48/305 English Page 53 application is one of the missions for the imaging and other intelligence satellites discussed earlier, there have also been proposals for developing satellites specifically for this purpose. For some countries, transparency concerning space launching capabilities is now a significant issue. (a) PAXSAT-A 163. The Canadian PAXSAT-A concept, developed in 1987-1988, was the outcome of a feasibility study on the ability of a specialized spacecraft to provide information on other spacecraft, while the PAXSAT-B concept (discussed below) was intended to monitor ground activities from space. 41/164. PAXSAT-A concerns verifying the stationing of weapons in space, which requires the determination of the function and purpose of a satellite using non-intrusive means. These sensors would function in a complementary fashion, for example, combining an image of a satellite’s radar antenna with data on the operating wavelength of the radar, thus providing an indication of the satellite’s resolution and ground coverage. The mass of the target satellite could be assessed by knowledge of the thruster aperture combined with radar observations of the satellite’s accelerations after thruster firings of measured duration, which would be monitored by the infrared sensor. 165. The PAXSAT-A constellation might initially consist of two operational satellites plus one spare in high-inclination orbits at altitudes of 500-2,000 kilometres. Subsequently, another satellite might be launched into semi-synchronous orbit, with another placed into geosynchronous orbit. (b) Satellites for monitoring terrestrial activities 166. Imaging and other intelligence satellites have made a significant contribution to arms limitation. Thus far, however, satellites used for arms limitation verification have served this function as an adjunct to their primary mission of collecting strategic and tactical military intelligence. None the less, there have been several proposals for satellites that would be deployed specifically for arms limitation verification. Such satellites could make a positive contribution to regional and global confidence-building initiatives within given institutional arrangements. (c) International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) 167. In 1978, at the First Special Session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, France submitted a proposal calling for the establishment of an International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) for the international verification of disarmament and arms limitation agreements, as well as for monitoring crisis situations. 42/This proposal led to a study by a Group of Experts on the implications of setting up such an agency. 43/168. The implementation of the ISMA concept was expected to proceed in three phases: (a) In Phase I, an Image Processing and Interpretation Center (IPIC) would be established using imagery from existing civilian and other national satellites for training and exploitation; /...A/48/305 English Page 54 (b) In Phase II, a network of 10 specialized ground stations would be devoted to receiving data from civilian and non-civilian satellites; (c) In Phase III three specialized ISMA spacecraft would be launched and operated. 169. The initial phase of this proposal was subsequently proposed by France at the third special session devoted to disarmament in June 1988, entitled Satellite Image Processing Agency (SIPA). 44/The principal function of the Agency would correspond to the initial phase of ISMA, the gathering and processing of data emanating from existing civilian satellites and the dissemination of the resulting analysis to Member States. This could contribute to verification of existing disarmament and arms limitation agreements, establishing facts prior to the conclusion of new agreements, monitoring crisis situations and disengagement agreements, as well as preventing and handling disasters and major natural hazards. The Agency could serve as a centre for the training of photo-interpretation experts, as well as a research centre for the further development of these applications. (d) International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA) 170. At the third special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament in 1988, the Soviet Union proposed the establishment of an International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA), 45/which would provide the international community with information relating to compliance with multilateral arrangements for disarmament and the reduction of international tension and would also monitor the military situation in areas of conflict. In the opinion of the Soviet Union, placing the results of monitoring by national satellite systems at the disposal of an international organization would be a major step towards promoting confidence and openness in relations between States. 171. In addition to its military policy aspects, the activities of ISpMA could interest many States by supplying them with satellite data important to their economic development. 172. ISpMA might be assigned the following functions: (a) Collection of information from space monitoring; (b) Consideration of requests from the United Nations and individual States for a study of information services that could prove useful to them in evaluating compliance with international arrangements and agreements concerning local wars and crisis situations; (c) Elaboration of recommendations on procedures for the use of space facilities for monitoring or verification of future treaties and agreements. 173. The ISpMA concept can be successfully implemented by moving forward in stages and establishing a sound political, legal and technical basis for the implementation of subsequent steps. (a) At the first stage a Space Image Processing and International Centre would be created as the main technical organ of ISpMA. In view of the /...A/48/305 English Page 55 heterogeneity of data coming from national space monitoring sources, it is particularly important to have a universal facility to convert data from various sources into an integrated geographical information system for subsequent processing and analysis. Obligations to provide such a facility might be assumed by Member States that possess the necessary resources, financial or technological, for creating it; (b) At the second stage of ISpMA’s activities, a network of ground datareceeptio points would be created to receive data through channels operating in near-real time from Member States that have space monitoring facilities. 46/(e) PAXSAT-B 174. The PAXSAT-B spacecraft grew out of a feasibility study by Canada of space technologies specifically geared to verifying treaties based on the control of conventional forces over a limited region, such as the European theatre. 47/It was assumed that it would operate in the political and military context previously outlined for PAXSAT-A. The PAXSAT-B was required to provide data based on two scenarios: (a) The more critical was the detection of a violation breakout and involved satellite access to any point in the region within 36 hours. (b) The less critical was surveying the entire treaty area over a period of 30-40 days. 175. Given the meteorological conditions of the European region, this meant that the satellite had to carry an all-weather imaging radar sensor, which was expected to have some capability for penetrating rudimentary camouflage countermeasures. /...A/48/305 English Page 56 VI. CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE A. The need for confidence-building measures in outer space 176. The potential importance of confidence-building measures in outer space derives both from concerns over emerging trends in space activities, as well as from the need to prevent an arms race in outer space. 177. A number of security concerns have been voiced by various States about current and potential directions of military space activities. Some of these are interrelated and such concerns may apply at both global and regional levels. 178. These concerns among States are not only related to the militarization of outer space, but also particularly to the "weaponization" of outer space. At present there are no weapons deployed in space, and most of the world community wants to be sure that such systems will not appear in future. One source of these concerns lies basically in the areas of ballistic missile defence (BMD) and anti-satellite (ASAT) systems. These systems could threaten satellites in orbit, including those playing an important role in maintaining strategic stability. 179. A second concern is based on the increasing application of military space systems to support terrestrial combat operations, and the significant disparities in such capabilities of modern weapon systems. Military satellites are of increasing relevance to the contemporary battlefield. 180. Another concern derives from the proliferation of missile technology in the world. While recognizing the legitimate right of States to acquire space-launch capability for peaceful purposes, many States believe that such capability might be used for military applications. The latter could include space activities that might be considered hostile to other States. 181. The most significant concern arises from all those mentioned above, namely, that the peaceful uses of the space environment may become increasingly constrained by military considerations. Thus far, space missions have coexisted largely with relatively little mutual interaction. But future growth in military space programmes might result in diminished opportunities for international cooperation in peaceful uses of outer space. 182. Currently, however, there is no agreement as to whether the existing international regime applicable to outer space is adequate. While the importance of this regime has been recognized, uncertainties remain. Thus some Parties to the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 maintain that the Treaty places no constraints on military activities in the Earth’s orbit other than the placement of nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction. Other Parties to the Treaty contend that the Treaty’s mandate that space be used for peaceful purposes precludes the application of space systems to combat support functions. 183. As indicated earlier in chapter IV, at least three categories of space activities are envisioned under the present international legal regime for outer space. Activities that are prohibited by various elements of the legal regime, such as, for example, the placement of weapons of mass destruction in space. Activities that are encouraged are those that promote the peaceful uses of space /...A/48/305 English Page 57 for the benefit of all humankind, such as scientific exploration and discovery. Activities that are permitted encompass the full range of those not explicitly prohibited, though not specifically encouraged. While these broad distinctions may have been adequate in the early years of the space age, it is not clear that they provide sufficient guidance for the decades ahead. Enlarged space capabilities and the enlarged community of nations that are actively participating in the utilization of the space environment may require a further elaboration of international norms of behaviour. 184. The progressive expansion of the range of space activities and the increasing number of space-faring nations justify the progressive development of new international norms for space activities. Given the time required to complete the negotiation of any potential additional multilateral treaties governing space activities, a range of confidence-building measures could make a positive contribution to this process. B. Proposals for specific confidence-building measures in outer space 185. Over the past decades a wide range of measures have been proposed by various States to address the issue of the prevention of an arms race in outer space. As early as 1957, in the Subcommittee of the Disarmament Commission, Canada, France, the United Kingdom and the United States called for a technical study of the features of an inspection system to ensure that the launching of objects through outer space was conducted exclusively for peaceful and scientific purposes. 48/186. Some of the proposals advanced over the past decade are directly concerned with arms limitation and prohibitions on space weapons and related activities. A number of other suggestions have been advanced relating to confidence-building measures in this field. Some arms limitation initiatives, too, contain elements that provide enhanced transparency of activities, and thus are also of interest in the present context. Overview of proposals 49/187. A schematic overview of proposals concerning confidence-building measures (CBMs) advanced over the past decade is presented in table 3. These proposals generally fall into a number of categories, including: (a) Those intended to increase the transparency of space operations generally; (b) Those intended specifically to increase the range of information concerning satellites in orbit; (c) Those that would establish rules of behaviour governing space operations; (d) Those that pertain to the international transfer of space and rocket technology. /...A/48/305 English Page 58 Table 3 Confidence-building proposals discussed in the Ad Hoc Committee for the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space A. Confidence-building measures Nature of measures Major objective Measures Means Voluntary/reciprocal (1989) Transparency in international law of outer space and activities in that environment Indicate States’ understanding of and adherence to relevant treaty obligations Sharing of information regarding their current and prospective activities in outer space Dissemination of information through: Diplomatic channels in the CD The Secretary-General of the CD Contractual obligation Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road/Rules of Behaviour International law: Improving existing legal norms aimed at transparency Outer space and activities: Establishing a set of norms to guide States’ behaviour in respect of their own and/or others’ activities in outer space Reducing the risk of accidental collisions, preventing incidents, preventing close-range co-orbital pursuits, and ensuring better knowledge of outer space traffic Provision of regular updating, in the event of manoeuvres or drifting, of orbital elements declared at the time of registration The keeping of a minimal distance between any two satellites placed in the same orbit (in order to avoid not only accidental collisions, but also short-range co-orbital tracking, which is a precondition for the system of space mines) Monitoring of close-range passing (to limit risks of collision or interference Broadening of the Registration Convention relating to information on launches scheduled by States Establishment of a procedure providing for requests for explanations in the event of incidents/suspicious acts Identification of keep-out zones in the form of two spherical zones moving with each satellite: (1) a proximity zone to delimit the location of each space object in reciprocal orbit, as well as the capability of each object to move with respect to the others, and (2) a wider approach zone, with obligatory notification for passage through it International Launch-Notification Centre Notification of ballistic missile and space launcher launches The establishment of an international centre under the auspices of the United Nations Launch data collection and analysis International Trajectography Centre (1989) Collect data for updating registration Monitor space objects Conduct real time calculation of space objects’ trajectories The establishment of an international trajectography centre and Consultation Machinery Data provided by each State concerning its own satellites or the satellites it has detected. Constant upgrade information on orbits and manoeuvres /...A/48/305 English Page 59 Nature of measures Major objective Measures Means Satellite Image Processing Agency (1989) Collect data to facilitate the verification of disarmament agreements, and to serve as a clearing-house for the exchange of data, the establishment of certain facts, such as force estimates, in advance of the conclusion of disarmament agreements Monitoring of compliance with disengagement agreements (local conflicts) Prevention/handling of natural disasters/development programmes Establishment of a low-cost Agency assigned to conduct data-processing, management, analysis, and dissemination operations The collection and processing of data obtained from existing civilian satellites, and then to disseminate this material to the Agency’s members Source: UNIDIR study entitled Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for International Security UNIDIR/92/77 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.92.0.30), p. 100. /...A/48/305 English Page 60 B. Confidence-and security-building measures concerning a Code of Conduct for the Space Activities of States __________ Source: Reproduction from document CD/OS/WP.58 (based on proposals by States members of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space). /...A/48/305 English Page 61 C. Possible institutional arrangements Feature ISMA France 1978 WSO USSR 1985 PAXSAT A Canada 1986 ISI Soviet Union 1988 ISpM Soviet Union 1988 UNITRAS France 1989 SIPA France 1989 INC France 1993 Type Proposal Proposal Concept Proposal Proposal Proposal Proposal Proposal Scope Global: existing and future treaties (unlimited number of treaties covering any type of weapon and weapons system) Global: to promote global cooperation in outer space development Treaty specific on the PAROS (unlimited number of treaties) Specific treaty on the PAROS: prohibiting the placement of weapons of any kind in outer space Global: existing and future treaties (unlimited number of treaties covering any type of weapon and weapons systems) Global: all States possessing or using satellites; future agreements Global: Agency’s members Global: new international instrument on regime of prior notification of space launches and ballistic missiles Objective Monitoring; verification (under special arrangements) Cooperation in communication, navigation, rescue of people, weather forecasting service etc. Verification (under special arrangements) Verification Monitoring: verification (under special arrangements) Monitoring of the trajectory of Earthorbiitin devices Collect and process data obtained by existing civilian satellite; to serve as research centre; to train national personnel to interpret space images; Strengthening cooperation and transparency in outer space Application -monitoring and/or verification (as applicable) Arms limitation and disarmament; RIOs dealing with security issues; Settlement of disputes Coordination of different peaceful uses of outer space Arms limitation and disarmament Arms limitation and disarmament Arms limitation and disarmament; RIOs dealing with security issues; Confidencebuilldin measures; Settlement of disputes; Natural disasters; Other emergencies Confidencebuillding provide proof of good faith in the event of alleged deliberate collision Confidencebuilldin and securitybuillding Monitoring of compliance with disengagement agreements in local conflicts Notification, CBMs, transparency /...A/48/305 English Page 62 Feature ISMA France 1978 WSO USSR 1985 PAXSAT A Canada 1986 ISI Soviet Union 1988 ISpM Soviet Union 1988 UNITRAS France 1989 SIPA France 1989 INC France 1993 Method Remote sensing (space-to-Earth) Remote probing of the Earth by geophysical methods and by means of unmanned interplanetary spacecraft Remote sensing (space-to-space) On-site Remote sensing (space-to-Earth) Data collection through States’ satellites; high-performance tracking and computer devices Data collection through ground sensors and satellite-borne detectors Receiving information; establishing databank; providing information Function NTMs; ISMA satellites Communication, rescue of people, study and preservation of the earth’s biosphere; developing of new sources of energy etc. Permanent inspection teams; Ad Hoc inspection teams PAXSAT satellites (NTMs of contracting parties may contribute some data) Permanent inspection teams; Ad Hoc inspection teams NTMs; Possibility of ISMA satellites Collects data for updating registrations; monitoring space objects; conduct real time calculation of space objects’ trajectories Processing of remote maintenance data; data quality control; manned techniques of photo interpretation and computerassiiste interpretation Supply information: using detection capabilities of States on voluntary basis Output Supply of satellite monitoring/verification data Disseminate scientific and technological data Supply of satellite verification data Treaty specific verification Supply of satellite monitoring/verification data Provide data to be stored, not published Disseminate restricted or unrestricted data Supply through data bank information Source: UNIDIR study entitled Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space, UNIDIR/86/08 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.86.0.2), p. 137 and documents DP/PV.377, CD/937 and CD/OS/WP.59.6 /...A/48/305 English Page 63 188. Coverage of all existing, official and non-official proposals goes beyond the need of the present study. Therefore the overview of proposals that follows will be confined to those submitted to various disarmament forums, including the Conference on Disarmament, the United Nations Disarmament Commission and the United Nations General Assembly’s First Committee, as well as to some bilateral proposals put forward within the framework of the negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union, among others. According to a UNIDIR study, 50/those proposals fall in the categories set forth in the following paragraphs. 1. Confidence-building measures on a voluntary and reciprocal basis 189. Agreements could be reached on certain arrangements that would not, initially, be intended to constitute a treaty. Any such agreement would take the form of non-mandatory provisions that States would observe in a spirit of reciprocity. This type of approach, if agreed, would demonstrate cooperative behaviour and contribute to mutual confidence. 190. In a proposal of this kind, Pakistan suggested in 1986 that the Conference on Disarmament "should call upon the space powers to share information regarding their current and prospective activities in space and to indicate their understanding of and adherence to relevant treaty obligations". 51/191. In 1989, Poland submitted a proposal whereby measures would be adopted by the Conference on Disarmament itself, to which participating States would submit information leading to transparency in outer space activities. 52/These measures, which were not intended to be legal obligations, would include information on the following: (a) Positive law of outer space -a reaffirmation of the importance of space law; a call on all States to act in conformity with space law; a call on all States not yet parties to agreements related to outer space to consider their accession to such international instruments; a suggestion to all States Parties to multilateral treaties and agreements related to outer space to accept the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice in all disputes concerning interpretation and application of such instruments; (b) Transparency in space activities -an exchange of information on a voluntary basis of their space activities such as: activities having military or military-related functions; prior notification of the launching of space objects; sending observers to the launching of space objects or to the preparation of or participation in other space activities, particularly those having military or military-related functions (in the spirit of reciprocity and goodwill); supplying other information considered useful for (i) building confidence and (ii) the reduction of misunderstanding; (c) Destination of information -to other members of the Conference on Disarmament, either through usual diplomatic channels or through the Secretary-General of the Conference on Disarmament and open to all States. 192. Further measures proposed by Poland suggested that members of the Conference on Disarmament, particularly those with outer space capabilities, /...A/48/305 English Page 64 should agree to recognize that increased voluntary transparency would reduce misunderstanding among States. 193. In 1991, France declared itself "... ready to give favourable consideration to a measure providing for assessment visits at launch site or orbital control site of a registered space object", made it clear that measures involving such visits should take place on a voluntary basis and, stated that "... only States which had agreed to such an inspection could be visited". 53/2. Confidence-building measures on a contractual obligation basis 194. Confidence-building measures on contractual basis have been the subject of several different proposals. For example, in 1986, Pakistan expressed the view that such measures could include, inter alia: negotiations to reach an interim or partial agreement in view of an international treaty to supplement the ABM Treaty; a moratorium on the development, testing and deployment of ASAT weapons; and immunity for space objects. 54/195. To the above-mentioned proposals could be added proposals such as those for the creation of an international space agency and/or an international trajectography centre. (a) Space Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road 196. The two terms, Space Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road, have been used interchangeably in the discussions of the Conference on Disarmament about confidence-building measures. In its generic meaning, a Space Code of Conduct has been considered to consist of a set of norms to guide States’ behaviour in respect of their own and/or others’ activities. The Rules of the Road, sometimes referred to as Rules of Behaviour, however, represent either the reaching of agreements on such norms or the norms themselves. The Rules of the Road would therefore be part of the Space Code of Conduct. 197. France, for example, has advocated that the aim of a code of conduct "... is to guarantee the security of space activities while preventing the use of space for aggressive purposes". It has further stated that, "... what is most important is to be able at any time to distinguish an incident of fortuitous or accidental origin from the result of specific aggression. To that end, it is suggested that a set of rules of behaviour should be drawn up ...". 55/Thus, both concepts would be employed as yardsticks in the establishment of measures to increase the safety of space objects and the predictability of space activities. 198. Germany 56/has repeatedly advocated that negotiations on these two concepts be undertaken under the auspices of the Conference on Disarmament for a number of reasons. A Space Code of Conduct is seen by Germany as a mechanism to reduce misinterpretation of space activities and inadvertent collisions with other space objects. In its view, this would create more transparency in respect of accidents in outer space, as well as provide a means of consultation between States in any such eventualities. /...A/48/305 English Page 65 199. Germany also suggested a number of subject areas from which specific rules could be created. These included a mutual renunciation of measures that would interfere with the operation of other States’ space objects; the establishment of minimum distances between space objects; the imposition of speed limits on space objects that approach one another and on high-velocity fly-by and trailing; restrictions on very low altitude overflight by manned or unmanned spacecraft; stringent requirements for advanced notice of launch activities; the grant of the right of inspection or restrictions on it; and the establishment of Keep-out Zones. 57/200. The various measures mentioned above have sometimes been referred to as a sort of traffic code for space objects. 201. Such measures were formally proposed by France in 1989 within the framework of its proposal on satellite immunity. 58/However, the French proposal was not conceived as exclusive; it focused mainly on the development of rules of conduct for space vehicles to reduce the risk of accidental collisions, prevent incidents, prevent close-range co-orbital pursuit, and ensure better knowledge of space traffic as follows: (a) Providing for regular updating, in the event of manoeuvres or drifting, of orbital elements declared at the time of registration; (b) Keeping a minimum distance between any two satellites placed in the same orbit in order to avoid not only accidental collision, but also short-range co-orbital tracking, which is a precondition for the system of space mines; (c) Monitoring close-range passing to limit risks of collision or interference. 202. In 1991, a French working paper 59/suggested that these rules might be implemented by: (a) A broadening of the Registration Convention relating to information on launches scheduled by States; (b) A procedure providing for requests for explanations in the event of an incident or suspicious activity; (c) The identification of keep-out zones in the form of two spherical zones moving with each satellite: a proximity zone to delimit the location of each space object in reciprocal orbit, as well as the capability of each object to move with respect to the others; a wider approach zone, with obligatory notification for passage through it. (b) Open outer space 203. In addition to proposals made at the Conference on Disarmament, some delegations have advocated a wide range of confidence-building measures to foster transparency and safety in space activities as viable contributions to achieving mutual confidence. The concept of open outer space has been presented as one such approach and is aimed at building confidence on a step-by-step basis. It would mean reaching agreement on a measure such as providing for data /...A/48/305 English Page 66 exchange and then gradually build up confidence to obtain agreement on a measure more directly concerned with arms limitation. The Soviet Union has suggested 60/that this concept be examined by the Conference on Disarmament since, in its view, the most important measures related to the realization of the open outer space are: the strengthening of the 1975 Registration Convention; the elaboration of Rules of the Road or a Code of Conduct for space activities; the use of space-based monitoring devices in the interest of the international community; and the establishment of an international space inspectorate. 3. Proposals for institutional framework 204. There are several proposals suggesting the creation of different mechanisms for space activities, whose functioning could also contribute to enhancing and/or contributing to confidence-building in outer space activities. (a) International Trajectography Centre (UNITRACE) 205. In July l989, France proposed the creation of an international trajectography centre (UNITRACE), 61/to be set up within the framework of an agreement on the immunity of satellites and possibly as part of the United Nations Secretariat. The membership of the Centre would be open, on a voluntary basis, to all States possessing or using satellites. Since its main objective would be clearly confined to the monitoring of the trajectory of Earth-orbiting devices, France suggested that the Centre could play a key role in building up confidence among States. The Centre’s principal function would therefore be to collect data for updating registration, monitor space objects, and conduct real time calculation of space objects’ trajectories. Moreover, to fulfil its functions properly, the Centre would also require constantly upgraded information on orbits and manoeuvres. While the French proposal acknowledged that the existence of such a database would lead to a higher level of transparency, it also recognized that the nature of this data-gathering was such that the protection of technological and military information would be a serious consideration. (b) Satellite Image-Processing Agency (SIPA) 206. In 1989, France proposed the creation of a Satellite Image-Processing Agency (SIPA), 62/which would constitute the initial phase of an international institution for satellite monitoring. However, the French initiative clearly stated that the proposed agency "... would be a confidence-building device and would not be intended to be the embryo of a verification system with universal competence attached to the United Nations". Instead, SIPA is to be understood as an agency to be created within the framework of confidence-building and security-building measures. It would be designed as a low-cost agency with three objectives. The first of these would be to collect and process data obtained from existing civilian satellites, and then to disseminate that material to the Agency’s members. Its second objective would be to serve as a research unit or centre charged with (a) identifying groups of satellites which could contribute to the implementation of multilateral civil or military programmes, and (b) designing various possible linkage agreements. The third objective would be to train national personnel to interpret space images and /...A/48/305 English Page 67 ascertain the extent to which the monitoring and verification of arms limitation and disarmament could be performed by means of satellites. 207. At the third special session of the United Nations General Assembly devoted to disarmament, held in 1988, the Soviet Union proposed the creation of an International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA), which was later elaborated in more detail in the Conference on Disarmament (for more details see chapter V). 63/According to this proposal, the main function of the Agency would be to collect information about monitoring space; providing information to the United Nations and Governments that could be useful in controlling local conflicts and crisis situations; and consideration of recommendations concerning the use of space-monitoring for control of future agreements. 4. The international transfer of missiles and other sensitive technologies 208. Concerns about the proliferation of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, as well as the proliferation of delivery systems for such weapons, particularly long-range ballistic missiles, has been one of the sources of interest in creating mechanisms for the international transfer of missiles and other sensitive technologies. 209. In 1987, a group of States, 64/sharing concerns about the proliferation of certain missile systems capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction, agreed to a Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). The primary purpose of this regime is to limit the proliferation of certain missiles, as well as specified components and technologies. This regime is not based on a formal treaty. Rather, each party has taken appropriate unilateral measures to adopt and implement common guidelines. Since 1987, additional countries, including a number of developing countries with important missile or space programmes, have adopted the regime’s guidelines or declared their support for the regime’s objectives. 65/210. The international supplier-control regime applied to the proliferation of ballistic and cruise missiles has been the subject of a number of suggestions. 211. In the context of MTCR, which has been developed to limit the proliferation of some types of missiles and missile technology, France has suggested that it: "... should only be a stage towards a more general agreement, one that is geographically more extensive, better controlled and applicable to all. The agreement would lay down rules promoting civilian cooperation in space, while removing the dangers of the diversion of technology for developing a military ballistic capability ... the aim would be to arrive at a situation where all States wishing to gain access to space for development purposes would cooperate in a framework guaranteeing security." 66/212. In 1991, Argentina and Brazil proposed a set of guidelines for the international transfer of sensitive technology that addressed this issue. They noted that: /...A/48/305 English Page 68 "To aim at universality, and to prove capable of generating really effective international controls, the regulation of the flows of sensitive technologies cannot fail to take account of the interest and need of a large number of States in enjoying access to those technologies for peaceful purposes. It seems fair to assume that the degree of adherence by the community of nations to rules intended to curb the use of sensitive technologies in weapons of mass destruction will be in proportion to the perception that such rules do not constitute an impediment, but rather an encouragement, to the dissemination of scientific and technological knowledge for peaceful purposes." 67/213. The suggested guidelines included: "Enhanced international cooperation in the areas of science and technology strengthens confidence among States. "The existence of disparities of treatment in this area and the differing degrees of access to high technology may result in a deterioration of confidence among countries. "Because sensitive technologies can be used both for peaceful purposes and for weapons of mass destruction, they cannot be defined as inherently harmful. It is the intent or purpose underlying their utilization that such technologies may or may not have security implications. "A system of international controls over flows of sensitive technology products, services and know-how should be seen essentially as of a monitoring nature, and not as a mechanism for the restriction of legitimate transfers." 68/214. This general approach is consistent with a number of other suggestions that have been made for revising the present international technology transfer regime in light of the new world political environment. 5. Proposals for confidence-building measures in outer space within bilateral USA-USSR negotiations 215. A broad range of transparency and predictability measures has been discussed in the bilateral Defence and Space Talks between the United States and the Soviet Union. 69/These have included: (a) Annual exchanges of data, meetings of experts, briefings, visits to laboratories, observations of tests, and ABM test satellite notifications; (b) A proposal for "dual pilot implementation" with each side demonstrating its proposed predictability measures; (c) A proposal to conclude a free-standing agreement covering those measures, independent of the status of negotiations on concrete limitations on anti-missile testing and deployment. /...A/48/305 English Page 69 216. Concrete steps taken with respect to these initiatives include the visit in December 1989 by Soviet specialists to United States-directed energy facilities in California and New Mexico. 217. Although these measures were proposed in a bilateral context, it was suggested, in 1986, by Sri Lanka that they might usefully be extended to multilateral application: 70/"The ’open laboratories’ offer of the United States delegation could be implemented in an Ad Hoc Committee of the Conference with information provided by all delegations ..." 218. Also, in 1988, Pakistan suggested that, in addition to providing detailed information in advance of a launch concerning the nature of the payload, that this information should be verified: "... at the launch site by an international agency ... such an institution could be set up for the purpose of verifying data concerning the function of space objects with a view to providing the international community with reliable information on activities in space, especially those of a military nature." 71/219. At the Summit Meeting in June 1992 between the Presidents of the United States and of the Russian Federation, it was stated in a joint statement issued on a Global Protection System (GPS) that they were continuing their discussion of the potential benefits of a Global Protection System against ballistic missiles, agreeing that it was important to explore the role for defences in protecting against limited ballistic missile attacks. They also agreed that they should work together with allies and other interested States in developing a concept for such a system as part of an overall strategy regarding the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction. 72/6. Other proposals 220. In 1985, a broader approach to the question of international cooperation in space technology was suggested by the Soviet Union, which proposed the formation of a World Space Organization (WSO) to coordinate and promote global cooperation in space development. 73/The programme of work would include: (a) Communication, navigation, rescue of people on Earth, in the atmosphere and outer space; (b) Remote sensing of the Earth for agricultural development of the natural resources of the land, the world’s seas and oceans; (c) The study and preservation of the Earth’s biosphere; (d) The establishment of a global weather forecasting service and notification of natural disasters; (e) The development of new sources of energy and the creation of new materials and technologies; /...A/48/305 English Page 70 (f) The exploration of outer space and celestial bodies by geophysical methods and by means of unmanned interplanetary spacecraft. 74/221. In August 1987, the Soviet Union suggested the creation of an International Space Inspectorate (ISI). This proposal was subsequently elaborated, 75/on the basis that: "On-site inspection directly before launch is the simplest and most effective method of making sure that objects to be launched into and stationed in space are not weapons and are not equipped with weapons of any kind." 222. Suggested measures within the concept of International Space Inspectorate included:"(a) Advance submission by the receiving State to the representatives of the International Space Inspectorate of information on every forthcoming launch, including the date and time of launch, the type of launch vehicle, the parameters of the orbit, and general information on the space object to be launched; "(b) The permanent presence of inspection teams at all sites for launching space objects in order to check all such objects irrespective of the vector; "(c) The start of inspection -days before the object to be launched into space is mounted on the launch vehicle or other vector; "(d) The holding of inspections also at agreed storage facilities, industrial enterprises, laboratories and testing centres; "(e) The verification of undeclared launches from undeclared launching pads by means of ad hoc on-site inspection." 76/223. Although the proposal for an International Space Inspectorate was advanced in the context of an agreement that would ban all space weapons, this approach, in the Soviet Union’s view, could be also considered as the basis for a free-standing initiative to enhance transparency and predictability. 224. Space-related matters have been proposed as a possible area of interest in some regional and multilateral arms control and disarmament negotiations. 225. The Tenth Conference of the Heads of State or Government of Non-Aligned Countries, which met in Jakarta from 1 to 6 September 1992, called for "the establishment of a multilateral satellite verification system under the auspices of the United Nations", which would ensure equal access to information for all States. 77//...A/48/305 English Page 71 C. Analysis 226. Although each of those suggestions makes a positive contribution to understanding the opportunities for confidence-building in outer space, there remain a number of issues that need to be more fully addressed. 1. General measures to enhance transparency and confidence 227. Based on the experience in other terrestrial arenas, the application of additional measures to increase the level of information concerning current and future space activities seems highly appropriate. The precedent of steps for providing improved predictability in the bilateral Defence and Space Talks is a useful beginning. 228. Two aspects, however, require further attention. The first relates to the question of whether such confidence-building measures have the character of voluntary steps that each State is free to exercise as it chooses, or whether they constitute legal obligations incumbent on all States. While many of these steps could provide an effective method for publicly demonstrating the character of a State’s space activities, it remains to be seen how far States would be prepared to go in this direction in the absence of general reciprocity. From the point of view of some States, there is a necessity for some States to protect certain intelligence-related space activities; this is a factor that has to be taken into consideration. 229. The second question relates to the nature of activities that might be disclosed. From one perspective, these transparency measures would help to demonstrate that no proscribed space activities are occurring. From another perspective, such measures would be used to reduce the likelihood of misunderstanding or misperception with respect to space weapons and other activities. 230. Although many of the confidence-building mechanisms that have been suggested would be applicable in either context, agreement on which context is relevant may have significant consequences for the initiation and implementation of such measures. 2. Strengthening the registration of space objects and other related measures 231. A revision and strengthening of the provisions of the Registration Convention is, from the point of view of some States, one of the avenues for strengthening the international space legal regime covering military and other activities in space. 232. The proposal for an International Trajectography Centre also raises some operational concerns. In 1989, France noted that: "... to give, say, the precise position of an observation satellite is, however, to disclose thereby the precise object of its monitoring function. How, then, to reconcile the constraints of confidentiality /...A/48/305 English Page 72 with the gathering of all the requisite information concerning satellite’s trajectories!"? 78/233. While this may be the situation for imaging intelligence satellites with optical systems, which must modify their orbits so that they fly directly over an area of interest, more sophisticated imaging satellites are not so constrained. However, concerns about the confidentiality of orbital information are still present, since notice of an impending overflight could provide sufficient warning to permit concealment from observation from space. 234. France further suggested that: "... the grouping of that information in a computer system operating on the ’black box’ principle could constitute an appropriate solution ... (the centre) ... would receive and store, without publishing it, the orbital data declared at the time of registration and updated in the event of any subsequent change of trajectory." 79/235. However, given the present level of classification that surrounds the orbits of intelligence satellites, it is necessary that such a centre should provide a sufficient level of protection for such information. This situation may evolve with increasing confidence among the major space Powers, which, thanks to their developed tracking facilities, would allow the cross-verification of the data communicated to the centre. In any case, it may appear profitable for space Powers to communicate data concerning their satellites in exchange of the immunity of the latter. 3. Code of Conduct and Rules of the Road 236. Keep-out zones should be in conformity with the provisions of the Outer Space Treaty. Keep-out zones could be established in a multilateral context, and considered in a functional manner. 237. The need for a separate regime to guarantee the immunity of certain classes of satellites from attack has been questioned. It has been suggested that: "... international legal instruments already exist intended to ensure the immunity of satellites. These instruments prohibit the use of force against satellites except in cases of self-defence. Indeed, these international agreements go further than the proposals because they also prohibit the threat of the use of force against satellites. On the other hand, if these proposals mean to prohibit nations from taking actions against satellites in legitimate cases of self-defence, then they undermine the Outer Space Treaty, the United Nations Charter, and the inherent right of sovereign States to take adequate measures to protect themselves in the event of the threat or use of force." 80/238. The question of precisely which type of satellites would be granted immunity remains to be studied further. It has been noted that: /...A/48/305 English Page 73 "... information gathered by reconnaissance and surveillance satellites has also been used in support of military operations. However, if the functions performed by reconnaissance and surveillance satellites are as benign as they are sometimes made out to be, one may well ask why this capability should remain the monopoly of the space Powers. Should we not entrust surveillance and reconnaissance activities by satellite to an international agency in order to monitor compliance with disarmament agreements?" 81/239. It might be easier, at least initially, to reach international agreement on granting some appropriate form of protection to satellites owned and operated by international organizations than it would be to reach such an agreement on generic categories of satellites. 240. One of the problems with suggestions for grants of immunity is that many space systems have multiple applications. Military satellites may serve various missions depending on the operational context, while other satellites may perform both military and civilian functions. 241. Imaging intelligence satellites are used for arms control treaty verification, a function that is generally accorded a privileged status. But these same satellites can also support targeting of terrestrial weapons, an application that is a source of some ambivalence in the international community, and an impetus to the development of anti-satellite weapons. It is difficult to imagine how immunity could be granted to a satellite when it is performing its treaty verification function, while denying immunity to the same satellite a few minutes later as it supports targeting in some terrestrial conflict. 242. The viability of declarations on immunity would also be open to question as long as States were in the possession of means to attack and destroy satellites. The existence of robust anti-satellite capabilities would largely negate the significance of such declarations. France has proposed to grant legal immunity to all satellites that are not capable of active interference with other objects, that is, serving only stabilizing functions as opposed to aggressive uses of outer space. 82/4. The international transfer of missile and other sensitive technologies 243. In the past, the question of the development of space weapons was discussed largely in an East-West context, a focus that has substantially altered since the dramatic changes in the international environment. To an increasing extent, the question is now framed in a much broader context. The concerns of some countries over the proliferation of missile and other sensitive technologies require appropriate international arrangements. 244. New appropriate international arrangements for the transfer of space-related technology could provide a number of avenues for responding to security concerns posed by a number of States on the question of dual use technologies. /...A/48/305 English Page 74 VII. MECHANISMS OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION RELATED TO CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES IN OUTER SPACE 245. Resolution 45/55 B, which defines the mandate of the Study Group, recognized "the relevancy space has gained as an important factor for the socioeconnomi development of many States". In the same resolution, the General Assembly requested the Group to examine, inter alia, "possibilities for defining appropriate mechanisms of international cooperation in specific areas of interests and so on ..." 246. Priorities in specific areas of cooperation vary from one State and from one region to another. For the purposes of the study, international cooperation is viewed in the broader sense, including cooperation related to confidencebuilldin measures in outer space. This chapter therefore examines two categories of international mechanisms and proposals for creating new mechanisms. A. Existing mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space 247. There are three categories of international mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space: global, regional, and bilateral. 1. Global mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space 248. The United Nations has dealt with the questions concerning outer space since the beginning of the space age, mainly in two broader areas of its activities: peaceful uses of outer space and prevention of an arms race in outer space. 249. Growing interest in peaceful uses of outer space led to the establishment, in l959, of the Committee on the Peaceful Use of Outer Space (COPUOS) which was charged to report to the General Assembly on various aspects of the peaceful use of outer space, including: (a) activities of the United Nations and its specialized agencies; (b) dissemination of data on outer space research; (c) coordination of national research programmes; (d) further international arrangements to facilitate international cooperation in outer space within the framework of the United Nations; (e) and legal problems that might arise as a result of the exploration of outer space. The annual reports of the Committee are considered by the Special Political Committee of the United Nations General Assembly. 250. Since then, the work of the Committee and its two subcommittees -one concerned with legal issues, the other with scientific and technical matters -has led to the formulation of five international instruments dealing with general principles for the exploration and use of outer space, the rescue of astronauts and the return of objects launched into outer space, liability for damage caused by space objects, the registration of objects launched into space and activities on the Moon and other celestial bodies. /...A/48/305 English Page 75 251. The following questions are, inter alia, on the agenda of COPUOS 83/: (a) ways of maintaining outer space for peaceful purposes; (b) the work of its Scientific and Technical Sub-Committee and its Legal Sub-Committee; (c) the implementation of the recommendations of the United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space; (d) spin-off benefits of space technology, etc. For details see chapter III above.) 252. In addition to the elaboration of the above-mentioned agreements, the General Assembly, at the recommendation of COPUOS, has adopted the following Principles: (a) the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and the Use of Outer Space (resolution 1962 (XVIII); (b) Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting (resolution 37/92); (c) Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Space (resolution 41/65) and (d) Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space (resolution 47/68). 253. To contribute to the use of outer space for peaceful purposes, the United Nations has organized two special conferences on the subject: the First United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space 84/was held in l968 to examine the practical benefits of space exploration and research and the opportunities available to non-space powers to cooperate institutionally in space activities. The Second Conference, known as UNISPACE 82, 85/was held in Vienna in August l982. The Conference recommended, inter alia, guidelines for the rapidly growing use of space technology; called for the establishment of a United Nations space information system, initially to consist of a directory of information and data services accessible to all States. The Conference also considered the question of the utilization of outer space and stated that preventing an arms race in outer space was essential if States were to continue to cooperate with each other in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes. 254. Parallel to the United Nations activities related to the peaceful uses of outer space, the question of preventing an arms race in outer space has been on the General Assembly agenda since the early l950s. As early as l957, proposals were made in the Disarmament Commission 86/for an inspection system that would ensure that objects launched into outer space would be solely for peaceful purposes. The desire of the international community to prevent an arms race in outer space was expressed, as indicated earlier, by the General Assembly in its l978 Final Document, adopted at the tenth special session devoted to disarmament, which stated that "in order to prevent an arms race in outer space, further measures should be taken and appropriate international negotiations held in accordance with the spirit of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies" (para. 80). 255. The question of preventing an arms race in outer space has been on the agenda of the General Assembly since 1982. A number of resolutions have been adopted requesting the Conference on Disarmament to consider the question of negotiating effective and verifiable agreements for preventing an arms race in outer space or to consider as a matter of priority the question of negotiating an agreement to prohibit anti-satellite (ASAT) systems. /...A/48/305 English Page 76 256. Since 1982, the Conference on Disarmament, the sole multilateral negotiating body on this subject, has had on its agenda an item entitled "Prevention of an arms race in outer space". However, because of differing views concerning the formulation of a mandate, it was only in l985 that the Conference on Disarmament 87/was able to set up an ad hoc committee with a mandate to examine, as a first step, through substantive and general consideration, issues relevant to the subject. 257. The Ad Hoc Committee has continuously, since its inception, examined three subject areas within its mandate: (a) Issues relevant to the prevention of an arms race in outer space; (b) Existing agreements governing space activities; and (c) Existing proposals and future initiatives on the prevention of an arms race in outer space. Some States in the Ad Hoc Committee have been advocating adopting several confidence-building proposals as contributions to the prevention of an arms race in outer space. 258. In addition, the United Nations has additional functions related to space activities of States. Thus, the Secretary-General has been appointed as depositary of the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched in Outer Space (1975); the ENMOD Convention of 1977, and the Agreement Governing the Activities on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies of 1979. 259. According to the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space, 88/the States Parties have undertaken to maintain a central registry and to provide the Secretary-General of the United Nations with information on the space objects they have launched. According to articles 3 and 4, the mandatory reporting of space launches and the structure of the uniform system to be maintained by the Secretary-General is provided as follows: 1. Each State of registry shall furnish the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as soon as practicable, the following information concerning each space object on its registry: (a) The name of the launching State or States; (b) An appropriate designator of the space object or its registration number; (c) The date and territory or location of launch; (d) Basic orbital parameters, including: (i) nodal period, (ii) inclination, (iii) apogee, /...A/48/305 English Page 77 (iv) perigee; (e) The general function of the space object. 2. Each State of registry may, from time to time, provide the Secretary-General with additional information concerning a space object carried on its registry; 3. Each State of registry shall notify the Secretary-General to the greatest extent feasible and as soon as practicable, of space objects concerning which it has previously transmitted information and which have been, but no longer are in Earth orbit. 260. In the framework of multilateral mechanisms, it is noteworthy to mention two additional organizations: the International Telecommunication Satellite Organization (1971) and the International Maritime Satellite Organization (1976). 261. The International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT) is a commercial cooperative of 124 countries that owns and operates a global communications satellite system that is used by more than 170 countries around the world for international communications and by more than 30 countries for domestic communications. INTELSAT has been providing satellite services for public telecommunications since 1965 by means of a successive series of satellites known as INTELSAT I to VI. As of July 1992, the INTELSAT space segment consists of 18 INTELSAT V, V-A and VI satellites in geostationary orbit over the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. INTELSAT VII, which is currently the most technically advanced commercial satellites ever designed, will be launched in 1993. 89/262. The International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) was established on the initiative of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The INMARSAT Convention and Operating Agreement were adopted in September 1976 and entered into force in July 1979. INMARSAT was originally established to meet the needs of international shipping for reliable communications. Amendments to the constituent instrument to extend INMARSAT’s competence so that it can provide aeronautical satellite communications entered into force on 13 October 1989. Further amendments were adopted by the INMARSAT Assembly of Parties in January 1989 to enable INMARSAT to provide land mobile communications, but these amendments have not yet entered into force. INMARSAT is required to act exclusively for peaceful purposes. Its space segment is open for use by ships, aircraft and land mobile users of all nations, without discrimination on the basis of nationality. As of 31 May 1993, 67 States were Parties to the Convention. 90/2. Regional multilateral mechanisms 263. Parallel to the efforts made within the United Nations framework and in the Conference on Disarmament, there are several international instruments regarding activities of States in outer space of a given region, on the basis of which intensive cooperation has taken place. /...A/48/305 English Page 78 264. The International Organization of Space Communications (INTERSPUTNIK) was established in 1971 by an Agreement signed in November 1971, which entered into force in July 1972. It was established to meet the demands of various countries for telephone and telegraph communications and the exchange of radio and television programmes, as well as transmission of other kinds of information via satellite with a view to enhancing political, economic, and cultural cooperation. The following countries have been members of INTERSPUTNIK: Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, the German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Kazakhstan, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Laos, Mongolia, Poland, Romania, USSR, Viet Nam and the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen. At present INTERSPUTNIK is in a transitional period, as States consider the possibility of its functioning on a purely commercial basis. 91/265. In 1975, the European Space Conference, meeting in Brussels, approved the text of the Convention setting up the European Space Agency (ESA). The Member States are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Finland is an associate member, and Canada a closely cooperating State. According to the Convention, the purpose of the Agency is to provide for and to promote, for exclusively peaceful purposes, cooperation among European States in space research and technology and their space applications, with a view to their being used for scientific purposes and for operational space application systems. 92/266. In April 1967, a programme of comprehensive cooperation among the socialist countries for the peaceful uses of outer space was formed and later named the Council on International Cooperation in the Study and Utilization of Outer Space (INTERCOSMOS). Multilateral cooperation among those countries under the INTERCOSMOS programme was given legal status with the signature of an intergovernmental Agreement on Cooperation in the Peaceful Exploration and Use of Outer Space, which was signed in Moscow in July 1976 and entered into force in March 1977. Joint efforts under the INTERCOSMOS programme have been conducted in five main areas: space physics, including space material science; space meteorology; space biology and medicine; space communications and remote sensing of the Earth. Ten countries (Bulgaria, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, the German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Mongolia, Poland, Romania, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Viet Nam) participated in the programme. Its future status and specific forms of possible cooperation are at present under discussion. 93/267. The members of the Arab League founded the Arab Satellite Communication Organization (ARABSAT) by the adoption of the ARABSAT Charter, signed in April 1976. Twenty-one Arab States are members of the ARABSAT communication service. Its main objective is to establish and maintain a regional telecommunications systems for the Arab region. 94/268. In Africa a framework exists in the field of remote sensing -training, exchange of data, etc. -pursuant to the resolutions adopted by the Organization of African Unity and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa -and coordinated by the African Organization for Cartography and Remote Sensing. 269. The European Telecommunication Satellite Organization (EUTELSAT) was created in May 1977 by 17 European telecommunications administrations or recognized private operators of the European Conference of Postal and /...A/48/305 English Page 79 Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT). The organization attained its definitive form on 1 September 1985 upon the entry into force of an International Convention and an Operating Agreement signed by 26 European States. EUTELSAT now has 36 member countries. 95/270. The European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is an intergovernmental organization founded by 16 European member States and their meteorological services. The EUMETSAT Convention entered into force on 19 June 1986. Its primary objective is to establish, maintain and exploit European systems of operational meteorological satellites, taking into account as far as possible the recommendations of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). 96/271. The Western European Union (WEU) is one example of a regional effort to develop confidence-building initiatives related to space. The WEU has recently decided to set aside ECU 10 million for the implementation of a remote sensing centre, being now established in Torejon, Spain. 272. The agreement between France, Spain and Italy to develop and operate jointly the HELIOS imaging intelligence satellites is another example of a subregional arrangement that builds confidence in space among the Parties. 273. The II Space Conference for the Americas, held in Santiago de Chile from 26 to 30 April 1993, adopted a Declaration, whereby it emphasized the need for regional and international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space. The Conference also identified concrete areas and specific projects for cooperation among States of that region and also with States of other regions. 274. The first Asia-Pacific Workshop on Multilateral Cooperation in Space Technology and Applications, held in Beijing, China in December 1992, made a set of recommendations emphasizing the need for regional and international cooperation in space technology and its applications and proposed to identify, at its next workshop, potential multilateral cooperation projects among States of the Asia-Pacific region. 