A_AC_105_772_EF
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A/AC.105/772 A-AC-105-722-e-.pdf (English)A/AC.105/722 A-AC-105-722-f.pdf (French)
A/AC.105/722 A/CONF.184 /BP/15 United Nations treaties and principles on outer space Text and status of treaties and principles governing the activities of States in the exploration and use of outer space, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly A commemorative edition Published on the occasion of the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III) United Nations, Vienna 1999CONTENTS Page Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I. United Nations Treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and other Celestial Bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects . . . . . . . . . 11 Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 II. Principles adopted by the General Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 III. Status of International Agreements Relating to Activities in Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 United Nations treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Other agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Related international agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 IV. Commentary: A collection of extracts of statements made on the occasion of the adoption of the United Nations treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68iii Foreword The progressive development and codification of international law constitutes one of the principal responsibilities of the United Nations in the legal field. An important area for the exercise of such responsibilities is the new environment of outer space and, through the efforts of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its Legal Subcommittee, a number of significant contributions to the law of outer space have been made. The United Nations has, indeed, become a focal point for international cooperation in outer space and for the formulation of necessary international rules. Outer space, extraordinary in many respects, is, in addition, unique from the legal point of view. It is only recently that human activities and international interaction in outer space have become realities and that beginnings have been made in the formulation of international rules to facilitate international relations in outer space. As is appropriate to an environment whose nature is so extraordinary, the extension of international law to outer space has been gradual and evolutionary—commencing with the study of questions relating to legal aspects, proceeding to the formulation of principles of a legal nature and, then, incorporating such principles in general multilateral treaties. A significant first step was the adoption by the General Assembly in 1963 of the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space. The years that followed saw the elaboration within the United Nations of five general multilateral treaties, which incorporated and developed concepts included in the Declaration of Legal Principles: The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (General Assembly resolution 2222 (XXI), annex)—adopted on 19 December 1966, opened for signature on 27 January 1967, entered into force on 10 October 1967; The Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space (resolution 2345 (XXII), annex)—adopted on 19 December 1967, opened for signature on 22 April 1968, entered into force on 3 December 1968; The Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects (resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex)—adopted on 29 November 1971, opened for signature on 29 March 1972, entered into force on 1 September 1972; The Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space (resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex)—adopted on 12 November 1974, opened for signature on 14 January 1975, entered into force on 15 September 1976; The Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (resolution 34/68, annex)—adopted on 5 December 1979, opened for signature on 18 December 1979, entered into force on 11 July 1984. The United Nations oversaw the drafting, formulation and adoption of five General Assembly resolutions, including the Declaration of Legal Principles. These are: The Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, adopted on 13 December 1963 (resolution 1962 (XVIII));2See the report of the Secretary-General on international cooperation in space activities for enhancing s 1 ecurity in the post-cold-war era (A/48/221), and also General Assembly resolution 48/39, para. 2. 3 The Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting, adopted on 10 December 1982 (resolution 37/92); The Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space, adopted on 3 December 1986 (resolution 41/65); The Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space, adopted on 14 December 1992 (resolution 47/68); The Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries, adopted on 13 December 1996 (resolution 51/122). The 1967 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, could be viewed as furnishing a general legal basis for the peaceful uses of outer space and providing a framework for the developing law of outer space. The four other treaties may be said to deal specifically with certain concepts included in the 1967 Treaty. The space treaties have been ratified by many Governments and many others abide by their principles. In view of the importance of international cooperation in developing the norms of space law and their important role in promoting international cooperation in the use of outer space for peaceful purposes, the General Assembly and the Secretary-General of the United Nations have called upon all Member States of the United Nations not yet parties to the international treaties governing the uses of outer space to ratify or accede to those treaties as soon as feasible.1 From 19 to 30 July 1999, the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III) will consider the past achievements and current status of humankind’s activities in outer space and seek to map out a blueprint for future such activities, leading into the next century. One of the issues that will be discussed in that context is promotion of international cooperation, including the key aspect of the current status and future development of international space law. The purpose of the present publication is to set out again in a single volume the five outer space treaties so far adopted by the United Nations and the five sets of principles. Also included in this publication is a table listing the current parties to and the status of the five outer space treaties as well as other related international agreements governing space activities as at 1 February 1999. Furthermore, a commentary, consisting of a collection of statements made on the occasion of the adoption of the five outer space treaties, appears at the end of the publication. It is hoped that this collection will serve as a valuable reference document for the participants of the Conference in their deliberations on issues relating to international space law and its future development. In addition, it is hoped that this publication will serve to remind all readers interested in the legal aspects of outer space of the spirit of goodwill and cooperation that formed the basis for the legal instruments formulated and inspired the holding of this, the final United Nations conference of the twentieth century.4 I. United Nations Treaties Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies The States Parties to this Treaty, Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man’s entry into outer space, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the benefit of all peoples irrespective of the degree of their economic or scientific development, Desiring to contribute to broad international cooperation in the scientific as well as the legal aspects of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that such cooperation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between States and peoples, Recalling resolution 1962 (XVIII), entitled “Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space”, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 December 1963, Recalling resolution 1884 (XVIII), calling upon States to refrain from placing in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction or from installing such weapons on celestial bodies, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 17 October 1963, Taking account of United Nations General Assembly resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space, Convinced that a Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, will further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Have agreed on the following:5 Article I The exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind. Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies. There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigation. Article II Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means. Article III States Parties to the Treaty shall carry on activities in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding. Article IV States Parties to the Treaty undertake not to place in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner. The Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used by all States Parties to the Treaty exclusively for peaceful purposes. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration of the Moon and other celestial bodies shall also not be prohibited. Article V States Parties to the Treaty shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of another State Party or on the high seas. When astronauts make such a landing, they shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle. In carrying on activities in outer space and on celestial bodies, the astronauts of one State Party shall render all possible assistance to the astronauts of other States Parties. States Parties to the Treaty shall immediately inform the other States Parties to the Treaty or the Secretary-General of the United Nations of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, which could constitute a danger to the life or health of astronauts.6 Article VI States Parties to the Treaty shall bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in the present Treaty. The activities of non-governmental entities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the appropriate State Party to the Treaty. When activities are carried on in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with this Treaty shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States Parties to the Treaty participating in such organization. Article VII Each State Party to the Treaty that launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and each State Party from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to another State Party to the Treaty or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air space or in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies. Article VIII A State Party to the Treaty on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and over any personnel thereof, while in outer space or on a celestial body. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, including objects landed or constructed on a celestial body, and of their component parts, is not affected by their presence in outer space or on a celestial body or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State Party to the Treaty on whose registry they are carried shall be returned to that State Party, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return. Article IX In the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, States Parties to the Treaty shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties to the Treaty. States Parties to the Treaty shall pursue studies of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination and also adverse changes in the environment of the Earth resulting from the introduction of extraterrestrial matter and, where necessary, shall adopt appropriate measures for this purpose. If a State Party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State Party to the Treaty which has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by another State Party in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment.7 Article X In order to promote international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in conformity with the purposes of this Treaty, the States Parties to the Treaty shall consider on a basis of equality any requests by other States Parties to the Treaty to be afforded an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by those States. The nature of such an opportunity for observation and the conditions under which it could be afforded shall be determined by agreement between the States concerned. Article XI In order to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States Parties to the Treaty conducting activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, agree to inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of the nature, conduct, locations and results of such activities. On receiving the said information, the Secretary-General of the United Nations should be prepared to disseminate it immediately and effectively. Article XII All stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on a basis of reciprocity. Such representatives shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited. Article XIII The provisions of this Treaty shall apply to the activities of States Parties to the Treaty in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by a single State Party to the Treaty or jointly with other States, including cases where they are carried on within the framework of international intergovernmental organizations. Any practical questions arising in connection with activities carried on by international intergovernmental organizations in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be resolved by the States Parties to the Treaty either with the appropriate international organization or with one or more States members of that international organization, which are Parties to this Treaty. Article XIV 1. This Treaty shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Treaty before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Treaty shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments.8 3. This Treaty shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Treaty. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Treaty, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Treaty, the date of its entry into force and other notices. 6. This Treaty shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article XV Any State Party to the Treaty may propose amendments to this Treaty. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Treaty accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Treaty and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Treaty on the date of acceptance by it. Article XVI Any State Party to the Treaty may give notice of its withdrawal from the Treaty one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XVII This Treaty, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Treaty shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. INWITNESSWHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Treaty. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, D.C., the twenty-seventh day of January, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven.1Resolution 2222 (XXI), annex. 