3. Bilateral mechanisms 275. As indicated earlier, negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union have produced some of the fundamental agreements related to their military activities in outer space, notably the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1972. 97/The ABM Treaty provides, inter alia, for a Standing Consultative Commission of the two States to promote its objectives and implementation. The details concerning the Commission were elaborated in the Memorandum of Understanding Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics Regarding the Establishment of A Standing Consultative Commission 98/of 21 December 1972. 276. The Standing Consultative Commission has been used for cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union in promoting and implementing agreements signed within the framework of SALT-I and SALT-II 99/. The Treaty on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-Range and Shorter Range Missiles (INF Treaty /...A/48/305 English Page 80 of 1987) provides for the establishment of a Special Verification Commission. 100/277. On the basis of the Treaty on Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START-I), 101/a Joint Compliance and Inspection Commission was established. On the basis of the Protocol to the Treaty, signed in Lisbon in March 1992, representatives of Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine, as well as of the Russian Federation, will participate in the work of the Commission. 278. On the basis of the Treaty on Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START-II), 102/the Russian Federation and the United States established a new Bilateral Implementation Commission for resolving questions related to compliance with obligations assumed. 279. In addition, several agreements mainly concerning confidence-building between the two leading space Powers, such as the Nuclear Accident Agreement (1971); the Hot Line Agreement (1971); the Agreement on the Establishment of Nuclear Risk Prevention Centres (1987); and the Notification Agreement (1989) are providing for the notification, monitoring, verification and creation of different mechanisms or to use some existing mechanisms (such as an INTELSAT satellite circuit and a STATSIONAR satellite circuit), which are relevant to the prevention of an arms race in outer space. 280. The most recent Space Agreement between the United States and the Russian Federation (17 June 1992) on cooperation between the two countries provides a broad framework for cooperation related to space activities. 281. Various forms of international cooperation in space related matters exist in other bilateral agreements among different States of different regions. B. Some proposals for creating new international mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space 282. While the overview of the existing global, regional and bilateral mechanisms of international cooperation in outer space shows the extent of cooperation existing among States concerning their activities in outer space, none of the above-mentioned mechanisms, even those of global character, is an all-embracing organization that covers all aspects of space activities. Consequently, there are several proposals to expand existing mechanisms and/or to create new ones. 283. In general, most of the proposals put forward to date are linked to monitoring and/or verification of existing or future arms limitation agreements or represent a part of more comprehensive proposals concerning activities of States in outer space. As monitoring and verification could be a part of any international agreement on the prevention of an arms race in outer space, they could at the same time contribute to confidence-building and thus to furthering cooperation among States. 284. It is obvious that any monitoring or verification mechanism of arms limitation and disarmament agreements will be a very complex matter involving a /...A/48/305 English Page 81 wide spectrum of procedures such as Earth-to-space, space-to-space, space-to-Earth, air-to-ground, and on-site monitoring. Such an elaborate network would necessarily have to be designed to improve confidence-building. 285. Among the most widely discussed plans, are the French and Soviet proposals discussed in chapter V above. At the first special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, in June 1978, France put forward a detailed proposal for the establishment of an International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA). 103/One of the proposal’s main features was that existing and future disarmament and security agreements should be monitored, presumably via some special arrangement between the Contracting Parties and the Agency. The French proposal suggested that the Agency should be set up in stages and in 1981 became a subject of the United Nations study: The Implications of Establishing an International Satellite Monitoring Agency. 104/The study outlined the missions and facilities needed for ISMA, its organizational structure and the technical, legal and financial implications of its establishment. 286. At the second special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, in 1988, the Soviet Union proposed that the Conference on Disarmament should be charged with undertaking detailed negotiations on the establishment of an International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA). 105/Although the Soviet proposal would be based on the same principles as that of the French, there are several differences. The Soviet proposal suggested that the Agency should be developed in two stages, the first being a period for training the personnel and structuring the Agency itself, during which information would be supplied by States possessing space monitoring facilities and a Space Processing Inspectorate Centre (SPIC) would be created. The second stage would involve primarily the development of the ground segment by creating a network of data-reception points. 106/287. In March 1988, the Soviet Union proposed the creation of an International Space Inspectorate (ISI) 107/to verify the non-deployment of weapons of any kind in outer space. As ISI is based on the principle of on-site inspections before the launching of space objects, the scope of prohibition envisaged would include weapon systems equipped to conduct ground, air, or outer space strikes, "... irrespective of the physical principles on which they are based". 288. The Canadian proposal, PAXSAT, 108/or peace satellite, is a verification concept using space-based remote-sensing technology. As outlined in chapter V above, it has two potential applications, respectively PAXSAT A and PAXSAT B. In the first application, PAXSAT would be associated with agreements on outer space that entails space-to-space remote-sensing capability. By using nonclasssifie technology, PAXSAT A research is aimed at designing a satellite that can accurately ascertain whether other objects in orbit are able to perform as space weapons (e.g. ASAT weapons) or have space weapon capability. PAXSAT B is a segment of a Canadian research project that is to be associated with agreements calling for the regional ground observation. In addition, PAXSAT research also embraces the development of a database, presumably on space objects for application A and on conventional forces and weapons for application B. 289. In 1989, France proposed the establishment of an International Trajectography Centre (UNITRACE). 109/Since it would be designed to alert the States concerned in the event of threatened incidents and to supply evidence of /...A/48/305 English Page 82 good or bad faith in the event of an accident, it should meet the requirement of transparency and should also be in permanent possession of up-to-date information concerning the trajectories of space objects. At the same time, if it is to be acceptable to satellite-owning States, such a centre should be able to observe a degree of confidentiality in respect of military activities in space. Under the auspices of the United Nations Secretariat, it would have the following functions: (a) collection of data for updating registrations; (b) monitoring of space objects; (c) real time calculation of all possible trajectories. 290. Considering that the implementation of regional agreements on confidencebuilldin and security could draw to an increasing extent on the use of satellite images, France was prepared to contribute to the establishment and operation of regional agencies responsible for transparency in three forms: (a) assistance in training specialists in the interpretation of satellite data;(b) study of the possible structure and size of the reception facilities (engineering), which might be made available to States participating in such agencies; (c) initiation of more far-reaching consideration of the question of access to data and satellite information and discussion with other countries producing space images, with a view to possible agreements to supply regional agencies, at their request, with the information they need to perform such tasks. 291. At the forty-seventh session of the General Assembly, France indicated that it was going to propose a measure to enhance confidence by making it mandatory to give advance notice of the firing of ballistic missiles and rockets carrying satellites or other space objects. That notification measure, if adopted, would be complemented by the establishment of an international centre, under United Nations auspices, responsible for collecting and using the data received. 110/292. France elaborated its proposal in a working paper which it submitted in the Ad Hoc Committee on Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space of the Conference on Disarmament on 12 March 1993. 111/France proposed, inter alia, the establishment, through a new international instrument, which could be negotiated at the Conference on Disarmament, of a regime of prior notification of launches of space launchers and ballistic missiles. Such a regime should be supplemented by the establishment of an International Notification Centre responsible for the centralization and redistribution of collected data, so as to increase the transparency of space activities. The Centre would be set up under the auspices of the United Nations and legally attached to it, and could take the form of a division of the Office for Disarmament Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat. The main function of the Centre would be to receive notification of launches of ballistic missiles and space launches transmitted to it by States Parties. It would receive the information transmitted by States on launches /...A/48/305 English Page 83 actually carried out. States possessing detection capabilities, would be invited to communicate to the Centre, on a voluntary basis, data relating to launches they have detected; and it would place such information, through a data bank, at the disposal of the international community. 293. The establishment of a "World Space Organization" 112/was suggested by the Soviet Union in 1985 as a broader mechanism for international cooperation. The suggested functions of such Organization have been outlined in some detail in chapter VI. /...A/48/305 English Page 84 VIII. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 294. Since the adoption of resolution 45/55 B by the General Assembly, there has been substantial and rapid political change providing a new international context in which confidence-building measures in outer space have to be considered. New opportunities for global, regional and bilateral cooperation have arisen in space activities. 295. The Group of Experts therefore concludes that these changes, together with developments in technology, have not only preserved the relevance for confidence-building measures in space, but have also created an environment conducive to their implementation. 296. The Group of Experts believes that it has been demonstrated that space missions and operations have the potential to provide substantial scientific, environmental, economic, social, political and other benefits, and that the space environment should be used for the progress of humankind. Thus there is a clear tendency for a growing number of States to expand their activities related to outer space, some considering a military component important to their space activities. All space activities, though, should be conducted to enhance international peace and security. 297. It has been concluded by the Group that space applications are becoming more significant in terms of benefits in all respects and, accordingly, increasingly meaningful in both strategic and civilian aspects of life on earth. The use of space also has the potential to increase, aggravate or, by contrast, mitigate tension between States. 298. The Group finds that a significant part of the main concerns among the vast majority of States is still related to the possibility of introducing weapons in outer space. Some other military activities are also subjects of concern. To the vast majority of States, the question of access to and benefits from space technology is also becoming a significant factor that may need to be addressed specifically by confidence-building measures. 299. The rights of all States to explore and use outer space for the benefit and in the interest of all humankind is a universally accepted legal principle. It is the concern and responsibility of all States to ensure that these rights are realized in accordance with international law in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation. 300. The Outer Space Treaty, the cornerstone of international space law, was adopted in 1967, an era prior to the wider use of space technology for telecommunications purposes, prior to the availability of remote sensing systems, and prior to the incorporation of space applications into much of the civil infrastructure and capabilities of States. The rapid advances in space technologies require keeping continuously under review the need for updating or supplementing the current international legal regime. 301. The Group therefore concludes that legal norms may have to be developed further, whenever appropriate, to address new developments in space technology and increasing universal interest in its application. In this context, the need /...A/48/305 English Page 85 to formulate a framework for the enhancement of cooperation and confidencebuilldin among States was expressed in the Group. 302. The significant contribution of space activities to national and regional development, as well as to international understanding, is enhanced to the extent that such activities are conducted in a safe environment free from outside threats. It is also observed that concerns can arise from the fear of either a military or economic advantage provided through space, as well as from the difficulty of accessing the desired benefits of space applications in a cost-effective manner. 303. In addition to the status and capabilities of individual nations, the Group concludes that aspects of global and regional balance are to be taken into consideration. Given the complementary nature of space to military forces on the ground, some confidence-building measures may be contemplated with respect to neighbouring States or groups of States in cases of tension. The Group observes that advanced space technologies, providing a planetary perspective, have created a sense that any point on Earth could be reached from space. The Group therefore considers that all States can and should be involved at the global level in confidence-building regarding space. 304. The Group agrees that the application of space technologies is ambivalent in nature and that dual-purpose aspects of sensitive technologies should not be defined as harmful per se. It is the way in which they are utilized that determines whether they are harmful or not. Because the unilateral or rapid expansion of certain space capabilities by States can arouse suspicion in other States, the Group concludes that the extension of such capabilities should be accompanied, when appropriate, by a confidence-building framework designed to enhance transparency and openness. These space capabilities should also be developed in accordance with internationally agreed provisions ensuring their non-diversion for prohibited purposes. 305. There is potential concern, however, on both military and economic grounds that a State acquiring data revealing the weaknesses or other circumstances of another State could be exploited to the detriment of that State. Some countries fear that transparency measures regarding their space activities could affect their national security. Therefore transparency measures should be designed in such a way as to reconcile the need to build international confidence and the protection of national security interests. 306. The concerns are not only those that can be directly recognized, but also those related to the degree of commitment by others to confidence-building measures. Accordingly, the Group concludes that due consideration be given to the assessment of the implementation of confidence-building measures to ensure compliance, as well as making appropriate use of any verification provisions that may be included. 307. The Group has considered the span of technology and facilities required in a space mission, for the development of the spacecraft itself, the launch vehicle and launch operations, including tracking support as well as all other related operations during its lifetime. It is noted that many States have, as a matter of necessity or choice, specialized in specific fields, relying on others to complement these areas and fulfil their additional requirements. The Group /...A/48/305 English Page 86 believes that this is an important factor to be taken into account in addressing confidence-building measures. 308. The Group concludes that, in consideration of possible confidence-building measures in outer space, the differences in space capabilities among States should be taken into account. For the time being, only the United States and the Russian Federation have the full diversity of technology and available hardware to achieve self-sufficiency in the full diversity of space missions. Beyond this, there is a second, larger group of States that have achieved self-sufficiency within specific space missions. There is also a third substantial group of States that have space-related capabilities in specialized technologies or facilities, but lack autonomy in space. This includes those with direct space experience and ongoing programmes, as well as those with missile or other technologies that can be rapidly applied to space missions or portions thereof. 309. All States have legitimate interests in space and, in many cases, are benefiting from space activities. Some of them even own and operate space or space-associated assets, but are largely or totally dependent upon the commercial or political actions of others for their participation in space activities. 310. The disparities in levels of space capabilities among these groups, as well as among individual States, the inability to participate in space activities without the assistance of others, uncertainty concerning sufficient transfer of space technologies and the inability to acquire significant space-based information are factors in the lack of confidence among States. The existence of such factors may not be conducive to prevention of an arms race in outer space. In this context, the Group concludes that issues of access to and benefits from space should be addressed in order to promote cooperation and confidence-building among States. 311. The Group observes that full autonomous space capabilities in all States is neither technologically nor economically feasible in the foreseeable future. It therefore concludes that international cooperation is an important vehicle for promoting the right of each nation to achieve its legitimate objectives to benefit from space technology for its own development and welfare. Cooperation, with involvement of other nations, in the achievement of national objectives, requires confidence in the capabilities of others and in the policies providing access to these capabilities. 312. The Group concludes that some confidence-building measures in outer space could be considered as complementary to such measures applicable to terrestrial military activities and arrangements, thus constituting a wider body of mechanisms aimed at creating and maintaining confidence between States. 313. The Group observes that there are several causes of concerns in some States without military space capabilities regarding the application and use of such capabilities by other States. For example, certain space capabilities could serve as force multipliers in case of conflict, regional or otherwise. Satellites could be used to acquire data that could be exploited in a given military situation. Increased transparency can be instrumental in allaying /...A/48/305 English Page 87 mistrust and building confidence with regard to all space-related means and capabilities. 314. The Group concludes that appropriate confidence-building measures between States could address some of these current causes of concerns. Transparency could help allay suspicion and thus remove some of the factors constraining international cooperation. Causes of concerns about space capabilities may also need to be addressed by measures of arms control and disarmament, as well as adjustments of transfers of technology, without inhibiting the potential growth and development of peaceful space capabilities. Confidence-building measures in space in relation to regional security arrangements may also be contemplated in this respect. 315. The Group has examined the ways in which a State can advance its space technology such as endogenous development, technology transfer, and technical assistance that allows the receiving State to move rapidly through different phases and bring its own skills to the desired levels. The Group concludes that international cooperation is important for the advancement of space technology. 316. The Group concludes that specific confidence-building measures addressing the dual-use nature of technologies related to space may help establish a better environment for international cooperation. It believes that use of such technologies should be encouraged and access to their benefits secured under appropriate national and internationally agreed provisions that ensure their non-diversion for prohibited purposes. 317. The Group has considered the possibility of concluding an international agreement on banning weapons in outer space and concludes that this question deserves further consideration. The Group concludes further that there are many States that believe that in view of the new political situation in the world, the time has come to begin full-scale negotiations to work out an international agreement on banning weapons in outer space. Those States believe that such an agreement could become one of the most effective confidence-building measures in itself. 318. The Group notes the growing importance of space systems in providing support for international diplomacy. The Group emphasizes the potential of these systems, which could promote the effectiveness of the United Nations in preventive diplomacy, crisis management, the settlement of international disputes and conflict resolution. The Group believes that this is an important aspect of the role of these systems in promoting confidence and stability in international relations. 319. The point of departure for the recommendations of the Group is the text of General Assembly resolution 45/55 B and the provisions of the Outer Space Treaty, as well as concepts of transparency, predictability, aspects of conduct, and international cooperation, which are being considered mainly in the Conference on Disarmament, the United Nations Disarmament Commission, and the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. 320. The Group recommends, first of all, that all States Parties strictly observe the provisions of the Outer Space Treaty and other treaties on outer space concluded under the auspices of the United Nations, since these /...A/48/305 English Page 88 instruments include components establishing confidence among States. United Nations resolutions that enjoy universal support and that embody such principles on outer space can also contribute to confidence. 321. It is recommended by the Group that existing bilateral and multilateral mechanisms, particularly those multilateral mechanisms within the United Nations, should continue to play an important role in any further consideration and possible elaboration of specific confidence-building measures in the context of the prevention of an arms race in outer space. It is also suggested that the Conference on Disarmament be requested to continue considering further measures contributing to the prevention of an arms race in outer space. In this regard, should negotiations on further measures, including negotiations on outer space confidence-building measures, be required, the Conference on Disarmament should serve as an appropriate negotiating forum. 322. The Group of Experts recommends that the legal sub-committee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, within its mandate concerning the international legal regime governing outer space, continue to keep under review, inter alia, the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space with respect to staying abreast of technological developments and possible transparency and predictability needs. 323. The Group recommends that the International Satellite Monitoring Agency (ISMA) and the International Space Monitoring Agency (ISpMA) proposals be re-examined in the light of current and future developments. The Group has considered the possibility of the establishment of an international registry of orbital and functional data on vehicles and missions, which would receive submissions from tracking centres of Member States, and finds that this question deserves further consideration in view of its potential relevance to confidence-building. 324. The Group recommends building upon existing mechanisms related to space activities for alert in case of accidents or vehicle failure and to consider a role the United Nations might play in this respect. The idea of an international alert system may be further explored. 325. The Group of Experts recommends that States operating remote sensing systems operate these systems in conformity with United Nations General Assembly resolution 41/65, so as to contribute and facilitate the broadest access possible by the international community to remote sensing data on a non-discriminatory basis and at a reasonable cost, taking into account the needs and circumstances of the developing countries and the countries in transition. 326. The Group recommends that the concepts and proposals on "rules of the road", as possible components of confidence-building measures in outer space, should be kept under review. Factors such as manoeuvrability of spacecraft, potential conflicting orbits and predictability of close approaches should be taken into consideration. 327. The Group recommends that institutional mechanisms to encourage international cooperation among States in respect of space technology, including international transfer, should be evaluated, taking into account the legitimate concerns about dual-purpose technology. It is further recommended that measures /...A/48/305 English Page 89 be considered to enable all States to have access to space for peaceful purposes on a cost-recoverable or reasonable commercial basis, and that those States that need assistance in this respect could make use of appropriate forms of technical cooperation, duly taking into account the needs of the developing countries and the countries in transition. 328. The Group recommends that COPUOS explore mechanisms coordinating various international space activities, including interplanetary exploration, environmental monitoring, meteorological science, remote sensing, disaster relief and mitigation, search-and-rescue, training of personnel and spin-off. In this context, concepts involving universal participation such as a "World Space Organization" are possible useful points of reference for this exploratory work. 329. The Group notes the view expressed that given the dual-use nature of some space technologies and the international character of the relevant issues discussed in the context of the prevention of an arms race in outer space and of the peaceful uses of outer space, the possibility of establishing working contacts between the Conference on Disarmament and COPUOS should be explored and appropriate actions considered by the General Assembly to encourage such contacts. 330. The Group of Experts concludes that appropriate confidence-building measures with respect to outer space activities are potentially important steps towards the objective of preventing an arms race in outer space and ensuring the peaceful use of outer space by all States. 331. The Group hopes that the present study will be a useful reference for the continuing work of the Conference on Disarmament, in its Ad Hoc Committee on Outer Space, the United Nations Disarmament Commission and the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, as well as other international bodies interested in outer space and the questions dealt with in this study. Notes 1/See Official Records of the General Assembly, Tenth Special Session, Supplement No. 4 (A/S-10/4), sect. III. 2/General Assembly resolution 2222 (XXI), annex. 3/For events which occurred before December 1991, reference is made to the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics, and thereafter to the Russian Federation. 4/The use of the word "satellite" here does not exclude the relevance of other forms of spacecraft, such as "space station", "space shuttle", "sky lab" etc. 5/See: International Cooperation in the Uses of Outer Space -Activities of Member States, Note by the Secretariat (A/AC.105/505 and Add.1 to 3). /...A/48/305 English Page 90 6/Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.I.30), pp. 135-136. 7/Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for International Security, UNIDIR, Research Papers, No. 15, (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.92.0.30). 8/World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992 (Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 509-530. 9/The Treaty was adopted by the General Assembly on 13 December 1966 by resolution 2222 (XXI), annex, opened for signature on 27 January 1967, and entered into force on 10 October 1967. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.I.30, pp. 231-236. 10/The Treaty was signed on 10 October 1963 and entered into force on the same date. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Status of Multilateral Arms Regulations and Disarmament Agreements, 4th edition: 1992 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.93.IX.11), vol. I, p. 33. 11/The Agreement was adopted by the General Assembly on 19 December 1967 by resolution 2345 (XXII), and entered into force on 3 December 1968. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 237-240. 12/The Convention was adopted by the General Assembly on 29 November 1971 by resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex; opened for signature on 29 March 1972, and entered into force on 1 September 1972. The text of the Convention is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 241-249. 13/Adopted by the General Assembly on 12 November 1974 in resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex; entered into force on 15 September 1976. The text is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 250-254. 14/A revised Constitution and a revised Convention of the International Telecommunication Union (Geneva, 1992) were adopted at the Additional Plenipotentiary Conference (APP-92), which provided for their entry into force on 1 July 1994. Upon entry into force, the Geneva Constitution and Convention shall abrogate and replace the Nairobi Convention (1982), which is still in force. See International Telecommunication Union Convention, Nairobi, 1982, General Secretariat of the ITU, Geneva, ISBN 92-61-01651-0; the Nice Convention and Constitution signed on 30 June 1989, have not come into force. International Telecommunication Union, General Secretary, Geneva, 1989, PP-89/FINACTS/CONVO1E1.TXS. 15/The Convention was signed on 18 May 1977 and entered into force on 5 October 1978. The text of the Convention is reproduced in Status, vol. I, p. 217. 16/These Understandings are not incorporated into the Convention, but are part of the negotiating record and were included in the report transmitted by the Conference on Disarmament to the General Assembly in September 1976. The text is reproduced in Status, vol. I, p. 231. /...A/48/305 English Page 91 17/The Agreement was adopted by the General Assembly, by resolution 34/68, annex; opened for signature on 18 December 1979 and entered into force on 11 July 1984. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Space Activities, op. cit., pp. 255-263. 18/The Treaty was signed on 26 May 1972 and entered into force on 3 October 1972. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, 1990 edition, United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Washington, D.C. 20451, pp. 157-161. 19/The SALT-I Agreement was signed on 26 May 1972 and entered into force on 3 October 1972. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 169-176. 20/The SALT-II Treaty was signed on 18 June 1979, but never entered into force. The text of the Treaty is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 267-300. 21/The START-I Treaty was signed on 31 July 1991 and has not yet entered into force. It was supplemented by the Lisbon Protocol, signed on 23 May 1992 by Belarus, Kazakhstan, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United States. The text of the Treaty has been published as a CD document, CD/1192 and the text of the Protocol as CD/1193. 22/The START-II Treaty was signed by the Russian Federation and the United States on 3 January 1993 and its entry into force depends on the entry into force of the START-I Treaty. The text of the Treaty has been published as a CD document, CD/1194. 23/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 30 September 1971. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 120-121. 24/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 30 September 1971. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, pp. 124-128. 25/The USA and the USSR had agreed in 1963 to establish, for use in time of emergency, a direct communications link between the two Governments. The so-called "Hot Line" agreement provided for a wire telegraph circuit and, as a back-up system, a radio telegraph circuit. For the text of the Memorandum of Understanding with Annex, of 20 June 1963, see Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., pp. 34-36. 26/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 15 September 1987. Its text is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., pp. 338-344. 27/The Agreement was signed and entered into force on 31 May 1988. Its text is reproduced in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., pp. 457-458. /...A/48/305 English Page 92 28/The Agreement was signed on 12 June 1989 and entered into force on 1 January 1990. The text of the Agreement, its annexes and the agreed statements in connection with the Agreement is issued as a document of the Conference on Disarmament, CD/943, 4 August 1989. 29/Official Records of the General Assembly, Eighteenth Session, Supplement No. 15 (A/5515), pp. 15-16. 30/Ibid., Thirty-seventh Session, Supplement No. 51 (A/37/51), pp. 98-99. 31/Ibid., Forty-first Session, Supplement No. 53 (A/41/53), pp. 115-116. 32/See Resolutions and decisions adopted by the General Assembly during its forty-seventh session, 15 September to 23 December 1992. 33/Official Records of the General Assembly, Tenth Special Session, Supplement No. 4 (A/S-10/4). 34/Comprehensive Study on Confidence-Building Measures, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.82.IX.3. 35/General Assembly Official Records: Fifteenth Special Session, Supplement No. 3 (A/S-15/3). 36/Jasani, Buphendra, "Military Space Activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978 (Taylor and Francis, London, 1978); and DeVere, G. T., and Johnson, N. L., "The NORAD Space Network", Spaceflight, July 1985, vol. 27, pp. 306-309; and North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD Space Detection and Tracking System", Factsheet, 20 August 1982. 37/King-Hele, Desmond, Observing Earth Satellites (Macmillan, London, 1983).38/Manly, Peter, "Television in Amateur Astronomy", Astronomy, December 1984, pp. 35-37. 39/The 2.3 meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona has been used to produce images of the Hubble Space Telescope (McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared Astronomy: Pixels to Spare", Sky & Telescope, July 1991, pp. 31-35) and the Mir space station ("Satellite Trackers Bag Soviet Space Station", Sky & Telescope, December 1987, p. 580). 40/Jackson, P., "Space Surveillance Satellite Catalog Maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 April 1990. 41/"PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", External Affairs Canada, Verification Brochure, No. 2, 1987, 1988, pp. 97-102. 42/"Address by His Excellency Mr. Valery Giscard d’Estaing, President of the French Republic", A/S-10/PV.3, 25 May 1978. /...A/48/305 English Page 93 43/Study on the Implications of Establishing an International Satellite Monitoring Agency -report of the Secretary-General, A/AC.206/14, 6 August 1981. 44/France, Working Paper -Space in the Service of Verification -Proposal Concerning a Satellite Image Processing Agency, CD/945, CD/OS/WP.40, 1 August 1989. 45/Statement by Mr. E. A. Shevardnadze, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, at the third special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, A/S-15/PV.9. 46/CD/OS/WP.39. 47/"PAXSAT Concept", Verification Brochure, op. cit., pp. 97-102. 48/The United Nations and Disarmament 1945-1970 (United Nations publication, Sales No. 70.IX.1), p. 174. 49/See table 3. 50/Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space: A Guide to the Discussion in the Conference on Disarmament, UNIDIR/91/79 (United Nations publication, Sales No. GV.E.91.0.17), pp. 107-128. 51/CD/708. 52/CD/941. 53/CD/1092. 54/CD/708. 55/CD/1092. 56/CD/PV.318, CD/PV.345 and CD/PV.516. 57/Ibid. 58/CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35. 59/CD/1092. 60/CD/PV.560. 61/CD/937 and CD/PV.570. 62/CD/945 and CD/937. 63/CD/OS/WP.39. 64/Original participants of MTCR are: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom and United States. See The Arms Control Reporter, 1993, 706.A.2. /...A/48/305 English Page 94 65/As of 31 December 1992, the following additional countries had become participants of MTCR (in chronological order): Spain, Australia, Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Norway, Austria, Finland, Sweden, New Zealand, Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Switzerland. Ibid. 66/France, "Arms control and disarmament plan submitted by France" (CD/1079, 3 June 1991). 67/Argentina and Brazil, Working Paper entitled "International transfer of sensitive technologies" (A/CN.10/145, 25 April 1991). 68/Ibid. 69/United States of America, "Statement to the Outer Space Committee of the Conference on Disarmament" (CD/1087, 8 July 1991). 70/Statement by Mr. Dhanapala of Sri Lanka (CD/PV.354, 8 April 1986). 71/Statement by Mr. Ahmad of Pakistan (CD/PV.460, 26 April 1988). 72/CD/1162. 73/CD/PV.332, 22 August 1985, p. 23. 74/Ibid. 75/Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, "Establishment of an international system of verification of the non-deployment of weapons of any kind in outer space" (CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19, 17 March 1988). 76/Ibid. 77/Tenth Conference of Heads of State or Government of the Non-Aligned Countries, Jakarta, 1-6 September 1992, Final Document (A/47/675-S/24816), chap. II, para. 44. 78/France, Working Paper entitled "Prevention of an arms race in space: proposals concerning monitoring and verification and satellite immunity", CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35, 31 July 1989). Emphasis on original. 79/Ibid. 80/"Statement by the representative of the United States of America in the Ad Hoc Committee on 2 August 1988" (CD/905, CD/OS/WP.28, 21 March 1989). 81/Statement by Mr. Ahmad of Pakistan (CD/PV.413, 16 June 1987). 82/CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35 of 31 July 1989. 83/Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-eighth Session, Supplement No. 20 (A/48/20). /...A/48/305 English Page 95 84/Space Exploration and Applications; Papers Presented at the Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, Vienna, 14-27 August 1968, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.69.I.16, vols. I and II. 85/A/CONF.101/10 and Corr.1 and 2. 86/The United Nations and Disarmament 1945-1970, United Nations publication, Sales No. 70.IX.1, pp. 66-68. 87/Official Records of the General Assembly, Fortieth Session, Supplement No. 27 (A/40/27). 88/Ibid., Sixteenth Session, A/RES/1721 (XVI), 20 December 1961, annex B. 89/Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations. A review of the activities and resources of the United Nations, its specialized agencies and other international bodies relating to the peaceful uses of outer space, A/AC.105/521, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.92.I.30, pp. 164-173. 90/Ibid., pp. 179-185. 91/Ibid., pp. 174-175. 92/Ibid., pp. 135-164. 93/Ibid., pp. 175-178. 94/Ibid., pp. 185-186. 95/Ibid., pp. 187-188. 96/Ibid., pp. 188-190. 97/Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1990 Edition, pp. 157-161. 98/Ibid., pp. 175-176. 99/Ibid., pp. 169-176; 267-291. 100/Ibid., pp. 350-362. 101/The Treaty and related documents were published in Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements: START, Treaty Between the United States of America and the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (United States Arms Control Agency), 1990, Washington, D.C. 102/Text of the Treaty has been published as CD document CD/1194. /...A/48/305 English Page 96 103/Official Records of the General Assembly, Tenth Special Session, A/S-10/AC.1/7, 1 June 1978. 104/A/AC.206/14, United Nations publication, Sales No. E.83.IX.3. 105/Ibid., A/S-15/34. 106/CD/OS/WP.39, 2 August 1989. 107/CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19 of 17 March 1988. 108/Canada, External Affairs, "PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", Verification Brochure No. 2, 1987. 109/CD/937 and CD/PV.570. 110/Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-seventh Session, Plenary Meetings, 8th meeting, Statement by Mr. R. Dumas, on 23 September 1992. 111/Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space, Notification of Launches of Space Objects and Ballistic Missiles, CD/OS/WP.59. 112/The proposal was made in the Conference on Disarmament on 22 August 1985, CD/PV.332, p. 23. /...A/48/305 English Page 97 APPENDIX I Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies* The States Parties to this Treaty, Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man’s entry into outer space, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the benefit of all peoples irrespective of the degree of their economic or scientific development, Desiring to contribute to broad international cooperation in the scientific as well as the legal aspects of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that such cooperation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between States and peoples, Recalling resolution 1962 (XVIII), entitled "Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space", which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 December 1963, Recalling resolution 1884 (XVIII), calling upon States to refrain from placing in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, or from installing such weapons on celestial bodies, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 17 October 1963, Taking account of United Nations General Assembly resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space, Convinced that a Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, will further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Have agreed on the following: * General Assembly resolution 2222 (XXI), annex. /...A/48/305 English Page 98 Article I The exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind. Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies. There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigation. Article II Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation or by any other means. Article III States Parties to the Treaty shall carry on activities in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding. Article IV States Parties to the Treaty undertake not to place in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner. The Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used by all States Parties to the Treaty exclusively for peaceful purposes. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration of the Moon and other celestial bodies shall also not be prohibited. Article V States Parties to the Treaty shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of another State Party /...A/48/305 English Page 99 or on the high seas. When astronauts make such a landing, they shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle. In carrying on activities in outer space and on celestial bodies, the astronauts of one State Party shall render all possible assistance to the astronauts of other States Parties. States Parties to the Treaty shall immediately inform the other States Parties to the Treaty or the Secretary-General of the United Nations of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, which could constitute a danger to the life or health of astronauts. Article VI States Parties to the Treaty shall bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in the present Treaty. The activities of non-governmental entities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the appropriate State Party to the Treaty. When activities are carried on in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with this Treaty shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States Parties to the Treaty participating in such organization.Article VII Each State Party to the Treaty that launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and each State Party from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to another State Party to the Treaty or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air or in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies. Article VIII A State Party to the Treaty on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and over any personnel thereof, while in outer space or on a celestial body. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, including objects landed or constructed on a celestial body, and of their component parts, is not affected by their presence in outer space or on a celestial body or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State Party to the Treaty on whose registry they are carried shall be returned to that State Party, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return. /...A/48/305 English Page 100 Article IX In the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, States Parties to the Treaty shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties to the Treaty. States Parties to the Treaty shall pursue studies of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination and also adverse changes in the environment of the Earth resulting from the introduction of extraterrestrial matter and, where necessary, shall adopt appropriate measures for this purpose. If a State Party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State Party to the Treaty which has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by another State Party in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment. Article X In order to promote international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in conformity with the purposes of this Treaty, the States Parties to the Treaty shall consider on a basis of equality any requests by other States Parties to the Treaty to be afforded an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by those States. The nature of such an opportunity for observation and the conditions under which it could be afforded shall be determined by agreement between the States concerned. Article XI In order to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States Parties to the Treaty conducting activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, agree to inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of the nature, conduct, locations and results of such activities. On receiving the said information, the Secretary-General of the United Nations should be prepared to disseminate it immediately and effectively. /...A/48/305 English Page 101 Article XII All stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on a basis of reciprocity. Such representatives shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited. Article XIII The provisions of this Treaty shall apply to the activities of States Parties to the Treaty in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by a single State Party to the Treaty or jointly with other States, including cases where they are carried on within the framework of international intergovernmental organizations. Any practical questions arising in connection with activities carried on by international intergovernmental organizations in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be resolved by the States Parties to the Treaty either with the appropriate international organization or with one or more States members of that international organizations which are Parties to this Treaty. Article XIV 1. This Treaty shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Treaty before its entry into force, in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article, may accede to it at any time. 2. This Treaty shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments. 3. This Treaty shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments, including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Treaty. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Treaty, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of an accession to this Treaty, the date of its entry into force and other notices. /...A/48/305 English Page 102 6. This Treaty shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article XV Any State Party to the Treaty may propose amendments to this Treaty. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Treaty accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Treaty and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Treaty on the date of acceptance by it. Article XVI Any State Party to the Treaty may give notice of its withdrawal from the Treaty one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XVII This Treaty, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Treaty shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Treaty. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, the twenty-seventh day of January, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven. /...A/48/305 English Page 103 APPENDIX II Guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures and for the implementation of such measures on a global or regional level a/The Commission has elaborated the subsequent guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures for the consideration of the General Assembly at its forty-first session, in keeping with resolution 39/63 E of 12 December 1984. The text of the guidelines is agreed on all counts. The Commission wishes to draw particular attention to paragraph 1.2.5 of the guidelines, where it is emphasized that the accumulation of relevant experience with confidence-building measures may necessitate the further development of the text at a later time, should the General Assembly so decide. In elaborating the guidelines, all delegations were aware, notwithstanding the high significance and role of confidence-building measures, of the primary importance of disarmament measures and the singular contribution only disarmament can make to the prevention of war, in particular nuclear war. Some delegations would have wished to see the criteria and characteristics of a regional approach to confidence-building measures spelt out in greater detail. 1. General considerations 1.1 Frame of reference 1.1.1 The present guidelines for confidence-building measures have been drafted by the Disarmament Commission in pursuance of resolution 37/1OO D adopted by consensus by the General Assembly, in which the Disarmament Commission was requested "to consider the elaboration of guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures and for the implementation of such measures on a global or regional level" and of resolutions 38/73 A and 39/63 E, in which it was asked to continue and to conclude its work, and was further requested to submit to the Assembly at its forty-first session a report containing such guidelines. 1.1.2 In elaborating the guidelines the Disarmament Commission took into account, inter alia, the following United Nations documents: the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session of the General Assembly, the first special session devoted to disarmament (resolution S-10/2); the relevant resolutions adopted by consensus by the General Assembly (resolutions 34/87 B, 35/156 B, 36/57 F, 37/1OO D and 38/73); the replies received from Governments informing the Secretary-General of their views and experiences regarding confidence-building measures; b/the Comprehensive Study on Confidence-building Measures c/by a Group of Governmental Experts; the proposals made by individual countries at the twelfth special session of /...A/48/305 English Page 104 the General Assembly; d/the second special session devoted to disarmament, as well as the views of delegations as expressed during the annual sessions of the Disarmament Commission in 1983, 1984 and 1986 and reflected in the relevant documents of those sessions. 1.2 General political context 1.2.1 These guidelines have been elaborated at a time when it is universally felt that efforts to heighten confidence among States are particularly pertinent and necessary. There is a common concern about the deterioration of the international situation, the continuous recourse to the threat or use of force and the further escalation of the international arms build-up, with the concomitant rise in instabilities, political tensions and in mistrust, and the heightened perception of the danger of war, both conventional and nuclear. At the same time, there is a growing awareness of the unacceptability of war in our time, and of the interdependence of the security of all States. 1.2.2 This situation calls for every effort by the international community to take urgent action for the prevention of war, in particular nuclear war -in the language of the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session, a threat whose removal is the most acute and urgent task of the present day -and for concrete measures of disarmament -to prevent an arms race in space and to terminate it on Earth, to limit, reduce and eventually eliminate nuclear arms and enhance strategic stability -but also for efforts to reduce political confrontation and to establish stable and cooperative relationships in all fields of international relations. 1.2.3 In this context, a confidence-building process embracing all these fields has become increasingly important. Confidencebuilldin measures, especially when applied in a comprehensive manner, have a potential to contribute significantly to the enhancement of peace and security and to promote and facilitate the attainment of disarmament measures. 1.2.4 This potential is at present already being explored in some regions and subregions of the world, where the States concerned -while remaining mindful of the need for global action and for disarmament measures -are joining forces to contribute, by the elaboration and implementation of confidence-building measures, to more stable relations and greater security, as well as the elimination of outside intervention and enhanced cooperation in their areas. The present guidelines have been drafted with these significant experiences in mind, but they also purport to provide further support to these and other endeavours on the regional and /...A/48/305 English Page 105 global level. They do not, of course, exclude the simultaneous application of other security-enhancing measures. 1.2.5 These guidelines are part of a dynamic process over time. While they are designed to contribute to a greater usefulness and wider application of confidence-building measures, the accumulation of relevant experience may, in turn, necessitate the further development of the guidelines at a later time, should the General Assembly so decide. 1.3 Delimitation of the subject 1.3.1 Confidence-building measures and disarmament 1.3.1.1 Confidence-building measures must be neither a substitute nor a precondition for disarmament measures nor divert attention from them. Yet their potential for creating favourable conditions for progress in this field should be fully utilized in all regions of the world, in so far as they may facilitate and do not impair in any way the adoption of disarmament measures. 1.3.1.2 Effective disarmament and arms limitation measures which directly limit or reduce military potential have particularly high confidence-building value and, among these measures, those relating to nuclear disarmament as especially conducive to confidence-building. 1.3.1.3 The provisions of the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session relating to disarmament, particularly nuclear disarmament, also have a high confidencebuilldin value. 1.3.1.4 Confidence-building measures may be worked out and implemented independently in order to contribute to the creation of favourable conditions for the adoption of additional disarmament measures, or, no less important, as collateral measures in connection with specific measures of arms limitation and disarmament. 1.3.2 Scope of confidence-building measures: military and non-military measures 1.3.2.1 Confidence reflects a set of interrelated factors of a military as well as of a non-military character, and a plurality of approaches is needed to overcome fear, apprehension and mistrust between States and to replace them by confidence. 1.3.2.2 Since confidence relates to a wide spectrum of activities in the interaction among States, a comprehensive approach is indispensable and /...A/48/305 English Page 106 confidence-building is necessary in the political, military, economic, social, humanitarian and cultural fields. These should include removal of political tensions, progress towards disarmament, reshaping of the world economic system and the elimination of racial discrimination, of any form of hegemony and domination and of foreign occupation. It is important that in all these areas the confidence-building process should contribute to diminishing mistrust and enhancing trust among States by reducing and eventually eliminating potential causes for misunderstanding, misinterpretation and miscalculation. 1.3.2.3 Notwithstanding the need for such a broad confidencebuilldin process, and in accordance with the mandate of the Disarmament Commission, the main focus of the present guidelines for confidence-building measures relates to the military and security field, and the guidelines derive their specificity from these aspects. 1.3.2.4 In many regions of the world economic and other phenomena touch upon the security of a country with such immediacy that they cannot be disassociated from defence and military matters. Concrete measures of a non-military nature that are directly relevant to the national security and survival of States are therefore fully within the focus of the guidelines. In such cases military and non-military measures are complementary and reinforce each other’s confidencebuilldin value. 1.3.2.5 The appropriate mixture of different types of concrete measures should be determined for each region, depending on the perception of security and of the nature and levels of existing threats, by the countries of the regions themselves. 2. Guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures and for their implementation 2.1 Principles 2.1.1 Strict adherence to the Charter of the United Nations and fulfilment of the commitments contained in the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session of the General Assembly (resolution S-10/2), the validity of which had been unanimously and categorically reaffirmed by all Member States at the Twelfth Special Session of the General Assembly, the second special session devoted to disarmament, make a contribution of overriding importance for the preservation of peace and for /...A/48/305 English Page 107 ensuring the survival of mankind and the realization of general and complete disarmament under effective international control. 2.1.2 In particular, and as a prerequisite for enhancing confidence among States, the following principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations must be strictly observed: (a) Refraining from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State; (b) Non-intervention and non-interference in the internal affairs of States; (c) Peaceful settlement of disputes; (d) Sovereign equality of States and self-determination of peoples. 2.1.3 The strict observance of the principles and priorities of the Final Document of the Tenth Special Session is of particular importance for enhancing confidence among States. 2.2 Objectives 2.2.1 The ultimate goal of confidence-building measures is to strengthen international peace and security and to contribute to the prevention of all wars, in particular nuclear war. 2.2.2 Confidence-building measures are to contribute to the creation of favourable conditions for the peaceful settlement of existing international problems and disputes and for the improvement and promotion of international relations based on justice, cooperation and solidarity; and to facilitate the solution of any situation which might lead to international friction. 2.2.3 A major goal of confidence-building measures is the realization of universally recognized principles, particularly those contained in the Charter of the United Nations. 2.2.4 By helping to create a climate in which the momentum towards a competitive arms build-up can be reduced and in which the importance of the military element is gradually diminished, confidence-building measures should in particular facilitate and promote the process of arms limitation and disarmament. 2.2.5 A major objective is to reduce or even eliminate the causes of mistrust, fear, misunderstanding and miscalculation with regard to relevant military activities and intentions of other States, factors which may generate the perception of an impaired /...A/48/305 English Page 108 security and provide justification for the continuation of the global and regional arms build-up. 2.2.6 A centrally important task of confidence-building measures is to reduce the dangers of misunderstanding or miscalculation of military activities, to help to prevent military confrontation as well as covert preparations for the commencement of a war, to reduce the risk of surprise attacks and of the outbreak of war by accident; and thereby, finally, to give effect and concrete expression to the solemn pledge of all nations to refrain from the threat or use of force in all its forms and to enhance security and stability. 2.2.7 Given the enhanced awareness of the importance of compliance, confidence-building measures may serve the additional objective of facilitating verification of arms limitation and disarmament agreements. In addition, strict compliance with obligations and commitments in the field of disarmament and cooperation in the elaboration and implementation of adequate measures to ensure the verification of such compliance -satisfactory to all parties concerned and determined by the purposes, scope and nature of the relevant agreement -have a considerable confidencebuilldin effect of their own. Confidence-building measures cannot, however, supersede verification measures, which are an important element in arms limitation and disarmament agreements. 2.3 Characteristics 2.3.1 Confidence in international relations is based on the belief in the cooperative disposition of other States. Confidence will increase to the extent that the conduct of States, over time, indicates their willingness to practice non-aggressive and cooperative behaviour. 2.3.2 Confidence-building requires a consensus of the States participating in the process. States must therefore decide freely and in the exercise of their sovereignty whether a confidence-building process is to be initiated and, if so, which measures are to be taken and how the process is to be pursued. 2.3.3 Confidence-building is a step-by-step process of taking all concrete and effective measures which express political commitments and are of military significance and which are designed to make progress in strengthening confidence and security to lessen tension and assist in arms limitation and disarmament. At each stage of this process States must be able to measure and assess the results achieved. Verification of/...A/48/305 English Page 109 compliance with agreed provisions should be a continuing process. 2.3.4 Political commitments taken together with concrete measures giving expression and effect to those commitments are important instruments for confidence-building. 2.3.5 Exchange or provision of relevant information on armed forces and armaments, as well as on pertinent military activities, plays an important role in the process of arms limitation and disarmament and of confidence-building. Such an exchange or provision could promote trust among States and reduce the occurrence of dangerous misconceptions about the intentions of States. Exchange or provision of information in the field of arms limitation, disarmament and confidence-building should be appropriately verifiable as provided for in respective arrangements, agreements or treaties. 2.3.6 A detailed universal model being obviously impractical, confidence-building measures must be tailored to specific situations. The effectiveness of a concrete measure will increase the more it is adjusted to the specific perceptions of threat or the confidence requirements of a given situation or a particular region. 2.3.7 If the circumstances of a particular situation and the principle of undiminished security allow, confidence-building measures could, within a step-by-step process where desirable and appropriate, go further and (though not by themselves capable of diminishing military potentials) limit available military options. /...A/48/305 English Page 110 2.4 Implementation 2.4.1 In order to optimize the implementation of confidence-building measures, States taking, or agreeing to, such measures should carefully analyse, and identify with the highest possible degree of clarity, the factors which favourably or adversely affect confidence in a specific situation. 2.4.2 Since States must be able to examine and assess the implementation of, and to ensure compliance with, a confidencebuilldin arrangement, it is indispensable that the details of the established confidence-building measures should be defined precisely and clearly. 2.4.3 Misconceptions and prejudices, which may have developed over an extended period of time, cannot be overcome by a single application of confidence-building measures. The seriousness, credibility and reliability of a State’s commitment to confidence-building, without which the confidence-building process cannot be successful, can be demonstrated only by consistent implementation over time. 2.4.4 The implementation of confidence-building measures should take place in such a manner as to ensure the right of each State to undiminished security, guaranteeing that no individual State or group of States obtains advantages over others at any stage of the confidence-building process. 