9 Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space The Contracting Parties, Noting the great importance of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 which calls for the rendering of all possible assistance to astronauts in the event of accident, distress or emergency landing, the prompt and safe return of astronauts, and the return of objects launched into outer space, Desiring to develop and give further concrete expression to these duties, Wishing to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, Prompted by sentiments of humanity, Have agreed on the following: Article 1 Each Contracting Party which receives information or discovers that the personnel of a spacecraft have suffered accident or are experiencing conditions of distress or have made an emergency or unintended landing in territory under its jurisdiction or on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State shall immediately: (a) Notify the launching authority or, if it cannot identify and immediately communicate with the launching authority, immediately make a public announcement by all appropriate means of communication at its disposal; (b) Notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who should disseminate the information without delay by all appropriate means of communication at his disposal. Article 2 If, owing to accident, distress, emergency or unintended landing, the personnel of a spacecraft land in territory under the jurisdiction of a Contracting Party, it shall immediately take all possible steps to rescue them and render them all necessary assistance. It shall inform the launching authority and also the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the steps it is taking and of their progress. If assistance by the launching authority would help to effect a prompt rescue or would contribute substantially to the effectiveness of search and rescue operations, the launching authority shall cooperate with the Contracting Party with a view to the effective conduct of search and rescue operations. Such operations shall be subject to the direction and control of the Contracting Party, which shall act in close and continuing consultation with the launching authority.10 Article 3 If information is received or it is discovered that the personnel of a spacecraft have alighted on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State, those Contracting Parties which are in a position to do so shall, if necessary, extend assistance in search and rescue operations for such personnel to assure their speedy rescue. They shall inform the launching authority and the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the steps they are taking and of their progress. Article 4 If, owing to accident, distress, emergency or unintended landing, the personnel of a spacecraft land in territory under the jurisdiction of a Contracting Party or have been found on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State, they shall be safely and promptly returned to representatives of the launching authority. Article 5 1. Each Contracting Party which receives information or discovers that a space object or its component parts has returned to Earth in territory under its jurisdiction or on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State, shall notify the launching authority and the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 2. Each Contracting Party having jurisdiction over the territory on which a space object or its component parts has been discovered shall, upon the request of the launching authority and with assistance from that authority if requested, take such steps as it finds practicable to recover the object or component parts.3. Upon request of the launching authority, objects launched into outer space or their component parts found beyond the territorial limits of the launching authority shall be returned to or held at the disposal of representatives of the launching authority, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return. 4. Notwithstanding paragraphs 2 and 3 of this article, a Contracting Party which has reason to believe that a space object or its component parts discovered in territory under its jurisdiction, or recovered by it elsewhere, is of a hazardous or deleterious nature may so notify the launching authority, which shall immediately take effective steps, under the direction and control of the said Contracting Party, to eliminate possible danger of harm. 5. Expenses incurred in fulfilling obligations to recover and return a space object or its component parts under paragraphs 2 and 3 of this article shall be borne by the launching authority. Article 6 For the purposes of this Agreement, the term “launching authority” shall refer to the State responsible for launching, or, where an international intergovernmental organization is responsible for launching, that organization, provided that that organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Agreement and a majority of the States members of that organization are Contracting Parties to this Agreement and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies.11 Article 7 1. This Agreement shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Agreement before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Agreement shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments. 3. This Agreement shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Agreement. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Agreement, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Agreement, the date of its entry into force and other notices. 6. This Agreement shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article 8 Any State Party to the Agreement may propose amendments to this Agreement. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Agreement accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Agreement and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Agreement on the date of acceptance by it. Article 9 Any State Party to the Agreement may give notice of its withdrawal from the Agreement one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article 10 This Agreement, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Agreement shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Agreement. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, D.C., the twenty-second day of April, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-eight.12 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects The States Parties to this Convention, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in furthering the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Recalling the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, Taking into consideration that, notwithstanding the precautionary measures to be taken by States and international intergovernmental organizations involved in the launching of space objects, damage may on occasion be caused by such objects, Recognizing the need to elaborate effective international rules and procedures concerning liability for damage caused by space objects and to ensure, in particular, the prompt payment under the terms of this Convention of a full and equitable measure of compensation to victims of such damage, Believing that the establishment of such rules and procedures will contribute to the strengthening of international cooperation in the field of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Have agreed on the following: Article I For the purposes of this Convention: (a) The term “damage” means loss of life, personal injury or other impairment of health; or loss of or damage to property of States or of persons, natural or juridical, or property of international intergovernmental organizations; (b) The term “launching” includes attempted launching; (c) The term “launching State” means: (i) A State which launches or procures the launching of a space object; (ii) A State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched; (d) The term “space object” includes component parts of a space object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof. Article II A launching State shall be absolutely liable to pay compensation for damage caused by its space object on the surface of the Earth or to aircraft flight.13 Article III In the event of damage being caused elsewhere than on the surface of the Earth to a space object of one launching State or to persons or property on board such a space object by a space object of another launching State, the latter shall be liable only if the damage is due to its fault or the fault of persons for whom it is responsible. Article IV 1. In the event of damage being caused elsewhere than on the surface of the Earth to a space object of one launching State or to persons or property on board such a space object by a space object of another launching State, and of damage thereby being caused to a third State or to its natural or juridical persons, the first two States shall be jointly and severally liable to the third State, to the extent indicated by the following: (a) If the damage has been caused to the third State on the surface of the Earth or to aircraft in flight, their liability to the third State shall be absolute; (b) If the damage has been caused to a space object of the third State or to persons or property on board that space object elsewhere than on the surface of the Earth, their liability to the third State shall be based on the fault of either of the first two States or on the fault of persons for whom either is responsible. 