2.4.5 The building of confidence is a dynamic process: experience and trust gained from the implementation of early largely voluntary and militarily less significant measures can facilitate agreement on further and more far-reaching measures. The pace of the implementation process both in terms of timing and scope of desirable measures depends on prevailing circumstances. Confidence-building measures should be as substantial as possible and effected as rapidly as possible. While in a specific situation the implementation of farreacchin arrangements at an early stage might be attainable, it would normally appear that a gradual step-by-step process is necessary. 2.4.6 Obligations undertaken in agreements on confidence-building measures must be fulfilled in good faith. 2.4.7 Confidence-building measures should be implemented on the global as well as on regional levels. Regional and global approaches are not contradictory, but rather complementary and interrelated. In view of the interaction between global and regional events, progress on one level contributes to advancement on the other level; however, one is not a pre-condition for the other. /...A/48/305 English Page 111 In considering the introduction of confidence-building measures in particular regions, the specific political, military and other conditions prevailing in the region should be fully taken into account. Confidence-building measures in a regional context should be adopted on the initiative and with the agreement of the States of the region concerned. 2.4.8 Confidence-building measures can be adopted in various forms. They can be agreed upon with the intention of creating legally binding obligations, in which case they represent international treaty law among parties. They can, however, also be agreed upon through politically binding commitments. Evolution of politically binding confidence-building measures into obligations under international law can also be envisaged. 2.4.9 For the assessment of progress in the implementing action of confidence-building measures, States should, to the extent possible and where appropriate, provide for procedures and mechanisms for review and evaluation. Where possible, timefraame could be agreed to facilitate this assessment in both quantitative and qualitative terms. 2.5 Development, prospects and opportunities 2.5.1 A very important qualitative step in enhancing the credibility and reliability of the confidence-building process may consist in strengthening the degree of commitment with which the various confidence-building measures are to be implemented; this, it should be recalled, is also applicable to the implementation of commitments undertaken in the field of disarmament. Voluntary and unilateral measures should, as early as appropriate, be developed into mutual, balanced and politically binding provisions and, if appropriate, into legally binding obligations. 2.5.2 The nature of a confidence-building measure may gradually be enhanced to the extent that its general acceptance as the correct pattern of behaviour grows. As a result, the consistent and uniform implementation of a politically binding confidence-building measure over a substantial period of time, together with the requisite opinio iuris, may lead to the development of an obligation under customary international law. In this way, the process of confidence-building may gradually contribute to the formation of new norms of international law. 2.5.3 Statements of intent and declarations, which in themselves contain no obligation to take specific measures, but have the potential to contribute favourably to an atmosphere of greater mutual trust, should be developed further by more concrete agreements on specific measures. 2.5.4 Opportunities for the introduction of confidence-building measures are manifold. The following compilation of some of/...A/48/305 English Page 112 the main possibilities may be of assistance to States wishing to define what might present a suitable opportunity for action. 2.5.4.1 A particular need for confidence-building measures exists at times of political tension and crises, where appropriate measures can have a very important stabilizing effect. 2.5.4.2 Negotiations on arms limitation and disarmament can offer a particularly important opportunity to agree on confidence-building measures. As integral parts of an agreement itself or by way of supplementary agreements, they can have a beneficial effect on the parties’ ability to achieve the purposes and goals of their particular negotiations and agreements by creating a climate of cooperation and understanding, by facilitating adequate provisions for verification acceptable to all the States concerned and corresponding to the nature, scope and purpose of the agreement, and by fostering reliable and credible implementation. 2.5.4.3 A particular opportunity might arise upon the introduction of peace-keeping forces, in accordance with the purposes of the United Nations Charter, into a region or on the cessation of hostilities between States. 2.5.4.4 Review conferences of arms limitation agreements might also provide an opportunity to consider confidencebuilldin measures, provided those measures are in no way detrimental to the purposes of the agreements; the criteria of such action to be agreed upon by the parties to the agreements. 2.5.4.5 Many opportunities exist in conjunction with agreements among States in other areas of their relations, such as the political, economic, social and cultural fields, for example in the case of joint development projects, especially in frontier areas. 2.5.4.6 Confidence-building measures, or at least a statement of intent to develop them in the future, could also be included in any other form of political declaration on goals shared by two or more States. 2.5.4.7 Since it is especially the multilateral approach to international security and disarmament issues which enhances international confidence, the United Nations can contribute to increasing confidence by playing its central role in the field of international peace, security and disarmament. Organs of the United Nations and other international organizations could/...A/48/305 English Page 113 participate in encouraging the process of confidencebuillding as appropriate. In particular the General Assembly and the Security Council -their tasks in the field of disarmament proper notwithstanding -can further this process by adopting decisions and recommendations containing suggestions and requests to States to agree on and implement confidence-building measures. The Secretary-General, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, could also contribute significantly to the process of confidencebuilldin by suggesting specific confidence-building measures or by providing his good offices, particularly at times of crises, in promoting the establishment of certain confidence-building procedures. 2.5.4.8 In accordance with item IX of its established agenda -the so-called dialogue -and without prejudice to its negotiating role in all areas of its agenda, the Conference on Disarmament could identify and develop confidence-building measures in relation to agreements on disarmament and arms limitation under negotiation in the Conference. /...A/48/305 English Page 114 Notes a/Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifteenth Special Session, Supplement No. 3 (A/S-15/3), pp. 21-32. b/A/34/416 and Add.1-3; A/35/397. c/United Nations publication, Sales No. E.82.IX.3. d/See A/S-12/AC.1/59. /...A/48/305 English Page 115 APPENDIX III Status of multilateral treaties relating to activities in outer space a/TREATIES TITLE PTBT Partial Test Ban Treaty (1963) OST Outer Space Treaty (1967) ARRA Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space (1968) Lib. Conv. Liability Convention (1972) Regis. Con. Registration Convention (1975) ITU International Telecommunication Convention (1992) b/ENMOD Conv. Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques (1977) Moon Agr. Moon Agreement (1979) ABBREVIATIONS a Ratification, accession, succession (no reservations, clarifications or statements) b Signature; no ratification c Declaration of acceptance /...A/48/305 English Page 116 Status of multilateral treaties relating to activities in outer space Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Afghanistan a a b a Albania a a b Algeria b b b a Antigua and Barbuda a a a a a a Argentina a a a a b b a Australia a a a a a b a a Austria a a a b a b a a Bahamas a a a b Bahrain b Bangladesh a a a Barbados a a b Belgium a a a a a b Benin a a a b a Bhutan a b Bolivia a b b b Botswana a b a a b Brazil a a a a b a Brunei Darussalam b /...A/48/305 English Page 117 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Bulgaria a a a a a b a Burkina Faso b a b Burundi b b b b b Belarus a a a a a b Cambodia b Cameroon b b a b Canada a a a a a b a Cape Verde a b a Central African Republic a b b b Chad a b Chile a a a a a b a China a a a a b Colombia a b b b b Comoros b Costa Rica a b b Côte d’Ivoire a b Croatia b Cuba a a a a b a Cyprus a a a a a b a Czech and Slovak Federal Republic c/a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 118 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Democratic People’s Republic of Korea b a Denmark a a a a a b a Djibouti b Dominican Republic a a b a Ecuador a a a a Egypt a a a b b a El Salvador a a a b b Equatorial Guinea a a Estonia b Ethiopia b b b b Fiji a a a a b Finland a a a a b a France a a a a b b Gabon a a a b Gambia a b a b b Germany a a a a a b a Ghana a b b b b a Greece a a a a b a Grenada b Guatemala a b a b /...A/48/305 English Page 119 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Guinea b Guinea-Bissau a a a Guyana b a Haiti b b b b Holy See b b b Honduras a b b b Hungary a a a a a b a Iceland a a a b b a India a a a a a b a b Indonesia a b b Iran, Islamic Republic of a b a a b b b Iraq a a a a b Ireland a a a a b a Israel a a a a b Italy a a a a b a Jamaica a a b b Japan a a a a a b a Jordan a b b b b Kenya a a a b Kuwait a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 120 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Laos a a a a a Latvia b Lebanon a a a b b b Lesotho b b b Liberia a b b Libyan Arab Jamahiriya a a Liechtenstein a b Lithuania b Luxembourg a b b a b b Madagascar a a a b Malawi a b a Malaysia a b b b Maldives a Mali b a a b Malta a b a b Mauritania a b Mauritius a a Mexico a a a a a b a Monaco b b Mongolia a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 121 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Morocco a a a a b b b Myanmar a a b b Nepal a a a b b Netherlands a a a a a b a a New Zealand a a a a b a Nicaragua a b b b b b Niger a a a a a b Nigeria a a a b Norway a a a b b a Oman b b Pakistan a a a a a b a a Panama a b a b Papua New Guinea a a a a b a Paraguay b a Peru a a a b a b Philippines a b b b b a Poland a a a a a b a Portugal b a b b Qatar b Republic of Korea a a a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 122 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Republic of Moldova b Romania a a a a b a b Russian Federation a a a a a b a Rwanda a b b b San Marino a a a b Sao Tome and Principe a Saudi Arabia a a b Senegal a b a b Seychelles a a a a a Sierra Leone a a b b b Singapore a a a a b b Slovenia b Solomon Islands a Somalia b b b South Africa a a a b Spain a a a a b a Sri Lanka a a a b a Sudan a b Suriname b Swaziland a a b /...A/48/305 English Page 123 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Sweden a a a a a b a Switzerland a a a a a b a Syrian Arab Republic a a a a b b Thailand a a a b Togo a a a Tonga a a a Trinidad and Tobago a b Tunisia a a a a b a Turkey a a b b b Uganda a a b Ukraine a a a a a b a United Arab Emirates b United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland a a a a a b a United Republic of Tanzania a b b United States of America a a a a a b a Uruguay a a a a a b a Venezuela a a b a b Viet Nam a b a Western Samoa a Yemen a a a b a /...A/48/305 English Page 124 Entity PTBT OST ARRA Liab. Conv. Regis. Conv. ITU Conv. ENMOD Conv. Moon Agr. Yugoslavia a b a a a Zaire a b b b b Zambia a a a a b Zimbabwe b Organizations European Space Agency c c c European Telecommunication Satellite Organization c a/Signatories and Parties as of 1 January 1993. b/The States Parties listed in the table are those which have signed the Constitution and Convention of the International Telecommunication Union (Geneva, 1992). The Nairobi Convention (1982), which is still in force, has 128 States Parties. The Nice Constitution and Convention were ratified or accepted only by 22 States. c/As of 1 January 1993, two independent countries were named the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic. /...A/48/305 English Page 125 Selected bibliography on technical, political and legal aspects of outer space activities Note by the Secretariat 1. In the course of the discussion of the Group of Governmental Experts to Carry Out a Study on the Application of Confidence-Building Measures in Outer Space, the Secretariat was asked to provide an illustrative bibliography on technical and legal aspects of outer space activities to serve as a preliminary listing of source materials and as a first step in a process of data collection. 2. There is already a large quantity of published materials on the subject of outer space and the number is growing rapidly. While every effort has been made to present a bibliographical selection that is representative of various viewpoints on the subject, this survey should not be considered as an exhaustive listing of the publications available on the issue of outer space technology and legal aspects of States’ activities in outer space. In particular, this preliminary listing does not adequately reflect materials published in languages other than English. 3. The views expressed by the various authors in the publications listed in the present document are solely their own. Inclusion in this select bibliographical listing does not convey any endorsement of the contents of the publications. /...A/48/305 English Page 126 1. Articles Adams, Peter, "New group to examine proliferation of satellites", EW Technology, Defense News, 5 February 1990, p. 33. Adams, Peter, "U.S., Soviets edge closer to rewritten ABM Treaty at defense and space talks", Defense News, 21 August 1989. "Administration sets policy on Landsat continuity", LANDSAT DATA USERS’ NOTES, Earth Observation Satellite Company, vol. 7, No. 1, Spring 1992, p. 4. "Advanced missile warning satellite evolved from smaller spacecraft", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 January 1989, p. 45. "AF Weapons Laboratory examines laser ASAT questions", SDI Monitor, 14 September 1990, pp. 209-211. Aftergood, Steve, David W. Hafemeister, Oleg F. Prilutsky, Joel R. Primack and Stanislav N. Rodionov, "Nuclear power in space", Scientific American, June 1991, vol. 264, No. 6, pp. 42-47. "Air Force wants to update spacetrack", Electronics, 6 January 1977, p. 34. "Allied milspace", Military Space, 19 November 1990, p. 5. "Allies, US explore space cooperation", Military Space, 19 November 1990, pp. 1-3. Anson, Peter, "The Skynet Telecommunication Programme", Colloque Activités Spaciales Militaires (Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989), pp. 143-159. Anthony, Ian (ed.), "The Co-ordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls", Arms Export Regulations (Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991), pp. 207-211. , "The missile technology control regime", Arms Export Regulations (Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991), pp. 219-227. "Argentina develops Condor solid-propellant rocket", Aviation Week and Space Technology, June 1985, p. 61. Asker, James R., "U.S. draws blueprints for first lunar base", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 31 August 1992, pp. 47-51. Aubay, P. H., J. B. Nocaudie, "Surveillance terrestre", Colloque Activités Spaciales Militaires (Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989), pp. 143-159. "Australian-Asian cooperation increases in telecommunications", Space Policy, vol. 8, 1 February 1992, p. 96. /...A/48/305 English Page 127 "Australian defence may launch own satellite", C and C Space and Satellite Newsletter, 8 June 1990, pp. 1-2. "Avco puts together laser radar for strategic defense", Space News, 30 July 1990. Ball, Desmond, Australia’s Secret Space Programmes, Canberra Paper on Strategy and Defence No. 43 (Canberra, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, 1988), 103 pp.and Helen Wilson (eds.), Australia and Space (Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992). Badurkin, V., "Mukachev radar facility prompts local protests", FBIS-Sov, 7 March 1990, pp. 2-3. Bates, Kelly, "SDIO’s Cooper says U.S. could deploy strategic defense system for $40 billion", Inside the Pentagon, 20 December 1990, pp. 10-11. Beatty, J. Kelly, "The GEODSS difference", Sky and Telescope, May 1982, pp. 469-473. Bennet, Ralph, "Brilliant pebbles", Reader’s Digest, September 1989, pp. 128-132. Bernard Raab, "Nuclear-powered infrared surveillance satellite study", Inter-Society Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 1977, Fairchild Space and Electronics Company, Germantown, Maryland. Bertotti, Bruno and Luciano Anselmo, The Problem of Debris and Military Activities in Space, Permanent Representative of Italy, Conference on Disarmament, 6 August 1991. Beusch, J., et al, "NASA debris environment characterization with the haystack radar", AIAA Paper 90-1346, 16 April 1990. Bhatia, A., "India’s space program -cause for concern?", Asian Survey, October 1985, p. 1017. Bhatt, S., "Space law in the 1990s", International Studies, vol. 26, No. 4, October 1989, pp. 323-335. Bobb, Dilip and Amarnath K. Menon, "Chariot of fire", India Today, 15 June 1989, pp. 28-32. Bosco, Joseph A., "International law regarding outer space -an overview", Journal of Air Law and Commerce, Spring 1990, pp. 609-651. Boulden, Jane, "Phase I of the Strategic Defense Initiative: current issues, arms control and Canadian national security", Issue Brief, Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, No. 12, August 1990. /...A/48/305 English Page 128 Bourely, Michael G., "La production du lanceur Ariane", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi 1981, pp. 279-314. Brankli, Hank, "Weather satellite photos and the Vietnam War", Naval History, Spring 1991, pp. 66-68. "Brazil plans to launch its own satellites in the 1990s", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 July 1984, p. 60. "Brazil’s space age begins", Interavia, December 1984, No. 12. "Brazil -aiming for self-sufficiency in orbit", Space World, October 1985, p. 29. Brooks, Charles D., "S.D.I.: a new dimension for Israel", Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, 11(4), Winter 1986, pp. 341-348. "Canada studies PAXSATS for arms control", Military Space, 31 August 1987, pp. 1-3. Chandrashekar, S., "An assessment of Pakistan’s missile programme", Unpublished, 1992. __________, "Export controls and proliferation: an Indian perspective, Forthcoming, 1992. __________, "Missile technology control and the Third World", Space Policy, November 1990, pp. 278-284. Charles, Dan, "Spy satellites: entering a new era", Science, 24 March 1989, pp. 1541-1543. Chayes and Chayes, "Testing and development of ’exotic’ systems under the ABM Treaty: the great reinterpretations caper", Harvard Law Review, No. 1956, 1986. Chen, Yanping, "China’s space policy: a historical review", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, pp. 116-128. Chen, Zhiqiang, "Sun Jiadong talking about China’s space technology", Military World, Jan./Feb. 1990, pp. 34-38. "China/Brazil space talks", Aerospace Daily, 10 August 1987, p. 219. Chosh, S. K., "India’s space program and its military implications", Agence Defence Journal, September 1981. Cleminson, Frank R. and Pericles Gasparini Alves, "Space weapon verification: a brief appraisal", Verification of Disarmament or Limitation of Armaments: Instruments, Negotiations, Proposals, Serge Sur (ed.) UNIDIR, New York, 1992, pp. 177-206. /...A/48/305 English Page 129 _________, "PAXSAT and progress in arms control", Space Policy, May 1988, pp. 97-102. Clark, Phillip, "Soviet worldwide ELINT satellites", Jane’s Soviet Intelligence Review, July 1990, pp. 330-332. Cohen, William S., "Limited defences under a modified ABM Treaty", Disarmament, vol. XV, No. 1, 1992, pp. 13-27. Condom, P., "Brazil aims for self-sufficiency in space", Interavia, January 1984, No. 1, pp. 99-101. Corradini, Alessandro, "Consideration of the question of international arms transfer by the United Nations", by Transparency in international transfers, Disarmament Topical Paper 3, United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs, New York: United Nations publication, 1990. Couston, M., "Vers un droit des stations spatiales", Revue française du droit aerien et spatial, 1990, No. 1. Covault, Craig, "New missile warning satellite to be launched on the first Titan 4", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 January 1989, pp. 34-40. __________, "USAF missile warning satellites providing 90-sec. Scud attack alert", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 January 1990, pp. 60-61. __________, "Soviet military space operations developing longer life satellites", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 April 1990, pp. 44-49. __________, "Maui optical station photographs external tank reentry breakup", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 June 1990, pp. 52-53. __________, "Russia seeks joint space test to build military cooperation", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 March 1992, pp. 18-19. "Congress splits on milspace budget", Military Space, 25 September 1989, p. 2. Cox, David, et al, "Security cooperation in the Arctic: a Canadian response to Murmansk", Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 24 October 1989. "Crisis shows need for better tactical satellite communications", Aerospace Daily, 31 January 1991, p. 174. Daly, P., "GLONASS status", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 September 1987, p. 108. Danchik, Robert, et al, "The Navy navigation satellite system (TRANSIT)", Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest, vol. 11, Nos. 1 and 2, 1990, pp. 97-101. de Briganti, Giovanni, "West Germany reverses stance on reconnaissance satellites", Space News, 9 April 1990. /...A/48/305 English Page 130 __________, "Budget reveals slower growth for military space programs", Defense News, 3 December 1990, p. 14. de Selding, Peter, "Defense minister says no to French radar spy satellite", Space News, 12 March 1990. __________, "UK Minister balks at call for European spy satellite", Space News, 16 July 1990, pp. 1, 20. DeVere, G. T. and N. L. Johnson, "The NORAD space network", Spaceflight, July 1985, vol. 27, pp. 306-309. Domke, M., "Kostendämpfungsstrategie: integration ziviler und militärischer produktion neuer technologien", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft und Frieden, 4/1991, pp. 26-31. Du, Shuhua, "The outer space and the moon treaties", Verification of current disarmament and arms limitation agreements: ways, means and practices, UNIDIR, New York: United Nations Publication, 1991. Dudney, Robert S., "The force forms up", Air Force Magazine, February 1992, p. 23. "European space industry eyes spy sats", Military Space, 23 April 1990, pp. 5-6. "Expert says no blessing for SDI deployment", FBIS-SOV, 91-023, 21 October 1991, p. 1. "Experts map out European satellite plan", Military Space, 9 April 1990, p. 7. Falkenheim, Peggy L., "Japan and arms control: Tokyo’s response to SDI and INF", Aurora Papers, No. 6, Ontario: The Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 1987. Finney, A. T., "Tactical uses of the DSCS III communications system", in NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium 16-19 October 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Foley, Theresa, "Raytheon proposes rail-mobile radar for midcourse SDI sensing", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 January 1988, pp. 22-24. "French milspace", Military Space, 5 December 1988, p. 5. "Foreign milspace", Military Space, 28 January 1991, p. 4. "French study military recon satellite", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 January 1973, p. 15. Furniss, Tim, "UK studies new military satellite plan", Flight International, 7 October 1989, p. 4. /...A/48/305 English Page 131 __________, "Iraq plans to launch two science satellites", Flight International, 21 February 1990, p. 20. Fujita Yasuki, "Recent developments in the peaceful utilization of space", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, March 1992, p. 1. "Gadhafi: Libya needs space power", Space News, 25 June 1990, p. 2. "General Dynamics wins MLV II competition", Aerospace Daily, 4 May 1988, p. 185.6. George, E. V., "Diffraction-limited imaging of Earth satellites", Energy and Technology Review, August 1991, p. 29. Gettins, Hal, "Shepherd touching off interservice row", Missiles and Rockets, 7 March 1960, pp. 21-28. Gilmartin, Trish, "Pentagon Advisory Panel Chairman urges gradual evolutionary approach to SDI", Defense News, 25 July 1988, p. 30. Goldblat, Josef, "The ENMOD Convention Review Conference", Disarmament, vol. VII, No. 2, Summer 1984, pp. 93-102. Goure, D., "Soviet radars: the eyes of Soviet defenses", Military Technology, 1988, n. 5, pp. 36-38. Graham, C. P., "Brazilian space programme -an overview", Space Policy, February 1991, pp. 72-76. Granger, Ken, Geographic information and remote sensing technologies in the defence of Australia, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Green, David, "UK space policy -a problem of culture", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, November 1987, pp. 277-279. Grossman, Elaine, "Small and light ’Brilliant Eyes’ could replace three SDI surveillance systems", Inside the Army, 28 May 1990, p. 15. Gullikstad, Espen, "Finland", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991, pp. 59-63. __________, "Sweden", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991, pp. 147-155. Halperin, Emmanuel, "Israel et les missiles", Politique internationale, No. 44, 1989, pp. 251-256. He, Changchui, "The development of remote sensing in China", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 1, February 1989, pp. 65-75. /...A/48/305 English Page 132 "Helios to deliver imagery to 3 nations", Military Space, 21 November 1988, pp. 1-3. Henize, Karl, "Tracking artificial satellites and space vehicles", Advances in Space Science (Academic Press, New York, 1960), vol. 2. Howell, Andreas, "The challenge of space surveillance", Sky and Telescope, June, 1987, pp. 584-588. Hua-bao, Lin, "The Chinese recoverable satellite program", 40th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, 7-12 October 1989, Malaga, Spain, IAF-89-426. "Hughes, Martin and Rockwell selected for GBI program", SDI Monitor, 31 August 1990, pp. 197-198. Hughes, Peter C., Satellites harming other satellites, Arms Control Verification Occasional Paper No. 7, Ottawa: Arms Control and Disarmament Division, External Affairs and International Trade, Canada, July 1991. Hurwitz, Bruce A., "Israel and the law of outer space", Israel Law Review, vol. 22, No. 4, Summer-Autumn 1988, pp. 457-466. Iguchi, Chikako, "International cooperation in lunar and space development: Japan’s role", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 256-267. "India’s space policy", Space Policy, November 1987, pp. 326-334. "Indigenous missile", Asian Defense Journal, September 1985. "Industrial view on European space-based verification", Presentation at Dornier, Dornier Deutsche Aerospace, Friedrichshafen, 18 February 1992. "Industry observer", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 June 1977, p. 11. "International space", Military Space, 9 April 1990, p. 5. "Invasion tip", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 6 August 1990, p. 15. "Iraqi space launch more modest than claimed", Flight International, 20 December 1989, p. 4. "Israeli satellite launch sparks concerns about Middle East missile build-up", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 26 September 1988, p. 21. "Israel hints at plans to launch spy satellite", Defense News, 11 March 1991, p. 9. Jackson, P., "Space surveillance satellite catalog maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 April 1990. "Japan plans satellite", Jane’s Defense Weekly, 16 September 1989. /...A/48/305 English Page 133 Jasani, Buphendra, "Military space activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978 (Taylor and Francis, London, 1978). __________, et al, "Share satellite surveillance", The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, March 1990, pp. 15-16. __________ and Larsson, Christer, "Security implications of remote sensing", Space Policy, February 1988, p. 48. Jeambrun, Georges, "La Politique de contrôle des satellites français (1990-2000)", Defense nationale, 43e année, Fevrier 1987, pp. 129-139. Karp, Aaron, "Space technology in the Third World: commercialization and the spread of ballistic missiles", Space Policy, May 1986, pp. 157-168. __________, "Ballistic-missile proliferation in the Third World", in World Armament and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1989, Oxford University Press, pp. 287-318. __________, "Ballistic missile proliferation", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 327-329. Kawachi, Masao, Toyohiko Ishii and Koichi Ijichi, "The Space Flyer Unit", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, March 1992. Kenden, A., "Military maneuvers in synchronous orbit", Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, February 1983, V. 36, pp. 88-91. Kiernan, Vincent, "Air Force begins upgrades to satellite scanning telescope", Space News, 23 July 1990, p. 8. __________, "Air Force alters GPS signals to aid troops", Space News, 24 September 1990, pp. 1, 35. __________, "Officials: changing world heightens demand for Milstar", Space News, 8 October 1990, p. 8. __________, "US Congress slashes Milstar funding, orders shift of system to tactical users", Space News, 22 October 1990, pp. 3, 37. __________, "DMSP satellite launched to aid troops in Middle East", Space News, 10 December 1990, p. 6. __________, "Pentagon prepares for ASAT flight testing in 1996", Space News, 5-18 August 1991, p. 23 Kirton, John, "Canadian space policy", Space Policy, vol. 6, No. 1, February 1990, pp. 61-73. Klass, Philip, "Inmarsat decision pushes GPS to forefront of Civ Nav-Sat field", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 January 1991, pp. 34-35. /...A/48/305 English Page 134 "Krasnoyarsk radar dismantling in full swing", FBIS-Sov, 10 October 1990, p. 1. Kubbing, B. W., "The SDI agreement between Bonn and Washington: review of the first four years", Space Policy, August 1990, pp. 231-247. Langberg, Mike, "Lockheed fights for Milstar as Cold War thaw threatens", San Jose Mercury News, 14 January 1991, pp. 1C, 6C. Lawler, Andrew, "Taiwan seeks start on $400 million plan to enter space arena", Space News, 19 February 1990, pp. 1, 36. Lawler, Andrew, "Brazil chafes at missile curbs", Space News, vol. 2, No. 35, 14-20 October 1991, p. 1, 20. __________, "South Korea plans to build, launch satellites", Space News, 25 June 1990, pp. 1, 20. "Le traité germano-américain sur l’IDS", Bruxelles: GRIP, No. 103, November 1986. Lee, Yishane, "South Korea, Taiwan gear up to enter satellite era", Space News, 24 September 1990, p. 7. Leitenberg, M., "Satellite launchers -and potential ballistic missiles -on the commercial market", Current Research on Peace and Violence, 1981, No. 2, pp. 115-128. Leopold, George, "Canada, US to begin talks on joint space-based radar", Defense News, 26 June 1989, p. 9. "Lessons of the Gulf War", Trust and Verify, No. 18, March 1991, pp. 1-2. "Les satellites d’observation: un instrument européen pour la verification du désarmement", Assemblée de l’Union de l’Europe occidentale, Commission technique et aerospatiale, Colloque, Rome 27, et 28, mars 1990. "Libya offers to finance Brazilian missile project", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 6 February 1988, p. 201. "Libya wants CSS-2", Flight International, 14 May 1988, p. 6. Lindsey, George, "Surveillance from space: a strategic opportunity for Canada", Working Paper 44, Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, June 1992. Liu Ji-yuan and Min Gui-rong, "The progress of astronautics in China", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 2, May 1987, pp. 141-147. "LLNL space imaging tests slated for Maui telescope", Space News, 19 February 1990, p. 12. Lockwood, Dunbar, "Verifying START: from satellites to suspect sites", Arms Control Today, vol. 20, No. 8, October 1990, pp. 13-19. /...A/48/305 English Page 135 Lopes, Roberto, "A satellite deal with Iraq", Space Markets, No. 3, 1989, p. 191. Lygo, Raymond, "The UK’s future in space", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, November 1987, pp. 281-283. "Magnavox prepares for GPS buildup", Military Space, 25 September 1989, pp. 3-5. Mahnken, T. G., "Why Third World space systems matter", Orbis, Fall 1991, S. 563-579. Maitra, Ramtanu, "India’s space program: boosting industry", Fusion, 7(4), July/August 1985, pp. 53-58. Manly, Peter, "Television in amateur astronomy", Astronomy, December 1984, pp. 35-37. Marov, Mikail Ya., "The new challenge for space in Russia", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 269-279. Matte, Nicolas, "The treaty banning nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water (10 October 1963) and peaceful uses of outer space", in Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. IX, 1984, pp. 391-414. McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared astronomy: pixels to spare", Sky and Telescope, July 1991, pp. 31-35. Mehmud, Salim, "Pakistan’s space programme", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 8, August 1989, pp. 217-225. "Meteor 2-20, after being stored on orbit, begins transmission", Aerospace Daily, 19 November 1990, p. 302. Middleton, B. S. and E. F. Cory, "Australian space policy", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 1, February 1989, pp. 41-46. Milhollin, G., "India’s missiles -with a little help from our friends", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, November 1989, pp. 31-35. Monserrat Filho, Jose, "Foguetes proibidos", O Globo, 24, June 1992, p. 6. "MTCR-Update: June-December 1991", Missile Monitor, No. 2, Spring 1992. NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium, 16-19 October 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Naval Space Command, "NAVSPASUR news release", NAVSPASURINST 5780.1, 11 July 1983. "Navy satellites approach critical replacement stage", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 March 1988, pp. 46, 51. /...A/48/305 English Page 136 Norman, Colin, "Cut price plan offered for SDI deployment", Science, 7 October 1988, pp. 24-25. North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD space detection and tracking system", Factsheet, 20 August 1982. Osborne, Freleigh, "PAXSAT space-based remote sensing for arms control verification", IEEE Electro/88, Boston, MA, 10-12 May 1988, Professional Program Session Record 24. "OSD puts USAF space radar plan on hold, OSD studies nonspace options", Inside the Air Force, 7 December 1990, pp. 10-11. Ospina, Sylvia, "Project CONDOR, the Andean regional satellite system -key legal considerations", Space Communication and Broadcasting, 1989, vol. 6, pp. 367-377. "Pakistan steps up its space program", Space World, May 1985, p. 33. Paolini, Jérôme, "French military space policy and European cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 4, No. 3, August 1988, pp. 201-210. "PAXSAT could monitor space arms treaty", Military Space, 14 September 1987, pp. 6-7. Payne, Jay H., "A limited antiballistic missile system", Ohio: Department of the Air Force, Air University, Air Force Institute of Technology, Defense Technical Information Center, 1990, pp. 2.13-2.24. Pederson, Kenneth S., "Thoughts on international space cooperation and interests in the post-Cold War world", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 205-219. Perry, Geoffrey, "Pupil projects involving satellites", Space Education, vol. 1, 1984, p. 320. Piazzano, Piero, "Cosi un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, Mo. 120, Aprile 1991, pp. 16-25. Pike, Gordon, "Chinese launch services: a user’s guide, Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, pp. 103-115. Pike, John, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 49-84. __________, Sarah Lang and Eric Stambler, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, pp. 121-146. Politi, Alessandro, "Italy plans military satellite network for early warning, reconnaissance", Defense News, 7 January 1991, pp. 3, 31. /...A/48/305 English Page 137 "Portuguese balk at US radar, leaving US with blind spot", Space News, 9 October 1989, p. 4. Potter, M., "Swords into ploughshares: missiles into commercial launchers", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, pp. 146-150. Rains, Lon, "Soviets launch first ELINT spy satellite since 1988", Space News, 29 May 1990. Rajan, Y. S., "Benefits from space technology: a view from a developing country", Space Policy, 4(3) August 1988, pp. 221-228. Rankin, Robert, "Iraq still gets US satellite weather photos", The Philadelphia Inquirer, 22 January 1991, p. 9-A. Rennow, Hans-Henrik, "The Information Revolution II: satellites and peace, The World Today, London, June 1989, pp. 97-99. "Requests for proposals -Air Force Space Technology Center", SDI Monitor, 25 May 1990, p. 125. "RFP for two more DSP satellites to be released Jan. 31", Aerospace Daily, 23 January 1991, p. 125. Richelson, J., The U.S. intelligence community (Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, 1985), pp. 140-143. Richelson, Jeffrey, "The future of space reconnaissance", Scientific American, January 1991, pp. 38-44. Richter, Andrew, North American Aerospace Defence Cooperation in the l99Os: Issues and Prospects, Department of National Defense, Canada, Operational Research and Analysis Establishment, Extra-Mural Paper No. 57, July 1991. Risse-Kappen, Thomas, "Star Wars controversy in West Germany", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, vol. 43, No. 6, July/August 1987, pp. 50-52. Rossi, Sergio A., "La politica military spaziale Europea e l’Italia", Afari Esteri, anno XIX, No. 76, autunno 1987, pp. 521-533. Rubin, Uzi, "Iraq and the ballistic missile scare", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 46(8), October 1990, pp. 11-13. Saint-Lager, Olivier de, "L’organisation des activités spatiales françaises: une combinaison dynamique du secteur public et du secteur privé", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi, 1981, pp. 475-487. Salvatori, Nicoletta, "Cosi un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, No. 120, Aprile 1991, pp. 109-121. "Satellite intelligence", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 25 February 1991, p. 13. /...A/48/305 English Page 138 "Satellite trackers bag Soviet space station", Sky and Telescope, December 1987, p. 580. Scheffran, Jiirgen and Aaron Karp, "The national interpretation of the missile technology control regime -the US and German experience", Controlling the Development and Spread of Military Technology: Lessons form the Past and Challenges for the 199Os, Vu University Press, Amsterdam 1992, pp. 235-251. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Verification and risk for an anti-satellite weapons ban", Bulletin of Peace Proposals, vol. 17, No. 2, 1986, pp. 165-173. __________, "Dual use of missile and space technologies", to be published in G. Neuneck, O. Ischebeck, Missile Technologies, Proliferation and Concepts for Arms Control, Hamburg 1992, pp. 1-16. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Startbahn für den weltraumkrieg? -Der ASAT-Test und die Osterinsel", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft & Frieden, No. 4, 1985. Scott, William B. and Stanley W. Kandebo, "NASA-AMES proposal could challenge NASP", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 September 1992, pp. 27-30. "SDI constellation grows in brilliance", Military Space, 14 January 1991, pp. 3-4. "SDIO plans to buy 4600 Brilliant Pebble interceptors", Defense Daily, 13 February 1990, p. 231. "SDIO retools for limited threats", SDI Monitor, 21 December 1990, pp. 281-282. "SDIO works up three limited-strike protection plans", SDI Monitor, 18 January 1991, p. 21. "Secret images for Japan", Aviation Week and Space Technologies, 9 March 1992, p. 11. Shastri, R., "The spread of ballistic missiles and its implications", Strategic Analysis, May 1988, pp. 157-168. "Shuttle-Deployed Syncom IV-5 arrives on station, begins testing", Aerospace Daily, 19 January 1990, p. 110. Simpson, John, Philip Acton and Simon Crowe, "The Israeli satellite launch: capabilities, intentions and implications", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 2, May 1989, pp. 117-128. "Sluggers pinch hit for Army GPS", Military Space, 24 September 1990, pp. 1, 8. Smith, David, "The defense and space talks: moving towards non-nuclear strategic defenses", NATO Review, vol. 28, No. 5, October 1990, pp. 17-21. "South Korea needs to develop spy satellite", Defense Daily, 26 November 1990, p. 312. /...A/48/305 English Page 139 "Soviet Union launches military navigation satellite", Aerospace Daily, 20 September 1990, p. 471. "Soviets announce failure of early warning satellite", Aerospace Daily, 28 June 1990, p. 518. "Soviets confirm Cosmos 1900 difficulties", Aerospace Daily, 16 May 1988, p. 252. "Soviets launch Mir resupply vehicle, two satellites", Aerospace Daily, 2 October 1990, p. 5. "Soviets reject transition to strategic defenses -Hadley", Defense Daily, 22 March 1990, p. 458. "Space surveillance contracts expected", Defense Electronics, June 1984, p. 19. "Space surveillance deemed inadequate", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 June 1980, pp. 249-259. "SSTS cost drivers identified", Military Space, 29 September 1986, p. 3. Sta. Romana, Elpidio R., "Japan, SDI and the Pacific", Foreign Relations, pp. 105-123. Stares, Paul B., "The military uses of space after the Cold War", Australia and Space, Desmond Ball and Helen Wilson (eds.), Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Surikov, Boris, "Krasnoyarsk radar station’s future considered", FBIS-Sov, 27 March 1990, pp. 2-3. "Surveillance system to monitor Soviet ASATs", Defense Electronics, March 1983, p. 16. "Swift development of China’s missiles and space technology: an interview with Mr. Liu Jiyan, Vice-Minister of the Ministry of the Aerospace Industry of China", CONMILIT, vol. 3, No. 182, 1992, pp. 45-52. Taylor, Trevor, "SDI -the British response", Star Wars and European Defence, Hans Günter Brauch (ed.), Houndmills: Macmillian Press, 1987, pp. 129-149. __________, "Britain’s response to the strategic defence initiative", International Affairs, vol. 62, No. 2, Spring 1986, pp. 217-230. Teitelbaum, Sheldon, "Israel and Star Wars: the shape of things to come", New Outlook, vol. 28, No. 5/6, May/June 1985, pp. 59-62. "The JDW Interview", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 9 February 1991, p. 200. "Third World countries are increasing their interest in space", SDI Monitor, 7 December 1990, p. 275. /...A/48/305 English Page 140 Thomas, Paul, "Space traffic surveillance", Space/Aeronautics, November 1967, pp. 75-86. Thomas, Raju G. C., "India’s nuclear and space programs: defence or development?", World Politics, 38(2), January 1986, pp. 315-342. "Transcarpathian Oblast radar project mothballed", FBIS-Sov, 22 August 1990, p. 51. "TRW to develop $33-million USAF space surveillance network", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 May 1978, pp. 24-25. Turner, R., "Brazil says missile technology controls hamper launch industry", Defense News, 24 July 1989, p. 18. Ulsamer, Edgar, "ESD: enhancing effectiveness electronically", Air Force Magazine, July 1978, p. 49. "USAF Asat test advances 1959 aircraft launch data", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 29 August 1983, p. 22. "US increasing coverage of Soviet space launches", Defense Daily, 15 April 1986, p. 251. "U.S. upgrading ground-based sensors", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 June 1980, pp. 239-241. van Reeth, George and Kevin Madders, "Reflections on the quest for international cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, August 1992, pp. 221-231. von Welck, Stephan F., "India space program", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, November 1987, pp. 326-334. Vohra, Ruchita, "Iraq joins the missile club: impact and implications", Strategic Analysis, 13(1), April 1990, pp. 59-68. Weeb, Richard L., "Estimating the life cycle cost of the space exploration initiative", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 1, February 1992. Welk, S. F. von, "The export of space technology: prospects and dangers", Space Policy, August 1987, pp. 221-231. Wells, Damon R. and Daniel E. Hastings, "The US and Japanese space programmes: a comparative study", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 3, August 1991, pp. 233-256. Williamson, Mark, "The UK Parliamentary Space Committee", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 2, May 1992, pp. 159-165. Wilson, A., "Non-US launcher systems for the next decade", Interavia, July 1988, No. 7, p. 687. /...A/48/305 English Page 141 Wood, Lowell, "Concerning advanced architectures for strategic defense", Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Preprint UCRL-98424, 13 March 1988. __________, "Brilliant Pebbles missile defense concept advocated by Livermore scientist", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 13 June 1988, pp. 151-155. Wu, Guoxiang, "China’s space communications goals", Space Policy, vol. 4, No. 1, February 1988, pp. 41-45. Yang, Chunfu, "China’s LONG MARCH series carrier rockerts", Military World, May 1989, pp. 20-25. Zaloga, Steven, Soviet air defence missiles, Jane’s Information Group, Coulsdon, Surrey, 1989, pp. 118-148. Zaloga, Steve, "Soviet radars draw opposition", Armed Forces Journal International, June 1990, p. 21. Zhukov, G. and Y. Kolosov, International Space Law, 1984. Zorpette, Glenn, "Kwajalein’s new role", IEEE Spectrum, March 1989, pp. 64-69. 2. Books, special studies and reports Anti-satellite weapons, countermeasures, and arms control, Office of Technology Assessment, report no. OTA-ISC-281, September 1985. Atlas géographic de l’espace. Sous la direction de Fernand Verger, Sides-Reclus, 1992. Balaschak, M. et al., Assessing the comparability of dual-use technologies for ballistic missile development, Cambridge, M.A.: Center for International Studies, June 1981. Ball, Desmond, A base for debate (Allen and Unwin, London, 1987). Berman, R. P. and J. C. Baker, Soviet strategic forces, Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1982. Birkholz, M. et al., Die Bundesrepublik als Heimlicher Waffenexporteur, Berlin: Arbeitskreis Physik und Rüstung, 1983. Brauch, Hans Günter, Henny J. Van Der Graaf, John Grin and Wim A. Smit (eds.), Controlling the development and spread of military technology: lessons form the past and challenges for the 1990s, Vu University Press, Amsterdam 1992, 406 pp. Bunn, Matthew, Foundation for the future: the ABM treaty and national security, Washington, D.C.: The Arms Control Association, 1990. Carus, W. S., Ballistic missiles in modern conflict, Praeger, 1991. /...A/48/305 English Page 142 Cochran, C. D., D. M. Gorman and J. D. Dumoulin (eds.), Space handbook, Air University Press, January 1985. Cochran, T. B., W. M. Arkin, R. S. Norris and J. I. Sands, Nuclear weapons databook: Soviet nuclear weapons, vol. IV, New York, Harper and Row Publishers, 1989. Colloque: activités spatiales militaires, Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mai 1989, 382 pp. Christol, C., The Modern International Law of Outer Space, 1982. Chayes, Antonia H. and Paul Doty (eds.), Defending deterrence: managing the ABM treaty regime into the 21st century, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Dorn, Walter, Peace-keeping satellites: the case for international surveillance and verification, Dundas, Peace Research Institute, 1989, Peace Research Reviews, 187 pp. Dolye, Stephen, Civil uses of outer space: implications for international security, UNIDIR, New York, 1991. Disarmament: problems related to outer space, UNIDIR, New York, United Nations Publication, 1987, 190 pp. Gasparini Alves, Pericles, Prevention of an arms race in outer space: a guide to discussions at the conference on disarmament, New York: UNIDIR, 1991, 203 pp. Gatland, K., Space technology, New York: Harmony Books, Fourth Edition 1984. Gold, D., SDI -the US Strategic Defense Initiative and the implications of Israel’s participation, Center for Strategic Studies, Tel Aviv, Memorandum No. 16, December 1985. Gummett, P. and J. Reppy (eds.), The Relations between defence and civil technologies, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988. Hecht, J., Beam weapons -the next arms race, Plenum Press, 1984. Hord, R. M., CRC handbook of space technology: status and projections, Boca Raton, Florida, 1985. Huang, Z., Long March launch vehicles in the 1990s, in Sharokhi, F. et al., Space commercialization: launch vehicles and programs, Washington, D.C.: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 1990, pp. 1-6. Jasani, Bhupendra, Space and international security, London, Royal United Services Institute, 70 pp. __________, ed., Peaceful and non-peaceful uses of space: problems of definition for the prevention of an arms race, UNIDIR, 1991. /...A/48/305 English Page 143 __________, Space weapons and international security, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. __________, Outer space-battlefield of the future?, London, Taylor and Francis, 1978. Johnson, Nicholas L. (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs: Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1989. __________ (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs: Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1990. __________ and Darren S. McKnight, Artificial space debris, Malabar: Orbit Book Company, 1987. King-Hele, Desmond, Observing earth satellites (Macmillan, London, 1983). Krige, John, The prehistory of ESRO: 1959/1960, European Space Agency, HSR-1, July 1992. "Le Grandi Esplorazioni nel mondo sopra de noi", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, No. 120, Aprile 1991. Milton, A. Fenner, M. Scott Davis and John A. Parmentola, Making Space Defense Work, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Nolan, Janne E, Trappings of power: ballistic missiles in the Third World, The Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C., 1991, 209 pp. Outer space in the 1990s: the role of arms control, security, technical and legal implications, Proceedings of the Symposium, held on November 11-12-13, 1992. Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canada, 258 pp. Raiten, E. and K. Tsipis, Conventional antisatellite weapons, Program in Science and Technology for International Security, MIT, Cambridge, March 1984. Reijnen, G. C. M. and W. de Graff, The pollution of outer space, in particular of the geostationary orbit, Dordrecht, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989. Richelson, Jeffrey, The U.S. intelligence community, Ballinger, Cambridge, Ma. 1985. __________, America’s secret eyes in space, New York, Harper and Row, 1990. Rudert, R., K. Schichl and S. Seeger, Atomraketen als Entwicklungshilfe, Marburg 1985. Seiler, A., Die Entstehung und Entwicklung von Eureka, Diplomarbeit, Berlin, 1988. /...A/48/305 English Page 144 Sofaer, Abraham D., The ABM Treaty, Part I: treaty language and negotiating history, 11 May 1987. __________, The ABM Treaty, Part II: ratification process, 12 March 1987. __________, The ABM Treaty, Part III: subsequent practice, 9 September 1987. Space Log: 1957-1991, International Space Year, 1992, TRW, 1992. Space-strike arms and international security, Report of the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace Against the Nuclear Threat, Moscow, October 1985. Steinberg, G. M., Satellite reconnaissance: the role of informal bargaining, New York, Praeger, 1982. Space surveillance for arms control and verification: options, proceedings of the symposium held on October 21-23, 1988, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, Montreal, McGill University, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, 1988. Stanyard, Roger, World satellite survey, London, LLoyd’s Aviation Department, 1987. Stares, Paul, The militarization of space: US policy 1945-84, Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1985, p. 117. Sutton, G. P., Rocket propulsion elements, New York, etc., John Wiley, 1986. Swahn, Johan, Open skies for all: the prospects for international satellite surveillance, Gothenburg, Technical Peace Research Unit, January 1989, Chalmers University of Technology, 74 pp. Stutzle, W., B. Jasani and R. Cowen (eds.), The ABM treaty: to defend or not to defend, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. Long, F. A., D. Hafner and J. Boutwell (eds.), Weapons in space, New York, W. W. Norton and Company, 1986. -----NACIONES A UNIDAS Asamblea General Distr. GENERAL A/48/305 15 de octubre de 1993 ESPAÑOL ORIGINAL: INGLES Cuadragésimo octavo período de sesiones Tema 70 del programa PREVENCION DE UNA CARRERA DE ARMAMENTOS EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE Estudio sobre la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre Informe del Secretario General 1. La Asamblea General en su resolución 45/55 B, de 4 de diciembre de 1990, pidió al Secretario General que, con la asistencia de un grupo de expertos de los gobiernos, realizara un estudio sobre aspectos concretos relacionados con la aplicación de distintas medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluidas las distintas tecnologías disponibles y las posibilidades de definir mecanismos apropiados para la cooperación internacional en esferas de interés determinadas, y que le informara al respecto en su cuadragésimo octavo período de sesiones. 2. En cumplimiento de esa resolución, el Secretario General tiene el honor de presentar a la Asamblea General el Estudio sobre la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre (véase anexo). 93-44577 (S) 221093 231093 /...A/48/305 Español Página 2 Anexo ESTUDIO SOBRE LA APLICACION DE MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE INDICE Párrafos Página SIGLAS Y ABREVIATURAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 CARTA DE ENVIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 PROLOGO DEL SECRETARIO GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 I. INTRODUCCION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 -16 12 II. CONSIDERACIONES GENERALES . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 -55 16 A. Utilización actual del espacio ultraterrestre 20 -44 16 1. Satélites de formación de imágenes . . . . 25 -26 22 2. Satélites de obtención de información transmitida por señales . . . . . . . . . 27 -28 22 3. Satélites de alerta temprana . . . . . . . 29 22 4. Satélites meteorológicos . . . . . . . . . 30 23 5. Sistemas de detección de explosiones nucleares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 23 6. Satélites de telecomunicaciones . . . . . 32 23 7. Satélites de navegación . . . . . . . . . 33 23 8. Armas antisatélite . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 -40 24 9. Armas antimisiles . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 -44 25 B. Nuevas tendencias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 -55 25 1. Capacidad de otros Estados en materia espacial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 -48 25 2. Número y capacidad cada vez mayores . . . 49 -50 26 3. Sistemas de doble finalidad . . . . . . . 51 -54 26 4. Aplicaciones para el combate . . . . . . . 55 27 /...A/48/305 Español Página 3 INDICE (continuación) Párrafos Página III. MARCO JURIDICO ACTUAL: ACUERDOS Y DECLARACIONES DE PRINCIPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 -80 28 A. Acuerdos multilaterales de ámbito mundial . . 59 -67 28 1. Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre . 59 -60 28 2. Otros acuerdos multilaterales de ámbito mundial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 -67 33 B. Tratados bilaterales . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 -75 35 C. Resoluciones de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas que contienen declaraciones de principios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 -80 38 IV. CONSIDERACION GENERAL DEL CONCEPTO DE MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 -114 40 A. Características . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 -103 41 B. Criterios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 -109 43 C. Aplicabilidad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 -114 44 V. ASPECTOS CONCRETOS DE LAS MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE . . . . . . 115 -175 46 A. Aspectos propios del medio espacial . . . . . 117 -129 46 B. Aspectos políticos y jurídicos . . . . . . . . 130 -138 48 C. Repercusiones tecnológicas y científicas . . . 139 -175 49 1. La tecnología y el espacio ultraterrestre 144 -161 50 a) Tecnología para la vigilancia de las operaciones espaciales . . . . . . . . 146 -147 51 b) Sistemas ópticos pasivos con base en tierra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 -149 51 c) Sistemas ópticos activos con base en tierra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 52 d) Radar con base en tierra . . . . . . . 151 -152 52 e) Otras características de los medios técnicos de vigilancia espacial . . . 153 -154 52 f) Vigilancia de las armas espaciales . . 155 -161 53 /...A/48/305 Español Página 4 INDICE (continuación) Párrafos Página 2. Tecnología y medidas de fomento de la confianza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 -175 54 a) PAXSAT-A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 -165 54 b) Satélites para vigilar las actividades terrestres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 54 c) Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control (OISCO) . . . . . . . . . . 167 -169 54 d) Organismo Internacional de Vigilancia Espacial (OIVE) . . . . . . . . . . . 170 -173 55 e) PAXSAT-B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 -175 56 VI. MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 -244 57 A. La necesidad de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre . . . . 176 -184 57 B. Propuestas de medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre . . 185 -225 58 Reseña de las propuestas . . . . . . . . . . . 59 1. Medidas de fomento de la confianza sobre una base voluntaria y recíproca . . . . . 189 -193 59 2. Medidas de fomento de la confianza con carácter de obligación contractual . . . . 194 -203 65 3. Propuestas para un marco institucional . . 204 -207 68 4. La transferencia internacional de las tecnologías de misiles y otras tecnologías críticas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 -214 69 5. Propuestas de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre en el marco de las negociaciones bilaterales entre los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética . . . . . . . . . . . 215 -219 70 6. Otras propuestas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 -225 71 /...A/48/305 Español Página 5 INDICE (continuación) Párrafos Página C. Análisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 -244 73 1. Medidas generales para aumentar la transparencia y la confianza . . . . . . . 227 -230 73 2. Fortalecimiento del registro de objetos espaciales y otras medidas conexas . . . . 231 -235 73 3. Código de buena conducta y normas de circulación . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 -242 74 4. Transferencia internacional de tecnología de misiles y otras tecnologías críticas . 243 -244 76 VII. MECANISMOS DE COOPERACION INTERNACIONAL RELACIONADOS CON LAS MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE . . . . . . 245 -293 77 A. Mecanismos existentes de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre . . 247 -281 77 1. Mecanismos mundiales de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre 248 -262 77 2. Mecanismos multilaterales regionales . . . 263 -274 81 3. Mecanismos bilaterales . . . . . . . . . . 275 -281 83 B. Algunas propuestas para la creación de nuevos mecanismos internacionales de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre . . 282 -293 84 VIII. CONCLUSIONES Y RECOMENDACIONES . . . . . . . . . . 294 -331 88 Apéndices I. Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 II. Directrices sobre tipos apropiados de medidas de fomento de la confianza y sobre la aplicación de tales medidas en los planos mundial o regional . . . . . . . . 108 III. Situación de los tratados multilaterales relativos a las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre . . . . . . . . 120 Bibliografías seleccionadas sobre aspectos técnicos, políticos y jurídicos de las actividades relativas al espacio ultraterrestre . . . 129 /...A/48/305 Español Página 6 SIGLAS Y ABREVIATURAS Acuerdo sobre la notificación de lanzamientos Acuerdo entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre la notificación del lanzamiento de misiles balísticos intercontinentales y de misiles balísticos lanzados desde submarinos Acuerdo sobre la Luna Acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes Acuerdo de salvamento Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre Acuerdo de reducción de riesgos Acuerdo entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre el establecimiento de centros para la reducción del riesgo nuclear Acuerdo sobre accidentes nucleares Acuerdo sobre las medidas para reducir el riesgo de desencadenar una guerra nuclear entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas Acuerdo del "teléfono rojo" Acuerdo sobre las medidas para reducir el riesgo de desencadenar una guerra nuclear entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas Acuerdo sobre la prevención de actividades militares peligrosas Acuerdo entre el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de América y el Gobierno de la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre la prevención de actividades militares peligrosas ESA Agencia Espacial Europea ARABSAT Organización Arabe de Comunicaciones mediante Satélite ASAT Arma antisatélite CCD Dispositivo de acoplamiento por carga CD Conferencia de Desarme CEPT Conferencia Europea de Administraciones de Correos y Telecomunicaciones CIME Centro de inspección de materiales procesados en el espacio Convención PROMOD Convención sobre la Prohibición de Utilizar Técnicas de Modificación Ambiental con Fines Militares u Otros Fines Hostiles Convenio sobre la responsabilidad Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales /...A/48/305 Español Página 7 Convenio de registro Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre COSPAS-SARSAT Sistema internacional de satélites destinado a la detección y la determinación de la posición de buques y aviones siniestrados CTII Centro de Tratamiento e Interpretación de Imágenes DMB Defensas contra misiles balísticos EHF Frecuencia extremadamente alta ELINT Obtención de información por medios electrónicos EUMETSAT Organización Europea de Satélites Meteorológicos EUTELSAT Organización Europea de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite PMAL Protección Mundial contra Ataques Limitados GPS Sistema de Posicionamiento Mundial IFRB Junta Internacional de Registro de Frecuencias INMARSAT Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Marítimas por Satélite INTELSAT Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite INTERCOSMOS Consejo de Cooperación Internacional en el Estudio y la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre INTERSPUTNIK Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Espaciales CIEI Centro de Inspectores Espaciales Internacionales LPAR Gran radar de antena de elementos múltiples en fase PAB Proyectil o misil antibalístico MBI Misil balístico intercontinental MBS Misil balístico lanzado desde un submarino RCTM Régimen de Control de la Tecnología de Misiles OIR Organizaciones internacionales regionales OISCO Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control OIVE Organismo Internacional de Vigilancia Espacial /...A/48/305 Español Página 8 OME Organización Mundial del Espacio OMI Organización Marítima Internacional OMM Organización Meteorológica Mundial SALT Negociaciones sobre la limitación de las armas estratégicas SIGINT Obtención de información transmitida mediante señales SPOT Sistema Experimental de Observación de la Tierra START-I Tratado sobre la reducción y limitación de las armas estratégicas ofensivas START-II Tratado sobre nuevas reducciones y limitaciones de las armas estratégicas ofensivas Tratado PAB Tratado sobre misiles antibalísticos Tratado de prohibición de los ensayos Tratado por el que se prohíben los ensayos con armas nucleares en la atmósfera, el espacio ultraterrestre y debajo del agua Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes Tratado FNAI Tratado sobre la eliminación de los misiles de alcance intermedio y de menor alcance UEO Unión Europea Occidental UHF Frecuencia ultraalta UIT Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones UNIDIR Instituto de las Naciones Unidas de Investigaciones sobre el Desarme UNISPACE Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos UNITRACE Centro Internacional de Trayectografía VR Vehículo de reingreso OTIS Organismo de Tratamiento de las Imágenes obtenidas por Satélite /...A/48/305 Español Página 9 CARTA DE ENVIO 16 de julio de 1993 Excelentísimo Señor: Tengo el honor de presentarle adjunto el informe del Grupo de Expertos Gubernamentales encargados de realizar un estudio sobre la aplicación de distintas medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, que fue nombrado por Vuestra Excelencia en cumplimiento del párrafo 3 de la sección B de la resolución 45/55 de la Asamblea General, de 4 de diciembre de 1990. Se nombraron los siguientes expertos de los gobiernos: Dr. Mohamed Ezz El Din Abdel-Moneim Director Adjunto Departamentos de Organizaciones Internacionales Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores El Cairo, Egipto Sr. Sergey D. Chuvakhin Departamento de Reducción de Armamentos y Desarme Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores de Rusia Moscú, Federación de Rusia Sr. F. R. Cleminson Jefe de la Sección de Verificación e Investigación División de Control de Armamentos y Desarme Departamento de Relaciones Exteriores Ottawa, Canadá Dr. Radoslav Deyanov Ministro Plenipotenciario Jefe de la División de Control de Armamentos y Desarme Departamento de Organizaciones Internacionales Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores Sofía, Bulgaria Sr. Luiz Alberto Figueiredo Machado Primer Secretario Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores Departamento del Medio Ambiente Brasilia, Brasil Sr. P. Hobwani Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores Harare, Zimbabwe Dr. C. Raja Mohan Profesor Asociado Instituto de Estudios y Análisis de Defensa Nueva Delhi, India /...A/48/305 Español Página 10 Sr. Pierre-Henri Pisani Consejero Especial Dirección de Relaciones Internacionales Centro Nacional de Estudios Espaciales París, Francia Sr. Archelaus R. Turrentine Oficina de Asuntos Multilaterales Organismo de los Estados Unidos para el Control de Armamentos y el Desarme Washington, D.C., Estados Unidos de América Sr. Sikandar Zaman Presidente de la Comisión de Investigación del Espacio Ultraterrestre y la Alta Atmósfera del Pakistán Karachi, Pakistán El informe fue elaborado durante el período comprendido entre julio de 1991 y julio de 1993, en que el Grupo celebró cuatro períodos de sesiones en Nueva York: el primero de ellos del 29 de julio al 2 de agosto de 1991, el segundo del 23 al 27 de marzo de 1992; el tercero del 1º al 12 de marzo de 1993; y el cuarto del 6 al 16 de julio de 1993. En el tercer período de sesiones del Grupo, el Sr. SHA Zukang de la República Popular de China participó en calidad de experto y, en el cuarto período de sesiones, el Sr. WU Chengjiang, también de la República Popular de China, participó como experto. Al realizar su labor, el Grupo tuvo ante sí publicaciones y documentos pertinentes facilitados por los distintos miembros del Grupo. Los miembros del Grupo desean expresar su reconocimiento por la asistencia que recibieron de los miembros de la Secretaría. En especial, desean dar las gracias al Sr. Davinic´, Director de la Oficina de Asuntos de Desarme, y a la Sra. Olga Sukovic, quien actuó como Secretaria del Grupo. El Grupo de Expertos me ha pedido que, en mi calidad de Presidente, le presente en su nombre este informe, que fue aprobado por unanimidad. Al no oponerse al consenso y permitir que se llevase adelante el estudio en su forma definitiva, el experto de los Estados Unidos indicó que había recibido comentarios y reservas adicionales de su gobierno en relación con el estudio que se comunicarán al Secretario General. He sido informado de que estos comentarios y reservas se distribuirán por separado como documento de las Naciones Unidas en relación con el tema 70. (Firmado) Robert GARCIA-MORITAN Presidente del Grupo de Expertos encargado del estudio sobre la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre /...A/48/305 Español Página 11 PROLOGO DEL SECRETARIO GENERAL Todos los Estados tienen derecho a explorar y aprovechar con fines pacíficos el espacio común de la humanidad. Para la comunidad internacional, el reto constante de la era espacial ha consistido en ampliar los horizontes humanos mediante la exploración y utilización pacífica del espacio ultraterrestre, evitando al mismo tiempo que el espacio y la tecnología se utilizaran con fines amenazadores o destructivos. Las cuestiones relacionadas con el espacio ultraterrestre figuran en el programa de las Naciones Unidas desde hace casi cuatro décadas. Durante este tiempo, los acuerdos internacionales sobre el espacio ultraterrestre tendían a evitar la militarización del espacio ultraterrestre y garantizar a todos los Estados el acceso a los posibles beneficios de la tecnología espacial. La tecnología es una fuerza dinámica. La rápida evolución y las disparidades crecientes en la capacidad tecnológica espacial han provocado inevitablemente un cierto grado de desconfianza y sospecha. Es preciso abordar la cuestión de la aplicación insuficiente de las tecnologías espaciales a las necesidades del desarrollo. A medida que son más y más los Estados que participan en actividades espaciales, cobra urgencia la necesidad de una mayor cooperación bilateral y multilateral. La cooperación es esencial a fin de salvaguardar el espacio ultraterrestre para usos pacíficos y de que los beneficios de la tecnología especial lleguen a todos los Estados. Se ha creado actualmente un nuevo entorno internacional. El período que siguió a la guerra fría ha sido testigo de muchos cambios espectaculares y trascendentales. Pero el mundo sigue siendo un lugar peligroso. Para evitar conflictos basados en concepciones erróneas y en la desconfianza, es necesario promover la transparencia y otras medidas destinadas a crear confianza: en materia de armamentos, de tecnologías amenazadoras, en la esfera espacial y en otras esferas. Resulta alentador ver que la comunidad internacional reconoce cada vez más la necesidad de las medidas de fomento de la confianza. El fomento de la cooperación y la confianza debe ser una tarea prioritaria, ya que la confianza y la cooperación son contagiosas. La cooperación internacional en la esfera de la tecnología espacial puede contribuir a facilitar el camino para la ulterior cooperación en otras esferas: política, militar, económica y social. Creo que esta era la intención de la Asamblea General cuando solicitó un estudio sobre la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. El estudio puede ser una referencia útil y una fuente de inspiración. Espero que contribuya a armonizar las opiniones y a construir un firme consenso internacional sobre las cuestiones relacionadas con el espacio ultraterrestre. Deseo expresar mi sincero agradecimiento a los miembros del Grupo de Expertos por su trabajo en la preparación del presente informe. Recomiendo el informe a la Asamblea General instándola a que le preste la máxima atención. Boutros BOUTROS-GHALI Secretario General Naciones Unidas /...A/48/305 Español Página 12 I. INTRODUCCION 1. Desde el lanzamiento, en 1957, del primer satélite artificial al espacio ultraterrestre, las cuestiones del espacio ultraterrestre se han debatido en distintos foros de las Naciones Unidas, y en sus organizaciones conexas. Desde el punto de vista del presente estudio, el principal órgano competente es la Conferencia de Desarme y su órgano subsidiario, el Comité ad hoc sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre que desde 1982 ha tenido en su programa un tema titulado "Prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre" y que ha estado examinando, mediante un análisis sustantivo y general, cuestiones relacionadas con el espacio ultraterrestre. En lo que respecta a la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, el órgano más importante es la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, junto con su Subcomisión Jurídica y su Subcomisión de Asuntos Científicos y Técnicos. Las deliberaciones de este Comité contribuyeron a la concertación de varios instrumentos jurídicos internacionales sobre los aspectos pacíficos de la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre. 2. La era del espacio, iniciada hace casi cuatro décadas, se ha caracterizado también por un rápido desarrollo en la tecnología espacial, y por la creciente preocupación que suscitan los peligros inherentes a una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. En 1978, la Asamblea General reconoció oficialmente esas preocupaciones en el Documento Final del décimo período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General, el primer período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme1, y pidió que se adoptaran nuevas medidas y se celebraran negociaciones internacionales apropiadas sobre ese tema. Numerosos Estados Miembros consideraron necesario adoptar medidas adicionales para prevenir la posibilidad de una militarización del espacio ultraterrestre. 3. En el curso de los años, los Estados Miembros se han ocupado de dos tipos distintos de intereses con respecto al espacio ultraterrestre en los foros internacionales: los relacionados con la aplicación pacífica y los relacionados con la prevención de una carrera de armamentos. A medida que ha ido creciendo el alcance de las actividades militares y de seguridad nacional en el espacio ultraterrestre, han ido aumentando también las preocupaciones de muchos Estados por el riesgo de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. Al mismo tiempo, se ha intentado mantener presentes los beneficios posibles de aplicar con fines civiles las tecnologías espaciales desarrolladas inicialmente en el marco de programas militares y de seguridad nacional. Es precisamente en relación con actividades militares y de seguridad conexas que se han hecho propuestas sobre un conjunto de normas encaminadas a aumentar la confianza entre los Estados en general y en particular en esferas concretas de sus actividades espaciales. 4. En 1993, había 300 satélites funcionando en órbita, más de la mitad de los cuales cumplían misiones militares o relacionadas con objetivos de seguridad nacional. Además de las dos principales Potencias espaciales, hay un gran grupo de Estados que han logrado la autosuficiencia en lo referente a determinadas misiones espaciales. Por otra parte, varios Estados poseen capacidad en el ámbito espacial en lo relativo a tecnologías o instalaciones especializadas, a la vez que crece el interés de la gran mayoría de los Estados por participar en las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre y compartir la tecnología espacial. /...A/48/305 Español Página 13 5. Debido a la falta de arreglos completos para prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre, ha aumentado el interés por fomentar la confianza mediante la aceptación de ciertos compromisos, medidas o directrices por los Estados en materia de actividades relacionadas con el espacio. Muchos creen que tales medidas podrían constituir un avance positivo hacia la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. El objetivo de las medidas de ese tipo es lograr una mayor transparencia y previsibilidad en las actividades espaciales en general, mediante medidas como la notificación previa, la verificación, el seguimiento, y los códigos de conducta, contribuyendo con ello a la seguridad regional y mundial. 6. En su cuadragésimo quinto período de sesiones, el 4 de diciembre de 1990, la Asamblea General aprobó una resolución sobre el espacio ultraterrestre compuesta de dos secciones. En la sección A de su resolución 45/55, titulada "Prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre" la Asamblea General expresó, entre otras cosas, su convicción "de que debieran examinarse medidas adicionales en la búsqueda de acuerdos bilaterales y multilaterales eficaces y verificables con miras a evitar una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre", y reafirmó "la importancia y urgencia de prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre y de que todos los Estados estén dispuestos a contribuir a ese objetivo común, de conformidad con las disposiciones del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes" (en adelante Tratado sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre). Además reconoció "la pertinencia de considerar medidas de afianzamiento de la confianza y de una mayor transparencia y apertura en la cuestión del espacio", y pidió a la Conferencia de Desarme "que continúe aprovechando las zonas de convergencia con miras a emprender negociaciones para concertar uno o varios acuerdos, según proceda, para prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre en todos sus aspectos". 7. En la sección B de su resolución, la 45/55, titulada "Medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre", la Asamblea General pidió al Secretario General que, con la asistencia de expertos de los gobiernos, realizara el presente estudio. El texto de la resolución es el siguiente: "La Asamblea General, Consciente de la importancia y la urgencia que reviste la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre, Recordando que de conformidad con el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes2, la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán hacerse en provecho y en interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, y ser de la incumbencia de toda la humanidad, Teniendo presente el hecho de que más y más Estados se están interesando activamente en el espacio ultraterrestre y participando en importantes programas espaciales para la exploración y explotación de ese medio, /...A/48/305 Español Página 14 Reconociendo en ese contexto la función que ha adquirido el espacio como factor importante para el desarrollo socioeconómico de muchos Estados, además de su función innegable respecto de cuestiones de seguridad, Poniendo de relieve que la utilización cada vez más intensa del espacio ultraterrestre ha aumentado la necesidad de que haya más transparencia y de que se adopten medidas de fomento de la confianza, Recordando que la comunidad internacional ha reconocido unánimemente, en particular en las resoluciones de la Asamblea General 43/78 H, de 7 de diciembre de 1988, y 44/116 U, de 15 de diciembre de 1989, la importancia y la utilidad de las medidas de fomento de la confianza, que pueden contribuir considerablemente a la promoción de la paz y la seguridad y al desarme, Habida cuenta de la importante labor que está realizando el Comité ad hoc de la Conferencia de Desarme sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre, que contribuye a determinar las esferas en las cuales podrían adoptarse medidas de fomento de la confianza, Teniendo presente que existen diferentes propuestas e iniciativas respecto de este asunto, lo que demuestra el acercamiento constante de las opiniones, 1. Reafirma la importancia de las medidas de fomento de la confianza como medio para garantizar el logro del objetivo de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre; 2. Reconoce la aplicabilidad de esas medidas en el medio espacial con arreglo a criterios concretos que deberán definirse; 3. Pide al Secretario General que, con la asistencia de expertos de los gobiernos, realice un estudio sobre aspectos concretos relacionados con la aplicación de distintas medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluidas las distintas tecnologías disponibles, las posibilidades de definir mecanismos apropiados para la cooperación internacional en esferas de interés determinadas, y demás cuestiones, y que le informe al respecto en su cuadragésimo octavo período de sesiones." 8. Tras la aprobación de la mencionada resolución, la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas ha aprobado dos resoluciones más en relación con el tema titulado "Prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre". En la resolución 46/33, de 6 de diciembre de 1991, la Asamblea después de pedir de nuevo a la Conferencia de Desarme "que examine con carácter prioritario la cuestión de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre", reconoce, entre otras cosas, "la pertinencia de considerar medidas de fomento de la confianza y de una mayor transparencia y apertura en la cuestión del espacio"; y, en la resolución 47/51, de 9 de diciembre de 1992, reconoce, entre otras cosas, "la convergencia cada vez mayor de opinión sobre la elaboración de medidas destinadas a fomentar la transparencia, la confianza y la seguridad en la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre". /...A/48/305 Español Página 15 9. En cumplimiento de su mandato, el Grupo decidió dividir el estudio en ocho capítulos. Además, consideró que convendría incluir como anexos varios textos pertinentes para el estudio, así como una bibliografía selecta. 10. Tras este capítulo introductorio, en el capítulo II de este estudio se examina la utilización actual del espacio ultraterrestre y las nuevas tendencias, haciéndose hincapié en los correspondientes problemas técnicos, tales como los distintos tipos de satélites y sus misiones, las armas antisatélites y las armas antimisiles. En relación con las nuevas tendencias, se hace hincapié en la capacidad espacial de los Estados, los sistemas de uso doble y las aplicaciones bélicas. 11. El capítulo III trata del marco jurídico actual: los acuerdos generales multilaterales y los acuerdos bilaterales tanto sobre los aspectos militares como pacíficos de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, así como de varias resoluciones en que figuran declaraciones de principios aprobadas por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas. 12. El capítulo IV se refiere a la cuestión general de las medidas de fomento de la confianza. Esas medidas se han ido aplicando cada vez más en una amplia gama de contextos, incluidos los ámbitos de la seguridad mundial, regional y bilateral. Han sido utilizadas para atender preocupaciones en materia de seguridad suscitadas por las armas convencionales, así como por las armas nucleares y otras armas de destrucción en masa. Se indican algunas características comunes de las medidas de fomento de la confianza, así como varios criterios generales para su aplicación con éxito. Además, se examina la viabilidad de esas medidas. 13. El capítulo V trata de aspectos concretos de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en su aplicación al espacio ultraterrestre. Se analizan las consideraciones políticas, jurídicas, tecnológicas y científicas relacionadas con su aplicación. Se determinan las oportunidades y obstáculos tecnológicos tanto en relación con el fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, es decir, las medidas relativas a las operaciones en el espacio, como con las medidas de fomento de la confianza desde el espacio, es decir, las medidas que se sirven de la tecnología espacial. 14. En el capítulo VI se examinan las medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre que han sido propuestas por diversos gobiernos, y se analizan distintos aspectos de su posible aplicación. 15. En el capítulo VII se pasa revista a la gama de mecanismos de cooperación internacional relacionados con las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. Entre ellos figura el papel desempeñado por las Naciones Unidas y la Conferencia de Desarme, así como algunos otros foros mundiales, regionales, bilaterales y de otra índole, en su desarrollo y aplicación. También se abordan algunas propuestas sobre la creación de nuevos mecanismos internacionales. 16. El último capítulo contiene las conclusiones y recomendaciones del Grupo de Expertos. /...A/48/305 Español Página 16 II. CONSIDERACIONES GENERALES 17. El sueño de la humanidad de aprovechar al máximo el espacio ultraterrestre para el desarrollo de la ciencia y el bienestar de la humanidad aún no se ha hecho realidad y, por lo tanto, sigue siendo un objetivo por alcanzar. Se han logrado importantes progresos en las ciencias espaciales, incluidas las ciencias de teleobservación de la Tierra y la atmósfera, y en la exploración lunar e interplanetaria, y estos avances se están convirtiendo en la base de las ciencias ambientales del futuro. Se han registrado notables progresos también en las aplicaciones espaciales como las telecomunicaciones, la navegación, la búsqueda y salvamento, la meteorología y la teleobservación de la Tierra para fines diversos. El espacio se ha convertido en un factor importante del bienestar económico y social de muchos Estados. 18. Desde el lanzamiento del primer Sputnik, en 1957, la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas3, los Estados Unidos de América y un número creciente de otros países han utilizado el espacio con fines militares. Este hecho determina el contexto en que se ha desarrollado la idea de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. La mayoría de los 300 satélites4, aproximadamente que funcionan hoy día en órbita terrestre se utilizan junto con misiones militares para operaciones en tiempo de paz o, cada vez más, para apoyar fuerzas armadas ubicadas en la Tierra. Los satélites de telecomunicaciones, navegación, observación, meteorología, etc. contribuyen, entre otras cosas, a aumentar la eficacia de los sistemas militares terrestres. 19. El desarrollo de una capacidad de lanzamiento al espacio ultraterrestre, o el acceso a ella, o ambas cosas, es indispensable para la explotación efectiva del espacio para fines pacíficos y comerciales y en apoyo de los procesos de regulación de los armamentos, así como para objetivos militares. Aún queda mucho por hacer, mediante satélites y otro tipo de vehículos espaciales, en esferas como la ciencia del espacio, la investigación solar e interplanetaria, la biología espacial, el medio ambiente y demás fines. A. Utilización actual del espacio ultraterrestre 20. El desarrollo de la investigación sobre el espacio ultraterrestre y sus aplicaciones ha sido posible gracias al constante perfeccionamiento, en algunos casos impulsado por las necesidades militares, de los sistemas de lanzamiento disponibles. Existen dos tipos de sistemas de lanzamiento: a) Los sistemas de transporte reutilizables, cuya función fundamental es garantizar los vuelos tripulados y conservar las infraestructuras en órbita; su fiabilidad debe ser la mayor posible, habida cuenta de la presencia de seres humanos a bordo; b) Los sistemas de lanzamiento desechables que según su capacidad en términos de empuje pueden poner en diferentes órbitas cargas útiles de diferente masa. La reciente evolución registrada en el campo del desarme permite prever el empleo de misiles reacondicionados para poner cargas útiles en órbita baja alrededor de la Tierra. /...A/48/305 Español Página 17 21. Normalmente se ponen satélites en cuatro tipos de órbitas, que se definen según su altitud, período e inclinación con respecto al ecuador de la Tierra (gráficos I y II): Gráfico I Orbitas típicas de los satélites Todas las órbitas simples de los satélites suponen un movimiento elíptico en un plano fijo en el espacio celeste que pasa por el centro de la masa del sistema (normalmente la Tierra), a la vez que la Tierra gira debajo del vehículo espacial y su órbita. /...A/48/305 Español Página 18 Gráfico II Orbitas típicas de los satélites Todas las órbitas simples de los satélites suponen un movimiento elíptico en un plano fijo en el espacio celeste que pasa por el centro de la masa del sistema (normalmente la Tierra), a la vez que la Tierra gira debajo del vehículo espacial y su órbita. a) Las órbitas terrestres bajas incluyen las órbitas a alturas que van desde unos cientos de kilómetros hasta más de 1.000 kilómetros, y pueden tener cualquier inclinación, aunque normalmente esas órbitas tienen inclinaciones altas a fin de aprovechar al máximo la cobertura de las zonas de latitud alta de la superficie terrestre; /...A/48/305 Español Página 19 b) Las órbitas terrestres geosincrónicas se sitúan a una altura de casi 36,000 kilómetros, y tienen un período de aproximadamente un día, lo cual permite al satélite catar instantáneamente casi la mitad de la superficie de la Tierra. Esas órbitas son útiles para las comunicaciones, la alerta temprana, o la reunión de información por medios electrónicos. Si el satélite se encuentra en el plano orbital del ecuador de la Tierra (inclinación cero), se les llama órbitas geoestacionarias, y permiten a un solo satélite abarcar durante las 24 horas del día determinada zona; c) Las órbitas semisincrónicas se caracterizan por un período de 12 horas, con satélites a una altura de unos 20,000 kilómetros. Las órbitas semisincrónicas circulares son las que normalmente recorren los satélites de navegación modernos; d) Las órbitas Molniya son un subgrupo de las órbitas semisincrónicas, que son sumamente elípticas, caracterizadas por puntos bajos (perigeos) de unos cientos de kilómetros, y puntos altos (apogeos) de casi 40.000 kilómetros. Normalmente estas órbitas tienen inclinaciones de 63 grados y se usan para abarcar las regiones polares y de latitud alta. 22. Cabe caracterizar también a los sistemas espaciales por las funciones que cumplen, como se muestra en el cuadro 1 y se analiza con más detalle en las secciones siguientes. Como todos los demás satélites, en general, los satélites militares suelen desempeñar dos tipos de funciones: adquirir información; y transmitir información. Los satélites se pueden utilizar para adquirir información sobre la ubicación de fuerzas militares terrestres sirviéndose de imágenes o mediante la captación de transmisiones electrónicas (obtención de información por medios electrónicos, u obtención de información transmitida mediante señales). Otras funciones de reunión de información comprenden los datos meteorológicos, la alerta de misiles y la detección de explosiones nucleares. Determinados tipos de información se transmiten mediante los satélites de telecomunicaciones y de navegación. 23. En los últimos años, se ha perfilado una tendencia a una mayor apertura y transparencia con respecto a muchas actividades espaciales, con inclusión de algunas que sirven para fines militares. Sin embargo, es preciso reconocer que algunos detalles de las capacidades y las operaciones concretas de los satélites con misiones militares probablemente sigan siendo considerados sumamente secretos por los Estados a que pertenecen. 24. Hay que señalar también que la mayoría de las tecnologías espaciales son excelentes ejemplos de tecnologías que pueden ser de doble utilización. Los satélites, que son indispensables en muchas aplicaciones en el sector civil, por ejemplo, los satélites meteorológicos, pueden considerarse también como importantes multiplicadores de fuerzas cuando se utilizan para fines militares. La tecnología requerida para interceptar satélites en el espacio es, en ciertos aspectos, similar a la necesaria para interceptar los misiles balísticos o sus ojivas. La experiencia técnica en el campo de los misiles antibalísticos puede constituir una base tecnológica directa para idear una capacidad antisatélite. Lo contrario no es necesariamente cierto. /...A/48/305 Español Página 20 Cuadro 1 Características generales de algunas misiones espaciales corrientes Misión Orbitas corrientes Energía Elementos principales de naves espaciales/sensores/instrumentos Observaciones A. Ciencia Observación de la atmósfera y de la alta atmósfera Baja altitud Alta inclinación Baja Media Sensores ópticos, infrarrojos próximos e infrarrojos Duración: 2 a 5 años Medición de radiación y del campo magnético Elíptica, de alta altitud y de alta inclinación Baja Magnetómetros, sensores de radiaciones. Detectores de partículas electrizadas Duración: 5 a 8 años Solar Orbitas solares, algunas procedentes de órbitas planas solares Moderada Sensores electroópticos, de radiaciones de campos magnéticos y de partículas, con control térmico complejo Interplanetaria Planetaria, centrífuga Moderada Sensores electroópticos, de medición de radianes, sistemas especiales de transmisión de datos a larga distancia Muchos incluyen vuelos rasantes, vehículos orbitales, módulos de aterrizaje, que tienen sistemas análogos a los sistemas científicos terrestres B. Observaciones terrestres Vigilancia de los recursos de tierras e hídricos y de la cubierta vegetal Baja altitud inclinada Baja-media Sensores infrarrojos ópticos, de espectro múltiple. Radares de abertura simulada de antenas grandes, con enlaces de datos de banda amplia Duración: 5 a 8 años Algunos tienen capacidad de captación de objetivos fuera de trayectoria Algunos tienen datos incorporados Vigilancia atmosférica y meteorológica Baja altitud inclinada Baja-media Sensores ópticos, infrarrojos próximos e infrarrojos Duración: 5 a 8 años Vigilancia ambiental Baja altitud inclinada Baja Sensores para medir los gases de la atmósfera Duración: 5 a 7 años Vigilancia del tráfico aéreo Altitud media inclinada Muy alta Radares desde el espacio con antenas muy grandes Duración 5 años o más /...A/48/305 Español Página 21 Cuadro 1 (continuación) Misión Orbitas corrientes Energía Elementos principales de naves espaciales/sensores/instrumentos Observaciones C. Comunicaciones Internacionales y nacionales Muy elíptica, de gran inclinación, geosincrónica, ecuatorial Alta Antenas y transpondedores de multifrecuencia Duración: 10 a 15 años con capacidad de mantenimiento en órbita Comunicaciones acústicas, de datos y de vídeo Sistema de transmisión directa Geosincrónica ecuatorial Alta Antenas y transmisores de alta frecuencia Transmisión directa de programas de radio y televisión. Duración: 10 a 12 años Móvil Geosincrónica ecuatorial Alta Antenas y transmisores grandes de baja frecuencia Por ejemplo: M-SAT, INMARSAT Personal Constelación de baja altitud Baja Media Configuración de antenas para satélites de uso múltiple Constelación de satélites Militar Orbita geosincrónica ecuatorial Alta Antenas y transmisores de frecuencia UHF a EHF, con mecanismo de criptografía Duración: 10 a 15 años También se utiliza para la transmisión de datos Búsqueda y salvamento Baja altitud Moderada Receptores y transmisores con capacidad de medición por efecto Dopler Capta señales de una baliza activada cuando el vehículo que la transporta está en una emergencia D. Navegación Posicionamiento de navegación y mundial Altitud media inclinada Moderada Medición de precisión del tiempo y de frecuencia Constelación de satélites, con aplicaciones en la navegación aérea y en tierra /...A/48/305 Español Página 22 1. Satélites de formación de imágenes 25. Los satélites de formación de imágenes, en órbita a alturas de varios cientos de kilómetros, utilizan la película, las cámaras electroópticas o el radar para producir imágenes de alta resolución de la superficie de la Tierra en distintas regiones del espectro. Esos satélites de formación de imágenes pueden servir para detectar objetos sobre la superficie terrestre o marina, y en el caso de algunos sistemas de satélites militares de la más alta resolución, para identificar diferentes tipos de vehículos y otro equipo y distinguir entre ellos. Quizás su aplicación más notable haya sido como medios técnicos nacionales de verificación de los acuerdos de limitación de armamentos. 26. La utilización de la capacidad de formación de imágenes ópticas de los satélites civiles como LANDSAT, SPOT y la serie COSMOS ha servido ya para detectar algunas anomalías como en el caso del accidente de Chernobyl (1986) y el alcance de los problemas ambientales relacionados con la guerra del Golfo (1991). Los satélites militares de reconocimiento y sus capacidades analíticas conexas son, en general, mucho más eficaces a este respecto. 2. Satélites de obtención de información transmitida por señales 27. Los satélites de obtención de información transmitida por señales están diseñados para detectar las transmisiones de los sistemas de comunicaciones terrestres, así como los radares y otros sistemas electrónicos. La interceptación de esas transmisiones puede proporcionar información sobre el tipo y ubicación de transmisores de baja potencia, como las radios portátiles. Sin embargo, estos satélites no pueden interceptar las comunicaciones transmitidas por líneas terrestres. 28. La obtención de información transmitida mediante señales puede dividirse en varias categorías. La obtención de información transmitida mediante telecomunicaciones tiene por objeto analizar la fuente y el contenido del tráfico de mensajes. Si bien las comunicaciones militares más importantes están protegidas por técnicas de codificación, se puede emplear la computadora para descifrar parte del tráfico, y se puede lograr una información secreta adicional del análisis de las estructuras de las transmisiones electrónicas a lo largo del tiempo. La obtención de información electrónica está dedicada al análisis de las estructuras de las transmisiones electrónicas no relacionadas con las telecomunicaciones. Esta categoría comprende la telemetría de pruebas de misiles o transmisores por radar. 3. Satélites de alerta temprana 29. Los satélites de alerta temprana llevan incorporados sensores de rayos infrarrojos que detectan el calor de los motores de los cohetes. Estos satélites se utilizan para vigilar los lanzamientos de misiles a fin de asegurar el cumplimiento de los tratados, así como para brindar una alerta temprana de ataques con misiles. También pueden utilizarse para ubicar los emplazamientos de misiles utilizados en operaciones de combate. /...A/48/305 Español Página 23 4. Satélites meteorológicos 30. La utilidad civil de los satélites meteorológicos es de dominio común. También prestan apoyo vital a las operaciones militares tanto en tiempo de paz como de guerra. El acceso gratuito a los datos de los satélites meteorológicos ha constituido una excelente muestra de cooperación internacional en la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos a lo largo de los años y ha resultado de fundamental importancia para ayudar a los Estados a elaborar mejores pronósticos meteorológicos y a aumentar la capacidad para hacer frente a casos de desastres naturales. 5. Sistemas de detección de explosiones nucleares 31. Desde principios de la década de 1960, se han desplegado satélites con la capacidad de detectar explosiones nucleares en la Tierra y en el espacio. Algunos de estos satélites, junto con los satélites meteorológicos y los de alerta temprana, llevan incorporados varios tipos de sensores para detectar la ubicación de las explosiones nucleares y evaluar su rendimiento energético. La información obtenida por estos satélites se puede utilizar también para la planificación de operaciones militares. 6. Satélites de telecomunicaciones 32. Las telecomunicaciones constituyen una de las aplicaciones más generalizadas de los satélites modernos. Los satélites de telecomunicaciones son importantes para aplicaciones tanto militares como civiles. Cabe clasificar a estos satélites en tres categorías, según sus características orbitales: pueden ser geosincrónicos, semisincrónicos o no sincrónicos. También se les puede clasificar por sus frecuencias de funcionamiento, amplitud de bandas o el tipo de tráfico y servicios que proporcionan. La mayoría de los satélites de telecomunicaciones se encuentran en una órbita geoestacionaria alrededor de la Tierra. Hoy día los satélites son un elemento corriente y vital de los sistemas de telecomunicaciones internacionales, así como de muchas redes nacionales, y de sistemas especializados como el sistema internacional COPAS-SARSAT de búsqueda y salvamento. 7. Satélites de navegación 33. Los satélites de navegación representan una de las primeras aplicaciones militares de la tecnología espacial y se encuentran entre los de mayor utilidad para las fuerzas militares en la Tierra. Los aviaciones militares utilizan actualmente los satélites de navegación para guiarse hacia los aviones nodriza y reabastecerse de combustible en vuelo, ya que vuelan sin escalas desde sus bases hasta zonas de conflicto a miles de millas de distancia. Los aviones pueden usar también los satélites de navegación para que les guíen hacia sus objetivos con precisión matemática, donde pueden soltar sus bombas con una precisión comparable a la de armas "inteligentes" que son mucho más caras. /...A/48/305 Español Página 24 8. Armas antisatélite 34. Con el tiempo, al ir aumentando, junto con los programas espaciales más activos, la importancia para los Estados de las aplicaciones de los sistemas espaciales militares, ha crecido el interés por el desarrollo de armas antisatélite a fin de contrarrestar las aportaciones que los satélites de los posibles adversarios puedan hacer a su eficacia de combate. 35. Se teme que cualquier utilización de un armamento antisatélite contra un objeto espacial en órbita produzca residuos que en algunos casos podrían afectar a otros objetos espaciales o incluso caer en zonas pobladas, con consecuencias imprevisibles. Esta preocupación se acentúa en relación con las consecuencias ambientales de una reentrada incontrolada en la atmósfera de los restos de un objeto espacial con una fuente de propulsión nuclear. 36. Las primeras investigaciones sobre el desarrollo de una capacidad antisatélite fueron realizadas por las potencias espaciales en la década de 1950. La primera interceptación antisatélite con éxito tuvo lugar cerca de la isla de Kwajalein, en el Océano Pacífico, en mayo de 1963. Un año después se instalaron dispositivos antisatélite con cabezas nucleares en la isla Johnson. Este programa, basado en el cohete Thor, terminó en 1976 y la atención de las actividades de investigación y desarrollo se desplazó hacia los mecanismos no nucleares de destrucción cinética. A principios de la década de 1980, la investigación se centró en el desarrollo de un vehículo hipersónico autoguiado en miniatura lanzado desde el aire, pero el programa fue congelado en 1988. Continúan las investigaciones sobre un interceptor de eliminación cinética desde tierra basado en un sistema de misiles de combustible sólido. 37. Al mismo tiempo que el proyecto que requería las pruebas de la isla de Kwajalein, se iniciaron investigaciones para desarrollar un interceptor coorbital diseñado para colocar un satélite de varias toneladas en órbita baja de la Tierra. La teoría era que al maniobrar cerca del satélite tomado como objetivo y hacer la misma órbita, se podría detonar una carga explosiva que haría llover metralla sobre el blanco. Se opinaba que, como los satélites eran delicados, se les podía destruir fácilmente utilizando este método. Las pruebas realizadas entre 1968 y 1982 tuvieron escaso éxito (aproximadamente un 70%, según se indica en algunas publicaciones) cuando se utilizaba un dispositivo de guía por radar y muchísimo menos cuando se utilizaba un dispositivo de guía de búsqueda de calor. Todo este sistema era complicado y su empleo resultaba limitado. A pesar de su eficacia marginal, fue declarado operacional. Desde 1982, no se ha vuelto a poner a prueba el sistema. 38. Se han realizado también trabajos sobre la utilización de sistemas de energía dirigida para las misiones antisatélite. Varios tipos de láser de alta energía con base en tierra, si están lo suficientemente enfocados y se les acopla un mecanismo de rastreo sumamente preciso, pueden producir desperfectos en los satélites en órbita que les pasen por encima. 39. Debe señalarse que actualmente gran parte de la labor realizada sobre estos sistemas antisatélite ha perdido prioridad o se le ha puesto fin. Esto refleja una relación más cooperativa entre los dos Estados con los programas especiales más activos. /...A/48/305 Español Página 25 40. En resumen, parece ser que la investigación relacionada específicamente con el desarrollo de la tecnología antisatélite ha sido poco convincente y esporádica, aunque de vez en cuando resurge el interés por el concepto. Determinnado aspectos de este concepto siguen siendo objeto de grandes controversias. 9. Armas antimisiles 41. Las armas antimisiles que forman parte de la defensa contra los misiles estratégicos ofensivos son de interés en el presente estudio pues representan una posible capacidad residual antisatélite, están basadas en el espacio o emplean componentes basados en el espacio. 42. Todo satélite que pasa por la zona limitada de ataque de un arma antimisil sería probablemente tan vulnerable al ataque como cualquier misil estratégico u ojiva nuclear que pasara por esa zona. En la mayoría de los casos, sólo los satélites de órbita baja estarían sujetos a esa vulnerabilidad teórica. 43. Sin embargo, cabe señalar que los láser precisos, de alta energía de alta energía los interceptores basados en el espacio y los sistemas antimisiles de largo alcance podrían, todos ellos, contribuir a aumentar la zona de vulnerabilidad de los satélites a los sistemas antimisiles. 44. Si bien las armas antimisiles basadas en el espacio han sido objeto de profundo estudio, no se han resuelto todos los problemas técnicos relativos a esas armas. Actualmente no se sabe de ningún programa para desplegar sistemas que incluyan esas armas. B. Nuevas tendencias 45. Como ya se ha mencionado en esta sección, el espacio ultraterrestre continúa adquiriendo una importancia creciente tanto para las actividades militares como para las civiles. Signos de esta importancia son, por ejemplo a) el creciente número de países que estudian la forma de utilizar el espacio ultraterrestre; b) los usos militares, que abarcan desde los objetivos o misiones estratégicos hasta los tácticos; c) la tecnología de comunicaciones con fines civiles que utiliza potencias más elevadas y nuevas bandas de frecuencia; y d) una coexistencia cada vez mayor de las aplicaciones comerciales y militares en la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre. Aunque desde el fin de la guerra fría algunas Potencias han reconsiderado ciertos aspectos de la utilización militar del espacio ultraterrestre, los países punteros en tecnología espacial siguen realizando investigaciones en este campo. 1. Capacidad de otros Estados en materia espacial 46. Varios otros Estados poseen una cierta capacidad en materia espacial o están planificando su desarrollo. Si bien en este momento en la mayoría de esos programas o planes nacionales no se prevé un componente militar, de ellos podría derivarse el desarrollo de una capacidad militar. Una mayor transparencia de los programas espaciales, incluidos los programas nacionales, sería un factor importante para el fomento de la confianza entre los Estados. /...A/48/305 Español Página 26 47. En cumplimiento de las recomendaciones de la Segunda Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos (UNISPACE II), y atendiendo una recomendación de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas pidió a los Estados Miembros, en el contexto de la resolución 46/45 de la Asamblea General, de 9 de diciembre de 1991, que presentasen informes anuales acerca de sus actividades espaciales. El informe que el Secretario General presentó a la Asamblea General en su cuadragésimo séptimo período de sesiones (A/47/383) contenía los informes anuales presentados por los Estados. Teniendo ese informe en consideración, la Asamblea General, en su resolución 47/67, de 14 de diciembre de 1992, pidió de nuevo al Secretario General que le presentase un informe en su cuadragésimo octavo período de sesiones sobre la aplicación de las recomendaciones de la Conferencia. Las solicitudes relativas a la presentación de información sobre las actividades espaciales a nivel nacional y a la aplicación de las recomendaciones de la Conferencia son temas corrientes de las resoluciones anuales de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas sobre la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos. 48. La descripción de los programas nacionales de los Estados excede del mandato de este Grupo de Expertos. La mayoría de estas actividades se lleva a cabo con fines como las telecomunicaciones, la meteorología, la investigación y la teleobservación de la Tierra y otras5. Vale la pena hacer notar que los Estados miembros de la Agencia Especial Europea (ESA) decidieron "europeizar" gran parte de sus programas espaciales nacionales incorporándolos a programas de la Agencia6. 2. Número y capacidad cada vez mayores 49. Durante el decenio de 1980, se perfeccionaron los satélites militares y su número aumentó. Además de mejorarse la capacidad de formación de imágenes ópticas, se introdujeron nuevos satélites que formaban imágenes por medio de radar, lo que hizo posible la observación con altos niveles de resolución en todo tipo de condiciones atmosféricas y de iluminación. 50. Del mismo modo que las fuerzas armadas dependen cada vez más de los satélites, estos se utilizan cada vez más de forma coordinada. Por ejemplo, la información obtenida por medio de satélites meteorológicos puede ser de utilidad para programar la observación libre de cubierta nubosa, y los satélites de navegación, gracias a su precisión, pueden ayudar a determinar con exactitud la situación de satélites en órbita y a su control7. 3. Sistemas de doble finalidad 51. La aplicación de las tecnologías espaciales pueden tener, en gran medida, una doble finalidad, como pueden tenerla, los sistemas aunque en menor medida. Mientras que las tecnologías empleadas pueden ser parecidas o idénticas, el fin a que se destinan, ya sea militar o civil, puede generalmente determinarse, aunque algunas veces con cierta dificultad. Cuando resulta eficaz en relación con su costo, y si se pueden cumplir sus requisitos de seguridad y de /...A/48/305 Español Página 27 disponibilidad, el estamento militar puede también celebrar contratos con empresas comerciales de manera similar a otros clientes. 52. Entre las funciones que es probable que permanezcan exclusivamente dentro del ámbito militar se encuentran los satélites de formación de imágenes utilizados como medios técnicos nacionales con fines de reunión de información, así como los receptores SIGINT y ELINT. Su objetivo fundamental es la reunión de información militar y estratégica de otra índole, pero pueden servir también para localizar objetivos para el ataque, objetivos éstos que probablemente sean más estratégicos que tácticos. Los satélites de alerta temprana pueden utilizarse para potenciar las defensas contra misiles balísticos, puesto que pueden facilitar información precisa sobre el lanzamiento de ese tipo de misiles. No obstante, muchos de estos satélites, especialmente los satélites de formación de imágenes, contribuyen en forma significativa a la verificación del control de armamentos. Los sistemas comerciales de formación de imágenes están acercándose tecnológicamente a los sistemas militares en lo que respecta a la resolución y, por lo tanto, podrían contribuir en buena medida en el futuro a aumentar la transparencia a nivel mundial. Sin embargo, carecen aún de la capacidad necesaria para contribuir a la verificación del control de armamentos, salvo en funciones de apoyo para determinar la presencia de grandes infraestructuras y de vigilancia de posibles degradaciones del medio ambiente. 53. Hay varios sectores, por ejemplo el de los satélites meteorológicos de baja altitud, que se basan en posibilidades civiles y militares casi idénticas. Los militares utilizan con frecuencia ambos sistemas, que son bastante similares desde el punto de vista físico y a menudo son construidos por la misma empresa. Ya se han desplegado sistemas discretos de satélites de navegación de baja altitud tanto civiles como militares, si bien la utilización militar de todas las posibilidades del Sistema de Posicionamiento Mundial (GPS) siguen sin estar a disposición de los usuarios civiles. La comunidad cartográfica militar es uno de los principales clientes de los datos obtenidos por teleobservación y las películas fotográficas de alta resolución empleadas en esa actividad, derivados en principio de satélites cuyo fin primordial fue inicialmente la cartografía militar, comienzan a encontrarse a disposición del sector comercial. 54. Es evidente que en la actualidad existen considerables posibilidades para utilizar en una forma más amplia los datos recogidos por medios militares o comerciales. Es indudable que, una vez despolarizado el mundo de la tecnología espacial, resulta necesario poner en marcha mecanismos de cooperación. Los datos recogidos deberían utilizarse a nivel mundial y en una forma organizada. 4. Aplicaciones para el combate 55. La integración cada vez mayor de la capacidad espacial de carácter militar con la planificación militar terrestre, y la de los sistemas espaciales entre sí, han conducido a la ampliación del papel de los sistemas espaciales militares. Como ejemplo reciente pueden citarse las operaciones "Escudo del desierto" y "Tormenta del desierto", durante las cuales se utilizaron con profusión los satélites de formación de imágenes, de intercepción de señales, de alerta temprana, de información meteorológica, de comunicaciones y de navegación de los Estados Unidos de América8. /...A/48/305 Español Página 28 III. MARCO JURIDICO ACTUAL: ACUERDOS Y DECLARACIONES DE PRINCIPIOS 56. Desde que dio comienzo la era espacial se han concluido varios instrumentos internacionales relativos a los aspectos pacíficos y militares de la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre. 57. Los tratados relativos a las actividades de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre pueden dividirse en tres categorías: acuerdos multilaterales de ámbito mundial (véase el apéndice III), acuerdos multilaterales regionales y acuerdos bilaterales. Además, la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas ha aprobado varias resoluciones que contienen declaraciones de principios relativas a las actividades espaciales de los Estados. 58. En el cuadro 2 se trata de determinar varias medidas de fomento de la confianza que figuran en algunos de estos tratados. A. Acuerdos multilaterales de ámbito mundial 1. Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre 59. El Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes de 1967 (Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre)9 estableció los principios rectores de las actividades pacíficas de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre. En virtud del artículo I, la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, a) "deberán hacerse en provecho y en interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, e incumben a toda la humanidad"; b) "estará abierto para su exploración y utilización a todos los Estados sin discriminación alguna en condiciones de igualdad y en conformidad con el derecho internacional"; y c) "estarán abiertos a la investigación científica, y los Estados facilitarán y fomentarán la cooperación internacional en dichas investigaciones". Además, las actividades de los Estados partes en este Tratado deberán llevarse a cabo "de conformidad con el derecho internacional, incluida la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, en interés del mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y del fomento de la cooperación y la comprensión internacionales" (artículo III). En el primer párrafo del artículo IV, los Estados Partes se comprometen, entre otras cosas, "a no colocar en órbita alrededor de la Tierra ningún objeto portador de armas nucleares ni de ningún otro tipo de armas de destrucción en masa, a no emplazar tales armas en los cuerpos celestes y a no colocar tales armas en el espacio ultraterrestre en ninguna otra forma". En el Tratado se dispone, además, que la Luna y demás cuerpos celestes se utilizarán exclusivamente con fines pacíficos y se prohíbe "establecer en los cuerpos celestes bases, instalaciones y fortificaciones militares, efectuar ensayos con cualquier tipo de armas y realizar maniobras militares" (párr. 2 del artículo IV). /...A/48/305 Español Página 29 Cuadro 2 Medidas de fomento de la confianza en algunos acuerdos multilaterales y bilaterales de desarme y limitación de armamentos Título del acuerdo Lugar y fecha de la firma Entrada en vigor Duración Número de Estados partes Medidas de fomento de la confianza previstas A. Acuerdos multilaterales relacionados con el espacio ultraterrestrea TPE Moscú 5 de agosto de 1963 10 de octubre de 1963 Ilimitada Derecho de retiro 119 Estados partes No hay cláusulas de verificación pero corrientemente se han utilizado medios técnicos nacionales con fines de verificación TEU Londres, Moscú Washington 27 de enero de 1967 10 de octubre de 1967 Ilimitada Derecho de retiro 93 Estados partes Oportunidad de observar el vuelo de objetos espaciales; inspección in situ de la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes; celebración de consultas si se cree que una actividad de un Estado puede perjudicar las actividades de otros; obligación de informar al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas acerca de la naturaleza, la marcha, la ubicación y los resultados de las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre; el Secretario General debe estar en condiciones de difundir esa información de modo inmediato y eficaz; se estipula que todas las instalaciones, el equipo y los vehículos espaciales serán accesibles a los representantes de otros Estados partes, sobre la base de reciprocidad Acuerdo de Salvamento Nueva York 22 de abril de 1968 3 de diciembre de 1968 No especificada Derecho de retiro 69 Estados partes Se especifica la obligación de notificar a la autoridad de lanzamiento en caso de accidente; notificar al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas al respecto; el Secretario General difundirá la información recibida Convenio sobre la responsabilidad Nueva York 29 de marzo de 1972 1º de septiembre de 1972 No especificada Derecho de retiro 35 Estados partes Las cuestiones que surjan por daños causados se resolverán por conducto de la Comisión de Reclamaciones Convenio de registro Nueva York 14 de enero de 1975 15 de septiembre de 1976 No especificada Derecho de retiro 37 Estados partes Establece el marco para presentar al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas la información relacionada con el nombre del Estado de lanzamiento; la designación apropiada; la fecha y lugar del lanzamiento de los objetos al espacio; los parámetros orbitales básicos, la función general; los cambios en los parámetros orbitales después del lanzamiento, la fecha de recuperación del objeto espacial /...A/48/305 Español Página 30 Cuadro 2 (continuación) Título del acuerdo Lugar y fecha de la firma Entrada en vigor Duración Número de Estados partes Medidas de fomento de la confianza previstas A. Acuerdos multilaterales relacionados con el espacio ultraterrestre (continuación) Convenio internacional de telecomunicaciones Ginebra Diciembre de 1992 1º de julio de 1994 Ilimitada Derecho de retiro 128 Estados partes La Unión mantiene y amplía la cooperación internacional entre todos los miembros para el mejoramiento y la utilización racional de las telecomunicaciones de todo tipo; coordina los esfuerzos encaminados a eliminar interferencias perjudiciales entre las estaciones de radio de diversos países; fomenta la cooperación internacional en el suministro de asistencia técnica a los países en desarrollo, etc. Convención PROMOD Nueva York 18 de mayo de 1977 5 de octubre de 1978 No especificada Derecho de retiro 57 Estados partes Consulta y colaboración entre los Estados partes para solucionar problemas relacionados con la aplicación de la Convención; un Comité Consultivo de Expertos podrá llevar a cabo verificaciones de hechos y emitir opiniones relacionadas con cualquier problema que surja; en caso de las obligaciones de la Convención, cualquier Estado Parte podrá presentar una denuncia al Consejo de Seguridad Acuerdo sobre la Luna Nueva York 18 de diciembre de 1979 11 de julio de 1984 Ilimitada Derecho de retiro 8 Estados partes Se dispone que se informará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sobre las actividades relativas a la exploración y utilización de la Luna; la información necesaria deberá incluir: la fecha, los objetivos, las localizaciones, los parámetros orbitales y la duración de cada misión a la Luna; se informará al Secretario General de cualquier fenómeno que se descubra en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluida la Luna; se proporcionará información sobre las estaciones en la Luna habitadas o inhabitadas; inspección in situ por todas las partes; realización de consultas en caso de incumplimiento por algún Estado Parte de las obligaciones que le corresponden y, si no se llega a una solución de la controversia, cualquier Estado Parte podrá solicitar la asistencia del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas /...A/48/305 Español Página 31 Cuadro 2 (continuación) Título del acuerdo Lugar y fecha de la firma Entrada en vigor Duración Número de Estados partes Medidas de fomento de la confianza previstas B. Acuerdos bilaterales relativos al espacio ultraterrestre Acuerdo sobre accidentes nucleares Washington 30 de septiembre de 1971 30 de septiembre de 1971 Ilimitada URSS, EE.UU. Notificación mutua en caso de accidentes en que se corra el riesgo de que estalle una guerra nuclear; establecimiento del Sistema de Comunicación Directa; consultas para examinar cuestiones relativas a la aplicación del Acuerdo Acuerdo del "teléfono rojo" Washington 30 de septiembre de 1971 30 de septiembre de 1971 No especificada URSS, EE.UU. Se dispone el establecimiento de un sistema de comunicaciones por satélite para incrementar la fiabilidad del Sistema de Comunicación Directa Tratado PAB Moscú 26 de mayo de 1972 3 de octubre de 1972 Ilimitada Derecho de retiro URSS, EE.UU. Se disponen medidas de verificación por medios técnicos nacionales, se establece el principio de no injerencia en la labor de los medios técnicos nacionales y se establece una Comisión Consultiva Permanente para examinar las cuestiones relativas al cumplimiento SALT I Moscú 26 de mayo de 1972 3 de octubre de 1972 Cinco años (hasta 1977) URSS, EE.UU. Disposiciones análogas a las del Tratado PAB Tratado de limitación de los ensayos nucleares (TLEN) Moscú 3 de julio de 1974 11 de diciembre de 1990 Cinco años Derecho de retiro URSS, EE.UU. Disposiciones análogas a las del Tratado PAB y a las de SALT I Tratado sobre explosiones nucleares con fines pacíficos (ENP) Moscú 28 de mayo de 1976 11 de diciembre de 1990 Cinco años, con posibilidad de prórroga URSS, EE.UU. Medios técnicos nacionales; se autoriza el acceso a los lugares de las explosiones; se establece una Comisión Consultiva Mixta, encargada de la información necesaria para la verificación SALT II Viena 18 de junio de 1979 Nunca ha entrado en vigor Cinco años URSS, EE.UU. Medios técnicos nacionales; intercambio voluntario de información en el marco de la Comisión Consultiva Permanente Centros para la reducción del riesgo nuclear Washington 15 de septiembre de 1987 15 de septiembre de 1987 Ilimitada Derecho de retiro URSS, EE.UU. En el Protocolo I se estipula la notificación de lanzamientos de proyectiles balísticos, en virtud del artículo 4 del Acuerdo sobre accidentes nucleares de 1971, y en virtud del párrafo 1 del artículo 6 del Acuerdo sobre la prevención de incidentes en alta mar y en el espacio aéreo sobre la alta mar, de 1972; en el Protocolo II se estipula el establecimiento y el mantenimiento de comunicaciones por facsímile entre los centros para la reducción del riesgo nuclear de cada una de las partes (un circuito de satélites INTELSAT y un circuito de satélites STATSIONAR) Cuadro 2 (continuación) Título del acuerdo Lugar y fecha de la firma Entrada en vigor Duración Número de Estados partes Medidas de fomento de la confianza previstas B Acuerdos bilaterales relativos al espacio ultraterrestre (continuación) /...A/48/305 Español Página 32 60. El Tratado regula algunas otras cuestiones conexas, tales como la responsabilidad internacional (artículo VI), la responsabilidad internacional por los daños derivados de dichas actividades (artículo VII), la cuestión de la jurisdicción, el control y la propiedad de los objetos lanzados al espacio (artículo VIII), la cooperación entre los Estados Partes, las consultas en el caso de que se pudiera crear un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de otros Estados Partes (artículo IX); se abre la posibilidad de observar el vuelo de los objetos espaciales lanzados por otros Estados (artículo X); y se dispone que "todas las estaciones, instalaciones, equipo y vehículos espaciales situados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes serán accesibles a los representantes de otros Estados Partes en el presente Tratado, sobre la base de reciprocidad" (artículo XII). El texto del Tratado se reproduce en el apéndice. 2. Otros acuerdos multilaterales de ámbito mundial 61. a) El primer tratado multilateral de ámbito mundial por el que se regulan las actividades militares de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre es el Tratado por el que se prohíben los ensayos con armas nucleares en la atmósfera, el espacio ultraterrestre y debajo del agua de 196310. En virtud del artículo I del Tratado, los Estados Partes se comprometen "a prohibir, a prevenir, y a no llevar a cabo cualquier explosión de ensayo de armas nucleares, o cualquier otra explosión nuclear en cualquier lugar que se halle bajo su jurisdicción o autoridad" en la atmósfera, más allá de sus límites, incluido el espacio ultraterrestre, o debajo del agua, o en cualquier otro medio. En el Tratado no se establece un mecanismo para la verificación, sino que se deja a los Estados Partes la labor de realizarla por sus propios medios técnicos. 62. b) En el Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre de 196711 se establecen las obligaciones de los Estados Partes que sepan o descubran "que la tripulación de una nave espacial ha sufrido un accidente, se encuentra en situación de peligro o ha realizado un aterrizaje forzoso o involuntario" en el territorio de otro Estado, y dispone que aquél a) "lo notificará a la autoridad de lanzamiento o, si no puede identificar a la autoridad de lanzamiento ni comunicarse inmediatamente con ella, lo hará público inmediatamente por todos los medios apropiados de comunicación de que disponga"; y b) "lo notificará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, a quien correspondería difundir sin tardanza la noticia por todos los medios apropiados de comunicación de que disponga" (art. 1). El resto de las disposiciones reglamentan detalladamente las obligaciones de la "autoridad de lanzamiento", las obligaciones y derechos de las demás Partes Contratantes afectadas por accidentes de esta naturaleza y la obligación de las Partes de notificar al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas acerca de las medidas de búsqueda y salvamento que hubiesen adoptado. 63. c) En el Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales de 197112 se dispone que "Un Estado de lanzamiento tendrá responsabilidad absoluta y responderá de los daños causados por un objeto espacial suyo en la superficie de la Tierra o a las aeronaves en vuelo" (art. II). En el resto de los artículos se establecen las obligaciones y derechos de los Estados Partes en el caso de que se produzcan daños, entre los que figuran el procedimiento para reclamar indemnización, incluida la creación /...A/48/305 Español Página 33 de una Comisión de Reclamaciones, la responsabilidad de las organizaciones internacionales que llevan a cabo actividades espaciales, etc. 64. d) En virtud del Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre de 197513, los Estados Partes se comprometen a registrar los objetos espaciales, por medio de su inscripción en un registro apropiado, cuando uno de sus objetos sea lanzado en órbita terrestre o más allá, y a informar al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas de la creación de dicho registro (art. II). El Secretario General llevará un Registro en el que se inscribirá la información proporcionada de conformidad con el artículo II. En el artículo IV se especifica la información que cada Estado de registro habrá de proporcionar, como el nombre del Estado o de los Estados de lanzamiento, una designación apropiada del objeto espacial, la fecha y territorio o lugar de lanzamiento, los parámetros orbitales básicos y la función general del objeto espacial. El capítulo VII del presente estudio contiene información más detallada a este respecto. 65. e) Los instrumentos básicos de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (UIT) son la Constitución y el Convenio concluidos en 1992 y complementados por el Reglamento de Radiocomunicaciones y las actas finales de las Conferencias Administrativas Mundiales de Radiocomunicaciones. La función principal de la Unión consiste en asignar bandas del espectro de radiofrecuencia y asignar frecuencias de radiocomunicaciones y las posiciones orbitales conexas dentro de la órbita geoestacionaria. Además, cualquiera que lleve a cabo la explotación de un satélite, sea cual fuere la misión de éste, debe comunicar sus planes a la Junta Internacional de Registro de Frecuencias (IFRB) a fin de garantizar un funcionamiento óptimo y de evitar que se produzcan interferencias perjudiciales14. 66. f) La Convención sobre la prohibición de utilizar técnicas de modificación ambiental con fines militares u otros fines hostiles (Convención PROMOD) de 197815 prohíbe la utilización de técnicas de modificación ambiental con fines militares u otros fines hostiles que tengan efectos vastos, duraderos o graves, como medios para producir destrucciones, daños o perjuicios a otro Estado Parte (art. I) y define esas técnicas como aquellas que tienen por objeto alterar, mediante la manipulación deliberada de los procesos naturales, la dinámica, la composición o la estructura de la Tierra, incluida su biótica, su litosfera, su hidrosfera y su atmósfera, o del espacio ultraterrestre (art. II). Los Estados Partes se comprometen a "consultarse mutuamente y a cooperar en la solución de cualquier problema que surja en relación con los objetivos de la Convención o en la aplicación de sus disposiciones", dichas consultas y cooperación pueden llevarse a cabo también mediante los procedimientos internacionales apropiados dentro del marco de las Naciones Unidas y de conformidad con su Carta, procedimientos entre los que pueden figurar los servicios de un Comité Consultivo de Expertos como se prevé en el párrafo 2 del artículo V (art. V, párr. 1). Las funciones y el reglamento del Comité Consultivo de Expertos se formulan en el anexo de la Convención. Además, son importantes para la interpretación de la Convención las declaraciones convenidas en relación con la Convención (que se refieren a los artículos I, II, III y VIII)16. 67. g) En el acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes de 197917 se desarrollan los principios establecidos en /...A/48/305 Español Página 34 el Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre que se relacionan con las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. El Acuerdo establece que la Luna será utilizada exclusivamente con fines pacíficos y prohíbe recurrir a la amenaza o al uso de la fuerza, así como a cualquier otro acto hostil, en ella. Se confirman también las obligaciones de los Estados en lo que respecta a no poner en órbita alrededor de la Luna, ni en ninguna otra trayectoria hacia la Luna o alrededor de ella, objetos portadores de armas nucleares o de cualquier otro tipo de armas de destrucción en masa y a no establecer en ella bases, instalaciones o fortificaciones militares. En el Acuerdo sobre la Luna se establece también que "los Estados partes informarán al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, en toda la medida de lo posible y practicable, de sus actividades relativas a la exploración y utilización de la Luna". Entre la información que se debe proporcionar respecto de cada misión a la Luna, a la mayor brevedad posible después del lanzamiento, figura la relativa a la fecha, los objetivos, las localizaciones, los parámetros orbitales y la duración de la misión, en tanto que, después de terminada cada misión, se debe proporcionar información sobre sus resultados (art. V, párr. 1). Además, los Estados Partes "informarán prontamente al Secretario General, así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, de cualquier fenómeno que descubran en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso a la Luna, que puedan poner en peligro la vida o la salud humanas, así como de cualquier indicio de vida orgánica" (párrafo 2 del artículo 5). En virtud del artículo 9, "los Estados Partes podrán establecer en la Luna estaciones habitadas o inhabitadas. El Estado Parte que establezca una estación utilizará únicamente el área que sea precisa para las necesidades de la estación y notificará inmediatamente al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas el emplazamiento y objeto de tal estación. Ulteriormente, dicho Estado notificará asimismo cada año al Secretario General si la estación se sigue utilizando y si se ha modificado su objeto". B. Tratados bilaterales 68. a) El Tratado Concertado entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre la limitación de los sistemas de proyectiles antibalísticos de 1972 (Tratado PAB)18 , es de duración ilimitada y reviste una importancia especial para el presente estudio. El objetivo del Tratado es limitar los sistemas de misiles antibalísticos (PAB) y sus componentes destinados a interceptar proyectiles balísticos estratégicos o sus elementos en trayectoria de vuelo. Están incluidos los lanzadores, interceptores y radares construidos y desplegados para cumplir una misión PAB o que son de un tipo ensayado con fines PAB. En el artículo I se sienta el principio básico del Tratado, a saber, la limitación del despliegue de sistemas PAB a zonas convenidas y en niveles convenidos. En virtud del Tratado se prohíbe la creación, ensayo y despliegue de sistemas PAB o sus componentes con base en el mar, en tierra con plataforma móvil, en la atmósfera y, lo que es más importante en el contexto del estudio, en el espacio (art. V). 69. Además del aspecto de la limitación de los armamentos, el Tratado PAB reviste interés para el estudio por las normas que en él se establecen sobre el uso de los medios técnicos nacionales de verificación. Este es el primer acuerdo (junto con el acuerdo SALT I) en que se hace referencia a la verificación por estos medios, como puede verse en el párrafo 1 del artículo 12, /...A/48/305 Español Página 35 párrafo 1, en el que se codifican los medios nacionales de verificación y se especifica que se utilizarán en forma compatible con los principios generalmente aceptados de derecho internacional. Es importante también el concepto de no interferencia con el funcionamiento de los medios técnicos nacionales de verificación (párrafo 2 del artículo 12) ya que entre ellos se encuentran sistemas con base en tierra y sistemas con base en el espacio. Este concepto incluye también en forma implícita la protección de sistemas con base en el espacio, como los satélites de reconocimiento (párrafo 3 del artículo 12) y, por lo tanto, la protección contra cualquier forma de interferencia. De esta manera, las Partes en el Tratado dieron legitimidad a sus actividades mediante satélites encaminadas a la vigilancia del cumplimiento de los acuerdos de limitación de armamentos y de desarme. Además, para promover los objetivos y la aplicación de las disposiciones del Tratado, se estableció una Comisión Consultiva Permanente dentro de cuyo marco las Partes podrían, entre otras cosas, examinar las cuestiones relativas al cumplimiento de las obligaciones asumidas, proporcionar a título voluntario la información que cada una considerase necesaria para asegurar la confianza en el cumplimiento de las obligaciones asumidas, examinar las cuestiones relativas al entorpecimiento involuntario de los medios técnicos nacionales de verificación, examinar posibles cambios en la situación estratégica que guardasen relación con las disposiciones del Tratado, etc. 70. b) La no interferencia con los medios técnicos nacionales se ha estipulado también en otros acuerdos entre los Estados Unidos y la URSS. Al igual que las disposiciones del Tratado PAB, las medidas de verificación contenidas en el Acuerdo Provisional sobre Ciertas Medidas Relativas a la Limitación de las Armas Ofensivas Estratégicas (SALT I) de 197219 y en el Tratado entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre la Limitación de Armas Estratégicas Ofensivas (SALT II) de 197920 revisten especial importancia en relación con el espacio ultraterrestre. En virtud de lo dispuesto en el inciso c) del párrafo 1 del artículo 9 del Tratado SALT II se proscriben el desarrollo, la prueba y el despliegue de sistemas para colocar en la órbita terrestre armas nucleares o cualquier otro tipo de armas de destrucción en masa, incluidos los proyectiles de órbita fraccionaria. En el Tratado START I de 1991 se dispone también que cada parte "utilizará sus medios técnicos nacionales de verificación" (párrafo 1 del artículo IX) y "no interferirá con los medios técnicos nacionales de verificación" (párrafo 2 del artículo IX)21. En el Tratado START II, concluido el 3 de enero de 1993 entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Federación de Rusia, se dispone que para la aplicación de ese Tratado se utilizarán las disposiciones relativas a la verificación contenidas en el Tratado START I22. 