2. In all cases of joint and several liability referred to in paragraph 1 of this article, the burden of compensation for the damage shall be apportioned between the first two States in accordance with the extent to which they were at fault; if the extent of the fault of each of these States cannot be established, the burden of compensation shall be apportioned equally between them. Such apportionment shall be without prejudice to the right of the third State to seek the entire compensation due under this Convention from any or all of the launching States which are jointly and severally liable. Article V 1. Whenever two or more States jointly launch a space object, they shall be jointly and severally liable for any damage caused. 2. A launching State which has paid compensation for damage shall have the right to present a claim for indemnification to other participants in the joint launching. The participants in a joint launching may conclude agreements regarding the apportioning among themselves of the financial obligation in respect of which they are jointly and severally liable. Such agreements shall be without prejudice to the right of a State sustaining damage to seek the entire compensation due under this Convention from any or all of the launching States which are jointly and severally liable. 3. A State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched shall be regarded as a participant in a joint launching. Article VI 1. Subject to the provisions of paragraph 2 of this article, exoneration from absolute liability shall be granted to the extent that a launching State establishes that the damage has resulted either wholly or partially from gross negligence or from an act or omission done with intent to cause damage on the part of a claimant State or of natural or juridical persons it represents. 2. No exoneration whatever shall be granted in cases where the damage has resulted from activities conducted by a launching State which are not in conformity with international law including, in particular,14 the Charter of the United Nations and the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. Article VII The provisions of this Convention shall not apply to damage caused by a space object of a launching State to: (a) Nationals of that launching State; (b) Foreign nationals during such time as they are participating in the operation of that space object from the time of its launching or at any stage thereafter until its descent, or during such time as they are in the immediate vicinity of a planned launching or recovery area as the result of an invitation by that launching State. Article VIII 1. A State which suffers damage, or whose natural or juridical persons suffer damage, may present to a launching State a claim for compensation for such damage. 2. If the State of nationality has not presented a claim, another State may, in respect of damage sustained in its territory by any natural or juridical person, present a claim to a launching State. 3. If neither the State of nationality nor the State in whose territory the damage was sustained has presented a claim or notified its intention of presenting a claim, another State may, in respect of damage sustained by its permanent residents, present a claim to a launching State. Article IX A claim for compensation for damage shall be presented to a launching State through diplomatic channels. If a State does not maintain diplomatic relations with the launching State concerned, it may request another State to present its claim to that launching State or otherwise represent its interests under this Convention. It may also present its claim through the Secretary-General of the United Nations, provided the claimant State and the launching State are both Members of the United Nations. Article X 1. A claim for compensation for damage may be presented to a launching State not later than one year following the date of the occurrence of the damage or the identification of the launching State which is liable. 2. If, however, a State does not know of the occurrence of the damage or has not been able to identify the launching State which is liable, it may present a claim within one year following the date on which it learned of the aforementioned facts; however, this period shall in no event exceed one year following the date on which the State could reasonably be expected to have learned of the facts through the exercise of due diligence. 3. The time limits specified in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article shall apply even if the full extent of the damage may not be known. In this event, however, the claimant State shall be entitled to revise the claim and submit additional documentation after the expiration of such time limits until one year after the full extent of the damage is known. Article XI15 1. Presentation of a claim to a launching State for compensation for damage under this Convention shall not require the prior exhaustion of any local remedies which may be available to a claimant State or to natural or juridical persons it represents. 2. Nothing in this Convention shall prevent a State, or natural or juridical persons it might represent, from pursuing a claim in the courts or administrative tribunals or agencies of a launching State. A State shall not, however, be entitled to present a claim under this Convention in respect of the same damage for which a claim is being pursued in the courts or administrative tribunals or agencies of a launching State or under another international agreement which is binding on the States concerned. Article XII The compensation which the launching State shall be liable to pay for damage under this Convention shall be determined in accordance with international law and the principles of justice and equity, in order to provide such reparation in respect of the damage as will restore the person, natural or juridical, State or international organization on whose behalf the claim is presented to the condition which would have existed if the damage had not occurred. Article XIII Unless the claimant State and the State from which compensation is due under this Convention agree on another form of compensation, the compensation shall be paid in the currency of the claimant State or, if that State so requests, in the currency of the State from which compensation is due. Article XIV If no settlement of a claim is arrived at through diplomatic negotiations as provided for in article IX, within one year from the date on which the claimant State notifies the launching State that it has submitted the documentation of its claim, the parties concerned shall establish a Claims Commission at the request of either party. Article XV 1. The Claims Commission shall be composed of three members: one appointed by the claimant State, one appointed by the launching State and the third member, the Chairman, to be chosen by both parties jointly. Each party shall make its appointment within two months of the request for the establishment of the Claims Commission. 2. If no agreement is reached on the choice of the Chairman within four months of the request for the establishment of the Commission, either party may request the Secretary-General of the United Nations to appoint the Chairman within a further period of two months. Article XVI 1. If one of the parties does not make its appointment within the stipulated period, the Chairman shall, at the request of the other party, constitute a single-member Claims Commission. 2. Any vacancy which may arise in the Commission for whatever reason shall be filled by the same procedure adopted for the original appointment. 3. The Commission shall determine its own procedure.16 4. The Commission shall determine the place or places where it shall sit and all other administrative matters. 5. Except in the case of decisions and awards by a single-member Commission, all decisions and awards of the Commission shall be by majority vote. Article XVII No increase in the membership of the Claims Commission shall take place by reason of two or more claimant States or launching States being joined in any one proceeding before the Commission. The claimant States so joined shall collectively appoint one member of the Commission in the same manner and subject to the same conditions as would be the case for a single claimant State. When two or more launching States are so joined, they shall collectively appoint one member of the Commission in the same way. If the claimant States or the launching States do not make the appointment within the stipulated period, the Chairman shall constitute a single-member Commission. Article XVIII The Claims Commission shall decide the merits of the claim for compensation and determine the amount of compensation payable, if any. Article XIX 1. The Claims Commission shall act in accordance with the provisions of article XII. 2. The decision of the Commission shall be final and binding if the parties have so agreed; otherwise the Commission shall render a final and recommendatory award, which the parties shall consider in good faith. The Commission shall state the reasons for its decision or award. 