71. c) Deben mencionarse también algunos otros instrumentos bilaterales que, si bien no contienen medidas de limitación de armamentos o de desarme, revisten cierta importancia para el estudio. Uno de ellos es el Acuerdo sobre las medidas para reducir el riesgo de desencadenar una guerra nuclear entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas de 197123. En virtud de este Acuerdo, las Partes se comprometen a facilitarse mutuamente información en caso de que suceda un incidente no autorizado o accidental que pueda provocar una guerra nuclear. Entre los requisitos del procedimiento de notificación que se establecen en el artículo 4 figura el de informar con antelación acerca de los lanzamientos previstos en el caso de que éstos se extiendan más allá del territorio nacional de la Parte que los haya /...A/48/305 Español Página 36 efectuado y lleven la dirección del territorio de la otra Parte. No obstante, el artículo 3 es el que guarda una relación más estrecha con el contexto de este estudio, ya que por medio de ese artículo las Partes en ese Tratado legitimizaron la existencia de ciertos sistemas de satélites y su utilización para fines militares. 72. d) La codificación de estos dos aspectos del Acuerdo de 1971 se detalló aún más en otro instrumento bilateral concluido el mismo día, el Acuerdo sobre medidas para mejorar el enlace directo de las comunicaciones entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas24. Los adelantos que habían tenido lugar desde 1963 en la tecnología de las comunicaciones por satélite25, ofrecían la posibilidad de beneficiarse de una mayor fiabilidad que las medidas que se habían acordado originalmente. En el Acuerdo, en cuyo anexo se detallan los aspectos concretos de la explotación, equipamiento y asignación de costos, se prevé el establecimiento de dos circuitos de comunicaciones por satélite entre los Estados Unidos y la URSS, con un sistema de terminales múltiples instalado en cada país. Los Estados Unidos deberán proporcionar un circuito por medio del sistema INTELSAT y, la URSS, un circuito por medio de su sistema MOLNIYA II. Además, cada Parte asume la responsabilidad de notificar a la otra cualquier modificación o sustitución que vaya a realizar en el sistema de comunicaciones por satélite que contenga el circuito que dicha Parte proporciona, y que pueda hacer necesaria alguna adaptación de las estaciones terrenas que utilizan ese sistema o que podría afectar en cualquier otra forma el mantenimiento del enlace directo de las comunicaciones. 73. e) Con el fin de complementar las medidas de comunicación de gobierno a gobierno adoptadas anteriormente, en el Acuerdo Concertado entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre el establecimiento de centros para la reducción del riesgo nuclear de 198726 y sus Protocolos I y II se codifica más a fondo la utilización de las comunicaciones por satélite en interés de la seguridad mutua. La comunicación entre los dos países se basa en enlaces directos por satélite. Estos enlaces se utilizan para el intercambio de la información y de las notificaciones requeridas en virtud de ciertos acuerdos de control de armamentos y de fomento de la confianza actualmente en vigor y de los que se puedan concluir en el futuro. En el artículo 1 del Protocolo I se dispone que ha de notificarse el lanzamiento de misiles balísticos de conformidad con el artículo 4 del Acuerdo sobre los accidentes nucleares de 1971 y con el párrafo 1 del artículo 6 del Acuerdo sobre la prevención de incidentes en y sobre la alta mar de 1972. Con el fin de lograr este propósito, en el artículo 1 del Protocolo II se dispone el establecimiento y mantenimiento de un circuito por satélite INTELSAT y de un circuito por satélite STATSIONAR encargados de facilitar la comunicación vía facsímile entre los Centros Nacionales de Riesgo Nuclear de las Partes. 74. f) El Acuerdo sobre la notificación de lanzamiento de misiles balísticos intercontinentales y de misiles balísticos lanzados desde submarinos de 198827 y el Acuerdo sobre la prevención de actividades militares peligrosas de 198928 son otros dos acuerdos bilaterales que guardan relación con el tema objeto del presente estudio. En el artículo 1 del acuerdo de 1988 se dispone que cada una de las Partes notificará, con no menos de 24 horas de antelación, la fecha, zona de lanzamiento y zona de impacto previstos de cualquier lanzamiento de un misil balístico estratégico (intercontinental o lanzado desde un submarino) y las /...A/48/305 Español Página 37 coordenadas geográficas de la zona o zonas de impacto previstas de los vehículos de reentrada. Las Partes convienen también en celebrar consultas, en la forma que mutuamente acuerden, para examinar cuestiones relativas a la aplicación de las disposiciones del Acuerdo. En el Acuerdo de 1989 se definen palabras y términos como láser y entorpecimiento de las redes de mando y de control. En este Acuerdo se codifica también el empleo de rayos láser en tiempo de paz. En el artículo 2, por ejemplo, se estipula que cada Parte adoptará las medidas necesarias para prevenir la utilización de "un láser de tal modo que su radiación pueda resultar nociva para el personal o causar daño al equipo de las fuerzas armadas de la otra Parte". Las Partes asumen también la obligación de notificarse mutuamente en el caso de que un láser sea utilizado de ese modo (párrafo 2 del artículo IV). Además, establece que, a fin de prevenir la realización de actividades militares peligrosas, y de resolver rápidamente cualquier incidente, las Partes deberán establecer y mantener las comunicaciones que se prevén en el anexo I del Acuerdo (art. VII). Asimismo, se establece una Comisión Militar Conjunta encargada de examinar las cuestiones relacionadas con el cumplimiento de las obligaciones contraídas en virtud del Acuerdo (art. IX). 75. Existen varios tratados bilaterales y regionales concluidos entre diferentes Estados que contienen disposiciones relacionadas con el espacio. C. Resoluciones de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas que contienen declaraciones de principios 76. La Asamblea General ha aprobado, por recomendación de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, varios conjuntos de principios rectores de las actividades espaciales de los Estados: la Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre (1963), los Principios que han de regir la utilización por los estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión (1982); los Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio (1986); y los Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre (1992). 77. a) El 13 de diciembre de 1963, la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas aprobó la resolución 1962 (XVIII) que contenía la Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre29. Sobre la base de los principios contenidos en la Declaración, se negociaron y concluyeron varios acuerdos multilaterales bajo los auspicios de la Naciones Unidas (como se ha indicado en las secciones A y B). En la Declaración se prevé, entre otras cosas, que "Si un Estado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, proyectado por él o por sus nacionales, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de otros Estados en materia de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, celebrará las consultas internacionales oportunas antes de emprender esa actividad o ese experimento. Si un Estado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, proyectado por otro Estado, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades en materia de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, podrá pedir que se celebren consultas sobre esa actividad o ese experimento" (Principio 6). /...A/48/305 Español Página 38 78. b) El 10 de diciembre de 1982, la Asamblea General aprobó la resolución 37/92, por la que aprobó los Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión30. En ella se dispone, entre otras cosas, que "Las actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión mediante satélites deberán realizarse de manera compatible con los derechos soberanos de los Estados" (Principio 1) y "de manera compatible con el fomento del entendimiento mutuo y el fortalecimiento de las relaciones de amistad y cooperación entre todos los Estados y pueblos con miras al mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales" (Principio 3). 79. c) El 3 de diciembre de 1986, la Asamblea General aprobó la resolución 41/65 que contiene los Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio31. En estos Principios se prevé, entre otras cosas, que las actividades de teleobservación "no deberán realizarse en forma perjudicial para los legítimos derechos e intereses del Estado observado" (Principio IV) y que "el Estado que realice un programa de teleobservación informará de ello al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas" y "Comunicará también, en la mayor medida posible dentro de lo viable y factible, toda la demás información pertinente a cualquier Estado, y especialmente a todo país en desarrollo afectado por ese programa, que lo solicite" (Principio IX). 80. d) El 14 de diciembre de 1992, la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas aprobó la resolución 47/68 que contenía los Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre32. En estos Principios se definen directrices y criterios para la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en condiciones de seguridad. En ellos se dispone, entre otras cosas, que los resultados de las evaluaciones de seguridad de las fuentes de energía nuclear realizadas por un Estado de lanzamiento "se harán públicos antes de cada lanzamiento y se informará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sobre la forma en que los Estados puedan llegar a conocer tales resultados de las evaluaciones de seguridad, a la mayor brevedad posible, antes de cada lanzamiento" (Principio 4). Asimismo, el Estado que lance un "objeto espacial con fuentes de energía nuclear a bordo deberá informar oportunamente a los Estados interesados en caso de que hubiera fallas de funcionamiento que entrañaran el riesgo de reingreso a la Tierra de materiales radiactivos" y deberá transmitir también esa información al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas "de manera que la comunidad internacional esté al corriente de la situación y tenga tiempo suficiente para planificar las actividades que se consideren necesarias en cada país" (Principio 5). /...A/48/305 Español Página 39 IV. CONSIDERACION GENERAL DEL CONCEPTO DE MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA 81. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza se aceptan cada vez más como un elemento importante para reducir las sospechas y tensiones existentes entre las naciones y para afianzar la paz y la estabilidad internacionales. Durante los tres decenios pasados, ciertos Estados han empezado a aplicar un número creciente de medidas bilaterales y multilaterales de fomento de la confianza. Esa rica experiencia histórica puede servir de base para evaluar las posibles contribuciones al fomento de la confianza en la esfera espacial. Al examinar dicha historia se descubre que esas medidas tienen algunas características comunes y que se pueden formular directrices para aplicarlas en determinadas circunstancias. Así, es posible determinar varios criterios para examinar la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. 82. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza han desempeñado también una función cada vez mayor en lo que respecta a la planificación de la seguridad de los Estados. Aunque al principio se limitaban a convenios bilaterales sobre armas nucleares estratégicas, esas medidas se han aplicado más recientemente a nivel internacional en la esfera de las fuerzas militares convencionales. Se va perfilando una clara pauta de medidas iniciales que reducen los riesgos de interpretaciones erróneas, que a su vez conduce a una elaboración de medidas más detalladas que se basan en esa experiencia positiva. 83. En el sistema de las Naciones Unidas se ha estado prestando creciente atención a la contribución que las medidas de fomento de la confianza podrían aportar en lo que respecta al fortalecimiento de la paz y la estabilidad internacionales. La experiencia positiva obtenida en el contexto bilateral, y en determinadas regiones ha constituido la base para la posible extensión de este proceso a otras esferas y asuntos. 84. En junio de 1978, en el párrafo 93 del Documento Final de su primer período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme, la Asamblea General observó que: "A fin de facilitar el proceso de desarme, es necesario adoptar medidas y aplicar políticas encaminadas a fortalecer la paz y la seguridad internacionales y a fomentar la confianza entre los Estados. El compromiso de adoptar medidas que fomenten la confianza podría contribuir en forma significativa a la preparación para progresos futuros en el desarme."33 85. En su trigésimo tercer período ordinario de sesiones, la Asamblea General aprobó la resolución 33/91, de 16 de diciembre de 1978, en cuya sección B recomendó a todos los Estados que considerasen la posibilidad de efectuar arreglos regionales en relación con el fomento de la confianza, y los invitó a que informaran al Secretario General sobre sus opiniones y experiencias respecto de las medidas de fomento de la confianza que consideraran adecuadas y viables. 86. Sobre la base de las respuestas a esa invitación, la Asamblea General aprobó la resolución 34/87, de 11 de diciembre de 1979, en cuya sección B decidió emprender un estudio amplio sobre las medidas de fomento de la confianza. El Grupo de Expertos encargado del estudio, integrado por 14 expertos gubernamentales, aprobó por consenso su informe el 14 de agosto /...A/48/305 Español Página 40 de 1981. El estudio constituyó el primer intento de aclarar y refinar el concepto de medidas de fomento de la confianza en un contexto mundial. Los expertos manifestaron la esperanza de que el informe proporcionara directrices y asesoramiento a los gobiernos que proyectaran elaborar y aplicar medidas de fomento de la confianza. También esperaban creara conciencia en el público acerca de la importancia de estas medidas, para el mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, así como para la formulación y promoción de un proceso de fomento de la confianza en diversas regiones34. 87. En su trigésimo sexto período ordinario de sesiones, la Asamblea General aprobó la resolución 36/97, de 9 de diciembre de 1982, en cuya sección F reiteró la importancia de las medidas de fomento de la confianza e invitó a todos los Estados a que consideraran la posibilidad de efectuar arreglos regionales de fomento de la confianza. Asimismo, pidió que se presentara a la Asamblea General, en su segundo período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme, un estudio amplio sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza. 88. En su trigésimo séptimo período ordinario de sesiones, la Asamblea General aprobó la resolución 37/100, en cuya sección D pidió a la Comisión de Desarme que considerara la elaboración de directrices para tipos apropiados de medidas de fomento de la confianza y para aplicarlas a nivel mundial y regional. Por último, el 18 de mayo de 1988, la Comisión aprobó las directrices35, que la Asamblea General hizo suyas en la sección H de su resolución 43/78. Las directrices figuran en el apéndice II del presente estudio. 89. Las Naciones Unidas han reconocido y promovido las medidas de fomento de la confianza como medios de disipar la desconfianza y estabilizar las situaciones de tensión, y han contribuido así a crear un clima propicio para la formulación de medidas eficaces de desarme y limitación de armamentos. 90. Sobre la base del estudio amplio sobre las medidas de fomento de la confianza, las directrices aprobadas por la Comisión de Desarme de las Naciones Unidas y otros convenios existentes, se examinan a continuación las características y criterios comunes para su aplicación y aplicabilidad. A. Características 91. El proceso de fomento de la confianza se origina en la creencia de que otros Estados están dispuestos a cooperar, y de que esa confianza aumenta con el tiempo, a medida que la conducta de los Estados demuestra su disposición a comportarse de manera cooperativa. 92. El proceso de fomento de la confianza entre los Estados avanza gracias a la reducción paulatina, o incluso la eliminación, de las causas de desconfianza, temor, malentendidos y errores de cálculo por lo que respecta a las capacidades militares y/o de doble uso pertinentes de otros Estados así como de otras actividades suyas relativas a la seguridad. Este proceso se basa en la premisa de reconocer que todo Estado necesita recibir garantías de que determinadas actividades militares o relativas a la seguridad realizadas por otros Estados no constituyen una amenaza para su propia seguridad. /...A/48/305 Español Página 41 93. La eficacia de las medidas de fomento de la confianza depende del grado en que esas medidas respondan directamente a percepciones concretas de incertidumbre o amenaza en situaciones o medios determinados. Por ello se deben concebir medidas específicas para cada circunstancia precisa. 94. El proceso de fomento de la confianza debe establecer un equilibrio entre las aplicaciones bilaterales y las multilaterales. Tal vez no se puedan encontrar aplicaciones mundiales para determinadas medidas regionales, pero estas medidas deben concebirse en un contexto mundial, teniendo en cuenta consideraciones regionales precisas. 95. El afianzamiento de la confianza se basa primordialmente en la política sobre prácticas militares aplicada por los Estados, y en medidas concretas que pongan de manifiesto un compromiso político cuyo significado se pueda examinar, verificar y evaluar. La certidumbre surge de la experiencia obtenida en lo que respecta al comportamiento de los Estados en situaciones particulares. De esa manera, la proclamación de principios generalmente aceptados de comportamiento internacional, las exposiciones de motivos o las promesas de comportamiento futuro se reciben con beneplácito, pero puede que no sean suficientes para reducir las sospechas o la percepción de que existe una amenaza. 96. Se podrá alcanzar una mayor confianza únicamente cuando el volumen de información en poder de los Estados les permita hacer previsiones satisfactorias y calcular las acciones y reacciones de otros Estados dentro de su entorno político. El nivel de previsibilidad aumenta según el nivel de apertura y transparencia con que los Estados estén dispuestos a dirigir sus asuntos políticos y militares. 97. La apertura, la previsibilidad y la fiabilidad de las políticas de los Estados son fundamentales para el mantenimiento y fortalecimiento de la confianza. Los acuerdos sobre medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza, al establecer el marco para una amplia gama de contactos e intercambios, pueden contribuir a mitigar las sospechas y a generar confianza. Mediante la ampliación de los contactos personales entre los encargados de adoptar decisiones es posible atenuar los prejuicios y las concepciones erróneas, que constituyen la base de la desconfianza y el temor. 98. El modo más eficaz de reducir las impresiones de amenaza o las situaciones de incertidumbre consiste en aplicar de manera consecuente, constante y plena las medidas aceptadas de fomento de la confianza. La fiabilidad, seriedad y credibilidad del compromiso de los Estados con el proceso de reducción de la desconfianza se demuestran aplicando responsablemente tales medidas. 99. El fomento de la confianza es un proceso mediante el cual la acumulación de experiencia en cuanto a formas de interacción positiva constituye el fundamento de una confiabilidad más amplia y de medidas ulteriores de fomento de la confianza. Se trata de un proceso dinámico, que se acelera con el tiempo. 100. Así pues, en general, este proceso evoluciona normalmente a partir de compromisos globales de índole menos coercitiva hasta llegar a compromisos más concretos, lo que actualmente da lugar a que se establezca paulatinamente una amplia red de medidas tendientes a afianzar la seguridad de los Estados: /...A/48/305 Español Página 42 a) Un medio de fomentar la confianza consiste en incrementar la calidad y la cantidad de la información que se intercambie sobre actividades y capacidad militares; b) Otro medio de seguir fomentando la confiabilidad y la predecibilidad consiste en ampliar el ámbito de las medidas de fomento de la confianza; c) Otro medio de fortalecer el fomento de la confianza consiste en incrementar el grado de adhesión al proceso. Debe darse reciprocidad a las medidas unilaterales adoptadas voluntariamente, de modo que se llegue a compromisos políticos mutuos respecto de medidas que puedan convertirse ulteriormente en obligaciones jurídicamente vinculantes. 101. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza tienen, principalmente, repercusiones políticas y sicológicas, y aunque estén estrechamente relacionadas no siempre pueden considerarse por sí solas disposiciones sobre limitación de armamentos en el sentido de que limiten o reduzcan las fuerzas armadas. Más bien, el fortalecimiento de la confianza puede tener efectos positivos en la estimación subjetiva de las intenciones y expectativas de otros Estados. 102. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza pueden contribuir al progreso en materia de acuerdos de desarme y limitación de armamentos. Podrían complementar los acuerdos de desarme y limitación de armamentos y, por ello, llegar a ser un importante medio para lograr progresos en la reducción de las tensiones internacionales. En el contexto de las negociaciones sobre desarme y limitación de armamentos, dichas medidas pueden ser parte del propio acuerdo, propiciando así el cumplimiento de las disposiciones sobre aplicación y verificación. 103. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza no pueden ser un sucedáneo de progresos concretos en la limitación y reducción de armamentos. La desconfianza y el recelo ocasionados por el aumento desenfrenado del número de armas, o por los constantes adelantos en la capacidad de esas armas, contrarrestarán con creces la contribución de las iniciativas de fomento de la confianza. B. Criterios 104. Para que las medidas de fomento de la confianza se apliquen eficazmente es preciso efectuar un análisis cuidadoso a fin de determinar con gran claridad cuáles son los factores que fortalecen o socavan la confianza en situaciones determinadas. 105. Si se desea contribuir plenamente al fomento de la predecibilidad y la confiabilidad, es preciso que se evalúe con exactitud la aplicación de las medidas adoptadas. Por ello es indispensable que se definan, con la mayor precisión y detalle posibles, los pormenores de las medidas que se adopten para fomentar la confianza. 106. Así pues, el proceso de fomento de la confianza requiere la adopción de criterios claros para juzgar el comportamiento de los Estados. Tales criterios son necesarios tanto para que los Estados pueden orientar sus propias actividades como para que cada Estado pueda evaluar las actividades de los demás Estados. El fomento de la confianza avanzará en la medida en que el /...A/48/305 Español Página 43 comportamiento de los Estados sea compatible con los criterios que se hayan aceptado y establecido. 107. El requisito de claridad también significa que los criterios aceptados deben poder ser verificados fácilmente por las partes interesadas y afectadas. Los procedimientos de verificación pueden por sí solos contribuir a fomentar la confianza. 108. Para que se inicie la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza es preciso que exista un consenso entre los Estados participantes. La aceptación de medidas prácticas para aplicar principios legítimos y universales de comportamiento internacional es el resultado de la voluntad política de los Estados, en libre ejercicio de su soberanía. Esa decisión entraña compromisos relativos a las medidas que se han de aplicar y la manera de aplicarlas. La observación de los principios de igualdad soberana, y la seguridad irrestricta y equilibrada son condiciones esenciales para los Estados que participan en el proceso de fomento de la confianza. 109. Las medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza tienen que ser aplicables a capacidades militares precisas, y relacionarse con características tecnológicas concretas de los sistemas militares. Al formular dichas medidas hay que tener en cuenta los aspectos de las tecnologías y sistemas militares que resulten más pertinentes en lo que respecta a las preocupaciones de seguridad de los Estados interesados y afectados. Del mismo modo, en las medidas de fomento de la confianza hay que tener en cuenta las características excepcionales del medio geográfico y físico en que se han de aplicar. C. Aplicabilidad 110. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza son aplicables a tres categorías de Estados: a) los que participan directamente en actividades que pueden ser causa de desconfianza o tensión; b) otros Estados afectados por las políticas militares o de seguridad de los Estados de la primera categoría; y c) los Estados cuya participación consiste en alentar el avance del proceso de fomento de la confianza. 111. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza varían, según se trate de obligaciones positivas o de restricciones negativas, y según se trate de una obligación que implica un intercambio de información o en una restricción de las actividades. 112. Esas medidas se han dividido en tres amplias categorías, según las actividades a las que se apliquen: a) Las actividades que se alientan incluyen aquellas que promueven los usos pacíficos del espacio en favor de toda la humanidad, como la exploración científica y el descubrimiento. Estas actividades incluyen medidas mediante las cuales los Estados muestran que sus intenciones y capacidades no son hostiles ni agresivas. Esas medidas, que se pueden aplicar de manera ininterrumpida, incluyen intercambios de información y personal, así como datos sobre el nivel y características de las fuerzas; /...A/48/305 Español Página 44 b) Las actividades que se permiten comprenden toda la gama de actividades que no están explícitamente prohibidas, aunque tampoco se alientan específicamente. Estas actividades incluyen medidas que reducen la aprensión que puedan tener los Estados en cuanto al potencial combativo para fines de actividades militares concretas. En particular, una de las medidas que tienen por objeto reducir las preocupaciones relativas a ataques sorpresivos consiste en notificar los movimientos militares y las actividades conexas; c) Las actividades que se prohíben son aquellas que están prohibidas en virtud de diversos elementos del actual régimen jurídico internacional, como la colocación de armas de destrucción masiva en el espacio. Las medidas destinadas a fortalecer estas prohibiciones incluyen las medidas encaminadas a limitar o prohibir el alcance o el carácter de determinados tipos de actividad, ya sea en circunstancias particulares o en general. Esas medidas difieren de las medidas tradicionales relativas al desarme o a la limitación de armamentos en que la limitación o la prohibición se refiere a las actividades de las fuerzas, y no a la capacidad o al potencial de éstas. 113. Hay además otras categorías de actividades cuya prohibición fomentaría la confianza. Esas categorías son: a) Actividades que aún no se hayan realizado y que en el presente no estén previstas, confirmando las normas de comportamiento existentes y proyectando esas normas hacia el futuro; b) Actividades que de otra manera se podrían realizar en una región o entorno determinados, con inclusión de actividades en sectores particularmente delicados como las zonas fronterizas; c) Actividades que únicamente se llevarían a cabo en una etapa en que se estuviesen deteriorando las relaciones políticas o militares. 114. Estas medidas podrían imponer limitaciones a algunas opciones militares, pero no podrían reemplazar otras medidas más concretas de limitación de armamentos o de desarme que sí limitarían y reducirían de manera directa las capacidades militares. /...A/48/305 Español Página 45 V. ASPECTOS CONCRETOS DE LAS MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE 115. Al extender al espacio ultraterrestre los principios universales sobre las medidas de fomento de la confianza se deben tener en cuenta las singulares características del medio espacial y de la tecnología espacial. La experiencia bilateral y regional obtenida hasta el presente en lo relativo a las iniciativas de fomento de la confianza puede servir para elaborar nuevas iniciativas. 116. Hay varios aspectos del medio espacial que lo diferencian de otros entornos en que se han aplicado ya medidas de fomento de la confianza. A. Aspectos propios del medio espacial 117. El espacio ultraterrestre está, a la vez, cercano y distante. Está distante en el sentido de que es difícil tener acceso a ese espacio, y a que, por su magnitud, incluso la estratosfera deja pequeñas las dimensiones terrestres. Está cercano en el sentido de que todos los Estados se hallan a una distancia relativamente corta del espacio ultraterreste, el cual se encuentra a sólo unos pocos kilómetros por encima de todos ellos. 118. El espacio ultraterrestre es a la vez un medio excepcionalmente hostil y excepcionalmente benigno. El vacío del espacio es fatal para los seres humanos que no estén protegidos, y presenta desafíos insólitos tanto para la experimentación como para el funcionamiento de objetos en el espacio. Asimismo, las radiaciones del medio espacial, cuya intensidad excede en gran medida la de las radiaciones terrestres, presentan graves peligros. Por otra parte, los meteoroides de origen natural y los desechos procedentes de las actividades de los seres humanos en el espacio plantean peligros a los seres humanos y su equipo que no tienen paralelos en la Tierra. La nave espacial y sus ocupantes (en su caso) se deben proteger de las bajas temperaturas en la zona de sombra de la Tierra o en el espacio interestelar, así como de las elevadas temperaturas que se generan al utilizar equipo de gran potencia a pleno sol. Y a pesar de ello, el espacio es también un medio excepcionalmente benigno. Una vez que entra en órbita y se libera de las tensiones del lanzamiento y la resistencia de la atmósfera, la nave espacial puede desplegar estructuras enormes y delicadas que se desplomarían rápidamente si se levantaren en la superficie de la Tierra o se proyectaran a gran velocidad a través de la atmósfera. 119. Un cohete tarda sólo unos pocos minutos en trasladar una nave espacial desde la superficie terrestre hasta una órbita cercana a la Tierra. Una vez que está en esa órbita, un satélite se desplaza a una velocidad de más de 25.000 kilómetros por hora, circundando el globo terráqueo hasta 16 veces en un día y proporcionando un vehículo excepcional para observar la Tierra. Además, cuando se encuentra en órbita por encima del régimen de resistencia de la atmósfera, una nave espacial continuará sin obstáculos durante años o decenios en su trayectoria de gravitación y radiación designadas. 120. Estas características ambientales plantean problemas tecnológicos excepcionales a quienes aspiran a llegar al espacio y utilizarlo. Las dificultades técnicas y la carga financiera que entraña el trasladarse al espacio y realizar actividades en él constituyen un desafío incluso para los /...A/48/305 Español Página 46 países más ricos y de tecnología más avanzada, y exceden con creces la capacidad y los recursos de la mayoría de los Estados. 121. Así pues, los países se pueden clasificar en tres categorías por lo menos, según su capacidad espacial. Hasta el presente, sólo dos naciones, los Estados Unidos y la Federación de Rusia, poseen la gama completa de pequeños y grandes vehículos de lanzamiento, de naves espaciales tripuladas y no tripuladas, y tecnología espacial civil y militar que es posible alcanzar en la actualidad. 122. Un creciente número de Estados tiene parte de esa capacidad, pero no toda, y suele consistir en instalaciones de lanzamiento y conocimientos en materia de diseño, manufactura y funcionamiento de satélites de investigación y de otra índole. El resto de los países, que constituyen la gran mayoría, no son potencias espaciales de este calibre, y obtienen beneficios de la explotación del espacio únicamente, por medio de la capacidad de los demás. 123. Al mismo tiempo, el número de países que participan directa o indirectamente en actividades espaciales no ha cesado de ampliarse desde 1957, y lo mismo ha sucedido con su capacidad. Todo hace suponer que estas tendencias continuarán en los decenios venideros. 124. El Grupo de Expertos toma nota de la opinión de algunos Estados de que es necesario ajustar cuanto antes ciertos aspectos del mercado espacial actual, especialmente en vista del nuevo clima político mundial. 125. Las propuestas tendientes al fomento de la confianza se han centrado en gran parte en medidas encaminadas a reducir las preocupaciones acerca de ataques sorpresivos o guerras involuntarias. Uno de los factores fundamentales que inciden en la aplicación de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre consiste, precisamente, en determinar cuáles son los problemas de seguridad planteados por las actividades y la tecnología espaciales que hay que examinar. 126. Para ello será preciso comprender el valor relativo de las medidas de fomento de la confianza aplicadas al espacio y de la cooperación en proyectos espaciales. La cooperación en el espacio, por sí sola, es capaz de fortalecer la confianza internacional y se podría considerar como una medida de fomento de la confianza. 127. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza pueden constituir una reacción al carácter intrusivo de las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre. El acceso al espacio concede a las potencias espaciales los medios de penetrar en todos los puntos de la Tierra, para muy diversos fines civiles y militares. Esta capacidad de intrusión, incluso en los casos en que no entrañe armamentos, puede generar desconfianza. Por ello, las medidas de fomento de la confianza podrían tener por objeto el dar seguridades de que las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre no se utilizarán contra los países no espaciales. Una mayor apertura en lo que respecta a las actividades militares y de otra índole realizadas en el espacio podría constituir una novedad positiva no sólo en la esfera militar, sino también en la esfera económica y social. 128. Desde otro punto de vista, las amenazas futuras a la estabilidad podrían surgir no sólo de sistemas militares en el espacio en general, sino también de /...A/48/305 Español Página 47 las armas espaciales en particular. Habría que seguir analizando las consecuencias de la elaboración de nuevos sistemas militares concebidos para su despliegue en el espacio. 129. En la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza a las actividades espaciales influye también una serie de otros factores. La verificación del cumplimiento es un elemento fundamental del fomento de la confianza. El espacio ofrece tanto desafíos como oportunidades para la verificación. Las enormes distancias del espacio, y las avanzadas tecnologías de los sistemas espaciales, pueden hacer más compleja la verificación. Al mismo tiempo, el espacio es el más transparente de los medios, pues está abierto en todas las direcciones, y las tecnologías se prestan a la verificación. Toda vez que algunos sistemas espaciales se pueden utilizar con fines tanto civiles como militares, no siempre es fácil establecer una diferencia entre esos fines. B. Aspectos políticos y jurídicos 130. La base política del fomento de la confianza en el espacio es la aplicación de principios universales de cooperación internacional y de prácticas de los Estados al medio del espacio ultraterrestre. 131. La prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre es un objetivo concreto de los esfuerzos por elaborar medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. Sin embargo hay otros objetivos que también podrían ser pertinentes en ese proceso. 132. Esos otros objetivos, que surgen de la preocupación manifestada por distintos grupos de Estados, se basan principalmente en la posibilidad de tener acceso al espacio, la realización de la transferencia de tecnología que les posibilite ese acceso y las cuestiones relativas a la estabilidad regional y mundial. El hecho de que las naciones y la comunidad internacional dependan cada vez más de la tecnología espacial para lograr objetivos económicos y sociales acentúa la necesidad de que todas las actividades realizadas en el espacio se lleven a cabo en un medio libre de riesgos. Esas preocupaciones se deben a las grandes diferencias existentes en materia de capacidad entre las distintas categorías de Estados. 133. En el pasado, las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre de las principales potencias espaciales parecían depender, al menos en parte, de los objetivos estratégicos que cada una de esas potencias trataba de alcanzar en el contexto de sus relaciones bilaterales. Es evidente que, desde las negociaciones para el Tratado PAB celebradas a principios del decenio de 1970 hasta las más recientes Conversaciones sobre defensa y espacio (cuya ronda más reciente tuvo lugar en octubre de 1991), siempre se ha hecho hincapié en la relación estratégica bilateral. Debido a los importantes cambios ocurridos en esa relación bilateral desde 1989, algunas actividades de cada una de ellas, particularmente las realizadas en el medio espacial con fines militares, al parecer se han definido de nuevo y se han reducido, por lo menos en parte, en virtud de consideraciones relativas al costo, la capacidad tecnológica y las restricciones jurídicas existentes. /...A/48/305 Español Página 48 134. Otra consideración importante a este respecto es, el hecho de que está aumentando el número de naciones con creciente capacidad en esferas relacionadas con el espacio ultraterrestre. Esto tiene repercusiones tanto mundiales como regionales, y aún falta determinar cuál es su importancia en lo que respecta a la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre desde los puntos de vista estratégico, económico y ambiental. 135. Además, aún no se sabe si las nuevas potencias espaciales estarán interesadas mayormente en aplicaciones científicas y otras actividades de índole civil, más bien que en las aplicaciones militares, como las principales potencias espaciales actuales. La respuesta podría depender en parte del alcance que llegue a tener la cooperación internacional en el espacio, así como de la índole de los demás intereses estratégicos de las nuevas potencias espaciales. 136. Las potencias no espaciales desean que se les den seguridades de que las principales potencias espaciales no utilizarán su capacidad espacial en forma alguna contra los países no espaciales. Además, esos Estados desean que el espacio se utilice exclusivamente con fines pacíficos. 137. El Tratado sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre y otros tratados que se examinan en el capítulo III contienen disposiciones que se pueden considerar medidas de fomento de la confianza. En lo que atañe al régimen jurídico, existen en el presente dos puntos de vista: en primer lugar, que el régimen jurídico en vigor representa un marco de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre que debe ser objeto de un examen constante, y, en segundo lugar, que el régimen jurídico existente es insuficiente y debe ser examinado más a fondo. En este último caso, la elaboración de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre facilitaría el cumplimiento de los tratados existentes. 138. Aún no se ha determinado si las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre podrían ser el tema de un tratado por separado o de un instrumento especial. Sea como fuere, sigue siendo necesario definir con mayor precisión algunos términos jurídicos y elaborar algunos otros, a fin de cumplir con las necesidades impuestas por la situación política y por los avances tecnológicos y científicos en el espacio ultraterrestre. C. Repercusiones tecnológicas y científicas 139. Las repercusiones tecnológicas y científicas de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre son de dos tipos, que corresponden a: las tecnologías que se pueden usar en apoyo de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre y las que se pueden utilizar para fomentar la confianza desde el espacio ultraterrestre. 140. Algunas actividades de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre podrían requerir una gama de tecnologías que se pudieran utilizar tanto para vigilar las actividades en el espacio como para aumentar la transparencia de las operaciones espaciales. Actualmente, si bien algunas actividades espaciales están previstas en acuerdos internacionales, como los procedimientos de publicación y notificación previas para todas las estaciones de satélites /...A/48/305 Español Página 49 previstos en las normas de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones, numerosas actividades espaciales no están reguladas por ningún acuerdo internacional concreto. 141. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza desde el espacio pueden mejorarse mediante diversos sistemas capaces de vigilar las actividades militares terrestres, en apoyo de las medidas de fomento de la confianza y de los regímenes de desarme y de reducción de armamentos vigentes y previstos. 142. Muchos sistemas espaciales tienen intrínsecamente una capacidad doble; es decir que encierran el potencial de cumplir funciones tanto civiles como militares. La tecnología utilizada para el lanzamiento de satélites es similar, en muchos aspectos, a la que se usa con los misiles balísticos de largo alcance. Los satélites utilizados para observar los recursos naturales pueden también obtener imágenes de interés para los estrategas militares, en tanto que los satélites de comunicaciones, meteorológicos y demás revisten utilidad tanto para fines civiles como militares. 143. Las múltiples aplicaciones de la tecnología del espacio entrañan varias consecuencias concretas. Algunas operaciones espaciales, incluidas las operaciones militares aunque no exclusivamente, producen desechos artificiales en el espacio que pueden constituir un peligro para otros satélites. Además, algunos tipos de misiones espaciales, tanto militares como civiles, pueden requerir fuentes de energía nuclear. El cumplimiento de las cláusulas de notificaciones que figuran en la resolución 47/68 de la Asamblea General podría disipar la inquietud en cuanto a la seguridad de utilizar estos dispositivos en el espacio ultraterrestre. Aunque la prohibición total de esas fuentes de energía nuclear tal vez no resulte aceptable, el suministro de más información y una mayor apertura podrían ser útiles para disipar la inquietud en cuanto a la seguridad. 1. La tecnología y el espacio ultraterrestre 144. Las consideraciones tecnológicas brindan varias oportunidades para la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, aunque establecen también algunas limitaciones de carácter práctico a estas operaciones. Las consideraciones tecnológicas tienen que ver tanto con la naturaleza de las actividades en el espacio como con los medios para la observación de estas actividades. 145. Cabe dividir las actividades en el espacio en varias fases, tales como el lanzamiento, las órbitas de transferencia, los despliegues, la comprobación y el funcionamiento. Antes de la fase de funcionamiento puede resultar difícil clasificar correctamente la función final de un satélite concreto. Sin embargo, cuando están en órbita y funcionando, los satélites por lo general exhiben características que son exclusivas de vehículos espaciales que desempeñan una función determinada. Por consiguiente, normalmente es posible identificar esa función. Los satélites de telecomunicaciones transmiten en frecuencias de radio de potencia, cobertura de frecuencia y polarización específicas. Los satélites utilizados con fines meteorológicos y para la observación de los recursos naturales por medios ópticos, así como los empleados para la obtención de información de inteligencia mediante imágenes y la alerta temprana de /...A/48/305 Español Página 50 lanzamientos de misiles tienen, sin excepción, sistemas ópticos con diversas aperturas y transmiten enormes cantidades de datos cuando están captando. Los satélites de radar, tanto civiles como militares, despliegan grandes antenas transmisoras y receptoras que emiten señales de radar en radiofrecuencias específicas, junto con datos a alta velocidad. Los satélites de obtención de información de inteligencia por medios electrónicos pueden desplegar antenas receptoras especiales. Finalmente, todos los satélites, sea cual sea su tipo, transmiten a las estaciones en tierra pautas telemétricas características. a) Tecnología para la vigilancia de las operaciones espaciales 146. Desde 1957, los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética han desplegado una amplia gama de sistemas para vigilar las actividades en el espacio36. Una de las funciones de estos sistemas ha sido el dar la alerta en caso de un ataque con misiles estratégicos. Pero el creciente número de satélites en órbita ha aumentado la necesidad de llevar un registro de los nuevos lanzamientos y de los deterioros inminentes de satélites, a fin de no confundir estos sucesos con lanzamientos de misiles hostiles. Por otra parte, el creciente alcance de las operaciones militares en el espacio ha hecho del registro y la caracterización de los sistemas espaciales una tarea importante por derecho propio. 147. Los sistemas de rastreo de satélites, tanto ópticos como de radar, se encuentran entre las tecnologías militares de teleobservación más avanzadas y caras. Los radares de rastreo espacial suelen tener alcances y sensibilidades de 10 a 100 veces mayores que los radares de rastreo de aviones u objetivos en la superficie. Además, los sistemas de rastreo óptico utilizan telescopios comparables a los de cualquier observatorio astronómico civil, con excepción de los más grandes. b) Sistemas ópticos pasivos con base en tierra 148. Los primeros tipos de sistemas de rastreo de satélites, y todavía los más baratos, utilizan la luz solar que refleja el vehículo espacial. Visible con el telón de fondo del firmamento al alba o tras la puesta de sol, los vehículos espaciales más grandes de órbita baja, como las estaciones espaciales o los satélites de obtención de información de inteligencia mediante imágenes, resultan comparables a las estrellas más brillantes del firmamento, en tanto que muchos otros satélites en órbita baja son visibles a simple vista37. Incluso los satélites situados a altitudes geosincrónicas son visibles, en condiciones ópticas de iluminación38, con instrumentos ópticos relativamente modestos. 149. La capacidad de un telescopio para observar satélites depende fundamentalmente de la apertura de su superficie óptica primaria, así como de las propiedades de los medios utilizados para crear la imagen. Para el rastreo de satélites se han utilizado telescopios con espejos de hasta 4 metros de diámetro. En un principio, las cámaras de rastreo de satélites utilizaban sistemas de película, pero últimamente los dispositivos de acoplamiento por carga electrónica (CCD) han sustituido a los sistemas de película. Estos dispositivos brindan una lectura instantánea de la imagen, sin necesidad del lento proceso de revelado que requieren los sistemas de película. Estas cámaras electrónicas con dispositivos de procesamiento de imágenes han permitido utilizar telescopios científicos de modestas aperturas de unos cuantos /...A/48/305 Español Página 51 metros para obtener imágenes reconocibles de vehículos espaciales grandes en órbitas bajas39. c) Sistemas ópticos activos con base en tierra 150. Aunque la mayoría de los sensores ópticos de rastreo de satélites se basan en la luz solar reflejada o en la energía infrarroja emitida, se están encontrando cada vez más aplicaciones para los sensores ópticos activos. Al iluminar el objetivo con una radiación de láser coherente, estos sistemas pueden formar imágenes de satélites durante la noche, cuando no están iluminados por la luz solar, así como de objetivos que pueden estar oscurecidos por la luminosidad del cielo durante las horas de luz. El uso de la iluminación activa permite también medir directamente la distancia hasta el objetivo, además de facilitar la clasificación de la estructura del satélite. d) Radar con base en tierra 151. Los sistemas de radar con base en tierra se vienen utilizando desde finales del decenio de 1950 para el rastreo de satélites civiles y militares40. El radar tiene varias ventajas en comparación con los sistemas de rastreo óptico, incluida su capacidad de observar objetivos y medir su distancia en cualquier tipo de condiciones climatológicas, independientemente de si se cuenta o no con iluminación natural. Hoy en día, tanto los Estados Unidos como la Comunidad de Estados Independientes despliegan amplias redes de radares que realizan funciones de rastreo de satélites y otras tareas, como la detección de ataques con misiles. 152. Al avanzar la tecnología del radar, se ha planteado una nueva dimensión del problema. Los grandes radares de antena de elementos múltiples en fase de hoy en día pueden realizar funciones muy diversas, entre ellas, dar la alerta temprana en caso de ataque con misiles o bombarderos. Estos grandes radares pueden rastrear satélites y otros objetos en el espacio y observar ensayos de misiles a fin de obtener información con fines de vigilancia. Además, son un elemento esencial de la actual generación de sistemas de misiles antibalísticos, dando la alerta inicial en caso de ataque y apoyando la dirección de la batalla, distinguiendo entre los vehículos de reentrada y los señuelos y guiando a los interceptores hacia sus blancos. e) Otras características de los medios técnicos de vigilancia espacial 153. Si bien estos distintos sistemas de obtención de información, muchos de los cuales se han construido con otros fines, pueden aumentar la transparencia de las operaciones en el espacio, hay algunas actividades espaciales militares que podrían requerir la aplicación de técnicas especiales diseñadas para proporcionar una confianza suficiente en cuanto a su naturaleza. 154. La presencia de fuentes de energía nuclear y de muchos tipos de armas espaciales en los satélites puede determinarse mediante la inspección antes del lanzamiento de toda la carga útil del satélite. /...A/48/305 Español Página 52 f) Vigilancia de las armas espaciales 155. Al considerar los sistemas de vigilancia de las armas espaciales se pueden aplicar tres criterios. En primer lugar, los sistemas de obtención de información necesarios y otros medios de aumentar la transparencia deben de estar disponibles durante el período en que es probable que se produzcan las actividades que suscitan inquietud. 156. En segundo lugar el costo de la vigilancia puede ser un obstáculo para la verificación. No es probable que los sistemas que requieren enormes gastos y producen datos de escaso interés obtengan apoyo suficiente. 157. En tercer lugar, los sistemas técnicos de obtención de información no deben ser tan poderosos que acaben imitando a los propios sistemas antimisiles que están supuestos a limitar. Puede resultar difícil distinguir entre los sistemas antisatélite prohibidos y los sistemas de verificación que requieren que satélites de inspección realicen encuentros con otros satélites para determinar la presencia o ausencia de actividades prohibidas. Puede ser igualmente difícil distinguir entre los sensores que constituirían la base de un sistema de dirección de batallas antimisiles y los enormes sensores telescópicos de infrarrojos con base en el espacio utilizados para la verificación. 158. La capacidad del láser (su "potencia luminosa") depende de la apertura de su espejo, y de la potencia y longitud de onda del rayo láser. Aunque la apertura del espejo se puede vigilar por distintos medios, no está claro que la tecnología actualmente disponible permita verificar algo más el principal haz operacional. Es posible que durante otro decenio no se disponga de instrumentos adecuados para vigilar la potencia y longitud de onda de los dispositivos de láser. 159. Por ejemplo, el desarrollo y despliegue de sensores especializados completamente nuevos con base en el espacio dedicados a la vigilancia de factores como la potencia luminosa del láser podrían requerir hasta 10 años desde el momento en que se toma la decisión de fabricar ese dispositivo. En tal situación, cabría considerar medidas de cooperación como las estaciones de vigilancia en los países, ya que se podrían desplegar mucho antes. 160. Todos los satélites civiles y militares son puestos en órbita por vehículos de lanzamiento que pueden ser observados por los satélites de alerta temprana. Las instalaciones y actividades de lanzamiento están vigiladas por satélites de formación de imágenes. Todos los satélites en órbita se pueden rastrear mediante diversos tipos de radares y cámaras con base en tierra. 161. Las pruebas de armas antisatélite y armas conexas contra un punto en el espacio sin tener un objetivo no proporcionarían las debidas garantías respecto de la exactitud libre de error necesaria para los mecanismos de intercepción por impacto de energía cinética. Las maniobras de interceptación de los interceptores de energía cinética se pueden distinguir de las actividades de otros satélites. Además, mediante los sensores basados en el espacio se pueden vigilar las corrientes telemétricas procedentes de los satélites. En consecuencia, debido a sus especiales necesidades en materia de pruebas, las armas de energía cinética se pueden vigilar fácilmente por distintos medios. /...A/48/305 Español Página 53 2. Tecnología y medidas de fomento de la confianza 162. Si bien los sistemas espaciales pueden ser objeto de vigilancia y medidas de fomento de la confianza, también pueden contribuir ellos mismos a este proceso. Los satélites pueden utilizarse para vigilar a otros satélites así como las actividades terrestres. Aunque esta última aplicación es una de las misiones de los satélites de formación de imágenes y otros satélites de obtención de información de inteligencia examinados anteriormente, también se han presentado propuestas para desarrollar satélites específicamente con este objeto. Para algunos países, la transparencia en relación con las capacidades de lanzamiento espacial es una importante cuestión de actualidad. a) PAXSAT-A 163. El concepto canadiense del PAXSAT-A desarrollado en 1987-1988, fue el resultado de un estudio de viabilidad sobre la capacidad de un vehículo espacial especializado para obtener información sobre otro vehículo espacial, en tanto que el concepto del PAXSAT-B (que se examina a continuación) se refiere a la vigilancia desde el espacio de las actividades en tierra41. 164. PAXSAT-A se refiere a la verificación del estacionamiento de armamentos en el espacio, que requiere la determinación de la función y los objetivos de un satélite utilizando medios discretos. Estos sensores funcionarían de forma complementaria, por ejemplo, combinando una imagen de la antena de radar de un satélite con datos sobre la longitud de onda operacional del radar, facilitando así un índice de la resolución del satélite y del terreno cubierto. La masa del satélite observado se podría evaluar si se conociera la apertura del propulsor junto con las observaciones del radar sobre las aceleraciones del satélite a consecuencia del encendido de los propulsores durante un tiempo determinado que sería registrado por el sensor de infrarrojos. 165. La constelación PAXSAT-A podría consistir inicialmente en dos satélites operacionales y otro de repuesto en órbitas de alta inclinación a alturas de 500 a 2.000 kilómetros. Posteriormente se podría poner un satélite más en órbita semisincrónica y aun otro más en órbita geosincrónica. b) Satélites para vigilar las actividades terrestres 166. Los satélites de formación de imágenes y otros satélites de obtención de información de inteligencia han realizado una importante contribución a la reducción de armamentos. Ahora bien, hasta la fecha los satélites utilizados para la verificación de la limitación de armamentos han cumplido esta función de manera accesoria a su misión fundamental de reunir información de inteligencia militar estratégica y táctica. No obstante, se han presentado diversas propuestas de desplegar satélites específicamente con fines de verificación de la limitación de armamentos. Esos satélites podrían realizar una contribución positiva a las iniciativas de fomento de la confianza regionales y mundiales en el marco de determinados arreglos institucionales. c) Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control (OISCO) 167. En 1978, durante el primer período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General dedicado al desarme, Francia presentó una propuesta relativa al /...A/48/305 Español Página 54 establecimiento de un Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control (OISCO) para la verificación internacional del cumplimiento de los acuerdos de desarme y la limitación de armamentos, así como para la vigilancia en situaciones de crisis42. Esta propuesta dio lugar a un estudio de un Grupo de Expertos sobre las repercusiones de la creación de un organismo de ese tipo43. 168. Se esperaba que la ejecución del proyecto del Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control se llevaría a cabo en tres fases: a) En la fase I, se establecería un Centro de Tratamiento e Interpretación de Imágenes que utilizaría las imágenes de los satélites civiles y otros satélites nacionales existentes con fines de capacitación y análisis; b) En la fase II, se establecería una red de 10 estaciones especializadas en tierra para recibir datos de satélites civiles y no civiles; c) En la fase III, se lanzarían y pondrían en funcionamiento tres vehículos espaciales especializados del Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control. 169. La fase inicial de esta propuesta fue presentada posteriormente por Francia en el tercer período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme, en junio de 1988, y trataba de la creación de un Organismo de Tratamiento de las Imágenes obtenidas por Satélite44. La principal función de ese Organismo correspondería a la fase inicial del proyecto del OISCO: la reunión y el procesamiento de datos procedentes de satélites civiles existentes y la difusión de los análisis resultantes entre los Estados miembros. Ello contribuiría a verificar el cumplimiento de los acuerdos vigentes de desarme y limitación de armamentos, determinando los hechos con antelación a la conclusión de nuevos acuerdos y vigilando las situaciones de crisis y los acuerdos de separación de fuerzas, así como a la prevención y tratamiento de las catástrofes y los riesgos naturales importantes. El Organismo podría servir de centro para la formación de expertos en interpretación de fotografías, así como de centro de investigación para el ulterior desarrollo de estas aplicaciones. d) Organismo Internacional de Vigilancia Espacial (OIVE) 170. En el curso del tercer período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas dedicado al desarme, celebrado en 1988, la Unión Soviética presentó una propuesta relativa a la creación de un Organismo Internacional de Vigilancia Espacial (OIVE)45 que facilitase a la comunidad internacional información sobre la observancia de los acuerdos multilaterales sobre desarme, contribuyese a la disminución de la tensión internacional y ejerciese la vigilancia sobre la situación militar en las zonas de conflicto. A juicio de la Unión Soviética, la facilitación a una organización internacional de los resultados de la labor de vigilancia ejercida por los sistemas nacionales de satélites aportaría una importante contribución a la mejora de la confianza y a la transparencia en las relaciones entre los Estados. 171. Además de los aspectos politicomilitares, las actividades del OIVE podrían tener importancia para muchos Estados, ya que les proporcionarían datos obtenidos mediante satélites importantes para su desarrollo económico. /...A/48/305 Español Página 55 172. Se podría encomendar al OIVE las funciones siguientes: a) La reunión de información sobre la vigilancia espacial; b) El examen de las solicitudes de las Naciones Unidas y de los Estados acerca de la prestación de servicios informativos que podría serles de utilidad al evaluar la observancia de los acuerdos internacionales y los arreglos relativos a las guerras locales y las situaciones de crisis; c) La elaboración de recomendaciones sobre los procedimientos relativos a la utilización de los medios de vigilancia espacial a fin de vigilar o fiscalizar la aplicación de futuros tratados y acuerdos. 173. La puesta en práctica del concepto del OIVE puede llevarse a buen término si el avance es gradual y si se establecen sólidas bases políticas, jurídicas y técnicas para realizar los pasos siguientes: a) En la primera etapa se establecería, en calidad de órgano técnico principal del OIVE, el Centro de Tratamiento e Interpretación de Fotografías Espaciales. Habida cuenta de que los datos procedentes de las fuentes de observación son heterogéneos, es especialmente importante disponer de un conjunto global de medios de transformación de los datos iniciales procedentes de distintas fuentes en un sistema integrado de información geográfica para su ulterior tratamiento y análisis. La obligación de suministrar esos medios podría ser asumida por los Estados Miembros poseedores de los recursos financieros o tecnológicos necesarios para fabricarlos; b) Durante la segunda etapa de las actividades del Organismo, se crearía una red de estaciones terrestres para la recepción, por líneas rápidas en tiempo casi real, de los datos obtenidos por los Estados Miembros que disponen de medios de vigilancia espacial46. e) PAXSAT-B 174. El vehículo espacial PAXSAT-B, surgió de un estudio de viabilidad del Canadá sobre tecnologías espaciales, fue diseñado específicamente para verificar un tratado basado en la limitación de las fuerzas convencionales en una región determinada, como el ámbito europeo47. Se partió del supuesto de que operaría en el contexto político y militar esbozado anteriormente para el PAXSAT-A. El PAXSAT-B tenía que obtener datos según dos series distintas de supuestos: a) La más crítica era la detección de un conato de violación y suponía el acceso por parte del satélite a cualquier punto de la región en un plazo de 36 horas; b) La menos crítica era el reconocimiento de toda la zona del tratado durante un período de 30 a 40 días. 175. Habida cuenta de las condiciones meteorológicas de la región europea, eso significaba que el satélite tendría que llevar a bordo un sensor de imágenes por radar que funcionara en cualquier tipo de condiciones climatológicas y que tuviera cierta capacidad para descubrir medidas rudimentarias de camuflaje. /...A/48/305 Español Página 57 VI. MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE A. La necesidad de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre 176. La importancia potencial de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre se deriva tanto de la preocupación que causan las nuevas tendencias en las actividades espaciales como de la necesidad de impedir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. 177. Diversos Estados han planteado varias cuestiones de seguridad relacionadas con las actuales y posibles orientaciones de las actividades militares en el espacio. Algunas de estas preocupaciones están relacionadas entre sí y son de interés tanto en el plano regional como mundial. 178. Estas preocupaciones de los Estados se relacionan no solamente con la militarización del espacio ultraterrestre, sino también, y en especial, con la "armamentización" del espacio ultraterrestre. Actualmente no hay armas desplegadas en el espacio, y la mayor parte de la comunidad mundial quiere asegurarse de que esos sistemas no aparecerán en el futuro. Una de estas preocupaciones reside fundamentalmente en las esferas de los sistemas de defensa contra misiles balísticos (DMB) y de las armas antisatélite. Estos sistemas pueden amenazar a los satélites en órbita, incluso a los que desempeñan un papel importante en el mantenimiento de la estabilidad estratégica. 179. Una segunda preocupación se deriva de la creciente utilización de sistemas espaciales militares en apoyo de operaciones de combate terrestre, y de las notables disparidades en las capacidades de esos sistemas modernos de armamentos. Los satélites militares revisten una importancia cada vez mayor en el campo de batalla contemporáneo. 180. Otra de las preocupaciones está relacionada con la proliferación de la tecnología de los misiles en el mundo. Si bien se reconoce el legítimo derecho de los Estados de adquirir capacidad de lanzamiento al espacio para fines pacíficos, muchos Estados consideran que esa capacidad podría tener también aplicaciones militares. Estas últimas podrían incluir actividades en el espacio que podrían considerarse hostiles para otros Estados. 181. La preocupación más grave se deriva de todas estas preocupaciones anteriores, a saber, que la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre para fines pacíficos pueda verse cada vez más constreñida por consideraciones militares. Hasta la fecha, las misiones espaciales han coexistido en general con relativamente escasa interacción mutua. Pero el crecimiento futuro de los programas espaciales militares podría dar lugar a una disminución de las oportunidades para la cooperación internacional en la utilización pacífica del espacio ultraterrestre. 182. No obstante, actualmente no hay acuerdo sobre si la normativa internacional vigente aplicable al espacio ultraterrestre es o no adecuada. Si bien se ha reconocido la importancia de esta normativa, aún no se ha disipado la incertidumbre. Por consiguiente algunas de las partes en el Tratado sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre de 1967 sostienen que el Tratado no pone limitaciones a /...A/48/305 Español Página 58 las actividades militares en órbita de la Tierra, salvo la colocación de armas nucleares u otras armas de destrucción en masa. Otras de las partes en el Tratado argumentan que el mandato del Tratado de que se utilice el espacio ultraterrestre para fines pacíficos impide la aplicación de sistemas espaciales a las funciones de apoyo al combate. 183. Según se indicó anteriormente en el capítulo IV, en la normativa jurídica internacional vigente para el espacio ultraterrestre se prevén por lo menos tres categorías de actividades espaciales. Las actividades prohibidas por distintos elementos de la normativa jurídica, como, por ejemplo, la colocación en el espacio de armas de destrucción en masa. Las actividades que se fomentan, que son las que promueven la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos en beneficio de toda la humanidad, como la exploración y los descubrimientos científicos; y las actividades permitidas, que comprenden toda la gama de actividades que no están explícitamente prohibidas, aunque no se las fomente específicamente. Si bien estas distinciones generales pueden haber sido adecuadas en los primeros años de la era espacial, es dudoso que brinden suficiente orientación para las décadas venideras. El aumento de las capacidades espaciales y la expansión de la comunidad de naciones que está participando activamente en la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre puede requerir una mayor elaboración de las normas de comportamiento internacionales. 184. La progresiva expansión del alcance de las actividades espaciales y el creciente número de naciones que utilizan el espacio, justifica el desarrollo progresivo de nuevas normas internacionales para las actividades espaciales. Habida cuenta del tiempo que se necesita para completar la negociación de cualquier posible nuevo tratado multilateral que rija las actividades espaciales, una serie de medidas de fomento de la confianza podría realizar una contribución positiva a este proceso. B. Propuestas de medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre 185. Durante las últimas décadas diversos Estados han propuesto una amplia gama de medidas para abordar la cuestión de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. Ya en 1957, en la Subcomisión de la Comisión de Desarme, el Canadá, Francia, los Estados Unidos y el Reino Unido solicitaron que se realizara un estudio técnico sobre las características de un sistema de inspección que garantizase el que el lanzamiento de artefactos al espacio extraterrestre tendría exclusivamente finalidades pacíficas y científicas48. 186. Algunas de las propuestas presentadas durante la pasada década se ocupan directamente de la reducción de armamentos y de prohibir las armas espaciales y actividades conexas. Se han hecho otras sugerencias sobre las medidas de fomento de la confianza en este campo; algunas iniciativas de limitación de armamentos incluyen elementos que promuevan una mayor transparencia de las actividades y, por consiguiente, también revisten interés en este contexto. /...A/48/305 Español Página 59 Reseña de las propuestas49 187. En el cuadro 3 figura un esquema de las propuestas relativas a las medidas de fomento de la confianza presentadas durante las últimas décadas. Estas propuestas corresponden en parte a las siguientes categorías: a) Las que tienen por objeto aumentar la transparencia de las operaciones espaciales en general; b) Aquellas cuyo objetivo concreto es aumentar el alcance de la información sobre los satélites en órbita; c) Las encaminadas a establecer normas de comportamiento que rijan las operaciones espaciales; d) Las relacionadas con la transferencia internacional de tecnología espacial y de cohetes. 188. El examen detallado de todas las propuestas oficiales y oficiosas existentes desborda las necesidades de este estudio. Por consiguiente, la reseña de las propuestas que figura a continuación se limitará a tratar las propuestas presentadas en varios foros de desarme, incluidas la Conferencia de Desarme, la Comisión de Desarme de las Naciones Unidas, y la Primera Comisión de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, así como algunas propuestas bilaterales presentadas en el marco de negociaciones entre los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética, etc. Según un estudio del UNIDIR50, cabe dividir estas propuestas en las tres categorías presentadas en los párrafos siguientes: 1. Medidas de fomento de la confianza sobre una base voluntaria y recíproca 189. Podrían concertarse acuerdos sobre determinados arreglos que, inicialmente, no estarían encaminados a constituir un tratado. En cualquier acuerdo de ese tipo figurarán disposiciones no obligatorias que los Estados respetarían en un espíritu de reciprocidad. Esta práctica, si se acuerda emplearla, demostraría que existe un ánimo de cooperación y contribuiría a la confianza mutua. 190. En este sentido, en 1986 el Pakistán sugirió, que la Conferencia de Desarme pidiera "a las Potencias espaciales que compartieran la información relacionada con sus actividades actuales y futuras en el espacio y que indicaran que comprenden y aceptan las obligaciones de los tratados pertinentes"51. /...A/48/305 Español Página 60 Cuadro 3 Medidas propuestas de fomento de la confianza examinadas en el Comité ad hoc sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre A. Medidas de fomento de la confianza Indole de las medidas Principal objetivo Medidas Medios Voluntarias/recíprocas (1989) Transparencia en cuestiones de derecho internacional relativas al espacio ultraterrestre y las actividades en dicho entorno Manifestar la comprensión por los Estados de las obligaciones en virtud del tratado y su adhesión a ellas Intercambio de información relativa a las actividades actuales y previstas de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre Difusión de información por medio de: Conductos diplomáticos en la Conferencia de Desarme El Secretario General de la Conferencia de Desarme Obligaciones contractuales Código de conducta y normas de circulación/reglas de comportamiento Derecho internacional: Mejorar las normas jurídicas en vigor que tienen por objeto la transparencia Espacio ultraterrestre y actividades: -Establecer un conjunto de normas para orientar el comportamiento de los Estados en lo que respecta a las actividades propias o las de los demás en el espacio ultraterrestre -Reducir el riesgo de colisiones accidentales, prevenir incidentes, prevenir las actividades coorbitales a corta distancia y velar por un mejor conocimiento de la circulación en el espacio ultraterrestre Suministro de información actualizada y periódica en los casos de maniobras o de desplazamientos a la deriva de elementos orbitales que se hayan declarado en el momento del registro Mantenimiento de una distancia mínima entre dos satélites de cualquier índole colocados en una misma órbita (a fin de evitar no sólo las colisiones accidentales sino también el rastreo coorbital a corta distancia, lo cual constituye un requisito para el sistema de minas espaciales) Vigilancia de los cruces a corta distancia (para reducir los riesgos de colisión o interferencia) Ampliación de las disposiciione del convenio de registro relativas a la información sobre lanzamientos previstos por los Estados Establecimiento de un procedimiento de petición de explicaciones en caso de incidentes/actividades sospechosas Determinación de zonas de exclusión en forma de dos zonas esféricas que se desplacen con cada satélite: 1) una zona de proximidad, para delimitar el emplazamiento de cada uno de los objetos espaciales en órbita recíproca, así como la capacidad de cada objeto de trasladarse en relación con los otros, y 2) una zona de aproximación, más amplia, al atravesar la cual se deberá presentar una notificación /...A/48/305 Español Página 61 Indole de las medidas Principal objetivo Medidas Medios Centro internacional de notificación de lanzamientos Notificación de lanzamientos de misiles balísticos y de lanzamisiles espaciales Establecimiento de un centro internacional bajo los auspicios de las Naciones Unidas Reunión y análisis de datos sobre lanzamientos Centro Internacional de Trayectografía (1989) Reunir datos para actualizar los registros Vigilar objetos espaciales Realizar cálculos en tiempo real de las trayectorias de objetos espaciales Establecimiento de un centro internacional de trayectografía y de un mecanismo de consultas Datos proporcionados por cada Estado respecto de sus propios satélites o los satélites que haya detectado. Información actualizada y constante sobre órbitas y maniobras Organismo de Tratamientos de las Imágenes obtenidas por Satélite (1989) Reunir datos para facilitar la verificación del cumplimiento de acuerdos de desarme y servir de centro de intercambio de datos; determinar ciertos hechos, como los relativos a las estimaciones de las fuerzas, antes de la concertación de acuerdos de desarme Verificación del cumplimiento de acuerdos sobre la separación (en conflictos locales) Prevención/ordenación de desastres naturales/programas de desarrollo Establecimiento de un organismo de bajo costo encargado de realizar el procesamieento el ordenamiento y el análisis de datos, así como las operaciones de difusión La reunión y procesamiento de datos obtenidos de los satélites civiles existentes, y la difusión ulterior de ese material a los miembros del Organismo Fuente: Estudio del Instituto de las Naciones Unidas de Investigación sobre el Desarme (UNIDIR): Access to Outer Technologies: Implications for International Security, UNIDIR/92/77 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: GV.92.0.30), pág. 100. Cuadro 3 (continuación) /...A/48/305 Español Página 62 Cuadro 3 (continuación) B. Medidas de fomento de la confianza y la seguridad relativas a un código de conducta para las actividades espaciales de los Estados Código de conducta para las actividades espaciales de los Estados Medidas destinadas a aumen-Medidas en el marco de un Medidas necesarias para el tar el grado de transparen-código de circulación control en el marco del cia de las actividades código de conducta previsto previas a los lanzamientos Primer conjunto de medidas Cuarto conjunto de medidas Séptimo conjunto de medidas Décimo conjunto de medidas Notificación anual Normas relativas a Normas relativas al Vigilancia del de las intenciones la notificación de derecho a realizar trafico espacial cambio de la órbita inspecciones Segundo conjunto de medidas Quinto conjunto de medidas Octavo conjunto de medidas Undécimo conjunto de medidas Ultima notificación Normas relativas Normas relativas al Medidas a los residuos establecimiento de institucionales espaciales zonas de exclusión Tercer conjunto de medidas Sexto conjunto de medidas Noveno conjunto de medidas Inspecciones de los Normas aplicables Normas en materia satélites in situ a las maniobras de consultas antes del lanzamiento espaciales Fuente: Documento CD/0S/WP.58 (conforme a las propuestas de los Estados miembros del Comité ad hoc sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre). /...A/48/305 Español Página 63 Cuadro 3 (continuación) C. Arreglos institucionales posibles Característica OIVE Francia 1978 WSO URSS 1985 PAXSAT A Canadá 1986 Cuerpo de inspectores espaciales internacionales Unión Soviética 1988 ISpM Unión Soviética 1988 UNITRAS Francia 1989 OTIS Francia 1989 INC Francia 1993 Tipo Propuesta Propuesta Concepto Propuesta Propuesta Propuesta Propuesta Propuesta Alcance Mundial: tratados en vigor y futuros (número ilimitado de tratados relativos a todos los tipos de armas y sistemas de armamentos) Mundial: promover la cooperación mundial para el desarrollo en el espacio ultraterrestre Tratado específico sobre los PAROS (número ilimitado de tratados) Tratado específico sobre los PAROS: prohibición del emplazamiento de armas de cualquier tipo en el espacio ultraterrestre Mundial: tratados en vigor y futuros (número ilimitado de tratados relativos a todos los tipos de armas y sistemas de armamentos) Mundial: todos los Estados que posean o utilicen satélites; acuerdos futuros Mundial: miembros del Organismo Mundial: nuevo instrumento internacional sobre el régimen de notificación previa de lanzamientos de lanzaproyectiles espaciales y proyectiles balísticos Objetivo Vigilancia; verificación (en virtud de disposiciones especiales) Cooperación en materia de comunicaciones, navegación, rescate de personas, servicio de pronósticos meteorológico, etc. Verificación (en virtud de disposiciones especiales) Verificación Vigilancia; verificación (en virtud de disposiciones especiales) Vigilancia de la trayectoria de dispositivos en órbita terrestre Reunir y procesar datos obtenidos por los satélites civiles existentes; servir de centro de investigaciiones impartir capacitación al personal nacional para interpretar las imágenes espaciales Fortalecer la cooperación y la transparencia en el espacio ultraterrestre Aplicación -vigilancia o verificación (según proceda) Limitación de armamentos y desarme; medidas de RIO respecto de cuestiones de seguridad; arreglo de controversias Coordinación de la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con diversos fines pacíficos Limitación de armamentos y desarme Limitación de armamentos y desarme Limitación de armamentos y desarme; medidas de RIO respecto de cuestiones de seguridad; medidas de fomento de la confianza; arreglo de controversias; desastres naturales; otras situaciones de emergencia Fomento de la confianza; proporcionar pruebas de buena fe en los casos de posibles colisiones deliberadas Fomento de la confianza y de la seguridad; verificación del cumplimiento de las disposiciones sobre la separación en conflictos locales Notificación, medidas de fomento de la confianza, transparenciaA/48/305 Español Página 64 Característica OIVE Francia 1978 WSO URSS 1985 PAXSAT A Canadá 1986 Cuerpo de inspectores espaciales internacionales Unión Soviética 1988 ISpM Unión Soviética 1988 UNITRAS Francia 1989 OTIS Francia 1989 INC Francia 1993 Método Teledetección (del espacio hacia la Tierra) Teleobservación de la Tierra por métodos geofísicos y mediante naves interplanetarias no tripuladas Teledetección (del espacio hacia el espacio)‘ Sobre el terreno Teledetección (del espacio hacia la Tierra) Reunión de datos mediante satélites de los Estados; rastreo de alto rendimiento y equipo de computadoras Reunión de datos mediante sensores en la Tierra y detectores transportados por satélite Recepción de información; establecimiento de bancos de datos; suministro de información Función Medios técnicos nacionales; satélites del OIVE Comunicaciones, estudio de rescates de personas y conservación de la biosfera terrestre; aprovechamiento de nuevas fuentes de energía, etc. Satélites de PAXSAT (los medios técnicos nacionales de las partes contratantes pueden aportar algunos datos) Grupos permanennte de inspección; grupos ad hoc de inspección Medios técnicos nacionales; posibilidad de utilizar satélites del OIVE Reunión de datos para actualizar los registros; vigilancia de objetos espaciales; realizar cálculos en tiempo real de las trayectorias de objetos espaciales Procesamiento de datos de telemantenimiiento fiscalización de calidad de la información; técnicas de interpretación fotográfica y de interpretación con ayuda de computadoras Proporcionar información: utilizar las capacidades de detección que los Estados ofrezcan voluntariamente Producto Suministro de datos sobre vigilancia/verificaació por satélite Difusión de datos científicos y tecnológicos Suministro de datos sobre verificación por satélite Verificación de determinados tratados Suministro de datos sobre vigilancia/verificaació por satélite Suministro de datos destinados aalmacenamiento, no a publicación Difusión limitada o ilimitada de datos Suministro de información mediante bancos de datos Fuente: Estudio del Instituto de las Naciones Unidas de Investigación sobre el Desarme (UNIDIR) titulado: Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space, UNIDIR/86/08 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: GV.86.0.2), pág. 137 y documentos CD/PV.377, CD/937 y CD/OS/WP.59.A/48/305 Español Página 65 Cuadro 3 (continuación) /...A/48/305 Español Página 66 191. En 1989, Polonia propuso que las medidas las tomara la propia Conferencia de Desarme, y que los Estados participantes le presentaran información que coadyuvase a la transparencia de las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre52. Estas medidas, que no serían obligaciones jurídicas, incluirían información sobre los siguientes aspectos: a) Ley positiva del espacio ultraterrestre -reafirmación de la importancia del derecho espacial; exhortación a todos los Estados a que actúen de conformidad con el derecho espacial; exhortación a todos los Estados que aún no sean partes en acuerdos relacionados con el espacio ultraterrestre a que estudien la posibilidad de adherirse a dichos instrumentos internacionales; propuesta a todos los Estados Partes en tratados y acuerdos multilaterales relacionados con el espacio ultraterrestre para que acepten la jurisdicción de la Corte Internacional de Justicia en todas las controversias relacionadas con la interpretación y aplicación de dichos instrumentos; b) Transparencia de las actividades espaciales -intercambio de información, en forma voluntaria sobre sus actividades espaciales; por ejemplo: actividades que tengan funciones militares o conexas; notificación previa del lanzamiento de objetos espaciales; envío de observadores a los lanzamientos de objetos espaciales o a los preparativos de otras actividades espaciales, o participación en ellas, en particular en las que tengan funciones militares o conexas (en un espíritu de reciprocidad y buena voluntad); suministro de otro tipo de información que se considere de utilidad para i) fomentar la confianza y ii) reducir los malentendidos. c) Destinatarios de la información -otros miembros de la Conferencia de Desarme, ya sea por conducto de los canales diplomáticos habituales o por conducto del Secretario General de la Conferencia de Desarme, y acceso para todos los Estados. 192. Según otras medidas propuestas por Polonia, los miembros de la Conferencia de Desarme, en particular los que posean capacidades en el espacio ultraterrestre, acordarían reconocer que una mayor transparencia con carácter voluntario reduciría los malentendidos entre los Estados. 193. En 1991, Francia declaró estar "dispuesta a examinar favorablemente una medida que prevea visitas de evaluación en el lugar del lanzamiento, e incluso en el lugar de control en órbita de un artefacto espacial registrado", y dejó claro que las medidas relacionadas con dichas visitas deberán tener lugar con carácter voluntario y que: "únicamente podría ser visitado el Estado que hubiera aceptado expresamente ser objeto de tal inspección"53. 2. Medidas de fomento de la confianza con carácter de obligación contractual 194. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza de carácter contractual han sido objeto de varias propuestas diferentes. Por ejemplo, en 1986 el Pakistán opinó que dichas medidas podrían incluir, entre otras cosas, negociaciones para llegar a un acuerdo provisional o parcial sobre un tratado internacional que complementase el Tratado ABM, una moratoria del desarrollo, ensayo y despliegue de armas antisatélite e inmunidad para los objetos espaciales54. /...A/48/305 Español Página 67 195. A dichas propuestas podrían añadirse otras, como las relacionadas con la creación de un organismo espacial internacional y/o un centro internacional de trayectografía. a) Código de buena conducta espacial y normas de circulación 196. Ambos términos, código de buena conducta espacial y normas de circulación, se han empleado indistintamente en los debates acerca de la Conferencia de Desarme sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza. Se considera que el código de buena conducta espaciales en su sentido genérico, es un conjunto de normas que rigen el comportamiento de los Estados con respecto a sus propias actividades y/o las de los demás. El término normas de circulación (a veces se emplea normas de comportamiento) por su parte, se refiere a la concertación de un acuerdo sobre dichas normas o a las propias normas. Las normas de circulación formarían pues parte del código de buena conducta espacial. 197. Francia, por ejemplo ha sostenido que el objetivo de un código de buena conducta "consiste en garantizar la seguridad de las actividades espaciales y prevenir al mismo tiempo la utilización del espacio con fines agresivos". También ha afirmado que, "... conviene, sobre todo, poder distinguir en todo momento entre un incidente de origen fortuito o accidental y el resultado de una agresión deliberada. A este respecto, se propone elaborar un conjunto de normas de comportamiento ..."55. Así pues, se emplearían ambos conceptos como patrones para elaborar medidas encaminadas a aumentar la seguridad de los objetos espaciales y la previsibilidad de la actividad espacial. 198. Alemania56 ha insistido repetidamente en que, por múltiples razones, las negociaciones sobre estos dos conceptos deben llevarse a cabo bajo los auspicios de la Conferencia de Desarme. Alemania considera que un código de buena conducta espacial es un mecanismo para reducir los malentendidos en torno a la actividad espacial y las colisiones involuntarias con otros objetos espaciales. A su juicio, esto propiciaría una mayor transparencia con respecto a los accidentes en el espacio ultraterrestre y proporcionaría un medio para que los Estados pudieran celebrar consultas en esos casos. 199. Alemania también propuso la elaboración de normas concretas respecto de algunas esferas. Entre ellas cabe destacar la renuncia recíproca a medida que constituyan una interferencia en el funcionamiento de los objetos espaciales de otros Estados; el establecimiento de distancias mínimas entre objetos espaciales; la fijación de límites de velocidad a esos objetos cuando se acercan unos a otros y a los vuelos de inspección y rastreo a alta velocidad; restricciones a las naves espaciales tripuladas o no tripuladas que vuelan a muy baja altura; cumplimiento estricto del aviso previo de las actividades de lanzamiento, concesión del derecho a inspección o restricciones al respecto; y establecimiento de zonas de exclusión57. 200. Las diversas medidas mencionadas más arriba en ocasiones se han considerado como una especie de código de circulación para objetos espaciales. 201. Dichas medidas fueron propuestas formalmente en 1989 por Francia, en el marco de sus propuestas sobre la inmunidad de los satélites58. Ahora bien, la propuesta de Francia no fue concebida con carácter excluyente; se centró fundamentalmente en la elaboración de normas de buena conducta para los /...A/48/305 Español Página 68 vehículos espaciales con miras a: reducir el riesgo de colisiones accidentales; prevenir incidentes; prevenir las persecuciones coorbitales a corta distancia; y garantizar un mejor conocimiento del tráfico espacial del modo siguiente: a) Disposiciones para actualizar de manera regular los elementos orbitales declarados en el momento del registro, en el caso de maniobras y derivas; b) El respeto de una distancia mínima entre cualesquiera dos satélites colocados en una misma órbita para evitar no sólo las colisiones accidentales, sino también las persecuciones coorbitales a corta distancia, que son un requisito necesario para el sistema de minas espaciales; c) La vigilancia de los cruces a corta distancia para limitar los riesgos de colisión o de interferencia. 202. En 1991, en un documento de trabajo de Francia59 se propuso que estas normas podrían ser complementadas mediante: a) Una ampliación del Convenio sobre el registro en relación con el grado de información sobre los lanzamientos previstos por los Estados; b) Un procedimiento para la petición de explicaciones en caso de incidentes o de actividades sospechosas; c) La definición de zonas de exclusión (keep-out zones) en forma de dos zonas esféricas que se desplacen con cada satélite: una zona llamada de proximidad que sirve para delimitar el emplazamiento en órbita recíproca de cada objeto espacial, así como la capacidad de movimiento de los objetos en relación unos con otros; una zona más amplia, llamada de aproximación, para atravesar la cual sería obligatoria la notificación. b) Espacio ultraterrestre abierto 203. Además de las propuestas formuladas en la Conferencia de Desarme, algunas delegaciones han propugnado una amplia gama de medidas de fomento de la confianza encaminadas a promover la transparencia y la seguridad en las actividades espaciales como contribución viable para lograr la confianza mutua. El concepto del espacio ultraterrestre abierto fue uno de esos enfoques y está encaminado a fomentar la confianza de manera gradual. Significaría llegar a un acuerdo sobre medidas tales como el intercambio de datos y luego gradualmente ir fomentando la confianza para llegar a un acuerdo sobre una medida más directamente relacionada con la limitación de armamentos. La Unión Soviética propuso60 que este concepto se examinara en la Conferencia de Desarme, ya que, a su juicio, las medidas más importantes para lograr un espacio ultraterrestre abierto son las siguientes: fortalecimiento del Convenio de 1975 sobre el registro; elaboración del código de circulación o código de conducta para las actividades espaciales; utilización de los medios de vigilancia espacial en interés de la comunidad internacional, y creación de un cuerpo de inspectores espaciales internacionales. /...A/48/305 Español Página 69 3. Propuestas para un marco institucional 204. Hay varias propuestas que se refieren a la creación de diferentes mecanismos para las actividades espaciales, cuyo funcionamiento también podría contribuir a fortalecer y/o promover el fomento de la confianza en las actividades del espacio ultraterrestre. a) El Centro internacional de trayectografía (UNITRACE) 205. En julio de 1989, Francia propuso la creación de un centro internacional de trayectografía (UNITRACE)61, que se establecería en el marco de un acuerdo sobre la inmunidad de los satélites y posiblemente formaría parte de la Secretaría de las Naciones Unidas. Todos los Estados que poseen o emplean satélites podrían, a título voluntario ser miembros del Centro. Francia opinaba que, puesto que su principal objetivo se limitaría claramente a la vigilancia de la trayectoria de dispositivos en órbita terrestre, el Centro podría desempeñar una función clave en el fomento de la confianza entre los Estados. Por consiguiente, la principal función del Centro sería: la obtención de datos para actualizar los registros, el seguimiento de objetos espaciales, y el cálculo en tiempo real de las trayectorias de los objetos espaciales. Además, para cumplir su función adecuadamente, el Centro necesitaría también información permanentemente actualizada sobre las órbitas y las maniobras. Si bien la propuesta francesa reconocía que la existencia de una base de datos de ese tipo conduciría a un mayor nivel de transparencia, también reconocía que la naturaleza de esta forma de obtener datos era tal que habría que tener seriamente en cuenta la necesidad de proteger la información tecnológica y militar. b) Organismo de tratamiento de las imágenes obtenidas por satélite (OTIS) 206. En 1989 Francia propuso la creación de un organismo de tratamiento de las imágenes obtenidas por satélite (OTIS)62 que constituiría la fase inicial de una institución internacional para la vigilancia por satélite. Ahora bien, la iniciativa francesa establecía claramente que ese organismo "... sería un mecanismo de fomento de la confianza y que no estaría destinado a constituir el embrión de un sistema de verificación de ámbito universal bajo los auspicios de las Naciones Unidas". El OTIS sería más bien un organismo que se crearía en el marco de las medidas de fomento de la confianza y de la seguridad. Se concebiría como un organismo de bajo costo con tres objetivos. El primero sería reunir y procesar los datos obtenidos por los satélites que se emplean actualmente para fines civiles, y posteriormente transmitir este material a los miembros del organismo. Su segundo objetivo sería servir de dependencia o centro de investigación encargado de a) determinar los grupos de satélites que podrían contribuir a la ejecución de los programas multilaterales de índole civil o militar, y b) elaborar varios acuerdos posibles de vinculación. El tercer objetivo sería enseñar al personal nacional a interpretar las imágenes espaciales y determinar hasta qué punto la labor de vigilancia y verificación de la limitación de armamentos y el desarme podría realizarse mediante satélites. 207. En el tercer período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas dedicado al desarme, celebrado en 1988, la Unión Soviética propuso la creación de un Organismo Internacional de Vigilancia Espacial (OIVE), sugerencia que luego se analizó a fondo en la Conferencia de Desarme (para mayor información véase el capítulo V)63. Según esta propuesta, la función principal /...A/48/305 Español Página 70 del organismo sería: reunir información sobre la vigilancia espacial; brindar a las Naciones Unidas y a los gobiernos información que pudiese ser de utilidad para controlar los conflictos locales y las situaciones de crisis; examinar las recomendaciones relativas al uso de la vigilancia espacial para el control de arreglos futuros. 4. La transferencia internacional de las tecnologías de misiles y otras tecnologías críticas 208. Las preocupaciones en torno a la proliferación de las armas nucleares y otras armas de destrucción en masa, así como la proliferación de sus sistemas vectores, en particular los misiles balísticos de gran alcance, han despertado interés en la creación de mecanismos para la transferencia internacional de tecnologías relativas a los misiles y otras tecnologías sensibles. 209. En 1987, un grupo de Estados64 preocupados por la proliferación de algunos sistemas de misiles capaces de portar armas de destrucción en masa, acordaron un régimen de vigilancia de las tecnologías balísticas. El propósito fundamental de este régimen es limitar la proliferación de determinado tipo de misiles así como de componentes y tecnologías específicos. Este régimen no se basa en un tratado formal, sino más bien en que cada parte tome medidas unilaterales idóneas para adoptar y aplicar directrices comunes. Desde 1987 otros países, incluidos algunos países en desarrollo con importantes programas de misiles o espaciales, han adoptado las directrices del régimen o declarado su apoyo a los objetivos del régimen65. 210. El régimen internacional de control de los suministradores aplicado a la proliferación de misiles balísticos y misiles de crucero ha sido objeto de numerosas sugerencias. 211. En el contexto del régimen de vigilancia de las tecnologías balísticas, creado para limitar la proliferación de algunos tipos de misiles y tecnología de misiles, Francia propuso que: "... sólo debería ser una etapa hacia un acuerdo más general, de más amplio ámbito geográfico, mejor controlado y aplicable a todos. Dicho acuerdo establecería normas favorables a la cooperación espacial civil, evitando los peligros de una desviación de la tecnología para la creación de una capacidad balística militar. Se trataría ... de llegar a una situación en la que cooperasen, dentro de un marco que garantizase la seguridad, el conjunto de los Estados que desean, para su desarrollo, tener acceso al espacio."66 212. En 1991, la Argentina y el Brasil propusieron un conjunto de orientaciones para la transferencia internacional de tecnología crítica que trataba sobre esta cuestión y apuntaron que: "Para conseguir que la regulación de las corrientes de la tecnología crítica sea universal y pueda dar lugar al establecimiento de controles internacionales realmente efectivos, es preciso que en esa regulación se tengan en cuenta los intereses y las necesidades de gran número de Estados en relación con el acceso a esas tecnologías con fines pacíficos. Cabe /...A/48/305 Español Página 71 suponer que el nivel de adhesión de la comunidad internacional a las normas encaminadas a contener la utilización de tecnologías críticas en las armas de destrucción masiva aumentará en la medida en que se considere que esas normas no constituyen un impedimento, sino un acicate, en relación con la difusión de los conocimientos científicos y tecnológicos con fines pacíficos."67 213. Las orientaciones propuestas incluían lo siguiente: "La intensificación de la cooperación internacional en materia de ciencia y tecnología fortalece la confianza entre los Estados. La existencia de disparidades de tratamiento en esta esfera y los diferentes niveles de acceso a la alta tecnología pueden entrañar un deterioro de la confianza entre los países. No se puede calificar de inherentemente nocivas a las tecnologías críticas, dado que cabe utilizarlas tanto para fines pacíficos como para la fabricación de armas de destrucción masiva. El objetivo o propósito que se persiga con su utilización determinará si esas tecnologías afectan o no afectan a la seguridad. Se debería considerar un sistema de controles internacionales de las corrientes de productos y servicios con tecnología crítica y de los conocimientos especializados en esa esfera que tuviese el carácter del mecanismo de supervisión y no de restricción de las transferencias legítimas."68 214. Este enfoque general es compatible con algunas otras propuestas de revisar el actual sistema internacional de transferencia de tecnología a la luz del nuevo clima político mundial. 5. Propuestas de medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre en el marco de las negociaciones bilaterales entre los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética 215. En las conversaciones bilaterales sobre defensa y espacio entre los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética se analizó una amplia gama de medidas de transparencia y previsibilidad669 entre las que figuran las siguientes: a) Intercambios anuales de datos, reuniones de expertos, reuniones de orientación, visitas a laboratorios, observación de los ensayos, y notificación de ensayos de misiles antibalísticos por satélite; b) Propuesta de la "doble ejecución piloto", en que cada parte demuestra sus posibles medidas de previsibilidad; c) Propuesta de concluir un arreglo autónomo que abarque estas medidas, independiente de la situación de las negociaciones sobre limitaciones concretas al ensayo y despliegue de sistemas antimisiles. /...A/48/305 Español Página 72 216. Entre las medidas concretas tomadas con respecto a estas iniciativas cabe mencionar la visita de especialistas soviéticos en diciembre de 1989 a instalaciones energéticas de California y Nuevo México, dirigida por los Estados Unidos. 217. Aunque estas medidas fueron propuestas en un contexto bilateral, en 1986 Sri Lanka opinó que su aplicación bien podría extenderse al plano multilateral70: "El ofrecimiento de "laboratorios abiertos" de la delegación de los Estados Unidos podría ponerse en práctica en un comité ad hoc de la Conferencia de Desarme al cual todas las delegaciones aportasen información ..." 218. El Pakistán también propuso en 1988 que, además de brindar información detallada sobre el tipo de carga explosiva con antelación al lanzamiento, se permitiera la verificación de dicha información: "... por un organismo internacional en el lugar de lanzamiento ... podría establecerse tal institución, como primera medida, para verificar los datos relativos a la función de los objetos espaciales con miras a proporcionar a la comunidad internacional información fidedigna sobre las actividades realizadas en el espacio, en especial las de carácter militar."71 219. En una declaración conjunta sobre un Sistema de Protección Mundial emitida en la Reunión en la Cumbre, celebrada en junio de 1992, entre los Presidentes de los Estados Unidos y de la Federación de Rusia, se afirmó que ambas partes continuaban examinando los posibles beneficios de un sistema de protección mundial contra misiles balísticos y habían coincidido en la importancia de investigar la función de las defensas en la protección contra ataques limitados de misiles balísticos; también convinieron en que deberían trabajar conjuntamente con los aliados y otros Estados interesados en la elaboración de un concepto de tal sistema como parte de una estrategia general acerca de la proliferación de los misiles balísticos y armas de destrucción en masa72. 6. Otras propuestas 220. En 1985 la Unión Soviética propuso un enfoque más amplio a la cuestión de la cooperación internacional en materia de tecnología espacial, en que se sugería la formación de una Organización Mundial de Espacio para promover y fomentar la cooperación mundial en el desarrollo espacial73. El programa de trabajo incluiría lo siguiente: a) Comunicación, navegación, rescate de personas en la Tierra, en la atmósfera y en el espacio ultraterrestre; b) Teleobservación de la Tierra para el aprovechamiento de los recursos naturales terrestres, marinos y oceánicos del mundo; c) Estudio y preservación de la biosfera de la Tierra; d) Establecimiento de un servicio mundial de pronósticos meteorológicos y notificación de los desastres naturales; /...A/48/305 Español Página 73 e) Desarrollo de nuevas fuentes de energía y creación de nuevos materiales y tecnologías; f) Exploración del espacio ultraterrestre y cuerpos celestes por métodos geofísicos y mediante naves interplanetarias no tripuladas74. 221. En agosto de 1987, la Unión Soviética propuso la creación de un Cuerpo de Inspectores Espaciales Internacionales. Posteriormente se amplió esta propuesta75 sobre la base de que: "El procedimiento más sencillo y eficaz para cerciorarse de que los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre y emplazados en él no son armas ni están dotados de ningún tipo de armas consiste en la realización de una inspección in situ inmediatamente antes de efectuarse el lanzamiento." 222. Entre las medidas propuestas en el marco del Cuerpo de Inspectores Espaciales Internacionales cabe mencionar: "a) Facilitación de información previa por el Estado objeto de inspección a los representantes del Cuerpo de Inspectores Espaciales Internacionales acerca de cada lanzamiento inminente, con indicación de la fecha y el momento del lanzamiento, el tipo de vehículo portador, los parámetros de la órbita y datos generales acerca del objeto espacial que vaya a lanzarse; b) Permanencia constante de los grupos de inspección en todos los polígonos de lanzamiento de objetos espaciales con el fin de verificar todos los objetos de esa clase, cualesquiera que sean los sistemas de lanzamiento; c) Necesidad de iniciar la inspección ... días antes de que el objeto lanzado al espacio sea instalado en el vehículo portador o en cualquier otro sistema de lanzamiento; d) Realización de inspecciones complementarias en instalaciones de almacenamiento, empresas industriales, laboratorios y centros experimentales convenidos; e) Verificación de los lanzamientos no declarados, efectuados a partir de plataformas de lanzamientos no declaradas, mediante la realización de inspecciones extraordinarias in situ."76 223. Si bien la propuesta del Cuerpo de Inspectores Espaciales Internacionales fue presentada en el contexto de un acuerdo que prohibiría todas las armas en el espacio, a juicio de la Unión Soviética este enfoque también podría considerarse como la base de una iniciativa autónoma para aumentar la transparencia y la previsibilidad. 224. Las cuestiones relacionadas con el espacio han sido propuestas como una posible esfera de interés en algunas negociaciones regionales y multilaterales sobre control de armamentos y desarme. /...A/48/305 Español Página 74 225. La Décima Conferencia de los Jefes de Estado o de Gobierno de los Países No Alineados reunidos en Yakarta del 1º al 6 de septiembre de 1992, recomendó "el establecimiento de un sistema de verificación multilateral por satélite bajo los auspicios de las Naciones Unidas" que garantizaría a todos los Estados igualdad de acceso a la información77. C. Análisis 226. Aunque cada una de estas sugerencias contribuye de modo positivo a comprender las oportunidades que existen para el fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, hay algunas otras cuestiones que es preciso analizar más a fondo. 1. Medidas generales para aumentar la transparencia y la confianza 227. Partiendo de la experiencia adquirida en otras esferas terrestres, parece muy conveniente aplicar nuevas medidas para aumentar el nivel de información relativa a las actividades espaciales presentes y futuras. Un útil punto de partida es el precedente de los pasos tomados en las conversaciones bilaterales de defensa y espaciales para mejorar la previsibilidad. 228. Con todo, hay dos aspectos que requieren mayor atención. El primero se refiere a la cuestión de si dichas medidas de fomento de la confianza son de carácter voluntario que cada Estado puede tomar a su elección, o si constituyen obligaciones jurídicas para todos los Estados. Si bien muchas de estas medidas pueden proporcionar un método eficaz para demostrar públicamente la naturaleza de las actividades espaciales de un Estado dado, aún queda por ver hasta qué punto estarían dispuestos a llegar los Estados en este sentido si no hay reciprocidad general. Según algunos países, ciertos Estados tienen que proteger determinadas actividades espaciales relacionadas con tareas de inteligencia, y este es un factor que hay que tener en cuenta. 229. La segunda cuestión se refiere a la naturaleza de las actividades que pudiesen ser reveladas. Según un punto de vista, estas medidas de transparencia coadyuvarían a demostrar que no se está produciendo ninguna actividad espacial prohibida. Según otro, dichas medidas se emplearían para reducir la probabilidad de malentendidos o errores de percepción con respecto a las armas espaciales y otras actividades. 230. Si bien muchos de los mecanismos de fomento de la confianza que se han propuesto se aplicarían en cualquiera de esos contextos, el logro de un acuerdo sobre cuál es el contexto pertinente podría tener importantes consecuencias para la iniciación y aplicación de dichas medidas. 2. Fortalecimiento del registro de objetos espaciales y otras medidas conexas 231. Según algunos Estados, la revisión y fortalecimiento de las disposiciones del Convenio sobre el registro es una de las formas de fortalecer el régimen /...A/48/305 Español Página 75 jurídico espacial internacional abarcando las actividades militares y de otro tipo en el espacio. 232. La propuesta relativa al centro internacional de trayectografía también suscita algunas preocupaciones de tipo operacional. En 1989 Francia señaló que: "... indicar, por ejemplo, la posición exacta de un satélite de observación significa revelar el objeto exacto de esa fiscalización. Entonces, ¿cómo conciliar esos requisitos de secreto con la recopilación de toda la información necesaria sobre las trayectorias de los satélites?"78 233. Aunque éste pudiese ser el caso de los satélites de formación de imágenes con sistemas ópticos, con fines de inteligencia, que deben modificar sus órbitas para poder sobrevolar directamente la zona de interés, los satélites de formación de imágenes más modernos no tienen esas limitaciones. Con todo, aún persisten las preocupaciones en torno a la confidencialidad de la información orbital, ya que el aviso de un sobrevuelo inminente podría dar la alerta con suficiente antelación como para ocultar el objetivo e impedir que pueda ser observado desde el espacio. 234. Francia sugirió además que: "... la agrupación de esa información en un sistema de informática que funcione como ’caja negra’ podría constituir una solución idónea ... (el centro) ... recibiría y conservaría, sin difundirlos, los datos orbitales comunicados en el momento de efectuar el registro y actualizados en casos de modificaciones ulteriores de las trayectorias."79 235. Ahora bien, dado el actual nivel de confidencialidad en torno a las órbitas de los satélites con fines de inteligencia, es necesario que el centro proporcione un nivel adecuado de protección a dicha información. Esta situación podría evolucionar si existiera una mayor confianza entre las principales potencias espaciales, que, gracias a sus avanzadas instalaciones de rastreo podrían comprobar los datos comunicados al centro. En todo caso, tal vez a las potencias espaciales les convenga comunicar datos relativos a sus satélites a cambio de la inmunidad de éstos. 3. Código de buena conducta y normas de circulación 236. Las zonas de exclusión deberían establecerse de conformidad con las disposiciones del Tratado sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre. Estas zonas podrían crearse en un contexto multilateral y considerarse de un modo funcional. 237. Se ha puesto en duda la necesidad de establecer un régimen separado para garantizar la inmunidad de determinados tipos de satélites contra ataques. Se ha dicho que: "... ya existen instrumentos jurídicos internacionales destinados a garantizar la inmunidad de los satélites. Esos instrumentos prohíben el uso de la fuerza contra los satélites excepto en casos de legítima defensa. /...A/48/305 Español Página 76 De hecho, esos acuerdos internacionales van más allá de las propuestas porque también prohíben la amenaza del uso de la fuerza contra los satélites. Por otra parte, si esas propuestas tuvieran por objeto prohibir que las naciones adoptaran medidas contra los satélites en caso de legítima defensa, socavarían entonces el Tratado sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre, la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y el derecho inherente de los estados soberanos a adoptar medidas adecuadas para protegerse en casos de amenaza o de uso de la fuerza."80 238. Es preciso seguir estudiando cuál es exactamente el tipo de satélites a los que se concedería inmunidad. Se ha señalado que: "... la información reunida por los satélites de reconocimiento y vigilancia también se ha empleado para apoyar operaciones militares. Con todo, si las funciones realizadas por los satélites de reconocimiento y vigilancia son tan inocuas como suele decirse, cabría preguntarse por qué esta capacidad debe seguir siendo monopolio de las potencias espaciales. ¿Acaso no deberíamos confiar las actividades de vigilancia y reconocimiento por satélite a un organismo internacional para que supervise el cumplimiento de los acuerdos de desarme?"81 239. Sería más fácil, al menos inicialmente, llegar a un acuerdo internacional que conceda algún tipo adecuado de protección a los satélites que poseen y operan las organizaciones internacionales que llegar a un acuerdo sobre categorías genéricas de satélites. 240. Uno de los problemas que plantea el otorgamiento de inmunidad es que muchos sistemas espaciales tienen múltiples aplicaciones. Los satélites militares podrían cumplir diversos tipos de misiones según el contexto operacional, en tanto que otros satélites podrían tener funciones a la vez militares y civiles. 241. Si bien los satélites de formación de imágenes con fines de inteligencia se emplean para verificar el cumplimiento del tratado de control de armamentos, función a la que suele concederse una categoría privilegiada, estos mismos satélites también pueden ayudar a identificar blancos para armas terrestres, aplicación que suscita cierta ambivalencia en la comunidad internacional e impulsa el desarrollo de las armas antisatélites. Es difícil imaginar cómo se podría conceder inmunidad a un satélite cuando realiza su función de verificación del cumplimiento de un tratado y negársela poco después cuando ayuda a identificar blancos en algún conflicto terrestre. 242. La viabilidad de las declaraciones sobre inmunidad también sería dudosa mientras los Estados tuvieran medios para atacar y destruir satélites. La existencia de capacidades antisatélite en gran medida anularía la significación de dichas declaraciones. Francia propuso conceder inmunidad jurídica a todos los satélites que no entorpezcan activamente el funcionamiento de otros objetos, es decir, que únicamente cumplan funciones estabilizadoras en contraposición con los usos agresivos del espacio ultraterrestre82. /...A/48/305 Español Página 77 4. Transferencia internacional de tecnología de misiles y otras tecnologías críticas 243. En el pasado, la cuestión del desarrollo de las armas espaciales se examinó sobre todo en un contexto Este-Oeste, un enfoque se modificó sustancialmente a raíz de los cambios radicales ocurridos en el clima internacional. En estos momentos la cuestión se inserta cada vez más en un contexto mucho más amplio. Se requieren arreglos internacionales adecuados para atender las preocupaciones de algunos países con respecto a la proliferación de tecnologías de misiles y otras tecnologías criticas. 244. La concertación de nuevos arreglos internacionales adecuados para la transferencia de tecnología relacionada con el espacio podría proporcionar algunos medios para atender las preocupaciones de seguridad planteadas por algunos Estados sobre la cuestión de las tecnologías de doble finalidad. /...A/48/305 Español Página 78 VII. MECANISMOS DE COOPERACION INTERNACIONAL RELACIONADOS CON LAS MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE 245. La resolución 45/55 B, en la que se define el mandato del Grupo de Expertos, reconoció "la función que ha adquirido el espacio como factor importante para el desarrollo socioeconómico de muchos Estados". En esa misma resolución, la Asamblea General pidió al Grupo que examine, entre otras cosas, "las posibilidades de definir mecanismos apropiados para la cooperación internacional en esferas de interés determinadas, y demás cuestiones". 246. Las prioridades con respecto a esferas concretas de cooperación varían según los Estados y las regiones. A efectos de este estudio, la cooperación internacional se considera en su sentido general, incluida la cooperación relacionada con las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. Así pues, en este capítulo se examinan dos categorías de mecanismos internacionales: los mecanismos existentes y las propuestas de creación de nuevos mecanismos. A. Mecanismos existentes de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre 247. Hay tres categorías de mecanismos internacionales de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre: mundiales; regionales, y bilaterales. 1. Mecanismos mundiales de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre 248. Las Naciones Unidas se han ocupado de las cuestiones relativas al espacio ultraterrestre desde el comienzo de la era espacial, fundamentalmente en el contexto de dos esferas más generales de sus actividades: la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos y la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. 249. El creciente interés en la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos dio lugar al establecimiento, en 1959, de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, a la cual se encargaron informes para la Asamblea General sobre distintos aspectos de la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, incluidos: a) las actividades de las Naciones Unidas y sus organismos especializados; b) la difusión de datos sobre la investigación relativa al espacio ultraterrestre; c) la coordinación de programas nacionales de investigación; d) la concertación de arreglos internacionales para facilitar la cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre en el marco de las Naciones Unidas; y e) los problemas jurídicos que pudieran surgir como resultado de la exploración del espacio ultraterrestre. Los informes anuales de la Comisión son examinados por la Comisión Política Especial de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas. 250. Desde entonces, la labor de la Comisión y sus dos subcomisiones -una encargada de los asuntos jurídicos y la otra de los científicos y técnicos -ha /...A/48/305 Español Página 79 dado lugar a la elaboración de cinco instrumentos internacionales que recogen los principios generales que deben regir la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, la responsabilidad por daños causados por objetos espaciales, el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre y las actividades en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. 251. El programa de la Comisión83 incluye, entre otras, las siguientes cuestiones: a) los medios y arbitrios para reservar el espacio ultraterrestre para fines pacíficos; b) la labor de su Subcomisión de Asuntos Científicos y Técnicos y la de su Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos; c) la aplicación de las recomendaciones de la Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos; d) los beneficios derivados de la tecnología espacial, etc. (En el capítulo III supra se brindan más detalles al respecto.) 252. Además de la elaboración de los acuerdos mencionados anteriormente, la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, por recomendación de la Comisión, ha aprobado los siguientes Principios: a) la Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre (resolución 1962 (XVIII)); b) los Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión (resolución 37/92); c) los Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio (resolución 41/65); y d) los Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre (resolución 47/68). 253. Con el objeto de fomentar la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, las Naciones Unidas han organizado dos conferencias especiales sobre el tema: la primera Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos84 se celebró en 1968 para examinar los beneficios prácticos que podrían obtenerse de la investigación y exploración espaciales y las oportunidades de que disponían las potencias no espaciales para la cooperación internacional en las actividades espaciales. La Segunda Conferencia, denominada UNISPACE 8285, se celebró en Viena en agosto de 1982. La Conferencia recomendó, entre otras cosas, orientaciones en relación con el rápido aumento de la utilización de la tecnología espacial, y pidió el establecimiento de un sistema de información de las Naciones Unidas sobre cuestiones espaciales, que inicialmente consistiría en un directorio de fuentes de información y servicios de datos accesibles a todos los Estados. La Conferencia examinó también la cuestión de la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre y señaló que la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre era esencial para que los Estados pudieran continuar cooperando unos con otros en la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos. 254. De forma paralela a las actividades de las Naciones Unidas relacionadas con la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, la cuestión de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre ha formado parte del programa de la Asamblea General desde principios de la década de 1950. Ya en 1957 se presentaron propuestas en la Comisión de Desarme86 sobre un sistema de inspección que asegurase que el lanzamiento de objetos al espacio /...A/48/305 Español Página 80 ultraterrestre se haría exclusivamente con fines pacíficos. El deseo de la comunidad internacional de prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre fue recogido, como se mencionó anteriormente, por la Asamblea General en su Documento Final de 1978, aprobado en el décimo período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme, en el que se señaló que "para evitar la carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre, deberían adoptarse nuevas medidas y celebrarse negociaciones internacionales apropiadas en consonancia con el espíritu del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes" (párr. 80). 255. La cuestión de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre ha formado parte del programa de la Asamblea General desde 1982. Se han aprobado varias resoluciones en que se pide a la Conferencia de Desarme que examine la cuestión de negociar acuerdos eficaces y verificables para prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre o que estudie, con carácter prioritario, la cuestión de la negociación de un acuerdo para prohibir los sistemas de armas antisatélite. 256. Desde 1982, la Conferencia de Desarme, único órgano de negociación multilateral sobre esta cuestión, ha incluido en su agenda un tema titulado "Prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre". Sin embargo, a causa de las diferencias de opinión sobre la formulación de un mandato, hasta 1985 la Conferencia de Desarme87 no pudo establecer un Comité ad hoc con el mandato de examinar como primer paso, mediante una consideración sustantiva y general, las cuestiones relacionadas con el tema. 257. Desde su creación, el Comité Ad Hoc ha venido examinando, sin interrupción, tres esferas contempladas en su mandato: a) Cuestiones relacionadas con la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre; b) Acuerdos en vigor que rigen las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre; y c) Propuestas existentes e iniciativas para el futuro sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. Algunos Estados que forman parte del Comité Ad Hoc han venido propugnando la aprobación de varias propuestas de fomento de la confianza como contribución a la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. 258. Además, las Naciones Unidas realizan funciones adicionales en relación con las actividades de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre. Por consiguiente, se ha nombrado al Secretario General depositario del Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre (1975); la Convención sobre la modificación ambiental, de 1977; y el Acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, de 1979. 259. Con arreglo al Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre88, los Estados partes se han comprometido a mantener un registro central y a facilitar al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas información /...A/48/305 Español Página 81 sobre los objetos espaciales que hayan lanzado. Según los Artículos 3 y 4, el registro obligatorio de los lanzamientos al espacio y la estructura del sistema normalizado que ha de mantener el Secretario General es la siguiente: 1. Todo Estado de registro proporcionará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, en cuanto sea factible, la siguiente información sobre cada objeto espacial inscrito en su registro: a) Nombre del Estado o de los Estados de lanzamiento; b) Una designación apropiada del objeto espacial o su número de registro; c) Fecha y territorio o lugar del lanzamiento; d) Parámetros orbitales básicos, incluso: i) Período nodal, ii) Inclinación, iii) Apogeo, iv) Perigeo; e) Función general del objeto espacial. 2. Todo Estado de registro podrá proporcionar de tiempo en tiempo al Secretario General información adicional relativa a un objeto espacial inscrito en su registro. 3. Todo Estado de registro notificará al Secretario General, en la mayor medida posible y en cuanto sea factible, acerca de los objetos espaciales respecto de los cuales haya transmitido información previamente y que hayan estado pero que ya no estén en órbita terrestre. 260. En el marco de los mecanismos multilaterales, son dignas de mención otras dos organizaciones: la Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite (1971) y la Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Marítimas por Satélite (1976). 261. La Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite (INTELSAT) es una cooperativa comercial de 124 países que son propietarios y administradores de un sistema mundial de telecomunicaciones por satélite que utilizan más de 170 países de todo el mundo para las comunicaciones internacionales, y más de 30 países para las comunicaciones internas. Mediante una serie sucesiva de satélites denominados INTELSAT I a VI, la INTELSAT viene prestando servicios de satélite para las telecomunicaciones públicas desde 1965. A partir de julio de 1992, la división espacial de la INTELSAT está integrada por 18 satélites INTELSAT V, V-A y VI en órbita geoestacionaria sobre las regiones del Océano Atlántico, el Océano Pacífico y el Océano Indico. Los INTELSAT VII, que actualmente son los satélites comerciales técnicamente más avanzados que se hayan diseñado jamás, se pondrán en órbita en 199389. /...A/48/305 Español Página 82 262. La Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Marítimas por Satélite (INMARSAT) se creó por iniciativa de la Organización Marítima Internacional (OMI). La Convención y el Acuerdo de Funcionamiento de la INMARSAT fueron aprobados en septiembre de 1976 y entraron en vigor en julio de 1979. La INMARSAT fue creada con el propósito de atender a la necesidad del transporte marítimo internacional de contar con comunicaciones fiables. Las enmiendas al instrumento constitutivo para ampliar las competencias de la INMARSAT a fin de que pudiera brindar comunicaciones vía satélite para el transporte aéreo entraron en vigor el 13 de octubre de 1989. En enero de 1989, la Asamblea de las Partes de la INMARSAT aprobó nuevas enmiendas a fin de que la INMARSAT prestara servicios de comunicaciones para el transporte por tierra, pero estas enmiendas no han entrado aún en vigor. La INMARSAT está obligada a funcionar exclusivamente con fines pacíficos. Su división espacial puede ser utilizada por buques, aeronaves y usuarios terrestres móviles de todas las naciones, sin discriminación por razón de su nacionalidad. Al 31 de mayo de 1993 eran Partes en la Convención 67 Estados90. 2. Mecanismos multilaterales regionales 263. Junto con los esfuerzos realizados en el marco de las Naciones Unidas y de la Conferencia de Desarme, hay varios instrumentos internacionales que se ocupan de las actividades de los Estados de determinadas regiones en el espacio ultraterrestre, instrumentos que han dado lugar a una estrecha cooperación. 264. La Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Espaciales (INTERSPUTNIK) se estableció en 1971 en virtud de un acuerdo firmado en noviembre de 1971 y que entró en vigor en julio de 1972. Su propósito era satisfacer la demanda de algunos países de comunicaciones por teléfono y telégrafo y el intercambio de programas de radio y televisión, así como la transmisión de otros tipos de información vía satélite con miras a promover la cooperación política, económica y cultural. Han sido miembros de la INTERSPUTNIK los países siguientes: Afganistán, Bulgaria, Cuba, Checoslovaquia, Hungría, Kazajstán, Mongolia, Polonia, la República Democrática Alemana, la República Democrática Popular Lao, la República Democrática Popular del Yemen, la República Popular Democrática de Corea, Rumania, la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas y Viet Nam. Actualmente la INTERSPUTNIK está en un período de transición y su objetivo es llegar a funcionar con carácter puramente comercial91. 265. En 1975, la Conferencia Espacial Europea reunida en Bruselas aprobó el texto de la Convención por la que se establecía la Agencia Espacial Europea (AEE). Sus Estados Miembros son Alemania, Austria, Bélgica, Dinamarca, España, Francia, Irlanda, Italia, Noruega, los Países Bajos, el Reino Unido, Suecia y Suiza. Finlandia es miembro asociado y el Canadá, mantiene una estrecha cooperación. Según la Convención, el objetivo de la Agencia es lograr y fomentar, con fines exclusivamente pacíficos, la cooperación entre los Estados europeos en la investigación y la tecnología espaciales y sus aplicaciones espaciales, con miras a que se utilicen para fines científicos y para sistemas de aplicaciones espaciales operacionales92. 266. En abril de 1967 se estableció un programa de cooperación general entre los países socialistas para la utilización con fines pacíficos del espacio /...A/48/305 Español Página 83 ultraterrestre, que más tarde se denominó Consejo de Cooperación Internacional en el Estudio y la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre (INTERCOSMOS). La cooperación multilateral entre esos países en el marco del programa INTERCOSMOS recibió su refrendo jurídico con la firma del Acuerdo para la cooperación en la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, acuerdo intergubernamental firmado en Moscú en julio de 1976, que entró en vigor en marzo de 1977. En el marco del programa INTERCOSMOS se han realizado esfuerzos conjuntos en cinco esferas principales: la física espacial, incluida la ciencia de los materiales espaciales; la meteorología espacial; la biología y la medicina espaciales; las comunicaciones espaciales y la teleobservación de la Tierra. Participaron en el programa 10 países (Bulgaria, Cuba, Checoslovaquia, Hungría, Mongolia, Polonia, la República Democrática Alemana, Rumania, la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas y Viet Nam). Su condición jurídica y formas concretas de posible cooperación en el futuro están siendo actualmente objeto de debate93. 267. Los miembros de la Liga Arabe fundaron la Organización Arabe de Comunicaciones mediante Satélite (ARABSAT) mediante la aprobación de la Carta de la ARABSAT firmada en abril de 1976. Son miembros del servicio de comunicaciones de ARABSAT 21 Estados árabes. Su principal objetivo es establecer y mantener sistemas de telecomunicaciones regionales para la región árabe94. 268. En Africa, las resoluciones aprobadas por la Organización de la Unidad Africana y la Comisión Económica para Africa de las Naciones Unidas constituyen un marco en la esfera de la teleobservación -capacitación, intercambio de datos, etc. -, cuyo órgano coordinador es la Organización Africana de Cartografía y Teleobservación. 269. La Organización Europea de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite (EUTELSAT) fue creada en mayo de 1977 por 17 administraciones europeas de telecomunicaciones u operadores privados acreditados de la Conferencia Europea de Administraciones de Correos y Telecomunicaciones (CEPT). La Organización tomó su forma definitiva el 1º de septiembre de 1985 con la entrada en vigor de una Convención Internacional y un Acuerdo Operativo firmados por 26 Estados europeos. Actualmente EUTELSAT cuenta con 36 países miembros95. 270. La Organización Europea de Satélites Meteorológicos (EUMETSAT) es una organización intergubernamental fundada por 16 Estados miembros europeos y sus servicios meteorológicos. La Convención de la EUMETSAT entró en vigor el 19 de junio de 1986. Su objetivo fundamental es establecer, mantener y explotar sistemas europeos de satélites meteorológicos operacionales teniendo en cuenta, en la medida de lo posible, las recomendaciones de la Organización Meteorológica Mundial (OMM)96. 271. La Unión Europea Occidental (UEO) es un ejemplo de esfuerzo regional para desarrollar iniciativas de fomento de la confianza en la esfera del espacio. La UEO ha decidido recientemente asignar 10 millones de ecus al proyecto de un centro de teleobservación, que se está estableciendo actualmente en Torrejón (España). 272. El acuerdo entre Francia, España e Italia para desarrollar y operar conjuntamente los satélites HELIOS de formación de imágenes con fines de /...A/48/305 Español Página 84 inteligencia constituyen otro ejemplo de arreglo subregional entre las partes sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio. 273. La segunda Conferencia Espacial de las Américas, celebrada en Santiago de Chile del 26 al 30 de abril de 1993, aprobó una Declaración en la que se hace hincapié en la necesidad de la cooperación regional e internacional para la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos. La Conferencia determinó esferas concretas y proyectos específicos de cooperación entre los Estados de esa región, así como con Estados de otras regiones. 274. En el primer curso práctico para la región de Asia y el Pacífico sobre cooperación multilateral en materia de tecnología espacial y sus aplicaciones, celebrado en Beijing (China) en diciembre de 1992, se hicieron una serie de recomendaciones que destacan la necesidad de cooperación regional e internacional en materia de tecnología del espacio y sus aplicaciones y se propuso especificar, en su siguiente curso práctico, posibles proyectos de cooperación multilateral entre los Estados de la región de Asia y el Pacífico. 3. Mecanismos bilaterales 275. Como se indicó anteriormente, las negociaciones entre los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética han tenido como fruto algunos de los acuerdos fundamentales relacionados con sus actividades militares en el espacio ultraterrestre, sobre todo el tratado sobre misiles antibalísticos de 197297. Este tratado prevé, entre otras cosas, una Comisión Consultiva Permanente de ambos Estados para fomentar sus objetivos y aplicación. Los detalles relativos a la Comisión se elaboraron en el Memorando de Entendimiento entre el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de América y el Gobierno de la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre el establecimiento de una Comisión Consultiva Permanente98 de 21 de diciembre de 1972. 276. La Comisión Consultiva Permanente ha sido el vehículo para la cooperación entre los Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética en el fomento y aplicación de acuerdos firmados en el marco de SALT I y SALT II99. El Tratado entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre la eliminación de sus misiles de alcance intermedio y de menor alcance (Tratado sobre las fuerzas nucleares de alcance intermedio de 1987) prevé el establecimiento de una Comisión Especial de Verificación100. 277. A raíz del Tratado sobre la reducción y limitación de las armas estratégicas ofensivas (START-I)101, se estableció una Comisión Conjunta de Cumplimiento e Inspección. En virtud del Protocolo anexo al Tratado, firmado en Lisboa en marzo de 1992, participarán en la labor de la Comisión representantes de Belarús, Kazajstán y Ucrania, así como de la Federación de Rusia. 278. Con arreglo al Tratado sobre nuevas reducciones y limitaciones de las armas estratégicas ofensivas (START-II)102, la Federación de Rusia y los Estados Unidos establecieron una Comisión Bilateral de Aplicación para resolver las cuestiones relacionadas con el cumplimiento de las obligaciones contraídas. 279. Por otra parte, varios acuerdos fundamentalmente relativos a las medidas de fomento de la confianza entre las dos principales potencias espaciales, como el /...A/48/305 Español Página 85 Acuerdo sobre accidentes nucleares (1971); el Acuerdo del "teléfono rojo" (1971); el Acuerdo entre la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas y los Estados Unidos de América sobre el establecimiento de centros para la reducción del riesgo nuclear (1987); y el Acuerdo sobre la notificación (1989), prevén medidas de notificación, vigilancia y verificación, y la creación de diferentes mecanismos o la utilización de los mecanismos existentes (como el circuito por satélite INTELSAT y el circuito por satélite STATSIONAR) con miras a prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. 