3. The Commission shall give its decision or award as promptly as possible and no later than one year from the date of its establishment, unless an extension of this period is found necessary by the Commission. 4. The Commission shall make its decision or award public. It shall deliver a certified copy of its decision or award to each of the parties and to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Article XX The expenses in regard to the Claims Commission shall be borne equally by the parties, unless otherwise decided by the Commission.17 Article XXI If the damage caused by a space object presents a large-scale danger to human life or seriously interferes with the living conditions of the population or the functioning of vital centres, the States Parties, and in particular the launching State, shall examine the possibility of rendering appropriate and rapid assistance to the State which has suffered the damage, when it so requests. However, nothing in this article shall affect the rights or obligations of the States Parties under this Convention. Article XXII 1. In this Convention, with the exception of articles XXIV to XXVII, references to States shall be deemed to apply to any international intergovernmental organization which conducts space activities if the organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Convention and if a majority of the States members of the organization are States Parties to this Convention and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. 2. States members of any such organization which are States Parties to this Convention shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the organization makes a declaration in accordance with the preceding paragraph. 3. If an international intergovernmental organization is liable for damage by virtue of the provisions of this Convention, that organization and those of its members which are States Parties to this Convention shall be jointly and severally liable; provided, however, that: (a) Any claim for compensation in respect of such damage shall be first presented to the organization; (b) Only where the organization has not paid, within a period of six months, any sum agreed or determined to be due as compensation for such damage, may the claimant State invoke the liability of the members which are States Parties to this Convention for the payment of that sum. 4. Any claim, pursuant to the provisions of this Convention, for compensation in respect of damage caused to an organization which has made a declaration in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article shall be presented by a State member of the organization which is a State Party to this Convention. Article XXIII 1. The provisions of this Convention shall not affect other international agreements in force insofar as relations between the States Parties to such agreements are concerned. 2. No provision of this Convention shall prevent States from concluding international agreements reaffirming, supplementing or extending its provisions. Article XXIV 1. This Convention shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Convention before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Convention shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics,18 the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments. 3. This Convention shall enter into force on the deposit of the fifth instrument of ratification. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Convention, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Convention, the date of its entry into force and other notices. 6. This Convention shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article XXV Any State Party to this Convention may propose amendments to this Convention. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Convention accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Convention and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Convention on the date of acceptance by it. Article XXVI Ten years after the entry into force of this Convention, the question of the review of this Convention shall be included in the provisional agenda of the United Nations General Assembly in order to consider, in the light of past application of the Convention, whether it requires revision. However, at any time after the Convention has been in force for five years, and at the request of one third of the States Parties to the Convention, and with the concurrence of the majority of the States Parties, a conference of the States Parties shall be convened to review this Convention. Article XXVII Any State Party to this Convention may give notice of its withdrawal from the Convention one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XXVIII This Convention, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Convention shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized thereto, have signed this Convention. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, D.C., this twenty-ninth day of March, one thousand nine hundred and seventy-two.2Resolution 2345 (XXII), annex. 3Resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex. 19 Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space The States Parties to this Convention, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in furthering the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Recalling that the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 of 27 January 1967 affirms that States shall bear international responsibility for their national activities in outer space and refers to the State on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried, Recalling also that the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space2 of 22 April 1968 provides that a launching authority shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to the return of an object it has launched into outer space found beyond the territorial limits of the launching authority, Recalling further that the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects3 of 29 March 1972 establishes international rules and procedures concerning the liability of launching States for damage caused by their space objects, Desiring, in the light of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, to make provision for the national registration by launching States of space objects launched into outer space, Desiring further that a central register of objects launched into outer space be established and maintained, on a mandatory basis, by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Desiring also to provide for States Parties additional means and procedures to assist in the identification of space objects, Believing that a mandatory system of registering objects launched into outer space would, in particular, assist in their identification and would contribute to the application and development of international law governing the exploration and use of outer space, Have agreed on the following: Article I For the purposes of this Convention: (a) The term “launching State” means: (i) A State which launches or procures the launching of a space object;20 (ii) A State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched; (b) The term “space object” includes component parts of a space object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof; (c) The term “State of registry” means a launching State on whose registry a space object is carried in accordance with article II. Article II 1. When a space object is launched into Earth orbit or beyond, the launching State shall register the space object by means of an entry in an appropriate registry which it shall maintain. Each launching State shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the establishment of such a registry. 