280. El Acuerdo Espacial más reciente entre los Estados Unidos y la Federación de Rusia (17 de junio de 1992), sobre cooperación entre ambos países, brinda un amplio marco para la cooperación en relación con las actividades espaciales. 281. En otros acuerdos bilaterales entre distintos Estados de diferentes regiones se establecen múltiples formas de cooperación en las cuestiones relacionadas con el espacio ultraterrestre. B. Algunas propuestas para la creación de nuevos mecanismos internacionales de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre 282. Si bien esta panorámica de los mecanismos bilaterales, regionales y mundiales existentes en materia de cooperación internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre revela el alcance de la cooperación entre los Estados en las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, ninguno de los mecanismos mencionados, incluso los de carácter mundial, es una organización general que abarque todos los aspectos de las actividades espaciales. Por consiguiente, se han presentado varias propuestas para ampliar los mecanismos existentes o crear otros nuevos. 283. En general, la mayoría de las propuestas presentadas hasta la fecha tratan de la vigilancia o la verificación de los acuerdos de limitación de armamentos vigentes o futuros, o constituyen parte de propuestas más generales sobre las actividades de determinados Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre. Habida cuenta de que la vigilancia y la verificación podrían formar parte de todo acuerdo internacional sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre, podrían también al mismo tiempo contribuir a las medidas de fomento de la confianza y, de esa manera, a promover la cooperación entre los Estados. 284. Es evidente que cualquier mecanismo de vigilancia o verificación de los acuerdos de limitación de armamentos y desarme será una cuestión muy compleja que entrañará un amplio espectro de procedimientos de inspección, por ejemplo, de Tierra a espacio, de espacio a espacio, de espacio a Tierra, de aire a tierra e in situ. Para mejorar el fomento de la confianza habrá que diseñar necesariamente una red de ese nivel de complejidad. 285. Entre los planes más debatidos, figuran las propuestas francesa y soviética examinadas en el capítulo V supra. En el primer período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General dedicado al desarme, celebrado en junio de 1978, Francia presentó una propuesta detallada para el establecimiento de un Organismo Internacional de Satélites de Control (OISCO)103. Una de las principales /...A/48/305 Español Página 86 características de la propuesta era que se debía vigilar la aplicación de los acuerdos existentes y futuros sobre desarme y seguridad, posiblemente mediante algún acuerdo especial entre las partes contratantes y el Organismo. La propuesta francesa sugería además que el Organismo se estableciera por etapas y en 1981, fue objeto de un estudio de las Naciones Unidas: Repercusiones de la creación de un organismo internacional de satélites de control104. En el estudio se reseñaban las misiones e instalaciones necesarias para el OISCO, su estructura orgánica y las repercusiones financieras, jurídicas y técnicas que tendría su establecimiento. 286. En el segundo período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General dedicado al desarme, celebrado en 1988, la Unión Soviética propuso que la Conferencia de Desarme se encargara de llevar a cabo negociaciones puntuales sobre el establecimiento de un Organismo Internacional de Vigilancia Espacial (OIVE)105. Aunque la propuesta soviética se basa en los mismos principios que la francesa, difiere en algunos aspectos. La propuesta soviética proponía que el Organismo se estableciera en dos etapas, la primera de las cuales sería un período de capacitación para el personal y de estructuración del propio Organismo durante el cual la información sería suministrada por los Estados dotados de instalaciones de vigilancia espacial y se crearía un Centro de Inspección de Materiales procesados en el Espacio (CIME). La segunda etapa consistiría fundamentalmente en el establecimiento del componente en tierra mediante la creación de una red de estaciones de recepción de datos106. 287. En marzo de 1988, la Unión Soviética propuso la creación de un Cuerpo de Inspectores Espaciales Internacionales107 para asegurar que no se desplegasen armamentos de ningún tipo en el espacio ultraterrestre. El Cuerpo de Inspectores se basa en el principio de las inspecciones in situ antes del lanzamiento de los artefactos espaciales y el alcance previsto de la prohibición incluiría sistemas de armamentos equipados para llevar a cabo ataques en la tierra, el aire o el espacio ultraterrestre, "... basados en cualesquiera principios físicos". 288. La propuesta canadiense PAXSAT108, o satélite para la paz, es un concepto de verificación que utiliza la tecnología de teleobservación basada en el espacio. Como ya se indicó en el capítulo V supra, tiene dos posibles aplicaciones denominadas PAXSAT A y PAXSAT B, respectivamente. En la primera aplicación, el PAXSAT estaría vinculado a acuerdos sobre el espacio ultraterrestre que entrañan la capacidad de teleobservación del espacio desde el espacio. Mediante la utilización de tecnología no reservada, la investigación del PAXSAT A está encaminada a diseñar un satélite que pueda determinar con precisión si otros objetos en órbita son capaces de funcionar como armas espaciales (por ejemplo, como armas antisatélite) o tener aplicaciones como armamentos espaciales. El PAXSAT B forma parte de un proyecto de investigación canadiense que va a estar vinculado a acuerdos que requieren la observación regional terrestre. Por otra parte, la investigación del PAXSAT incluye también el desarrollo de una base de datos, probablemente sobre artefactos espaciales para la aplicación A y sobre fuerzas y armas convencionales para la aplicación B. 289. En 1989, Francia propuso el establecimiento de un Centro Internacional de Trayectografía (UNITRACE)109. Como estaría concebido para alertar a los Estados interesados en caso de posibles incidentes y suministrar pruebas sobre la buena /...A/48/305 Español Página 87 o mala fe en caso de accidente, debía satisfacer el requisito de la transparencia y contar en todo momento con información actualizada sobre las trayectorias de los artefactos espaciales. Al mismo tiempo, si ha de ser aceptable para los Estados propietarios de satélites, un centro de esa índole debería poder mantener cierto grado de confidencialidad con respecto a las actividades militares en el espacio. Bajo los auspicios de la Secretaría de las Naciones Unidas, tendría las siguientes funciones: a) Reunión de datos para actualizar los registros; b) Vigilancia de los artefactos espaciales; c) Cálculo en tiempo real de todas las trayectorias posibles. 290. Habida cuenta de que en la aplicación de acuerdos regionales sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza y la seguridad se podría aprovechar cada vez más las imágenes obtenidas por satélites, Francia estaba dispuesta a contribuir de tres maneras al establecimiento y funcionamiento de organismos regionales encargados de mantener la transparencia: a) Prestado asistencia en la capacitación de especialistas para la interpretación de datos obtenidos por satélites; b) Estudiando la posible estructura y tamaño de las instalaciones de recepción (técnicas) de que podrían disponer los Estados participantes en esos organismos; c) Iniciando un examen más a fondo de la cuestión del acceso a los datos y a la información obtenida por satélites y el debate con otros países productores de imágenes espaciales, con miras a concertar acuerdos para suministrar a los organismos regionales que lo solicitaran la información que requiriesen para desarrollar esas tareas. 291. En el cuadragésimo séptimo período de sesiones de la Asamblea General, Francia indicó que iba a proponer una medida para aumentar la confianza por el procedimiento de hacer obligatorio el aviso previo antes del lanzamiento de misiles balísticos y cohetes portadores de satélites u otros artefactos espaciales. Esa medida de notificación, de adoptarse, sería complementada con el establecimiento, bajo los auspicios de las Naciones Unidas, de un centro internacional encargado de reunir y aprovechar los datos recibidos110. 292. Francia elaboró su propuesta en un documento de trabajo que presentó al Comité ad hoc sobre la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre de la Conferencia de Desarme, el 12 de marzo de 1993111. Francia propuso, entre otras cosas, el establecimiento, mediante un nuevo instrumento internacional que podría ser negociado en la Conferencia de Desarme, de un régimen de notificación previa de los lanzamientos de lanzadores espaciales y misiles balísticos, y que ese régimen fuera complementado por el establecimiento de un Centro Internacional de Notificación encargado de centralizar y redistribuir los datos obtenidos, a fin de aumentar la transparencia de las actividades espaciales. El Centro se establecería bajo los auspicios de las Naciones Unidas, estaría jurídicamente vinculado a ellas y podría estructurarse como una división de la Oficina de Asuntos de Desarme de la Secretaría de las/...A/48/305 Español Página 88 Naciones Unidas. El Centro tendría las siguientes funciones principales: recibir la notificación de lanzamientos de misiles balísticos y otros lanzamientos al espacio que le transmitieran los Estados partes; recibir la información transmitida por los Estados sobre lanzamientos ya realizados; los Estados dotados de capacidades de detección serían invitados a comunicar al Centro, con carácter voluntario, datos sobre los lanzamientos que ellos hubiesen detectado; y, mediante un banco de datos, el Centro pondría esta información a disposición de la comunidad internacional. 293. El establecimiento de una "Organización Mundial del Espacio"112 fue sugerido por la Unión Soviética en 1985 como mecanismo más amplio de cooperación internacional. Las funciones que tendría una organización de esa índole, se han descrito con cierto detalle en el capítulo VI. /...A/48/305 Español Página 89 VIII. CONCLUSIONES Y RECOMENDACIONES 294. Después de la aprobación de la resolución 45/55 B por la Asamblea General, se produjeron cambios políticos sustanciales y rápidos que han creado un nuevo contexto internacional, y es en este contexto que hay que examinar las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre. Las actividades espaciales abren nuevas oportunidades para la cooperación mundial, regional y bilateral. 295. Por consiguiente, el Grupo de Expertos concluye que estos cambios, conjuntamente con los adelantos tecnológicos, no sólo mantienen la pertinencia de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio, sino que también crean un clima propicio para su aplicación. 296. El Grupo de Expertos considera que ha quedado demostrado el potencial de las misiones y operaciones espaciales para brindar importantes beneficios científicos, ambientales, económicos, sociales, políticos y de otro tipo, y que el medio ambiente espacial debe emplearse para el progreso de la humanidad. Así pues, hay una clara tendencia a que un número creciente de Estados amplíen sus actividades relacionadas con el espacio ultraterrestre. Algunos Estados consideran que el componente militar es importante para sus actividades espaciales. Las actividades espaciales deberían estar encaminadas a fortalecer la paz y la seguridad internacionales. 297. El Grupo llegó a la conclusión de que las aplicaciones espaciales están cobrando mayor importancia por los beneficios que reportan en todos los campos y, por consiguiente, una significación cada vez mayor en los aspectos estratégicos y civiles de la vida en la Tierra. El uso del espacio también tiene la posibilidad de aumentar, agravar o, por contraste, aliviar las tensiones entre los Estados. 298. El Grupo considera que gran parte de las principales preocupaciones de la inmensa mayoría de los Estados aún sigue girando en torno a la posibilidad de que se introduzcan armas en el espacio ultraterrestre. También son motivo de preocupación algunas otras actividades militares. Para la inmensa mayoría de los Estados la cuestión del acceso a la tecnología espacial y a sus beneficios se está convirtiendo en un importante factor que tal vez sea necesario abordar específicamente en el marco de las medidas de fomento de la confianza. 299. El derecho de todos los Estados a explorar y utilizar el espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de toda la humanidad es un principio jurídico universalmente aceptado. Todos los Estados tienen la responsabilidad de garantizar el respeto de estos derechos, de conformidad con el derecho internacional y en su propio interés con miras a mantener la paz y la seguridad internacionales y promover la cooperación internacional. 300. El Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre, piedra angular del derecho internacional del espacio, fue aprobado en 1967, antes de que aumentara el empleo de la tecnología espacial para las telecomunicaciones, antes de que se dispusiera de sistemas de teleobservación, y antes de que se incorporaran las aplicaciones espaciales a gran parte de la infraestructura y capacidades civiles de los Estados. Los rápidos adelantos de las tecnologías espaciales requieren /...A/48/305 Español Página 90 un análisis permanente de la necesidad de actualizar o complementar el actual régimen jurídico internacional. 301. Por consiguiente, el Grupo entiende que tal vez sea preciso seguir perfeccionando las normas jurídicas, cuando proceda, para abordar los nuevos adelantos de la tecnología espacial y aumentar el interés universal en sus aplicaciones. En este contexto, el Grupo manifestó la necesidad de crear un marco estructural para fortalecer la cooperación y el fomento de la confianza entre los Estados. 302. La importancia de la contribución de las actividades espaciales al desarrollo nacional y regional y a la comprensión internacional es mayor si dichas actividades se realizan en un medio seguro, libre de amenazas externas. También se observa que las preocupaciones pueden nacer del temor a las ventajas de tipo militar o económico que proporciona el espacio y de lo difícil que resulta obtener los beneficios deseados de las aplicaciones espaciales de una manera eficaz en función de los costos. 303. El Grupo opina que, además de la situación y capacidades de cada nación, es preciso tomar en consideración los aspectos del equilibrio mundial y regional. Puesto que el empleo del espacio constituye un complemento de las fuerzas militares en tierra, tal vez deban contemplarse algunas medidas de fomento de la confianza con respecto a Estados vecinos o grupos de Estados en caso de tensión. El Grupo observa que las tecnologías espaciales modernas, que proporcionan una perspectiva planetaria, dan la impresión de que desde el espacio podría alcanzarse cualquier punto sobre la Tierra. Por consiguiente, el Grupo considera que todos los Estados pueden y deben participar a nivel mundial en el fomento de la confianza con respecto al espacio. 304. El Grupo coincide en que la aplicación de las tecnologías espaciales es ambivalente por naturaleza y que las tecnologías de acceso restringido no deben definirse como nocivas en sí mismas, por motivo de su dualidad, ya que la forma en que se utilizan es lo que determina si son nocivas o no. Puesto que la expansión unilateral o rápida de algunas capacidades espaciales por parte de algunos Estados puede suscitar desconfianza en otros Estados, el Grupo concluye que dicha extensión de las capacidades debe ir acompañada, siempre que sea posible, de un marco de fomento de la confianza destinado a aumentar la transparencia y la franqueza. Estas capacidades espaciales también deberán desarrollarse de conformidad con disposiciones internacionalmente acordadas que garanticen que no se desviarán para fines prohibidos. 305. Con todo, tanto por motivos militares como económicos, existe la preocupación latente de que un Estado que adquiera datos que revelen deficiencias u otras situaciones particulares de otro Estado pueda aprovecharlos en detrimento de otro Estado. Algunos países temen que las medidas de transparencia con respecto a sus actividades espaciales podrían afectar su seguridad nacional. Por consiguiente, las medidas de transparencia deben concebirse de modo que concilien la necesidad de fomentar la confianza internacional con la necesidad de proteger los intereses de seguridad nacional. 306. No se trata sólo de las preocupaciones que se pueden reconocer directamente, sino también de las relacionadas con el compromiso que contraigan otros con respecto a las medidas de fomento de la confianza. Por consiguiente, /...A/48/305 Español Página 91 a juicio del Grupo debe prestarse la debida atención a la evaluación de la aplicación de las medidas de fomento de la confianza para garantizar su cumplimiento, así como al uso adecuado de cualesquiera disposiciones de verificación que pudieran contener. 307. El Grupo ha tomado en cuenta la amplia gama de tecnologías e instalaciones que se requieren para una misión espacial, desde la construcción de la propia nave, el vehículo de lanzamiento y las operaciones de lanzamiento, incluidos los medios de rastreo, hasta todas las operaciones conexas durante su vida útil. Cabe señalar que muchos Estados, por necesidad o por elección, se han especializado en esferas concretas y dependen de otros para complementar sus actividades y satisfacer sus demás necesidades. El Grupo considera que este es un importante factor que hay que tener en cuenta al analizar las medidas de fomento de la confianza. 308. El Grupo considera que, al examinar las posibles medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre hay que tener en cuenta las diferentes capacidades espaciales de los Estados. Por el momento, sólo los Estados Unidos y la Federación de Rusia cuentan con toda la gama de tecnologías y equipo para realizar por sí mismos todo tipo de misiones espaciales; luego hay un segundo grupo de Estados, más numeroso que ha logrado la autosuficiencia con respecto a determinadas misiones espaciales; y hay un tercer gran grupo de Estados que cuenta con capacidades espaciales conexas en tecnologías o instalaciones especializadas, pero que no posee autonomía en el espacio. En este grupo se encuentran los Estados que tienen experiencia espacial directa y programas en marcha, así como los que poseen misiles u otras tecnologías que se pueden adaptar rápidamente a las misiones espaciales o a parte de ellas. 309. Todos los Estados tienen intereses legítimos en el espacio y en muchos casos se están beneficiando de las actividades espaciales. Algunos de ellos poseen y operan instalaciones espaciales o afines, pero dependen en gran parte o totalmente de las acciones comerciales o políticas de otros para su participación en actividades espaciales. 310. Las disparidades en los niveles de las capacidades espaciales entre estos grupos, así como entre los Estados, la imposibilidad de participar en las actividades espaciales sin la asistencia de otros, la incertidumbre con respecto a la transferencia de suficientes tecnologías espaciales y la incapacidad para adquirir información espacial importante, son factores que inciden en la falta de confianza entre los Estados. Dichos factores quizá dificulten la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. En este contexto, el Grupo concluye que es preciso abordar las cuestiones relacionadas con el acceso al espacio y a sus beneficios a fin de promover la cooperación y el fomento de la confianza entre los Estados. 311. El Grupo observa que en el futuro previsible el logro de la plena autonomía de las capacidades espaciales en todos los Estados no es viable, ni tecnológica ni económicamente. Por consiguiente, concluye que la cooperación internacional es un medio importante para fomentar el derecho de cada nación a lograr sus objetivos legítimos en cuanto al aprovechamiento de la tecnología espacial para su propio desarrollo y bienestar. La cooperación, con la participación de otras naciones para lograr los objetivos nacionales, requiere confianza en las capacidades de los demás y en las políticas que dan acceso a dichas capacidades. /...A/48/305 Español Página 92 312. El Grupo concluye que algunas medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre podrían considerarse como complemento de las medidas aplicables a las actividades y arreglos militares terrestres, constituyendo así un conjunto más amplio de mecanismos encaminados a crear y mantener la confianza entre los Estados. 313. El Grupo observa que algunos Estados que no poseen capacidades militares tienen varios motivos de preocupación con respecto a la aplicación y uso de dichas capacidades por otros Estados. Por ejemplo, algunas capacidades espaciales podrían servir de multiplicadores de fuerzas en caso de conflicto regional o de otro tipo. Los satélites podrían emplearse para obtener datos que podrían ser aprovechados en una situación militar dada. Una mayor transparencia puede ser de importancia capital para mitigar la desconfianza y fomentar la confianza con respecto a todos los medios y capacidades relacionados con el espacio. 314. El Grupo concluye que la aplicación de medidas adecuadas de fomento de la confianza entre los Estados podría eliminar algunos de estos motivos actuales de preocupación. La transparencia podría coadyuvar a disminuir la desconfianza y, por ende, eliminar algunos de los factores que obstaculizan la cooperación internacional. La aplicación de medidas de control de armamentos y desarme, y de ajuste de la transferencia de tecnología sin por ello inhibir el crecimiento y el desarrollo potenciales de las capacidades espaciales con fines pacíficos, quizá pudiera también calmar las preocupaciones con respecto a las capacidades espaciales. En este sentido podrían contemplarse también medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio en relación con los acuerdos de seguridad regional. 315. El Grupo ha examinado las formas en que un Estado puede fomentar su tecnología espacial, como el desarrollo autóctono, la transferencia de tecnología y la asistencia técnica que permita al Estado receptor avanzar rápidamente a través de las diferentes fases y lograr que sus propios conocimientos especializados alcancen los niveles deseados. El Grupo opina que la cooperación internacional es importante para el desarrollo de la tecnología espacial. 316. El Grupo considera que las medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza que tratan de la dualidad de las tecnologías relacionadas con el espacio podrían propiciar un mejor clima para la cooperación internacional, y entiende además que se debe fomentar su uso y garantizar el acceso a sus beneficios, en virtud de disposiciones pertinentes acordadas a nivel nacional e internacional que aseguren que no se emplearán para fines prohibidos. 317. El Grupo ha examinado la posibilidad de concertar un acuerdo internacional sobre la prohibición de las armas en el espacio ultraterrestre y considera que esta cuestión merece seguir siendo examinada. El Grupo observa además que muchos Estados opinan que en vista de la nueva situación política mundial, ha llegado el momento de comenzar negociaciones exhaustivas para elaborar un acuerdo internacional sobre la prohibición de las armas en el espacio ultraterrestre. A juicio de dichos Estados, un acuerdo de ese tipo constituiría una de las medidas más eficaces de fomento de la confianza. 318. El Grupo observa la importancia creciente de los sistemas espaciales como elemento de apoyo a la diplomacia internacional, y destaca las posibilidades que /...A/48/305 Español Página 93 brindan para promover la eficacia de las Naciones Unidas en lo que respecta a la diplomacia preventiva, la gestión de las crisis, el arreglo de las controversias internacionales y la solución de conflictos. El Grupo entiende que este es un importante aspecto del papel que desempeñan dichos sistemas en cuanto al fomento de la confianza y la estabilidad en las relaciones internacionales. 319. Las recomendaciones del Grupo se basan en el texto de la resolución 45/55 B de la Asamblea General y en las disposiciones del Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre, así como en los conceptos de transparencia, previsibilidad, aspectos de conducta y cooperación internacional, que se están examinando sobre todo en la Conferencia de Desarme, la Comisión de Desarme de las Naciones Unidas, y en la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos de las Naciones Unidas. 320. Ante todo, el Grupo recomienda que todos los Estados Partes cumplan estrictamente las disposiciones del Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre y otros tratados afines concertados bajo los auspicios de las Naciones Unidas, ya que estos instrumentos incluyen componentes que establecen la confianza entre los Estados. Las resoluciones de las Naciones Unidas que recogen dichos principios sobre el espacio ultraterrestre y que gozan de apoyo universal pueden contribuir también a fomentar la confianza. 321. El Grupo recomienda que los mecanismos bilaterales y multilaterales existentes, en particular los mecanismos multilaterales de las Naciones Unidas, sigan desempeñando un importante papel en cualquier examen ulterior y en la elaboración de medidas concretas de fomento de la confianza en el contexto de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. También se sugiere que se pida a la Conferencia de Desarme que siga analizando otras medidas que contribuyan a prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre. En este sentido, la Conferencia de Desarme debería servir de foro para las negociaciones sobre nuevas medidas, incluidas negociaciones sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio, en caso de que se requieran. 322. El Grupo de Expertos recomienda que la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, dentro de su mandato relativo al régimen jurídico internacional que rige las actividades del espacio ultraterrestre, mantenga en estudio, entre otras cosas, el Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre con miras a mantenerse al tanto de los adelantos tecnológicos y las posibles necesidades de transparencia y previsibilidad. 323. El Grupo recomienda que se examinen nuevamente las propuestas relativas al organismo internacional de satélites de control y al organismo internacional de vigilancia del espacio a la luz de las novedades actuales y futuras. El Grupo ha estudiado la posibilidad de establecer un registro internacional de datos orbitales y funcionales sobre vehículos y misiones, que recibiría información de los centros de rastreo de los Estados Miembros, y considera que esta cuestión merece seguir siendo examinada habida cuenta de su posible pertinencia para el fomento de la confianza. 324. El Grupo recomienda que se desarrollen los mecanismos existentes relacionados con las actividades espaciales para la alerta en caso de accidentes o falla de vehículos y que se examine el papel que podrían desempeñar las /...A/48/305 Español Página 94 Naciones Unidas en este campo. Sería conveniente seguir estudiando la posibilidad de crear un sistema internacional de alerta. 325. El Grupo de Expertos recomienda que los Estados que operan sistemas de teleobservación lo hagan de conformidad con la resolución 41/65 de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, a fin de facilitar el más amplio acceso posible de la comunidad internacional a los datos de teleobservación sobre una base no discriminatoria y a un costo razonable, teniendo en cuenta las necesidades y la situación de los países en desarrollo y de los países con regímenes en transición. 326. El Grupo recomienda que se sigan examinando los conceptos y propuestas sobre el "código de circulación", como posibles componentes de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en las actividades espaciales. Deberán tenerse en cuenta factores como la maniobrabilidad de las naves espaciales, la posible incompatibilidad de las órbitas y la previsibilidad de aproximaciones excesivas. 327. El Grupo recomienda que se evalúen los mecanismos institucionales para fomentar la cooperación internacional entre los Estados con respecto a la tecnología espacial, incluida la transferencia internacional, tomando en cuenta las preocupaciones legítimas con respecto a la dualidad de la tecnología. Se recomienda además que se analicen las medidas que permitan a todos los Estados tener acceso al espacio con fines pacíficos a un costo recuperable o sobre una base comercial razonable, y que los Estados que requieran asistencia a este respecto puedan aprovechar las formas adecuadas de cooperación técnica, tomando debidamente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo y de los países con regímenes en transición. 328. El Grupo recomienda que la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos estudie los mecanismos de coordinación de diversas actividades espaciales internacionales, incluida la exploración interplanetaria, la vigilancia del medio ambiente, la ciencia meteorológica, la teleobservación, el socorro en caso de desastre y la mitigación de sus efectos, la labor de búsqueda y rescate, la capacitación del personal y los resultados indirectos. En este contexto los conceptos que entrañan una participación universal como la "Organización Mundial del Espacio" constituyen posibles puntos de referencia útiles para esta labor exploratoria. 329. El Grupo toma nota de la opinión de que dada la dualidad de algunas tecnologías espaciales y el carácter internacional de las cuestiones pertinentes analizadas en el contexto de la prevención de una carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre y de los usos pacíficos del espacio ultraterrestre, es preciso examinar la posibilidad de establecer contactos de trabajo entre la Conferencia de Desarme y la Comisión y que la Asamblea General examine medidas idóneas que permitan fomentar dichos contactos. 330. El Grupo de Expertos concluyó que la aplicación de medidas apropiadas de fomento de la confianza con respecto a las actividades del espacio ultraterrestre pueden constituir un importante paso hacia el logro del objetivo de prevenir la carrera de armamentos en el espacio ultraterrestre y garantizar que todos los Estados lo utilicen con fines pacíficos. /...A/48/305 Español Página 95 331. El Grupo espera que el presente estudio sea de utilidad para la labor permanente de la Conferencia de Desarme, de su Comité ad hoc sobre el espacio ultraterrestre, de la Comisión de Desarme de las Naciones Unidas y de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos de las Naciones Unidas, así como para otros órganos internacionales interesados en el espacio ultraterrestre y en las cuestiones que se tratan en el presente estudio. Notas 1 Véase: Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, décimo período extraordinario de sesiones, Suplemento No. 4 (A/S-10/4), secc. III. 2 Resolución 2222 (XXI) de la Asamblea General, anexo. 3 Se hace referencia a la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas en relación con acontecimientos ocurridos antes de diciembre de 1991; a partir de esa fecha se hace referencia a la Federación de Rusia. 4 El empleo de la palabra "satélite" en este contexto no excluye la referencia a otros tipos de naves espaciales, como la "estación espacial", el "transbordador espacial", el "laboratorio espacial", etc. 5 Véase: Cooperación internacional para la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos -actividades de los Estados Miembros, Nota de la Secretaría, documento A/AC.105/505 y Add.1 a 3. 6 Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: E.92.I.30), págs. 135 y 136.7 Access to Outer Space Technologies: Implications for international Security, UNIDIR, Research Papers, No. 15 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: GV.E.92.0.30). 8 World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992 (Oxford University Press, 1992), págs. 509 a 530. 9 La Asamblea General aprobó el Tratado en el anexo de su resolución 2222 (XXI), de 13 de diciembre de 1966. El Tratado se abrió a la firma el 27 de enero de 1967 y entró en vigor el 10 de octubre de 1967. El texto del Tratado se reproduce en Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations, publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: E.92.I.30, págs. 231 a 236. 10 El Tratado se firmó el 10 de octubre de 1963 y entró en vigor el mismo día. El texto del Tratado se reproduce en Status of Multilateral Arms Regulations and Disarmament Agreements, cuarta edición: 1992 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: E.93.IX.11), vol. I, pág. 33. /...A/48/305 Español Página 96 Notas (continuación) 11 El Acuerdo fue aprobado por la Asamblea General en su resolución 2345 (XXII), de 19 de diciembre de 1967, y entró en vigor el 3 de diciembre de 1968. El texto del Acuerdo se reproduce en Space Activities, op. cit., págs. 237 a 240. 12 La Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas aprobó el Convenio en el anexo de su resolución 2777 (XXVI), de 29 de noviembre de 1971. El Convenio se abrió a la firma el 29 de marzo de 1972 y entró en vigor el 1º de septiembre de 1972. El texto del Convenio se reproduce en Space Activities, op. cit., págs. 241 a 249. 13 El Convenio fue aprobado por la Asamblea General en el anexo de su resolución 3235 (XXIX), de 12 de noviembre de 1974 y entró en vigor el 15 de septiembre de 1976. El texto del Convenio se reproduce en Space Activities, op. cit., págs. 250 a 254. 14 En la Conferencia Plenipotenciaria Adicional (APP-92) se adoptó una versión revisada de la Constitución y del Convenio de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (Ginebra, 1992) y se dispuso su entrada en vigor para el 1º de julio de 1994. Al entrar en vigor, la Constitución y el Convenio de Ginebra derogarán y reemplazarán al Convenio de Nairobi (1982) que rige actualmente. Véase el Convenio de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones, Nairobi, 1982, Secretaría General de la UIT, Ginebra, ISBN 92-61-01651-0. La Constitución y el Convenio de Niza, firmados el 30 de junio de 1989, no han entrado en vigor. Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones, Secretaría General, Ginebra, 1989, PP-89/FINACTS/CONVO1E1.TXS. 15 El Convenio fue firmado el 18 de mayo de 1977 y entró en vigor el 5 de octubre de 1978. El texto del Convenio figura en Status, vol. I, pág. 217. 16 Estas Declaraciones no están integradas en la Convención, pero forman parte de las negociaciones y se incluyeron en el informe de la Conferencia del Comité de Desarme a la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas en septiembre de 1976. El texto se reproduce en Status, vol. I, pág. 231. 17 El Acuerdo fue aprobado por la Asamblea General en el anexo de su resolución 34/68. El Acuerdo se abrió a la firma el 18 de diciembre de 1979 y entró en vigor el 11 de julio de 1984. Su texto se reproduce en Space Activities, op. cit., págs. 255 a 263. 18 El Tratado fue firmado el 26 de mayo de 1972 y entró en vigor el 3 de octubre de 1972. El texto del Tratado se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, 1990, Organismo de Regulación de Armamentos y de Desarme de los EE.UU., Washington, D.C. 20451, págs. 157 a 161. 19 El Acuerdo SALT-I fue firmado el 26 de mayo de 1972 y entró en vigor el 3 de octubre de 1972. El texto del Acuerdo se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, págs. 169 a 176. /...A/48/305 Español Página 97 Notas (continuación) 20 El Tratado SALT-II fue firmado el 18 de junio de 1979, pero nunca entró en vigor. El texto del Tratado figura en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, págs. 267 a 300. 21 El Tratado START-I fue firmado el 31 de julio de 1991 y todavía no ha entrado en vigor. Lo complementó el Protocolo de Lisboa, firmado el 23 de mayo de 1992 por Belarús, los Estados Unidos de América, Kazajstán, la Federación de Rusia y Ucrania. El texto del Tratado fue publicado como documento del Comité de Desarme CD/1192, y el texto del Protocolo como CD/1193. 22 El Tratado START-II fue firmado por los Estados Unidos de América y la Federación de Rusia el 3 de enero de 1993 y su entrada en vigor depende de la entrada en vigor del Tratado START-I. El texto del Tratado se ha publicado como documento del Comité de Desarme CD/1194. 23 El Acuerdo se firmó y entró en vigor el 30 de septiembre de 1971. El texto del Acuerdo se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, págs. 120 y 121. 24 El Acuerdo fue firmado y entró en vigor el 30 de septiembre de 1971. El texto del Acuerdo se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, págs. 124 a 128. 25 Los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas habían acordado en 1963 establecer, para su utilización en caso de emergencia, un enlace directo de comunicaciones entre los gobiernos de ambos países. En el llamado Acuerdo del "Teléfono Rojo" se disponía que se estableciera un circuito telegráfico y, como sistema redundante, un circuito radiotelegráfico. El texto del Memorando de Entendimiento y Anexo, de 20 de junio de 1963, se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, op. cit., págs. 34 a 36. 26 El Acuerdo fue firmado y entró en vigor el 15 de septiembre de 1987. Su texto se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, págs. 338 a 344. 27 El Acuerdo fue firmado y entró en vigor el 31 de mayo de 1988. Su texto se reproduce en Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, págs. 457 y 458. 28 El Acuerdo fue firmado el 12 de junio de 1989 y entró en vigor el 1º de enero de 1990. El texto del Acuerdo, junto con sus anexos y las declaraciones convenidas en relación con el Acuerdo, se publicó como documento del Comité de Desarme CD/943, de fecha 4 de agosto de 1989. 29 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, decimoctavo período de sesiones, Suplemento No. 15 A/5515), págs. 15 y 16. 30 Ibíd., trigésimo séptimo período de sesiones, Suplemento No. 51 (A/37/51), págs. 120 y 121. /...A/48/305 Español Página 98 Notas (continuación) 31 Ibíd., cuadragésimo primer período de sesiones, Suplemento No. 53 (A/41/53), págs. 120 y 121. 32 Resoluciones y decisiones aprobadas por la Asamblea General en la primera parte de su cuadragésimo séptimo período de sesiones, del 15 de septiembre al 23 de diciembre de 1992. 33 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, décimo período extraordinario de sesiones, Suplemento No. 4 (A/S-10/4). 34 Estudio amplio sobre las medidas de fomento de la confianza, publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: S.82.IX.3. 35 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, decimoquinto período extraordinario de sesiones, Suplemento No. 3 (A/S-15/3). 36 Jasani, Buphendra, "Military Space Activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978 (Taylor y Francis, Londres, 1978); y DeVere, G. T. y Jonhson, N. L., "The NORAD Space Network, Spaceflight, julio de 1985, vol. 27, págs. 306 a 309; y North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD Space Detection and Tracking System", Hoja de datos, 20 de agosto de 1982. 37 King-Hele, Desmond, Observing Earth Satellites (Macmillan, Londres, 1983).38 Manly, Peter, "Television in Amateur Astronomy", Astronomy, diciembre de 1984, págs. 35 a 37. 39 El telescopio de 2,3 metros del pico Kitt, en Arizona, se ha utilizado para producir imágenes del Telescopio Espacial Hubble (McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared Astronomy: Pixels to Spare", Sky & Telescope, julio de 1991, págs. 31 a 35) y la estación espacial Mir ("Satellite Trackers Bag Soviet Space Station, Sky & Telescope, diciembre de 1987, pág. 580). 40 Jackson, P., "Space Surveillance Satellite Catalog Maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 de abril de 1990. 41 "PAXSAT Concept: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", External Affairs Canada, Verification Brochure, No. 2, 1987, 1988, págs. 97 a 102. 42 "Discurso del Excelentísimo Sr. Valery Giscard d’Estaing, Presidente de la República Francesa", A/S-10/PV.3, 25 de mayo de 1978. 43 "Estudio sobre las repercusiones de la creación de un organismo internacional de satélites de control -informe del Secretario General", A/AC.206/14, 6 de agosto de 1981. /...A/48/305 Español Página 99 Notas (continuación) 44 Francia, documento de trabajo titulado "El espacio al servicio de la verificación: propuesta de organismo de tratamiento de las imágenes obtenidas por satélite", CD/945, CD/OS/WP.40, 1º de agosto de 1989. 45 Declaración realizada por el Sr. E. A. Shevardnadze, Ministro de Relaciones Exteriores de la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas, en el tercer período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General dedicado al desarme, A/S-15/PV.12. 46 CD/OS/WP.39. 47 "El concepto PAXSAT ...", Verification Brochure, op. cit., págs. 97 a 102.48 Las Naciones Unidas y el Desarme 1945-1970 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: 70.IX.1). 49 Véase el cuadro 3. 50 Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space: A Guide to the Discussion in the Conference on Disarmament, UNIDIR/91/79 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, No. de venta: GV.E.91.0.17), págs. 107 a 128. 51 CD/708. 52 CD/941. 53 CD/1092. 54 CD/708. 55 CD/1092. 56 CD/PV.318, CD/PV.345 y CD/PV.516. 57 Ibíd. 58 CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35. 59 CD/1092. 60 CD/PV.560. 61 CD/937 y CD/PV.570. 62 CD/945 y CD/937. 63 CD/OS/WP.35. /...A/48/305 Español Página 100 Notas (continuación) 64 Los países que participaron originalmente en el régimen de vigilancia de las tecnologías balísticas fueron: Alemania, el Canadá, los Estados Unidos, Francia, Italia, el Japón, y el Reino Unido. The Armas Control Reporter, 1993, 706.A.2. 65 Al 31 de diciembre de 1992, los siguientes países comenzaron a participar en el régimen de vigilancia de las tecnologías balísticas (en orden cronológico): España, Australia, Dinamarca, Bélgica, los Países Bajos, Luxemburgo, Noruega, Austria, Finlandia, Suecia, Nueva Zelandia, Grecia, Irlanda, Portugal y Suiza. Ibíd. 66 Francia, "Plan de control de los armamentos y desarme presentado por Francia", CD/1079, 3 de junio de 1991. 67 La Argentina y el Brasil, "Transferencia internacional de tecnologías críticas -Documento de trabajo", A/CN.10/145, 25 de abril de 1991. 68 Ibíd. 69 Estados Unidos de América, "Declaración ante el Comité ad hoc sobre el espacio ultraterrestre de la Conferencia de Desarme", CD/1087, 8 de julio de 1991. 70 Declaración del Sr. Dhanapala, de Sri Lanka, CD/PV.354, 8 de abril de 1986. 71 Declaración del Sr. Ahmad, del Pakistán, CD/PV.460, 26 de abril de 1988. 72 CD/1162. 73 CD/PV.332, 22 de agosto de 1985. 74 Ibíd. 75 Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas, "Establecimiento de un sistema internacional de verificación del no emplazamiento de armas de cualquier tipo en el espacio ultraterrestre", CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19, 17 de marzo de 1988. 76 Ibíd. 77 Décima Conferencia de Jefes de Estado o de Gobierno de los Países No Alineados, Jakarta, 1 a 6 de septiembre de 1992, Documento Final, pág. 32, Naciones Unidas, documento A/47/675-S/24816, cáp. II, párr. 44. 78 Francia, "Documento de trabajo -Prevención de la carrera de armamentos en el espacio: propuestas concernientes a la vigilancia y la verificación, así como a la inmunidad de los satélites", CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35, 31 de julio de 1989, se destaca el original. 79 Ibíd. /...A/48/305 Español Página 101 Notas (continuación) 80 "Declaración del representante de los Estados Unidos de América ante el Comité ad hoc el 2 de agosto de 1988", en CD/905, CD/OS/WP.28, 21 de marzo de 1989. 81 Declaración del Sr. Ahmad, del Pakistán, CD/PV.413, 16 de junio de 1987. 82 CD/937, CD/OS/WP.35 de 31 de julio de 1989. 83 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, cuadragésimo octavo período de sesiones, Suplemento No. 20 (A/48/20). 84 La exploración espacial y sus aplicaciones; documentos presentados a la Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, Viena, 14 a 27 de agosto de 1968, (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: S.69.I.16), vols. I y II. 85 A/CONF.101/10 y Corr.1 y 2. 86 Las Naciones Unidas y el desarme 1945-1970 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: 70.IX.1), págs. 66 a 68. 87 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, cuadragésimo período de sesiones, Suplemento No. 27 (A/40/27). 88 Ibíd., decimosexto período de sesiones, A/RES/1721(XVI), 20 de diciembre de 1961, anexo B. 89 Space Activities of the United Nations and International Organizations. A review of the activities and resources of the United nations, its specialized agencies and other international bodies relating to the peaceful uses of outer space, A/AC.105/521 (publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: E.92.I.30), págs. 164 a 173. 90 Ibíd., págs. 179 a 185. 91 Ibíd., págs. 174 y 175. 92 Ibíd., págs. 135 a 164. 93 Ibíd., págs. 175 a 178. 94 Ibíd., págs. 185 y 186. 95 Ibíd., págs. 187 y 188. 96 Ibíd., págs. 188 a 190. 97 Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements, Texts and Histories of the Negotiations, Organismo de Control de Armamentos y Desarme de los Estados Unidos, edición de 1990, págs. 157 a 161. /...A/48/305 Español Página 102 Notas (continuación) 98 Ibíd., págs. 175 y 176. 99 Ibíd., págs. 169 a 176; 267 a 291. 100 Ibíd., págs. 350 a 362. 101 El Tratado y sus documentos conexos se publicaron en Acuerdos sobre la limitación de armamentos y el desarme: START, Tratado entre los Estados Unidos de América y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas sobre la reducción y limitación de armas estratégicas ofensivas (Organismo de Control de Armamentos y Desarme de los Estados Unidos), 1990, Washington, D.C. 102 El texto del Tratado se ha publicado como documento de signatura CD (CD/1194). 103 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, décimo período extraordinario de sesiones, A/S-10/AC.1/7, 1º de junio de 1978. 104 A/AC.206/14, publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: S.83.IX.3. 105 Ibíd., A/S-15/34. 106 CD/OS/WP.39, 2 de agosto de 1989. 107 CD/817, CD/OS/WP.19, de 17 de marzo de 1988. 108 Canada, External Affairs, "PAXSAT Concepts: The Application of Space-Based Remote Sensing for Arms Control Verification", Verification Brochures No. 2, 1987. 109 CD/937 y CD/PV.570. 110 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, cuadragésimo séptimo período de sesiones, sesiones plenarias, octava sesión, declaración del Sr. R. Dumas, formulada el 23 de septiembre de 1992. 111 "Medidas de confianza en el espacio, notificación del lanzamiento de objetos espaciales y de misiles balísticos", CD/OS/WP.59. 112 La propuesta fue presentada en la Conferencia de Desarme el 22 de agosto de 1985, CD/PV.332, pág. 23. /...A/48/305 Español Página 102 Apéndice I TRATADO SOBRE LOS PRINCIPIOS QUE DEBEN REGIR LAS ACTIVIDADES DE LOS ESTADOS EN LA EXPLORACION Y UTILIZACION DEL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE, INCLUSO LA LUNA Y OTROS CUERPOS CELESTES* Los Estados Partes en este Tratado, Inspirándose en las grandes perspectivas que se ofrecen a la humanidad como consecuencia de la entrada del hombre en el espacio ultraterrestre, Reconociendo el interés general de toda la humanidad en el progreso de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, con fines pacíficos, Estimando que la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre se debe efectuar en bien de todos los pueblos, sea cual fuera su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, Deseando contribuir a una amplia cooperación internacional en lo que se refiere a los aspectos científicos y jurídicos de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Estimando que tal cooperación contribuirá al desarrollo de la comprensión mutua y al afianzamiento de las relaciones amistosas entre los Estados y los pueblos, Recordando la resolución 1962 (XVIII), titulada "Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre", que fue aprobada unánimemente por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas el 13 de diciembre de 1963, Recordando la resolución 1884 (XVIII), en que se insta a los Estados a no poner en órbita alrededor de la Tierra ningún objeto portador de armas nucleares u otras clases de armas de destrucción en masa, ni a emplazar tales armas en los cuerpos celestes, y que fue aprobada unánimemente por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas el 17 de octubre de 1963, Tomando nota de la resolución 110 (II), aprobada por la Asamblea General el 3 de noviembre de 1947, que condena la propaganda destinada a provocar o alentar, o susceptible de provocar o alentar cualquier amenaza a la paz, quebrantamiento de la paz o acto de agresión, y considerando que dicha resolución es aplicable al espacio ultraterrestre, Convencidos de que un Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, promoverá los propósitos y principios de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, ________________________ * Resolución 2222 (XXI) de la Asamblea General. /...A/48/305 Español Página 103 Han convenido en lo siguiente:Artículo I La exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán hacerse en provecho y en interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, e incumben a toda la humanidad. El espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, estará abierto para su exploración y utilización a todos los Estados sin discriminación alguna en condiciones de igualdad y en conformidad con el derecho internacional, y habrá libertad de acceso a todas las regiones de los cuerpos celestes. El espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, estarán abiertos a la investigación científica, y los Estados facilitarán y fomentarán la cooperación internacional en dichas investigaciones. Artículo II El espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, no podrá ser objeto de apropiación nacional por reivindicación de soberanía, uso u ocupación, ni de ninguna otra manera. Artículo III Los Estados Partes en el Tratado deberán realizar sus actividades de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, de conformidad con el derecho internacional, incluida la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, en interés del mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y del fomento de la cooperación y la comprensión internacionales. Artículo IV Los Estados Partes en el Tratado se comprometen a no colocar en órbita alrededor de la Tierra ningún objeto portador de armas nucleares ni de ningún otro tipo de armas de destrucción en masa, a no emplazar tales armas en los cuerpos celestes y a no colocar tales armas en el espacio ultraterrestre en ninguna otra forma. La Luna y los demás cuerpos celestes se utilizarán exclusivamente con fines pacíficos por todos los Estados Partes en el Tratado. Queda prohibido establecer en los cuerpos celestes bases, instalaciones y fortificaciones militares, efectuar ensayos con cualquier tipo de armas y realizar maniobras militares. No se prohíbe la utilización de personal militar para investigaciones científicas ni para cualquier otros objetivo pacífico. Tampoco se prohíbe la utilización de cualquier equipo o medios necesarios para la exploración de la Luna y de otros cuerpos celestes con fines pacíficos. /...A/48/305 Español Página 104 Artículo V Los Estados Partes en el Tratado considerarán a todos los astronautas como enviados de la humanidad en el espacio ultraterrestre, y les prestarán toda la ayuda posible en caso de accidente, peligro o aterrizaje forzoso en el territorio de otro Estado Parte o en alta mar. Cuando los astronautas hagan tal aterrizaje serán devueltos con seguridad y sin demora al Estado de registro de su vehículo espacial. Al realizar actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, así como en los cuerpos celestes, los astronautas de un Estado Parte en el Tratado deberán prestar toda la ayuda posible a los astronautas de los demás Estados Partes en el Tratado. Los Estados Partes en el Tratado tendrán que informar inmediatamente a los demás Estados Partes en el Tratado o al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sobre los fenómenos por ellos observados en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, que podrían constituir un peligro para la vida o la salud de los astronautas. Artículo VI Los Estados Partes en el Tratado serán responsables internacionalmente de las actividades nacionales que realicen en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los organismos gubernamentales o las entidades no gubernamentales, y deberán asegurar que dichas actividades se efectúen en conformidad con las disposiciones del presente Tratado. Las actividades de las entidades no gubernamentales en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán ser autorizadas y fiscalizadas constantemente por el pertinente Estado Parte en el Tratado. Cuando se trate de actividades que realiza en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, una organización internacional, la responsabilidad en cuanto al presente Tratado corresponderá a esa organización internacional y a los Estados Partes en el Tratado que pertenecen a ella. Artículo VII Todo Estado Parte en el Tratado que lance o promueva el lanzamiento de un objeto al espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y todo Estado Parte en el Tratado, desde cuyo territorio o cuyas instalaciones se lance un objeto, será responsable internacionalmente de los daños causados a otro Estado Parte en el Tratado o a sus personas naturales o jurídicas por dicho objeto o sus partes componentes en la Tierra, en el espacio aéreo o en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Artículo VIII El Estado Parte en el Tratado, en cuyo registro figura el objeto lanzado al espacio ultraterrestre, retendrá su jurisdicción y control sobre tal objeto, así como sobre todo el personal que vaya en él, mientras se encuentre en el espacio /...A/48/305 Español Página 105 ultraterrestre o en un cuerpo celeste. El derecho de propiedad de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, incluso de los objetos que hayan descendido o se construyan en un cuerpo celeste, y de sus partes componentes, no sufrirá ninguna alteración mientras estén en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso en un cuerpo celeste, ni en su retorno a la Tierra. Cuando esos objetos o esas partes componentes sean hallados fuera de los límites del Estado Parte en el Tratado en cuyo registro figuran, deberán ser devueltos a ese Estado Parte, el que deberá proporcionar los datos de identificación que se le soliciten antes de efectuarse la restitución. Artículo IX En la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los Estados Partes en el Tratado deberán guiarse por el principio de la cooperación y la asistencia mutua, y en todas sus actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán tener debidamente en cuenta los intereses correspondientes de los demás Estados Partes en el Tratado. Los Estados Partes en el Tratado harán los estudios e investigaciones del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y procederán a su exploración de tal forma que no se produzca una contaminación nociva ni cambios desfavorables en el medio ambiente de la Tierra como consecuencia de la introducción en él de materias extraterrestres, y cuando sea necesario adoptarán las medidas pertinentes a tal efecto. Si un Estado Parte en el Tratado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, proyectado por él o por sus nacionales, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de otros Estados Partes en el Tratado en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, incluso en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberá celebrar las consultas internacionales oportunas antes de iniciar esa actividad o ese experimento. Si un Estado Parte en el Tratado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, proyectado por otro Estado Parte en el Tratado, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, incluso en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, podrá pedir que se celebren consultas sobre dicha actividad o experimento. Artículo X A fin de contribuir a la cooperación internacional en la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, conforme a los objetivos del presente Tratado, los Estados Partes en él examinarán, en condiciones de igualdad, las solicitudes formuladas por otros Estados Partes en el Tratado para que se les brinde la oportunidad a fin de observar el vuelo de los objetos espaciales lanzados por dichos Estados. La naturaleza de tal oportunidad y las condiciones en que podría ser concedida se determinarán por acuerdo entre los Estados interesados. /...A/48/305 Español Página 106 Artículo XI A fin de fomentar la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, los Estados Partes en el Tratado que desarrollan actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la luna y otros cuerpos celestes, convienen en informar, en la mayor medida posible dentro de lo viable y factible, al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, acerca de la naturaleza, marcha, localización y resultados de dichas actividades. El Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas debe estar en condiciones de difundir eficazmente tal información, inmediatamente después de recibirla. Artículo XII Todas las estaciones, instalaciones, equipo y vehículos espaciales situados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes serán accesibles a los representantes de otros Estados Partes en el presente Tratado, sobre la base de reciprocidad. Dichos representantes notificarán con antelación razonable su intención de hacer una visita, a fin de permitir celebrar las consultas que procedan y adoptar un máximo de precauciones para velar por la seguridad y evitar toda perturbación del funcionamiento normal de la instalación visitada. Artículo XIII Las disposiciones del presente Tratado se aplicarán a las actividades de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, que realicen los Estados Partes en el Tratado tanto en el caso de que esas actividades las lleve a cabo un Estado Parte en el Tratado por sí solo o junto con otros Estados, incluso cuando se efectúen dentro del marco de organizaciones intergubernamentales internacionales. Los Estados Partes en el Tratado resolverán los problemas prácticos que puedan surgir en relación con las actividades que desarrollen las organizaciones intergubernamentales internacionales en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, con la organización internacional pertinente o con uno o varios Estados miembros de dicha organización internacional que sean Partes en el presente Tratado. Artículo XIV 1. Este Tratado estará abierto a la firma de todos los Estados. El Estado que no firmare este Tratado antes de su entrada en vigor, de conformidad con el párrafo 3 de este artículo, podrá adherirse a él en cualquier momento. 2. Este Tratado estará sujeto a ratificación por los Estados signatarios. Los instrumentos de ratificación y los instrumentos de adhesión se depositarán en los archivos de los Gobiernos de los Estados Unidos de América, el Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte y la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas, a los que por el presente se designa como Gobiernos depositarios./...A/48/305 Español Página 107 3. Este Tratado entrará en vigor cuando hayan depositado los instrumentos de ratificación cinco Gobiernos, incluidos los designados como Gobiernos depositarios en virtud del presente Tratado. 4. Para los Estados cuyos instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión se depositaren después de la entrada en vigor de este Tratado, el Tratado, entrará en vigor en la fecha del depósito de sus instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión. 5. Los Gobiernos depositarios informarán sin tardanza a todos los Estados signatarios y a todos los Estados que se hayan adherido a este Tratado, de la fecha de cada firma, de la fecha de depósito de cada instrumento de ratificación y de adhesión a este Tratado, de la fecha de su entrada en vigor y de cualquier otra notificación. 6. Este Tratado será registrado por los Gobiernos depositarios, de conformidad con el Artículo 102 de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo XV Cualquier Estado Parte en el Tratado podrá proponer enmiendas al mismo. Las enmiendas entrarán en vigor para cada Estado Parte en el Tratado que las aceptare cuando éstas hayan sido aceptadas por la mayoría de los Estados Partes en el Tratado, y en lo sucesivo para cada Estado restante que sea Parte en el Tratado en la fecha en que las acepte. Artículo XVI Todo Estado Parte podrá comunicar su retiro de este Tratado al cabo de un año de su entrada en vigor, mediante notificación por escrito dirigida a los Gobiernos depositarios. Tal retiro surtirá efecto un año después de la fecha en que se reciba la notificación. Artículo XVII Este Tratado, cuyos textos en chino, español, francés, inglés y ruso son igualmente auténticos, se depositará en los archivos de los Gobiernos depositarios. Los Gobiernos depositarios remitirán copias debidamente certificadas de este Tratado a los Gobiernos de los Estados signatarios y de los Estados que se adhirieran al Tratado. EN TESTIMONIO DE LO CUAL, los infrascritos, debidamente autorizados, firman este Tratado. HECHO por triplicado en las ciudades de Londres, Moscú y Washington, el día veintisiete de enero de mil novecientos sesenta y siete. /...A/48/305 Español Página 108 Apéndice II DIRECTRICES SOBRE TIPOS APROPIADOS DE MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA Y SOBRE LA APLICACION DE TALES MEDIDAS EN LOS PLANOS MUNDIAL O REGIONALa La Comisión ha elaborado las siguientes directrices sobre tipos apropiados de medidas de fomento de la confianza para que la Asamblea General las examine en su cuadragésimo primer período de sesiones de conformidad con la resolución 39/63 E, de 12 de diciembre de 1984. Existe un acuerdo en todo respecto sobre el texto de las directrices. La Comisión desea señalar en particular el párrafo 1.2.5 de las directrices, en que se recalca que el acopio de la experiencia pertinente para las medidas de fomento de la confianza puede exigir la ampliación del texto en fecha posterior, si la Asamblea General así lo decide. A pesar de la gran significación y del papel de las medidas de fomento de la confianza, al elaborar las directrices, todas las delegaciones tuvieron conciencia de la importancia primordial de las medidas de desarme y de la singular contribución que solamente el desarme puede hacer a la prevención de la guerra, en particular de la guerra nuclear. Algunas delegaciones hubieran deseado que se presentaran con mayor detalle los criterios y características de un enfoque regional de las medidas de fomento de la confianza. 1. Consideraciones generales 1.1 Marco de referencia 1.1.1 Las presentes directrices para la elaboración de medidas de fomento de la confianza han sido redactadas por la Comisión de Desarme en cumplimiento de la resolución 37/100 D, aprobada por consenso por la Asamblea General, en que se pedía a la Comisión de Desarme ’que considere la elaboración de directrices para tipos apropiados de medidas de fomento de la confianza y para aplicarlas a nivel mundial o regional’, y de las resoluciones 38/73 A y 39/63 E en que se pedía a la Comisión que continuara y concluyera su labor y que presentara a la Asamblea en su cuadragésimo primer período de sesiones un informe que contuviera dichas directrices. 1.1.2 Al elaborar las directrices, la Comisión de Desarme tuvo en cuenta, entre otras cosas, los siguientes documentos de las Naciones Unidas: el Documento Final del décimo período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General, primer período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme (resolución S-10/2); las resoluciones pertinentes aprobadas por consenso por la Asamblea General (resoluciones 34/87 B, 35/156 B, 36/57 f, 37/100 D y 38/73); las respuestas en que los gobiernos comunicaban al Secretario General sus opiniones y experiencias respecto de las medidas de fomento de la confianzab; el Estudio amplio sobre las medidas de fomento de /...A/48/305 Español Página 109 la confianzac; elaborado por un Grupo de Expertos Gubernamentales, las propuestas presentadas por distintos países en el duodécimo período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea Generald; el segundo período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme, así como las opiniones expresadas por las delegaciones durante los períodos de sesiones anuales de la Comisión de Desarme en 1983, 1984 y 1986 y que se recogen en los documentos pertinentes de dichos períodos de sesiones. 1.2 Contexto político general 1.2.1 Estas directrices se han elaborado en un momento en que hay un consenso universal en el sentido de que los esfuerzos para acrecentar la confianza entre los Estados son especialmente pertinentes y necesarios. Hay una inquietud general respecto del deterioro de la situación internacional, la persistente utilización de la amenaza o el uso de la fuerza y la intensificación de la acumulación internacional de armamentos, con el incremento concomitante de la inestabilidad, la tirantez política y la desconfianza, y una mayor conciencia del peligro de la guerra, ya sea convencional o nuclear. A la vez, existe cada vez mayor conciencia de la imposibilidad de aceptar la guerra en nuestra época y de la interdependencia de la seguridad de todos los Estados. 1.2.2 Esta situación exige que la comunidad internacional no escatime esfuerzos para adoptar medidas urgentes en pro de la prevención de la guerra, en especial de la guerra nuclear que, para utilizar el lenguaje del Documento Final del décimo período extraordinario de sesiones, representa una amenaza cuya eliminación es la tarea más inmediata y urgente en la actualidad, así como medidas concretas de desarme para prevenir una carrera de armamentos en el espacio y poner fin a la que existe en la Tierra y para limitar, reducir y, a la larga, eliminar los armamentos nucleares y fomentar una estabilidad estratégica, pero exige también que emprenda esfuerzos para reducir el enfrentamiento político y establecer relaciones estables y cooperativas en todas las esferas de las relaciones internacionales. 1.2.3 En este contexto, se ha hecho cada vez más importante un proceso de fomento de la confianza que abarque todas estas esferas. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza, especialmente si se aplican en forma amplia, encierran la posibilidad de hacer un aporte significativo al afianzamiento de la paz y la seguridad y de fomentar y facilitar el logro de medidas de desarme. 1.2.4 Estas posibilidades ya se están estudiando actualmente en algunas regiones y subregiones del mundo, en que los Estados interesados -que siguen conscientes de la necesidad de adoptar medidas a escala mundial y medidas de desarme -están /...A/48/305 Español Página 110 aunando esfuerzos para contribuir, mediante la elaboración y aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza, a establecer relaciones más estables y una mayor seguridad, así como a eliminar la intervención externa y aumentar la cooperación en sus regiones. Las presentes directrices se han redactado teniendo en cuenta estas importantes experiencias pero también se pretende con ellas dar mayor apoyo a éstos y otros esfuerzos en el plano regional y mundial. Por supuesto, no excluyen la aplicación simultánea de otras medidas de fomento de la seguridad. 1.2.5 Las presentes directrices son parte de un proceso dinámico que se desarrolla a lo largo del tiempo. Si bien su objetivo es contribuir a una mayor utilidad y una aplicación más generalizada de las medidas de fomento de la confianza, el acopio de la experiencia pertinente, a su vez, puede exigir que se amplíen las directrices en fecha posterior, si la Asamblea General así lo decide. 1.3 Delimitación del tema 1.3.1 Medidas de fomento de la confianza y desarme 1.3.1.1 Las medidas de fomento de la confianza no pueden ser un substituto ni una condición previa de las medidas de desarme, ni tampoco desviar la atención de éstas. Sin embargo, las posibilidades que encierran estas medidas para el establecimiento de condiciones favorables al progreso en esta esfera deberían utilizarse plenamente en todas las regiones del mundo, en tanto facilitaran y no obstaculizaran en modo alguno la adopción de medidas de desarme. 1.3.1.2 Las medidas eficaces de desarme y limitación de armamentos que limiten o reduzcan directamente el poderío militar tienen un valor muy especial en lo que se refiere al fomento de la confianza y, entre estas medidas, las que se relacionan con el desarme nuclear son particularmente conducentes al fomento de la confianza. 1.3.1.3 Las disposiciones del Documento Final del décimo período extraordinario de sesiones relativas al desarme, en especial al desarme nuclear, también tienen gran valor por lo que atañe al fomento de la confianza. 1.3.1.4 Las medidas de fomento de la confianza pueden elaborarse y aplicarse en forma independiente de modo de contribuir a la creación de condiciones favorables para la adopción de medidas de desarme adicionales o, lo que no es menos importante, /...A/48/305 Español Página 111 como medidas colaterales en relación con medidas concretas de limitación de armamentos y desarme. 1.3.2 Alcance de las medidas de fomento de la confianza; medidas militares y no militares 1.3.2.1 La confianza refleja un conjunto de factores relacionados entre sí, tanto de carácter militar como no militar, y es necesario adoptar una diversidad de enfoques para superar el temor, la aprensión y la desconfianza entre los Estados y sustituir esos sentimientos por la confianza. 1.3.2.2 Puesto que la confianza está relacionada con una amplia variedad de actividades en el ámbito de la interacción entre los Estados, es indispensable adoptar un enfoque amplio y es necesario fomentar la confianza en las esferas política, militar, económica, social, humanitaria y cultural. Ese enfoque debería comprender la eliminación de la tirantez política, el avance hacia el desarme, la reestructuración del sistema económico mundial y la eliminación de la discriminación racial, de toda forma de hegemonía y dominación y de la ocupación extranjera. Es importante que en todas estas esferas el proceso de fomento de la confianza contribuya a disminuir la desconfianza y a afianzar la confianza entre los Estados al reducir y, en último término, eliminar las posibles causas de malos entendidos, errores de interpretación y errores de apreciación. 1.3.2.3 A pesar de la necesidad de ese proceso amplio de fomento de la confianza, y de conformidad con el mandato de la Comisión de Desarme, las presentes directrices para la elaboración de medidas de fomento de la confianza se centran principalmente en la esfera militar y de seguridad, y las directrices derivan sus características concretas de estos aspectos. 1.3.2.4 En muchas regiones del mundo, los fenómenos económicos y de otra índole atañen a la seguridad de un país en forma tan inmediata que no pueden desvincularse de los asuntos militares y de defensa. Por consiguiente, las medidas concretas de carácter no militar que sean directamente pertinentes a la seguridad nacional y la supervivencia de los Estados recaen plenamente en el ámbito de las presentes directrices. En dichos casos, las medidas de carácter militar y no militar son complementarias y refuerzan mutuamente su valor para el fomento de la confianza. /...A/48/305 Español Página 112 1.3.2.5 Debe determinarse la combinación apropiada de diferentes tipos de medidas concretas para cada región, según la forma en que los propios países de la región perciban la seguridad y el carácter y la intensidad de las amenazas existentes. 2. Directrices para tipos apropiados de medidas de fomento de la confianza y para su aplicación 2.1 Principios 2.1.1 La firma adhesión a la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y el cumplimiento de los compromisos que figuran en el Documento Final del décimo período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General (resolución S-10/2), cuya validez ha sido reiterada unánime y categóricamente por todos los Estados Miembros en el duodécimo período extraordinario de sesiones de la Asamblea General, segundo período extraordinario de sesiones dedicado al desarme, aportan una contribución de importancia primordial para el mantenimiento de la paz y el logro del desarme general y completo bajo un control internacional eficaz. 2.1.2 En especial, y como requisito previo para mejorar la confianza entre los Estados, se deben observar estrictamente los siguientes principios consagrados en la Carta de las Naciones Unidas: a) Abstención de recurrir a la amenaza o al uso de la fuerza contra la integridad territorial o la independencia política de cualquier Estado; b) No intervención y no injerencia en los asuntos internos de los Estados; c) Arreglo pacífico de controversias; d) Igualdad soberana de los Estados y libre determinación de los pueblos. 2.1.3 La estricta observancia de los principios y prioridades del Documento Final del décimo período extraordinario de sesiones reviste especial importancia para el aumento de la confianza entre los Estados. 2.2 Objetivos 2.2.1 El objetivo final de las medidas de fomento de la confianza es fortalecer la paz y la seguridad internacionales y contribuir a la prevención de todo tipo de guerra, especialmente la guerra nuclear. /...A/48/305 Español Página 113 2.2.2 Las medidas de fomento de la confianza deben contribuir a la creación de condiciones favorables para el arreglo pacífico de las controversias y los problemas internacionales existentes y para el mejoramiento y la promoción de relaciones internacionales basadas en la justicia, la cooperación y la solidaridad y deben facilitar la solución de cualquier situación que pueda desembocar en fricciones de carácter internacional. 2.2.3 Uno de los objetivos principales de las medidas de fomento de la confianza es la realización de los principios reconocidos universalmente, especialmente los que están consagrados en la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. 2.2.4 Mediante su contribución al logro de un clima en que se pueda reducir el impulso a competir en poderío militar y en que disminuya gradualmente la importancia del elemento militar, las medidas de fomento de la confianza deberían facilitar y promover el proceso de limitación de armamentos y de desarme. 2.2.5 Otro de los objetivos principales es disminuir, o aun eliminar, las causas de desconfianza, temor, incomprensión y error de cálculo en relación con las actividades militares y las intenciones de otros Estados, factores que pueden causar la impresión de que la seguridad se ve afectada y ofrecer una justificación para continuar aumentando el poderío militar a nivel mundial y regional. 2.2.6 Una de las funciones de importancia capital de las medidas de fomento de la confianza es reducir los peligros de incomprensión o error de cálculo en relación con las actividades militares, ayudar a prevenir un enfrentamiento militar, así como los preparativos encubiertos para iniciar una guerra, reducir el peligro de que se produzcan ataques por sorpresa y de que estalle la guerra accidentalmente; y, por último, en esa forma, dar cumplimiento y expresión concreta al compromiso solemne de todas las naciones de abstenerse de la amenaza o el uso de la fuerza en todas sus formas y fomentar la seguridad y la estabilidad. 2.2.7 Dada la mayor conciencia de la importancia del cumplimiento, las medidas de fomento de la confianza pueden contribuir además a facilitar la verificación de los acuerdos sobre limitación de armamentos y desarme. Por otra parte, el estricto cumplimiento de las obligaciones y los compromisos en la esfera del desarme y la cooperación para la elaboración y aplicación de medidas adecuadas para asegurar la verificación de dicho cumplimiento -satisfactorio para todas las partes interesadas y determinado por los propósitos, el alcance y la índole del acuerdo pertinente -ejercen de por sí un notable efecto en el fomento de la confianza. /...A/48/305 Español Página 114 Sin embargo, las medidas de fomento de la confianza no pueden reemplazar a las medidas de verificación, que constituyen un elemento importante de los acuerdos de limitación de armamentos y de desarme. 2.3 Características 2.3.1 La confianza en las relaciones internacionales se basa en la fe en la voluntad de cooperar de otros Estados. La confianza aumentará en la medida en que la conducta de los Estados indique su voluntad de demostrar una actitud no agresiva y de cooperación. 2.3.2 El fomento de la confianza exige el consenso de los Estados que participan en el proceso. Por lo tanto, los Estados deben decidir, libremente y en ejercicio de su soberanía, si se ha de iniciar un proceso de fomento de la confianza y, en caso afirmativo, qué medidas se han de adoptar y cómo debe desarrollarse el proceso. 2.3.3 El fomento de la confianza es un proceso que se desarrolla paso a paso y que consiste en la adopción de medidas concretas y eficaces que entrañan un compromiso político y tienen importancia militar, y cuyo objetivo es avanzar hacia el fortalecimiento de la confianza y la seguridad con el fin de aliviar las tensiones y ayudar a la limitación de los armamentos y al desarme. En cada etapa de este proceso, los Estados deben estar en condiciones de medir y evaluar los resultados alcanzados. La verificación del cumplimiento de las disposiciones convenidas debe constituir un proceso continuo. 2.3.4 Los compromisos políticos asumidos junto con medidas concretas destinadas a expresar y dar efecto a dichos compromisos son instrumentos importantes para el fomento de la confianza. 2.3.5 El intercambio o suministro de información de interés sobre las fuerzas armadas y los armamentos, así como sobre las actividades militares pertinentes, desempeña un papel importante en el proceso de limitación de los armamentos y de desarme y en el fomento de la confianza. Ese intercambio o suministro podría promover la confianza entre los Estados y reducir la posibilidad de peligrosos errores en la interpretación de las intenciones de los Estados. El intercambio o suministro de información en la esfera de la limitación de los armamentos, el desarme y el fomento de la confianza debe ser susceptible de verificación apropiada, como se dispone en los respectivos arreglos, acuerdos o tratados. /...A/48/305 Español Página 115 2.3.6 Dado que, evidentemente, no es viable establecer un modelo universal detallado, las medidas de fomento de la confianza deberán adaptarse a cada situación concreta. La eficacia de una medida determinada aumentará en tanto se ajuste a la forma concreta en que se percibe la amenaza o a la necesidad de confianza de una situación particular o de una región determinada. 2.3.7 En la medida en que lo permitan las circunstancias de una situación particular y el principio de que no se menoscabe la seguridad, las medidas de fomento de la confianza podrían, a través de un proceso gradual cuando sea conveniente y apropiado, ir más lejos y limitar las opciones militares (aunque no puedan, por sí solas, disminuir el poderío militar). 2.4 Aplicación 2.4.1 A fin de perfeccionar la aplicación de las medidas de fomento de la confianza, los Estados que adopten medidas de esa índole, o que convengan en ellas, deberían analizar cuidadosamente y determinar con la mayor claridad posible los factores que afectan favorable o negativamente la confianza entre los Estados en una situación concreta. 2.4.2 Dado que los Estados deben estar en condiciones de examinar y evaluar la aplicación de los acuerdos de fomento de la confianza y de asegurar su cumplimiento, es indispensable que se definan con precisión y claridad los detalles de las medidas de fomento de la confianza que se establezcan. 2.4.3 Los errores de interpretación y los prejuicios que puedan haberse desarrollado a lo largo del tiempo no pueden eliminarse de una sola vez mediante la aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza. La seriedad, credibilidad y fiabilidad del empeño de un Estado en fomentar la confianza, sin las cuales no puede tener éxito el proceso, sólo se pueden demostrar mediante una aplicación consecuente a lo largo del tiempo. 2.4.4 La aplicación de medidas de fomento de la confianza debe hacerse de modo tal que se asegure el derecho de cada Estado a que no se menoscabe su seguridad, y con la garantía de que ningún Estado o grupo de Estados logrará ventajas sobre otros en ninguna etapa del proceso de fomento de la confianza. 2.4.5 El fomento de la confianza es un proceso dinámico: la experiencia y la confianza adquiridas en la aplicación de medidas anteriores en gran parte voluntarias y menos importantes desde el punto de vista militar pueden facilitar los acuerdos sobre medidas ulteriores de mayor alcance. /...A/48/305 Español Página 116 El ritmo del proceso de aplicación, tanto en lo que se refiere a la oportunidad como al alcance de las medidas, depende de las circunstancias imperantes. Las medidas de fomento de la confianza deben ser lo más sustanciales posible y se deben aplicar con la mayor rapidez. Aunque en una situación concreta se pueda lograr la aplicación de medidas de largo alcance en una etapa inicial, por lo general parecería necesario realizar el proceso en forma gradual. 2.4.6 Las obligaciones contraídas en virtud de acuerdos sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza deben cumplirse de buena fe. 2.4.7 Las medidas de fomento de la confianza deben aplicarse tanto a nivel mundial como regional. Los criterios regionales y mundiales no son contradictorios sino complementarios y relacionados entre sí. En vista de la interacción que existe entre los acontecimientos mundiales y regionales, el progreso alcanzado en un nivel contribuye a lograr avances en el otro nivel; sin embargo, lo uno no constituye condición previa para lo otro. Al considerar la posibilidad de introducir medidas de fomento de la confianza en ciertas regiones, se debe tener en cuenta la situación política, militar y de otro tipo imperante en la región. En un contexto regional, las medidas de fomento de la confianza deben adoptarse por iniciativa y con el acuerdo de los Estados de la región de que se trate. 2.4.8 Las medidas de fomento de la confianza pueden adoptarse en diversas formas. Se pueden concertar con la intención de crear obligaciones jurídicas, en cuyo caso representan el derecho internacional de tratados entre las partes. Sin embargo, también se pueden concertar mediante compromisos políticos. Asimismo, puede preverse la posibilidad de que los compromisos políticos derivados de las medidas de fomento de la confianza se conviertan en obligaciones con arreglo al derecho internacional. 2.4.9 Para la evaluación del progreso de las medidas de fomento de la confianza, los Estados deben prever en lo posible y en los casos pertinentes, procedimientos y mecanismos de examen y evaluación. Siempre que sea posible, se debe convenir en establecer plazos para facilitar esa evaluación en términos cuantitativos y cualitativos. 2.5 Desarrollo, perspectivas y oportunidades 2.5.1 Una medida cualitativa muy importante para aumentar la credibilidad y confiabilidad del proceso de fomento de la confianza podría ser el fortalecimiento del empeño con que se han de aplicar las diversas medidas de fomento de la confianza; cabe recordar que esto también se aplica al /...A/48/305 Español Página 117 cumplimiento de los compromisos contraídos en la esfera del desarme. Las medidas voluntarias y unilaterales deberían transformarse lo antes posible en disposiciones mutuas, equilibradas y políticamente obligatorias y, si cabe, en obligaciones jurídicamente obligatorias. 2.5.2 El carácter de una medida de fomento de la confianza puede mejorarse paulatinamente a medida que aumenta su aceptación general como norma correcta de conducta. En consecuencia, la aplicación coherente y uniforme de una medida políticamente obligatoria de fomento de la confianza durante un período considerable, junto con la necesaria opinio juris, puede llevar a la creación de una obligación con arreglo al derecho internacional consuetudinario. De esta forma, el proceso de fomento de la confianza podría contribuir gradualmente a la creación de nuevas normas de derecho internacional. 2.5.3 Las declaraciones de intención y las declaraciones que, en sí mismas, no entrañan obligación alguna de adoptar medidas específicas, pero ofrecen la posibilidad de contribuir favorablemente a la existencia de un clima de mayor confianza mutua, deberían ampliarse en la práctica con acuerdos más concretos sobre medidas determinadas. 2.5.4 Las oportunidades de introducir medidas de fomento de la confianza son múltiples. La siguiente recopilación de algunas de las principales posibilidades podría ayudar a los Estados que desean saber cuáles podrían ser las oportunidades adecuadas de acción. 2.5.4.1 Existe una necesidad especial de medidas de fomento de la confianza en los momentos de tensión y crisis política, y las medidas adecuadas pueden tener en esos casos un efecto estabilizador muy importante. 2.5.4.2 Las negociaciones sobre limitación de armamentos y desarme pueden ofrecer una oportunidad especialmente importante de llegar a un acuerdo sobre medidas de fomento de la confianza. Como parte integrante de un acuerdo o como acuerdos complementarios, pueden tener un efecto positivo sobre la capacidad de las partes de alcanzar los objetivos y las metas de sus negociaciones y acuerdos particulares al crear un clima de cooperación y comprensión, facilitar disposiciones adecuadas de verificación aceptables para todos los Estados interesados y que guarden relación con la índole, el alcance y el propósito del acuerdo, y promover la aplicación en forma verosímil y digna de crédito. 2.5.4.3 La introducción de fuerzas de mantenimiento de la paz en una región, de conformidad con los /...A/48/305 Español Página 118 propósitos que figuran en la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, o la cesación de las hostilidades entre Estados podrían ofrecer oportunidades concretas en este sentido. 2.5.4.4 Las conferencias de examen de los acuerdos sobre limitación de armamentos podrían brindar también una oportunidad para examinar las medidas de fomento de la confianza, a condición de que esas medidas no vayan de ningún modo en detrimento de los propósitos de los acuerdos; las partes en los acuerdos deberían convenir los criterios para la adopción de esas medidas. 2.5.4.5 Pueden surgir muchas oportunidades en conjunción con los acuerdos concertados entre Estados en otros aspectos de sus relaciones, tales como las esferas política, económica, social y cultural, por ejemplo en el caso de los proyectos conjuntos de desarrollo, en especial en las zonas fronterizas. 2.5.4.6 Podrían incluirse también medidas de fomento de la confianza o por lo menos una afirmación de la intención de elaborarlas en el futuro, en cualquier otro tipo de declaración política sobre objetivos compartidos por dos o más Estados. 2.5.4.7 Dado que es sobre todo el enfoque multilateral de la seguridad internacional y de las cuestiones de desarme lo que aumenta la confianza internacional, las Naciones Unidas pueden contribuir a ese proceso desempeñando su función central en las esferas de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y del desarme. Los órganos de las Naciones Unidas y otras organizaciones internacionales podrían participar cuando resultara apropiado en la promoción del proceso de fomento de la confianza. En especial, la Asamblea General y el Consejo de Seguridad -independientemente de las tareas que les incumben en la esfera del desarme propiamente dicho -pueden fomentar ese proceso mediante la adopción de decisiones y recomendaciones en que figuren sugerencias y solicitudes dirigidas a los Estados para que aprueben y apliquen medidas de fomento de la confianza. El Secretario General, de conformidad con la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, podría contribuir asimismo en forma significativa al proceso de fomento de la confianza sugiriendo medidas específicas de fomento de la confianza o interponiendo sus buenos oficios, sobre todo en los momentos de crisis, para promover el establecimiento de ciertos procedimientos de fomento de la confianza. /...A/48/305 Español Página 119 2.5.4.8 En el marco del tema IX de la agenda establecida -el decálogo -y sin perjuicio de su papel en las negociaciones de todos los aspectos de su agenda, la Conferencia de Desarme podría identificar y elaborar las medidas de fomento de la confianza que guardan relación con los acuerdos sobre desarme y limitación de armamentos que se están negociando en la Conferencia. Notas a Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, decimoquinto período extraordinario de sesiones, Suplemento No. 3 (A/S-15/3, págs. 24 a 36. b A/34/416 y Add.1 a 3; A/35/397. c Publicación de las Naciones Unidas, número de venta: S.82.IX.3. d Véase A/S-12/AC.1/59. /...A/48/305 Español Página 120 Apéndice III SITUACION DE LOS TRATADOS MULTILATERALES RELATIVOS A LAS ACTIVIDADES EN EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTREa Tratados Título TPE Tratado de prohibición de los ensayos (1963) TEU Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre (1967) ASDA Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre (1968) Conv. resp. Convenio sobre la responsabilidad (1972) Conv. reg. Convenio de registro (1975) UIT Convenio internacional de telecomunicaciones (1992)b Conv. PROMOD Convención sobre la prohibición de utilizar técnicas de modificación ambiental con fines militares u otros fines hostiles (1977) Ac. Luna Acuerdo sobre la Luna (1979) Abreviaturas a Ratificación, adhesión, sucesión (sin reservas, reservas, aclaraciones o declaraciones) b Firma; sin ratificación c Declaración de aceptación /...A/48/305 Español Página 121 Situación de los tratados multilaterales relacionados con las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Afganistán a a b a Albania a a b Alemania a a a a a b a Antigua y Barbuda a a a a a a Arabia Saudita a a b Argelia b b b a Argentina a a a a b b a Australia a a a a a b a a Austria a a a b a b a a Bahamas a a a b Bahrein b Bangladesh a a a Barbados a a b Belarús a a a a a b Bélgica a a a a a b Benin a a a b a Bhután a b Bolivia a b b b Botswana a b a a b Brasil a a a a b a Brunei Darussalam b /...A/48/305 Español Página 122 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Bulgaria a a a a a b a Burkina Faso b a b Burundi b b b b b Cabo Verde a b a Camboya b Camerún b b a b Canadá a a a a a b a Colombia a b b b b Comoras b Costa Rica a b b Côte d’Ivoire a b Croacia b Cuba a a a a b a Chad a b Chile a a a a a b a China a a a a b Chipre a a a a a b a Dinamarca a a a a a b a Djibouti b Ecuador a a a a Egipto a a a b b a El Salvador a a a b b /...A/48/305 Español Página 123 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Emiratos Arabes Unidos b Eslovenia b España a a a a b a Estados Unidos de América a a a a a b a Estonia b Etiopía b b b b Federación de Rusia a a a a a b a Fiji a a a a b Filipinas a b b b b a Finlandia a a a a b a Francia a a a a b b Gabón a a a b Gambia a b a b b Ghana a b b b b a Granada b Grecia a a a a b a Guatemala a b a b Guinea Ecuatorial a a Guinea b Guinea-Bissau a a a Guyana b a Haití b b b b /...A/48/305 Español Página 124 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Honduras a b b b Hungría a a a a a b a India a a a a a b a b Indonesia a b b Irán (República Islámica del) a b a a b b b Iraq a a a a b Irlanda a a a a b a Islandia a a a b b a Islas Salomón a Israel a a a a b Italia a a a a b a Jamahiriya Arabe Libia a a Jamaica a a b b Japón a a a a a b a Jordania a b b b b Kenya a a a b Kuwait a a a a b a Laos a a a a a Lesotho b b b Letonia b Líbano a a a b b b Liberia a b b /...A/48/305 Español Página 125 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Liechtenstein a b Lituania b Luxemburgo a b b a b b Madagascar a a a b Malasia a b b b Malawi a b a Maldivas a Malí b a a b Malta a b a b Marruecos a a a a b b b Mauricio a a Mauritania a b b México a a a a a b a Mónaco b b Mongolia a a a a a b a Myanmar a a b b Nepal a a a b b Nicaragua a b b b b b Níger a a a a a b Nigeria a a a b Noruega a a a b b a Nueva Zelandia a a a a b a /...A/48/305 Español Página 126 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Omán b b Países Bajos a a a a a b a a Pakistán a a a a a b a a Panamá a b a b Papua Nueva Guinea a a a a b a Paraguay b a Perú a a a b a b Polonia a a a a a b a Portugal b a b b Qatar b Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte a a a a a b a República Arabe Siria a a a a b b República Centroafricana a b b b República de Moldova b República Dominicana a a b a República Federal Checa y Eslovacac a a a a a b a República de Corea a a a a a b a República Popular Democrática de Corea b a República Unida de Tanzanía a b b Rumania a a a a b a b Rwanda a b b b /...A/48/305 Español Página 127 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Samoa Occidental a San Marino a a a b Santa Sede b b b Santo Tomé y Príncipe a Senegal a b a b Seychelles a a a a a Sierra Leona a a b b b Singapur a a a a b b Somalia b b b Sri Lanka a a a b a Sudáfrica a a a b Sudán a b Suecia a a a a a b a Suiza a a a a a b a Suriname b Swazilandia a a b Tailandia a a a b Togo a a a Tonga a a a Trinidad y Tabago a b Túnez a a a a b a Turquía a a b b b /...A/48/305 Español Página 128 País TPE TEU ASDA Conv. resp. Conv. reg. UIT Conv. PROMOD Ac. Luna Ucrania a a a a a b a Uganda a a b Uruguay a a a a a b a Venezuela a a b a b Viet Nam a b a Yemen a a a b a Yugoslavia a b a a a Zaire a b b b b Zambia a a a a b Zimbabwe b Organizaciones ESA (Agencia Espacial Europea) c c c EUTELSAT (Organización Europea de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite) c a Estados signatarios y Estados Partes al 1º de enero de 1993. b Los Estados Partes, enumerados en el cuadro son los que han firmado la Constitución y el Convenio de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (Ginebra, 1982). El Convenio de Nairobi (1992) tiene 128 Estados Partes. Sólo 28 Estados han ratificado la Constitución y el Convenio de Niza o se han adherido a ella.c A partir del 1º de enero de 1993 se separó en dos Estados independientes: la República Checa y la República Eslovaca. /...A/48/305 Español Página 129 Bibliografía seleccionada sobre aspectos técnicos, políticos y jurídicos de las actividades relativas al espacio ultraterrestre Nota de la Secretaría 1. En el curso de las deliberaciones del Grupo de Expertos Gubernamentales encargado de realizar un estudio sobre la aplicación de las medidas de fomento de la confianza en el espacio ultraterrestre, se pidió a la Secretaría que elaborase una bibliografía, ilustrativa de los aspectos técnicos y jurídicos de las actividades relativas al espacio ultraterrestre, que sirviese de lista preliminar de fuentes documentales y constituyese un primer paso en el proceso de recopilación de datos. 2. Existe ya una gran cantidad de material publicado sobre la cuestión del espacio ultraterrestre y el número de publicaciones crece rápidamente. A pesar de que se ha hecho todo lo posible para presentar una selección bibliográfica que sea representativa de los diversos puntos de vista existentes sobre el asunto, esta relación no debe considerarse como una enumeración exhaustiva de las publicaciones disponibles sobre el tema de la tecnología del espacio ultraterrestre y los aspectos jurídicos de las actividades de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre. En concreto, esta lista preliminar no refleja adecuadamente los materiales publicados en idiomas distintos del inglés. 3. Los puntos de vista expresados por los diversos autores de las publicaciones enumeradas en el presente documento son exclusivamente suyos. La inclusión de publicaciones en esta lista bibliográfica escogida no implica en modo alguno que se suscriban sus contenidos. /...A/48/305 Español Página 130 1. Artículos Adams, Peter, "New group to examine proliferation of satellites", EW Technology, Defense News, 5 de febrero de 1990, pág. 33. Adams, Peter, "U.S., Soviets edge closer to rewritten ABM Treaty at defense and space talks", Defense News, 21 de agosto de 1989. "Administration sets policy on Landsat continuity", LANDSAT DATA USERS’ NOTES, Earth Observation Satellite Company, vol. 7, No. 1, primavera de 1992, pág. 4. "Advanced missile warning satellite evolved from smaller spacecraft", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 de enero de 1989, pág. 45. "AF Weapons Laboratory examines laser ASAT questions", SDI Monitor, 14 de septiembre de 1990, págs. 209 a 211. Aftergood, Steve, David W. Hafemeister, Oleg F. Prilutsky, Joel R. Primack y Stanislav N. Rodionov, "Nuclear power in space", Scientific American, junio de 1991, vol. 264, No. 6, págs. 42 a 47. "Air Force wants to update spacetrack", Electronics, 6 de enero de 1977, pág. 34. "Allied milspace", Military Space, 19 de noviembre de 1990, pág. 5. "Allies, US Explore Space Cooperation", Military Space, 19 de noviembre de 1990, págs. 1 a 3. Anson, Peter, "The Skynet Telecommunication Programme", Colloque Activités Spaciales Militaires (Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mayo de 1989), págs. 143 a 159. Anthony, Ian (ed.). "The Co-ordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls", Arms Export Regulations (Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991), págs. 207 a 211. , "The missile technology control regime", Arms Export Regulations (Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991), págs. 219 a 227. "Argentina Develops Condor Solid-Propellant Rocket", Aviation Week and Space Technology, de junio de 1985, pág. 61. Asker, James R., "U.S. draws blueprints for first lunar base", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 31 de agosto de 1992, págs. 47 a 51. Aubay, P. H., J. B. Nocaudie, "Surveillance terrestre", Colloque Activités Spaciales Militaires (Association Aeronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mayo de 1989, págs. 143 a 159. /...A/48/305 Español Página 131 "Australian-Asian cooperation increases in telecommunications", Space Policy, vol. 8, 1º de febrero de 1992, pág. 96. "Australian Defence May Launch Own Satellite", C and C Space and Satellite Newsletter, 8 de junio de 1990, págs. 1 y 2. "Avco puts together laser radar for strategic defense", Space News, 30 de julio de 1990. Ball, Desmond, Australia’s Secret Space Programmes, Canberra Paper on Strategy and Defence No. 43 (Canberra, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, 1988), 103 págs. & Helen Wilson (eds.), Australia and Space (Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992). Badurkin, V., "Mukachev radar facility prompts local protests", FBIS-Sov, 7 de marzo de 1990, págs. 2 y 3. Bates, Kelly, "SDIO’s Cooper says U.S. could deploy strategic defense system for $40 billion", Inside the Pentagon, 20 de diciembre de 1990, págs. 10 y 11. Beatty, J. Kelly, "The GEODSS difference", Sky and Telescope, mayo 1982, págs. 469 a 473. Bennet, Ralph, "Brilliant pebbles", Reader’s Digest, septiembre de 1989, págs. 128 a 132. Bernard Raab, "Nuclear-powered infrared surveillance satellite study", Inter-Society Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 1977, Fairchild Space and Electronics Company, Germantown, Maryland. Bertotti, Bruno and Luciano Anselmo, The Problem of Debris and Military Activities in Space, Permanent Representative of Italy, Conference on Disarmament, 6 de agosto de 1991. Beusch, J., et al, "NASA debris environment characterization with the haystack radar", AIAA Paper 90-1346, 16 de abril de 1990. Bhatia, A., "India’s space program -Cause for concern?", Asian Survey, octubre 1985, pág. 1.017. Bhatt, S. "Space Law in the 1990s", International Studies, vol. 26, No. 4, octubre 1989, págs. 323 a 335. Bobb, Dilip and Amarnath K. Menon, "Chariot of fire", India Today, 15 de junio de 1989, págs. 28 a 32. Bosco, Joseph A., "International law regarding outer space -an overview", Journal of Air Law and Commerce, primavera de 1990, págs. 609 a 651. /...A/48/305 Español Página 132 Boulden, Jane, "Phase I of the Strategic Defense Initiative: current issues, arms control and Canadian national security", Issue Brief, Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, No. 12, agosto de 1990. Bourely, Michael G., "La production du lanceur Ariane", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi (1981), págs. 279 a 314. Brankli, Hank, "Weather satellite photos and the Vietnam War", Naval History, primavera de 1991, págs. 66 a 68. "Brazil plans to launch its own satellites in the 1990s", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 de julio de 1984, pág. 60. "Brazil’s space age begins", Interavia, diciembre de 1984, No. 12. "Brazil -aiming for self-sufficiency in orbit", Space World, octubre de 1985, pág. 29. Brooks, Charles D., "S.D.I.: a new dimension for Israel", Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, 11(4), invierno de 1986, págs. 341 a 348. "Canada studies PAXSATS for arms control", Military Space, 31 de agosto de 1987, págs. 1 a 3. Chandrashekar, S., "An assessment of Pakistan’s missile programme", Inédito, 1992. __________, "Export controls and proliferation: an Indian perspective", en prensa, 1992. __________, "Missile technology control and the Third World", Space Policy, noviembre de 1990, págs. 278 a 284. Charles, Dan, "Spy satellites: entering a new era", Science, 24 de marzo de 1989, págs. 1.541 a 1.543. Chayes and Chayes, "Testing and development of ’exotic’ systems under the ABM Treaty: the great reinterpretations caper", Harvard Law Review, No. 1.956, 1986. Chen, Yanping, "China’s space policy: a historical review", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, mayo de 1991, págs. 116 a 128. Chen, Zhiqiang, "Sun Jiadong talking about China’s space technology", Military World, enero/febrero de 1990, págs. 34 a 38. "China/Brazil space talks", Aerospace Daily, 10 de agosto de 1987, pág. 219. Chosh, S. K., "India’s space program and its military implications", Agence Defence Journal, septiembre de 1981. /...A/48/305 Español Página 133 Cleminson, Frank R. and Pericles Gasparini Alves, "Space weapon verification: a brief appraisal", Verification of Disarmament or Limitation of Armaments: Instruments, Negotiations, Proposals, Serge Sur (ed.) UNIDIR, Nueva York (1992), págs. 177 a 206. _________, "PAXSAT and progress in arms control", Space Policy, mayo de 1988, págs. 97 a 102. Clark, Phillip, "Soviet worldwide ELINT satellites", Jane’s Soviet Intelligence Review, julio de 1990, págs. 330 a 332. Cohen, William S., "Limited defences under a modified ABM Treaty", Disarmament, vol. XV, No. 1, 1992, págs. 13 a 27. Condom, P., "Brazil aims for self-sufficiency in space", Interavia, enero de 1984, No. 1, págs. 99 a 101. Corradini, Alessandro, "Consideration of the question of international arms transfer by the United Nations", Transparency in international transfers, Disarmament Topical Paper 3, United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs, Nueva York: Publicación de las Naciones Unidas, 1990. Couston, M., "Vers un droit des stations spatiales", Revue française du droit aerien et spatial, 1990, No. 1. Covault, Craig, "New missile warning satellite to be launched on the first Titan 4", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 de enero 1989, págs. 34 a 40. __________, "USAF missile warning satellites providing 90-Sec. Scud Attack Alert", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 de enero de 1990, págs. 60 y 61. __________, "Soviet military space operations developing longer life satellites", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 de abril 1990, págs. 44 a 49. __________, "Maui optical station photographs external tank reentry breakup", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 de junio de 1990, págs. 52 y 53. __________, "Russia seeks joint space test to build military cooperation", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 9 de marzo de 1992, págs. 18 y 19. "Congress splits on milspace budget", Military Space, 25 de septiembre de 1989, pág. 2. Cox, David, et al, "Security cooperation in the Arctic: a Canadian response to Murmansk", Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 24 de octubre de 1989. "Crisis shows need for better tactical satellite communications", Aerospace Daily, 31 de enero de 1991, pág. 174. /...A/48/305 Español Página 134 Daly, P., "GLONASS status", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 de septiembre de 1987, pág. 108. Danchik, Robert, et al, "The Navy navigation satellite system (TRANSIT)", Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest, vol. 11, Nos. 1 and 2, 1990, págs. 97 a 101. de Briganti, Giovanni, "West Germany reverses stance on reconnaissance satellites", Space News, 9 de abril de 1990. __________, "Budget reveals slower growth for military space programs", Defense News, 3 de diciembre de 1990, pág. 14. de Selding, Peter, "Defense minister says no to French radar spy satellite", Space News, 12 de marzo de 1990. __________, "UK Minister balks at call for European spy satellite", Space News, 16 de julio 1990, págs. 1 y 20. DeVere, G. T., and N. L. Johnson, "The NORAD space network", Spaceflight, julio de 1985, vol. 27, págs. 306 a 309. Domke, M., "Kostendämpfungsstrategie: integration ziviler und militärischer produktion neuer technologien", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft und Frieden, 4/1991, págs. 26 a 31. Du, Shuhua, "The outer space and the moon treaties", Verification of current disarmament and arms limitation agreements: ways, means and practices, UNIDIR, Nueva York: Publicación de las Naciones Unidas, 1991. Dudney, Robert S., "The force forms up", Air Force Magazine, febrero de 1992, pág. 23. "European space industry eyes spy sats", Military Space, 23 de abril de 1990, págs. 5 y 6. "Expert says no blessing for SDI deployment", FBIS-SOV, 91-023, 21 de octubre de 1991, pág. 1. "Experts map out European satellite plan", Military Space, 9 de abril de 1990, pág. 7. Falkenheim, Peggy L. "Japan and arms control: Tokyo’s response to SDI and INF", Aurora Papers, No. 6, Ontario: The Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament, 1987. Finney, A. T., "Tactical uses of the DSCS III communications system", in NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium 16 a 19 de octubre de 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Foley, Theresa, "Raytheon proposes rail-mobile radar for midcourse SDI sensing", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 11 de enero de 1988, págs. 22 a 24. /...A/48/305 Español Página 135 "French milspace", Military Space, 5 de diciembre de 1988, pág. 5. "Foreign milspace", Military Space, 28 de enero de 1991, pág. 4. "French study military recon satellite", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 de enero de 1973, pág. 15. Furniss, Tim, "UK studies new military satellite plan", Flight International, 7 de octubre de 1989, pág. 4. __________, "Iraq Plans to Launch Two Science Satellites", Flight International, 21 de febrero de 1990, pág. 20. Fujita Yasuki, "Recent developments in the peaceful utilization of space", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, marzo de 1992, pág. 1. "Gadhafi: Libya needs space power", Space News, 25 de junio de 1990, pág. 2. "General Dynamics wins MLV II competition", Aerospace Daily, 4 de mayo de 1988, pág 185.6. George, E. V., "Diffraction-limited imaging of Earth satellites", Energy and Technology Review, agosto de 1991, pág. 29. Gettins, Hal, "Shepherd touching off interservice Row", Missiles and Rockets, 7 de marzo de 1960, págs. 21 a 28. Gilmartin, Trish, "Pentagon Advisory Panel Chairman urges gradual evolutionary approach to SDI", Defense News, 25 julio de 1988, pág. 30. Goldblat, Josef, "Conferencia de examen de la Convención sobre la prohibición de utilizar técnicas de modificación ambiental con fines militares u otros fines hostiles" Disarmament, vol. VII, No. 2, verano de 1984, págs. 93 a 102. Goure, D., "Soviet radars: the eyes of Soviet defenses", Military Technology, 1988, n. 5, págs. 36 a 38. Graham, C. P., "Brazilian space programme -an overview", Space Policy, febrero de 1991, págs. 72 a 76. Granger, Ken, Geographic information and remote sensing technologies in the Defence of Australia, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Green, David, "UK space policy -a problem of culture", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, noviembre de 1987, págs. 277 a 279. Grossman, Elaine, "Small and light ’Brilliant Eyes’ could replace three SDI surveillance systems", Inside the Army, 28 de mayo de 1990, pág. 15. Gullikstad, Espen, "Finland", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991, págs. 59 a 63. /...A/48/305 Español Página 136 __________, "Sweden", Arms Export Regulations, Ian Anthony (ed.), Oxford University Press: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1991, págs. 147 a 155. Halperin, Emmanuel, "Israel et les missiles", Politique internationale, No. 44, 1989, págs. 251 a 256. He, Changchui, "The development of remote sensing in China", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 1, febrero de 1989, págs. 65 a 75. "Helios to deliver imagery to 3 nations", Military Space, 21 de noviembre de 1988, págs. 1 a 3. Henize, Karl, "Tracking artificial satellites and space vehicles", Advances in Space Science, (Academic Press, Nueva York, 1960), vol. 2. Howell, Andreas, "The Challenge of Space Surveillance", Sky and Telescope, junio de 1987, págs. 584 a 588. Hua-bao, Lin, "The Chinese recoverable satellite program", 40th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, 7 a 12 de octubre de 1989, Málaga, España, IAF-89-426. "Hughes, Martin and Rockwell selected for GBI Program", SDI Monitor, 31 de agosto de 1990, págs. 197 a 198. Hughes, Peter C., Satellites Harming Other Satellites, Arms Control Verification Occasional Paper No. 7, Ottawa: Arms Control and Disarmament Division, External Affairs and International Trade, Canada, julio de 1991. Hurwitz, Bruce A., "Israel and the law of outer space, Israel Law Review, vol. 22, No. 4, verano/otoño de 1988, págs. 457 a 466. Iguchi, Chikako, "International cooperation in lunar and space development: Japan’s role", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, agosto de 1992, págs. 256 a 267. "India’s space policy", Space Policy, noviembre de 1987, págs. 326 a 334. "Indigenous missile", Asian Defense Journal, septiembre de 1985. "Industrial view on European space-based verification", Presentation at Dornier, Dornier Deutsche Aerospace, Friedrichshafen, 18 de febrero de 1992. "Industry observer", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 20 de junio de 1977, pág. 11. "International space", Military Space, 9 de abril de 1990, pág. 5. "Invasion tip", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 6 de agosto de 1990, pág. 15. /...A/48/305 Español Página 137 "Iraqi space launch more modest than claimed", Flight International, 20 de diciembre de 1989, pág. 4. "Israeli satellite launch sparks concerns about Middle East missile build-up", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 26 de septiembre de 1988, pág. 21. "Israel hints at plans to launch spy satellite", Defense News, 11 de marzo de 1991, pág. 9. Jackson, P., "Space surveillance satellite catalog maintenance", AIAA Paper 90-1339, 16 de abril de 1990. "Japan plans satellite", Jane’s Defense Weekly, 16 de septiembre de 1989. Jasani, Buphendra, "Military space activities", Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Yearbook -1978 (Taylor and Francis, Londres, 1978). __________, et al, "Share satellite surveillance", The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, marzo de 1990, págs. 15 y 16. __________ and Larsson, Christer, "Security implications of remote sensing", Space Policy, febrero de 1988, pág. 48. Jeambrun, Georges, "La Politique de contrôle des satellites français (1990-2000)", Defense nationale, 43º año, febrero de 1987, págs. 129 a 139. Karp, Aaron, "Space technology in the Third World: commercialization and the spread of ballistic missiles", Space Policy, mayo de 1986, págs. 157 a 168. __________, "Ballistic-missile proliferation in the Third World", in World Armament and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1989, Oxford University Press, págs. 287 a 318. __________, "Ballistic missile proliferation", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, págs. 327 a 329. Kawachi, Masao, Toyohiko Ishii and Koichi Ijichi. "The Space Flyer Unit", Mitsubishi Electric Advance, vol. 58, marzo de 1992. Kenden, A., "Military maneuvers in synchronous orbit", Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, febrero de 1983, V. 36, págs. 88 a 91. Kiernan, Vincent, "Air Force begins upgrades to satellite scanning telescope", Space News, 23 de julio de 1990, pág. 8. __________, "Air Force alters GPS signals to aid troops", Space News, 24 de septiembre de 1990, págs. 1 y 35. __________, "Officials: changing world heightens demand for Milstar", Space News, 8 de octubre de 1990, pág. 8. /...A/48/305 Español Página 138 __________, "US Congress slashes Milstar funding, orders shift of system to tactical users", Space News, 22 de octubre de 1990, págs. 3 y 37. __________, "DMSP satellite launched to aid troops in Middle East", Space News, 10 de diciembre de 1990, pág. 6. __________, "Pentagon prepares for ASAT Flight Testing in 1996", Space News, 5 a 18 agosto de 1991, pág. 23 Kirton, John, "Canadian space policy", Space Policy, vol. 6, No. 1, febrero de 1990, págs. 61 a 73. Klass, Philip, "Inmarsat decision pushes GPS to forefront of Civ Nav-Sat field", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 14 de enero de 1991, págs. 34 y 35. "Krasnoyarsk radar dismantling in full swing", FBIS-Sov, 10 de octubre de 1990, pág. 1. Kubbing, B. W., "The SDI agreement between Bonn and Washington: review of the first four years", Space Policy, agosto de 1990, págs. 231 a 247. Langberg, Mike, "Lockheed fights for Milstar as Cold War thaw threatens", San José Mercury News, 14 de enero de 1991, págs. 1C y 6C. Lawler, Andrew, "Taiwan seeks start on $400 million plan to enter space arena", Space News, 19 de febrero de 1990, págs. 1 y 36. Lawler, Andrew, "Brazil chafes at missile curbs", Space News, vol. 2, No. 35, 14 a 20 de octubre de 1991, pág. 1 y 20. __________, "South Korea plans to build, launch satellites", Space News, 25 de junio de 1990, págs. 1 y 20. "Le traité germano-américain sur l’IDS", Bruxelles: GRIP, No. 103, noviembre de 1986. Lee, Yishane, "South Korea, Taiwan gear up to enter satellite era", Space News, 24 de septiembre de 1990, pág. 7. Leitenberg, M., "Satellite launchers -and potential ballistic missiles -on the commercial market", Current Research on Peace and Violence, 1981, No. 2, págs. 115 a 128. Leopold, George, "Canada, US to begin talks on joint space-based radar", Defense News, 26 de junio de 1989, pág. 9. "Lessons of the Gulf War", Trust and Verify, No. 18, marzo de 1991, págs. 1 y 2. "Les satellites d’observation: un instrument européen pour la vérification du désarmement", Assemblée de l’Union de l’Europe occidentale, Commission technique et aerospatiale, Colloque, Roma 27 y 28 de marzo de 1990. /...A/48/305 Español Página 139 "Libya offers to finance Brazilian missile project", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 6 febrero de 1988, pág. 201. "Libya wants CSS-2", Flight International, 14 de mayo de 1988, pág. 6. Lindsey, George, "Surveillance from space: a strategic opportunity for Canada", Working Paper 44, Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, junio de 1992. Liu Ji-yuan, y Min Gui-rong, "The progress of astronautics in China", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 2, mayo de 1987, págs. 141 a 147. "LLNL space imaging tests slated for Maui telescope", Space News, 19 de febrero de 1990, pág. 12. Lockwood, Dunbar, "Verifying START: from satellites to suspect sites", Arms Control Today, vol. 20, No. 8, octubre de 1990, págs. 13 a 19. Lopes, Roberto, "A satellite deal with Iraq", Space Markets, No. 3, 1989, pág. 191. Lygo, Raymond. "The UK’s future in space", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, noviembre de 1987, págs. 281 a 283. "Magnavox Prepares for GPS Buildup", Military Space, 25 de septiembre de 1989, págs. 3 a 5. Mahnken, T. G., "Why Third World space systems matter", Orbis, otoño de 1991, S. 563 a 579. Maitra, Ramtanu, "India’s space program: boosting industry", Fusion, 7(4), julio y agosto de 1985, págs. 53 a 58. Manly, Peter, "Television in amateur astronomy", Astronomy, diciembre de 1984, págs. 35 a 37. Marov, Mikhail Ya., "The new challenge for space in Russia", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, agosto de 1992, págs. 269 a 279. Matte, Nicolas, "The treaty banning nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water (10 de octubre de 1963) and peaceful uses of outer space", in Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. IX, 1984, págs. 391 a 414. McCaughrean, Mark, "Infrared astronomy: pixels to spare", Sky and Telescope, julio de 1991, págs. 31 a 35. Mehmud, Salim, "Pakistan’s space programme", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 8, agosto de 1989, págs. 217 a 225. "Meteor 2-20, after being stored on orbit, begins transmission", Aerospace Daily, 19 noviembre de 1990, pág. 302. /...A/48/305 Español Página 140 Middleton, B. S. and E. F. Cory, "Australian Space Policy", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 1, febrero de 1989, págs. 41 a 46. Milhollin, G., "India’s missiles -with a little help from our friends", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, noviembre de 1989, págs. 31 a 35. Monserrat Filho, Jose, "Foguetes proibidos", O Globo, 24 de junio de 1992, pág. 6. "MTCR-Update: junio-diciembre de 1991", Missile Monitor, No. 2, primavera de 1992. NATO AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development), Tactical Applications of Space Systems, Avionics Panel Symposium, 16 a 19 de octubre de 1989 (AGARD-CP-460, NTIS N90-27438). Naval Space Command, "NAVSPASUR news release", NAVSPASURINST 5780.1, 11 de julio de 1983. "Navy satellites approach critical replacement stage", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 21 de marzo de 1988, págs. 46 y 51. Norman, Colin, "Cut price plan offered for SDI deployment", Science, 7 de octubre de 1988, págs. 24 y 25. North American Aerospace Defense Command, "The NORAD space detection and tracking system", Factsheet, 20 de agosto de 1982. Osborne, Freleigh, "PAXSAT space-based remote sensing for arms control verification", IEEE Electro/88, Boston, Massachusets, 10 a 12 de mayo de 1988, Professional Program Session Record 24. "OSD puts USAF space radar plan on hold, OSD studies nonspace options", Inside the Air Force, 7 de diciembre de 1990, págs. 10 y 11. Ospina, Sylvia, "Project CONDOR, the Andean regional satellite system -key legal considerations", Space Communication and Broadcasting, 1989, vol. 6, págs. 367 a 377. "Pakistan steps up its space program", Space World, mayo de 1985, pág. 33. Paolini, Jérôme. "French military space policy and European cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 4, No. 3, agosto de 1988, págs. 201 a 210. "PAXSAT could monitor space arms treaty", Military Space, 14 de septiembre de 1987, págs. 6 y 7. Payne, Jay H., "A limited antiballistic missile system", Ohio: Department of the Air Force, Air University, Air Force Institute of Technology, Defense Technical Information Center, 1990, págs. 2.13 a 2.24. /...A/48/305 Español Página 141 Pederson, Kenneth S., "Thoughts on international space cooperation and interests in the post-Cold War world", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, agosto de 1992, págs. 205 a 219. Perry, Geoffrey, "Pupil projects involving satellites", Space Education, vol. 1, 1984, pág. 320. Piazzano, Piero, "Cosí un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, Mo. 120, abril de 1991, págs. 16 a 25. Pike, Gordon, "Chinese launch services: a user’s guide", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, mayo de 1991, págs. 103 a 115. Pike, John, "Military Use of Outer Space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1991, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, págs. 49 a 84. __________, Sarah Lang y Eric Stambler, "Military use of outer space", World Armaments and Disarmament, SIPRI Yearbook 1992, Stockholm International Peace Institute, Oxford University Press, 1991, págs. 121 a 146. Politi, Alessandro, "Italy plans military satellite network for early warning, reconnaissance", Defense News, 7 de enero de 1991, págs. 3 y 31. "Portuguese balk at US radar, leaving US with blind spot", Space News, 9 de octubre de 1989, pág. 4. Potter, M. "Swords into ploughshares: missiles into commercial launchers", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 2, May 1991, págs. 146 a 150. Rains, Lon, "Soviets launch first ELINT spy satellite since 1988", Space News, 29 May 1990. Rajan, Y. S. "Benefits from space technology: a view from a developing country", Space Policy, 4(3) agosto de 1988, págs. 221 a 228. Rankin, Robert, "Iraq still gets US satellite weather photos", The Philadelphia Inquirer, 22 de enero de 1991, pág. 9-A. Rennow, Hans-Henrik, "The Information Revolution II: satellites and peace", The World Today, Londres, junio de 1989, págs. 97 a 99. "Requests for proposals -Air Force Space Technology Center", SDI Monitor, 25 de mayo de 1990, pág. 125. "RFP for two more DSP satellites to be released Jan. 31", Aerospace Daily, 23 de enero de 1991, pág. 125. Richelson, J., The U.S. intelligence community, (Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, 1985), págs. 140 a 143. Richelson, Jeffrey, "The future of space reconnaissance", Scientific American, enero de 1991, págs. 38 a 44. /...A/48/305 Español Página 142 Richter, Andrew, North American Aerospace Defence Cooperation in the l99Os: Issues and Prospects, Department of National Defense, Canada, Operational Research and Analysis Establishment, Extra-Mural Paper No. 57, Julio de 1991. Risse-Kappen, Thomas, "Star Wars controversy in West Germany", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, vol. 43, No. 6, julio/agosto de 1987, págs. 50 a 52. Rossi, Sergio A., "La Politica Militare Spaziale Europea e l’Italia", Affari Esteri, año XIX, No. 76, otoño de 1987, págs. 521 a 533. Rubin, Uzi, "Iraq and the ballistic missile scare", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 46(8), octubre de 1990, págs. 11 a 13. Saint-Lager, Olivier de, "L’organisation des activités spatiales françaises: une combinaison dynamique du secteur public et du secteur privé", Annals of Air and Space Law, vol. vi, 1981, págs. 475 a 487. Salvatori, Nicoletta, "Cosí un sogno ha potuto mettere le ali", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, No. 120, abril de 1991, págs. 109 a 121. "Satellite intelligence", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 25 de febrero de 1991, pág. 13. "Satellite trackers bag Soviet space station", Sky and Telescope, diciembre de 1987, pág. 580. Scheffran, Jiirgen y Aaron Karp, "The national interpretation of the missile technology control regime -the US and German experience", Controlling the Development and Spread of Military Technology: Lessons form the Past and Challenges for the l99Os. Vu University Press, Amsterdam 1992, págs. 235 a 251. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Verification and risk for an anti-satellite weapons ban", Bulletin of Peace Proposals, vol. 17, No. 2, 1986, págs. 165 a 173. __________, "Dual use of missile and space technologies", que se publicará en G. Neuneck, O. Ischebeck, Missile Technologies, Proliferation and Concepts for Arms Control, Hamburgo, 1992, págs. 1 a 16. Scheffran, Jürgen, "Startbahn für den weltraumkrieg? -Der ASAT-Test und die Osterinsel", Informationsdienst Wissenschaft & Frieden, No. 4, 1985. Scott, William B. y Stanley W. Kandebo, "NASA-AMES proposal could challenge NASP", Aviation Weak and Space Technology, 14 de septiembre de 1992, págs. 27 y 30. "SDI constellation grows in brilliance", Military Space, 14 de enero de 1991, págs. 3 y 4. "SDIO plans to buy 4600 Brilliant Pebble interceptors", Defense Daily, 13 de febrero de 1990, pág. 231. /...A/48/305 Español Página 143 "SDIO retools for limited threats", SDI Monitor, 21 de diciembre de 1990, págs. 281 y 282. "SDIO works up three limited-strike protection plans", SDI Monitor, 18 de enero de 1991, pág. 21. "Secret images for Japan", Aviation Week and Space Technologies, 9 de marzo de 1992, pág. 11. Shastri, R., "The Spread of ballistic missiles and its implications", Strategic Analysis, mayo de 1988, págs. 157 a 168. "Shuttle-Deployed Syncom IV-5 arrives on station, begins testing", Aerospace Daily, 19 de enero de 1990, pág. 110. Simpson, John, Acton Philip y Crowe Simon, "The Israeli satellite launch: capabilities, intentions and implications", Space Policy, vol. 5, No. 2, mayo de 1989, págs. 117 a 128. "Sluggers pinch hit for Army GPS", Military Space, 24 de septiembre de 1990, págs. 1 y 8. Smith, David, "The defense and space talks: moving towards non-nuclear strategic defenses", NATO Review, vol. 28, No. 5, octubre de 1990, págs. 17 a 21. "South Korea needs to develop spy satellite", Defense Daily, 26 de noviembre de 1990, pág. 312. "Soviet Union launches military navigation satellite", Aerospace Daily, 20 de septiembre de 1990, pág. 471. "Soviets announce failure of early warning satellite", Aerospace Daily, 28 de junio de 1990, pág. 518. "Soviets confirm Cosmos 1900 difficulties", Aerospace Daily, 16 mayo de 1988, pág. 252. "Soviets launch Mir resupply vehicle, two satellites", Aerospace Daily, 2 de octubre de 1990, pág. 5. "Soviets reject transition to strategic defenses -Hadley", Defense Daily, 22 de marzo de 1990, pág. 458. "Space surveillance contracts expected", Defense Electronics, junio de 1984, pág. 19. "Space surveillance deemed inadequate", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 junio de 1980, págs. 249 a 259. "SSTS cost drivers identified", Military Space, 29 de septiembre de 1986, pág. 3. /...A/48/305 Español Página 144 Sta. Romana, Elpidio R. "Japan, SDI and the Pacific", Foreign Relations, págs. 105 a 123. Stares, Paul B., "The military uses of space after the Cold War", Australia and Space, Desmond Ball and Helen Wilson (eds.), Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Canberra, 1992. Surikov, Boris, "Krasnoyarsk radar station’s future considered", FBIS-Sov, 27 de marzo de 1990, págs. 2 y 3. "Surveillance system to monitor Soviet ASATs", Defense Electronics, marzo de 1983, pág. 16. "Swift development of China’s missiles and space technology: an interview with Mr. Liu Jiyan, Vice-Minister of the Ministry of the Aerospace Industry of China", CONMILIT, vol. 3, No. 182, 1992, págs. 45 a 52. Taylor, Trevor, "SDI -the British response", Star Wars and European Defence, Hans Günter Brauch (ed.), Houndmills: Macmillian Press, 1987, págs. 129 a 149. __________, "Britain’s response to the strategic defence initiative", International Affairs, vol. 62, No. 2, primavera de 1986, págs. 217 a 230. Teitelbaum, Sheldon, "Israel and Star Wars: the shape of things to come", New Outlook, vol. 28, No. 5/6, mayo y junio de 1985, págs. 59 a 62. "The JDW Interview", Jane’s Defence Weekly, 9 de febrero de 1991, pág. 200. "Third World countries are increasing their interest in space", SDI Monitor, 7 de diciembre de 1990, pág. 275. Thomas, Paul, "Space traffic surveillance", Space/Aeronautics, noviembre de 1967, págs. 75 a 86. Thomas, Raju G. C., "India’s nuclear and space programs: defence or development?", World Politics, 38(2), enero de 1986, págs. 315 a 342. "Transcarpathian Oblast radar project mothballed", FBIS-Sov, 22 de agosto de 1990, pág. 51. "TRW to develop $33 a million USAF space surveillance network", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 22 de mayo de 1978, págs. 24 y 25. Turner, R., "Brazil says missile technology controls hamper launch industry", Defense News, 24 de julio de 1989, pág. 18. Ulsamer, Edgar, "ESD: enhancing effectiveness electronically", Air Force Magazine, julio de 1978, pág. 49. "USAF Asat test advances 1959 aircraft launch data", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 29 de agosto de 1983, pág. 22. /...A/48/305 Español Página 145 "US increasing coverage of Soviet space launches", Defense Daily, 15 de abril de 1986, pág. 251. "U.S. upgrading ground-based sensors", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 16 de junio de 1980, págs. 239 a 241. van Reeth, George y Madders, Kevin, "Reflections on the quest for international cooperation", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 3, agosto de 1992, págs. 221 a 231. von Welck, Stephan F., "India space program", Space Policy, vol. 3, No. 4, noviembre de 1987, págs. 326 a 334. Vohra, Ruchita, "Iraq joins the missile club: impact and implications", Strategic Analysis, 13(1), abril de 1990, págs. 59 a 68. Weeb, Richard L., "Estimating the life cycle cost of the space exploration initiative", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 1, febrero de 1992. Welk, S. F. von, "The export of space technology: prospects and dangers", Space Policy, agosto de 1987, págs. 221 a 231. Wells, Damon R. y Hastings, Daniel E., "The US and Japanese space programmes: a comparative study", Space Policy, vol. 7, No. 3, agosto de 1991, págs. 233 a 256. Williamson, Mark, "The UK Parliamentary Space Committee", Space Policy, vol. 8, No. 2, mayo de 1992, págs. 159 a 165. Wilson, A., "Non-US launcher systems for the next decade", Interavia, julio de 1988, No. 7, pág. 687. Wood, Lowell, "Concerning advanced architectures for strategic defense", Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Preprint UCRL-98424, 13 de marzo de 1988. ____________, "Brilliant Pebbles missile defense concept advocated by Livermore scientist", Aviation Week and Space Technology, 13 de junio de 1988, págs. 151 a 155. Wu, Guoxiang, "China’s space communications goals", Space Policy, vol. 4, No. 1, febrero de 1988, págs. 41 a 45. Yang, Chunfu, "China’s LONG MARCH series carrier rockerts", Military World, mayo de 1989, págs. 20 a 25. Zaloga, Steven, Soviet air defence missiles, Jane’s Information Group, Coulsdon, Surrey, 1989, págs. 118 a 148. Zaloga, Steve, "Soviet radars draw opposition", Armed Forces Journal International, junio de 1990, pág. 21. Zhukov, G. y Kolosov, Y., International Space Law, 1984. /...A/48/305 Español Página 146 Zorpette, Glenn, "Kwajalein’s new role", IEEE Spectrum, marzo de 1989, págs. 64 a 69. 2. Libros, estudios especiales e informes Anti-satellite weapons, countermeasures, and arms control, Office of Technology Assessment, report No. OTA-ISC-281, septiembre de 1985. Atlas géographic de l’espace. Sous la direction de Fernand Verger, Sides-Reclus, 1992. Balaschak, M. et al., Assessing the comparability of dual-use technologies for ballistic missile development, Cambridge, MA: Center for International Studies, junio de 1981. Ball, Desmond, A base for debate, (Allen and Unwin, Londres, 1987). Berman, R. P. y Baker, J. C., Soviet strategic forces, Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1982. Birkholz, M. et al., Die Bundesrepublik als Heimlicher Waffenexporteur, Berlin: Arbeitskreis Physik und Rüstung, 1983. Brauch, Hans Günter, Van Der Graaf, Henny J., Grin, John y Smit, Wim A. (eds.), Controlling the development and spread of military technology: lessons form the past and challenges for the 1990s, Vu University Press, Amsterdam 1992, 406 págs. Bunn, Matthew, Foundation for the future: the ABM treaty and national security, Washington, D.C.: The Arms Control Association, 1990. Carus, W. S., Ballistic missiles in modern conflict, Praeger, 1991. Cochran, C. D., Gorman, D. M. y Dumoulin, J. D. (eds.), Space handbook, Air University Press, enero de 1985. Cochran, T. B., Arkin, W. M., Norris, R. S. y Sands, J. I., Nuclear weapons databook: Soviet nuclear weapons, vol. IV, Nueva York, Harper and Row Publishers, 1989. Colloque: activités spatiales militaires, Association Aéronautique et Astronautique de France, Gap, Imprimerie Louis-Jean, mayo de 1989, 382 págs. Christol, C., The Modern International Law of Outer Space, 1982. Chayes, Antonia H. y Doty, Paul (eds.), Defending deterrence: managing the ABM Treaty regime into the 21st century, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Dorn, Walter, Peace-keeping satellites: the case for international surveillance and verification, Dundas, Peace Research Institute, 1989, Peace Research Reviews, 187 págs. /...A/48/305 Español Página 147 Dolye, Stephen, Civil uses of outer space: implications for international security, UNIDIR, Nueva York, 1991. Disarmament: problems related to outer space, UNIDIR, Nueva York, publicación de las Naciones Unidas, 1987, 190 págs. Gasparini Alves, Pericles, Prevention of an arms race in outer space: a guide to discussions at the conference on disarmament, Nueva York: UNIDIR, 1991, 203 págs. Gatland, K., Space technology, Nueva York: Harmony Books, Cuarta Edición 1984. Gold, D., SDI -the US Strategic Defense Initiative and the implications of Israel’s participation, Center for Strategic Studies, Tel Aviv, Memorandum No. 16, diciembre de 1985. Gummett, P. y Reppy, J. (eds.), The Relations between defence and civil technologies, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988. Hecht, J., Beam weapons -the next arms race, Plenum Press, 1984. Hord, R. M., CRC handbook of space technology: status and projections, Boca Ratón, Florida, 1985. Huang, Z., Long March launch vehicles in the 1990s, en Sharokhi, F. et al., Space commercialization: launch vehicles and programs, Washington, D.C.: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 1990, págs. 1 a 6. Jasani, Bhupendra, Space and international security, Londres, Royal United Services Institute, 70 págs. __________, ed., Peaceful and non-peaceful uses of space: problems of definition for the prevention of an arms race, UNIDIR, 1991. __________, Space weapons and international security, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. __________, Outer space a battlefield of the future?, Londres, Taylor & Francis, 1978. Johnson, Nicholas L. (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs: Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1989. __________, (ed.), The Soviet year in space, Colorado Springs: Teledyne Brown Engineering, 1990. King-Hele, Desmond, Observing earth satellites, (Macmillan, Londres, 1983). Krige, John, The Prehistory of ESRO: 1959/1960, European Space Agency, HSR-1, julio de 1992. "Le Grandi Esplorazioni nel mondo sopra de noi", Airone Spazio, Numero Speciale, No. 120, april de 1991. /...A/48/305 Español Página 148 Milton, A. Fenner, M. Scott Davis y Parmentola, John A., Making Space Defense Work, Washington, Pergamon/Brassey’s, 1989. Nicholas L. Johnson y McKnight, Darren S., Artificial space debris, Malabar: Orbit Book Company, 1987. Nolan, Janne E, Trappings of power: ballistic missiles in the Third World, The Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C., 1991, 209 págs. Outer space in the 1990s: the role of arms control, security, technical and legal implications, Actas del simposio celebrado los días 11, 12 y 13 de noviembre de 1992. Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canadá, 258 págs. Raiten, E. y Tsipis, K., Conventional antisatellite weapons, Program in Science and Technology for International Security, MIT, Cambridge, marzo de 1984. Reijnen, G. C. M. y de Graff, W., The pollution of outer space, in particular of the geostationary orbit, Dordrecht, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1989. Richelson, Jeffrey, The U.S. intelligence community, Ballinger, Cambridge, Ma., 1985. Richelson, Jeffrey, America’s secret eyes in space, Nueva York, Harper and Row, 1990. Rudert, R., Schichl, K. y Seeger, S., Atomraketen als Entwicklungshilfe, Marburgo 1985. Seiler, A., Die Entstehung und Entwicklung von Eureka, Diplomarbeit, Berlin, 1988. Sofaer, Abraham D., The ABM Treaty, Part I: treaty language and negotiating history, 11 de mayo de 1987 __________, The ABM Treaty, Part II: ratification process, 12 de marzo de 1987. __________, The ABM Treaty, Part III: subsequent practice, 9 de septiembre de 1987. Space Log: 1957-1991, International Space Year, 1992, TRW, 1992. Space a strike arms and international security, Report of the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace Against the Nuclear Threat, Moscú, octubre de 1985. Steinberg, G. M., Satellite reconnaissance: the role of informal bargaining, Praeger, Nueva York, 1982. Space surveillance for arms control and Verification: options, proceedings of the symposium held en octubre 21-23, 1988, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, Montreal, McGill University, Centre for Research of Air and Space Law, 1988. /...A/48/305 Español Página 149 Stanyard, Roger, World satellite survey, Londres, LLoyd’s Aviation Department, 1987. Stares, Paul, The militarization of space: US policy 1945-84, Ithaca, Nueva York: Cornell University Press, 1985, pág. 117. Sutton, G. P., Rocket propulsion elements, Nueva York, etc., John Wiley, 1986. Swahn, Johan, Open skies for all: the prospects for international satellite surveillance, Gotemburgo, Technical Peace Research Unit, enero de 1989, Chalmers University of Technology, 74 págs. Stutzle, W., Jasani, B. y Cowen, R. (eds.), The ABM Treaty: to defend or not to defend, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1987. Long, F. A., Hafner, D., y Boutwell, J. (eds.), Weapons in space, Nueva York, W. W. Norton and Company, 1986. -----