2. Where there are two or more launching States in respect of any such space object, they shall jointly determine which one of them shall register the object in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article, bearing in mind the provisions of article VIII of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, and without prejudice to appropriate agreements concluded or to be concluded among the launching States on jurisdiction and control over the space object and over any personnel thereof. 3. The contents of each registry and the conditions under which it is maintained shall be determined by the State of registry concerned. Article III 1. The Secretary-General of the United Nations shall maintain a Register in which the information furnished in accordance with article IV shall be recorded. 2. There shall be full and open access to the information in this Register. Article IV 1. Each State of registry shall furnish to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as soon as practicable, the following information concerning each space object carried on its registry: (a) Name of launching State or States; (b) An appropriate designator of the space object or its registration number; (c) Date and territory or location of launch; (d) Basic orbital parameters, including: (i) Nodal period, (ii) Inclination, (iii) Apogee, (iv) Perigee; (e) General function of the space object. 2. Each State of registry may, from time to time, provide the Secretary-General of the United Nations with additional information concerning a space object carried on its registry.21 3. Each State of registry shall notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations, to the greatest extent feasible and as soon as practicable, of space objects concerning which it has previously transmitted information, and which have been but no longer are in Earth orbit. Article V Whenever a space object launched into Earth orbit or beyond is marked with the designator or registration number referred to in article IV, paragraph 1 (b), or both, the State of registry shall notify the Secretary-General of this fact when submitting the information regarding the space object in accordance with article IV. In such case, the Secretary-General of the United Nations shall record this notification in the Register. Article VI Where the application of the provisions of this Convention has not enabled a State Party to identify a space object which has caused damage to it or to any of its natural or juridical persons, or which may be of a hazardous or deleterious nature, other States Parties, including in particular States possessing space monitoring and tracking facilities, shall respond to the greatest extent feasible to a request by that State Party, or transmitted through the Secretary-General on its behalf, for assistance under equitable and reasonable conditions in the identification of the object. A State Party making such a request shall, to the greatest extent feasible, submit information as to the time, nature and circumstances of the events giving rise to the request. Arrangements under which such assistance shall be rendered shall be the subject of agreement between the parties concerned. Article VII 1. In this Convention, with the exception of articles VIII to XII inclusive, references to States shall be deemed to apply to any international intergovernmental organization which conducts space activities if the organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Convention and if a majority of the States members of the organization are States Parties to this Convention and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. 2. States members of any such organization which are States Parties to this Convention shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the organization makes a declaration in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article. Article VIII 1. This Convention shall be open for signature by all States at United Nations Headquarters in New York. Any State which does not sign this Convention before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Convention shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 3. This Convention shall enter into force among the States which have deposited instruments of ratification on the deposit of the fifth such instrument with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Convention, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession.22 5. The Secretary-General shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Convention, the date of its entry into force and other notices. Article IX Any State Party to this Convention may propose amendments to the Convention. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Convention accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Convention and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Convention on the date of acceptance by it. Article X Ten years after the entry into force of this Convention, the question of the review of the Convention shall be included in the provisional agenda of the United Nations General Assembly in order to consider, in the light of past application of the Convention, whether it requires revision. However, at any time after the Convention has been in force for five years, at the request of one third of the States Parties to the Convention and with the concurrence of the majority of the States Parties, a conference of the States Parties shall be convened to review this Convention. Such review shall take into account in particular any relevant technological developments, including those relating to the identification of space objects. Article XI Any State Party to this Convention may give notice of its withdrawal from the Convention one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XII The original of this Convention, of which the Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who shall send certified copies thereof to all signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, being duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments, have signed this Convention, opened for signature at New York on the fourteenth day of January, one thousand nine hundred and seventy-five.4Resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex. 23 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies The States Parties to this Agreement, Noting the achievements of States in the exploration and use of the Moon and other celestial bodies, Recognizing that the Moon, as a natural satellite of the Earth, has an important role to play in the exploration of outer space, Determined to promote on the basis of equality the further development of cooperation among States in the exploration and use of the Moon and other celestial bodies, Desiring to prevent the Moon from becoming an area of international conflict, Bearing in mind the benefits which may be derived from the exploitation of the natural resources of the Moon and other celestial bodies, Recalling the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space,2 the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects,3 and the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space,4 Taking into account the need to define and develop the provisions of these international instruments in relation to the Moon and other celestial bodies, having regard to further progress in the exploration and use of outer space, Have agreed on the following: Article 1 1. The provisions of this Agreement relating to the Moon shall also apply to other celestial bodies within the solar system, other than the Earth, except insofar as specific legal norms enter into force with respect to any of these celestial bodies. 2. For the purposes of this Agreement reference to the Moon shall include orbits around or other trajectories to or around it. 3. This Agreement does not apply to extraterrestrial materials which reach the surface of the Earth by natural means. Article 2 All activities on the Moon, including its exploration and use, shall be carried out in accordance with international law, in particular the Charter of the United Nations, and taking into account the Declaration on5Resolution 2625 (XXV), annex. 24 Principles of International Law concerning Friendly Relations and Cooperation among States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations,5 adopted by the General Assembly on 24 October 1970, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and mutual understanding, and with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties. Article 3 1. The Moon shall be used by all States Parties exclusively for peaceful purposes. 2. Any threat or use of force or any other hostile act or threat of hostile act on the Moon is prohibited. It is likewise prohibited to use the Moon in order to commit any such act or to engage in any such threat in relation to the Earth, the Moon, spacecraft, the personnel of spacecraft or man-made space objects. 3. States Parties shall not place in orbit around or other trajectory to or around the Moon objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction or place or use such weapons on or in the Moon. 4. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on the Moon shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration and use of the Moon shall also not be prohibited. Article 4 1. The exploration and use of the Moon shall be the province of all mankind and shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development. Due regard shall be paid to the interests of present and future generations as well as to the need to promote higher standards of living and conditions of economic and social progress and development in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. 2. States Parties shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance in all their activities concerning the exploration and use of the Moon. International cooperation in pursuance of this Agreement should be as wide as possible and may take place on a multilateral basis, on a bilateral basis or through international intergovernmental organizations. Article 5 1. States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of their activities concerned with the exploration and use of the Moon. Information on the time, purposes, locations, orbital parameters and duration shall be given in respect of each mission to the Moon as soon as possible after launching, while information on the results of each mission, including scientific results, shall be furnished upon completion of the mission. In the case of a mission lasting more than sixty days, information on conduct of the mission, including any scientific results, shall be given periodically, at thirty-day intervals. For missions lasting more than six months, only significant additions to such information need be reported thereafter.25 2. If a State Party becomes aware that another State Party plans to operate simultaneously in the same area of or in the same orbit around or trajectory to or around the Moon, it shall promptly inform the other State of the timing of and plans for its own operations. 3. In carrying out activities under this Agreement, States Parties shall promptly inform the Secretary-General, as well as the public and the international scientific community, of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the Moon, which could endanger human life or health, as well as of any indication of organic life. Article 6 1. There shall be freedom of scientific investigation on the Moon by all States Parties without discrimination of any kind, on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law. 2. In carrying out scientific investigations and in furtherance of the provisions of this Agreement, the States Parties shall have the right to collect on and remove from the Moon samples of its mineral and other substances. Such samples shall remain at the disposal of those States Parties which caused them to be collected and may be used by them for scientific purposes. States Parties shall have regard to the desirability of making a portion of such samples available to other interested States Parties and the international scientific community for scientific investigation. States Parties may in the course of scientific investigations also use mineral and other substances of the Moon in quantities appropriate for the support of their missions. 3. States Parties agree on the desirability of exchanging scientific and other personnel on expeditions to or installations on the Moon to the greatest extent feasible and practicable. Article 7 1. In exploring and using the Moon, States Parties shall take measures to prevent the disruption of the existing balance of its environment, whether by introducing adverse changes in that environment, by its harmful contamination through the introduction of extra-environmental matter or otherwise. States Parties shall also take measures to avoid harmfully affecting the environment of the Earth through the introduction of extraterrestrial matter or otherwise. 2. States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the measures being adopted by them in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article and shall also, to the maximum extent feasible, notify him in advance of all placements by them of radioactive materials on the Moon and of the purposes of such placements. 3. States Parties shall report to other States Parties and to the Secretary-General concerning areas of the Moon having special scientific interest in order that, without prejudice to the rights of other States Parties, consideration may be given to the designation of such areas as international scientific preserves for which special protective arrangements are to be agreed upon in consultation with the competent bodies of the United Nations. Article 8 1. States Parties may pursue their activities in the exploration and use of the Moon anywhere on or below its surface, subject to the provisions of this Agreement. 2. For these purposes States Parties may, in particular: (a) Land their space objects on the Moon and launch them from the Moon;26 (b) Place their personnel, space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations anywhere on or below the surface of the Moon. Personnel, space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations may move or be moved freely over or below the surface of the Moon. 3. Activities of States Parties in accordance with paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article shall not interfere with the activities of other States Parties on the Moon. Where such interference may occur, the States Parties concerned shall undertake consultations in accordance with article 15, paragraphs 2 and 3, of this Agreement. Article 9 1. States Parties may establish manned and unmanned stations on the Moon. A State Party establishing a station shall use only that area which is required for the needs of the station and shall immediately inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the location and purposes of that station. Subsequently, at annual intervals that State shall likewise inform the Secretary-General whether the station continues in use and whether its purposes have changed. 2. Stations shall be installed in such a manner that they do not impede the free access to all areas of the Moon of personnel, vehicles and equipment of other States Parties conducting activities on the Moon in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement or of article I of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. Article 10 1. States Parties shall adopt all practicable measures to safeguard the life and health of persons on the Moon. For this purpose they shall regard any person on the Moon as an astronaut within the meaning of article V of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies and as part of the personnel of a spacecraft within the meaning of the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space. 2. States Parties shall offer shelter in their stations, installations, vehicles and other facilities to persons in distress on the Moon. Article 11 1. The Moon and its natural resources are the common heritage of mankind, which finds its expression in the provisions of this Agreement, in particular in paragraph 5 of this article. 2. The Moon is not subject to national appropriation by any claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means. 3. Neither the surface nor the subsurface of the Moon, nor any part thereof or natural resources in place, shall become property of any State, international intergovernmental or non-governmental organization, national organization or non-governmental entity or of any natural person. The placement of personnel, space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations on or below the surface of the Moon, including structures connected with its surface or subsurface, shall not create a right of ownership over the surface or the subsurface of the Moon or any areas thereof. The foregoing provisions are without prejudice to the international regime referred to in paragraph 5 of this article.27 4. States Parties have the right to exploration and use of the Moon without discrimination of any kind, on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law and the terms of this Agreement. 5. States Parties to this Agreement hereby undertake to establish an international regime, including appropriate procedures, to govern the exploitation of the natural resources of the Moon as such exploitation is about to become feasible. This provision shall be implemented in accordance with article 18 of this Agreement. 6. In order to facilitate the establishment of the international regime referred to in paragraph 5 of this article, States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of any natural resources they may discover on the Moon. 7. The main purposes of the international regime to be established shall include: (a) The orderly and safe development of the natural resources of the Moon; (b) The rational management of those resources; (c) The expansion of opportunities in the use of those resources; (d) An equitable sharing by all States Parties in the benefits derived from those resources, whereby the interests and needs of the developing countries, as well as the efforts of those countries which have contributed either directly or indirectly to the exploration of the Moon, shall be given special consideration. 8. All the activities with respect to the natural resources of the Moon shall be carried out in a manner compatible with the purposes specified in paragraph 7 of this article and the provisions of article 6, paragraph 2, of this Agreement. Article 12 1. States Parties shall retain jurisdiction and control over their personnel, vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations on the Moon. The ownership of space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations shall not be affected by their presence on the Moon. 2. Vehicles, installations and equipment or their component parts found in places other than their intended location shall be dealt with in accordance with article 5 of the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space. 3. In the event of an emergency involving a threat to human life, States Parties may use the equipment, vehicles, installations, facilities or supplies of other States Parties on the Moon. Prompt notification of such use shall be made to the Secretary-General of the United Nations or the State Party concerned. Article 13 A State Party which learns of the crash landing, forced landing or other unintended landing on the Moon of a space object, or its component parts, that were not launched by it, shall promptly inform the launching State Party and the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Article 1428 1. States Parties to this Agreement shall bear international responsibility for national activities on the Moon, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in this Agreement. States Parties shall ensure that non-governmental entities under their jurisdiction shall engage in activities on the Moon only under the authority and continuing supervision of the appropriate State Party. 2. States Parties recognize that detailed arrangements concerning liability for damage caused on the Moon, in addition to the provisions of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies and the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, may become necessary as a result of more extensive activities on the Moon. Any such arrangements shall be elaborated in accordance with the procedure provided for in article 18 of this Agreement. Article 15 1. Each State Party may assure itself that the activities of other States Parties in the exploration and use of the Moon are compatible with the provisions of this Agreement. To this end, all space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations on the Moon shall be open to other States Parties. Such States Parties shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited. In pursuance of this article, any State Party may act on its own behalf or with the full or partial assistance of any other State Party or through appropriate international procedures within the framework of the United Nations and in accordance with the Charter. 2. A State Party which has reason to believe that another State Party is not fulfilling the obligations incumbent upon it pursuant to this Agreement or that another State Party is interfering with the rights which the former State has under this Agreement may request consultations with that State Party. A State Party receiving such a request shall enter into such consultations without delay. Any other State Party which requests to do so shall be entitled to take part in the consultations. Each State Party participating in such consultations shall seek a mutually acceptable resolution of any controversy and shall bear in mind the rights and interests of all States Parties. The Secretary-General of the United Nations shall be informed of the results of the consultations and shall transmit the information received to all States Parties concerned. 3. If the consultations do not lead to a mutually acceptable settlement which has due regard for the rights and interests of all States Parties, the parties concerned shall take all measures to settle the dispute by other peaceful means of their choice appropriate to the circumstances and the nature of the dispute. If difficulties arise in connection with the opening of consultations or if consultations do not lead to a mutually acceptable settlement, any State Party may seek the assistance of the Secretary-General, without seeking the consent of any other State Party concerned, in order to resolve the controversy. A State Party which does not maintain diplomatic relations with another State Party concerned shall participate in such consultations, at its choice, either itself or through another State Party or the Secretary-General as intermediary. Article 16 With the exception of articles 17 to 21, references in this Agreement to States shall be deemed to apply to any international intergovernmental organization which conducts space activities if the organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Agreement and if a majority of the States members of the organization are States Parties to this Agreement and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. States members of any such organization which are States Parties to this Agreement shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the organization makes a declaration in accordance with the foregoing.29 Article 17 Any State Party to this Agreement may propose amendments to the Agreement. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Agreement accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Agreement and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Agreement on the date of acceptance by it. Article 18 Ten years after the entry into force of this Agreement, the question of the review of the Agreement shall be included in the provisional agenda of the General Assembly of the United Nations in order to consider, in the light of past application of the Agreement, whether it requires revision. However, at any time after the Agreement has been in force for five years, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as depositary, shall, at the request of one third of the States Parties to the Agreement and with the concurrence of the majority of the States Parties, convene a conference of the States Parties to review this Agreement. A review conference shall also consider the question of the implementation of the provisions of article 11, paragraph 5, on the basis of the principle referred to in paragraph 1 of that article and taking into account in particular any relevant technological developments. Article 19 1. This Agreement shall be open for signature by all States at United Nations Headquarters in New York.2. This Agreement shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Any State which does not sign this Agreement before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. Instruments of ratification or accession shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 3. This Agreement shall enter into force on the thirtieth day following the date of deposit of the fifth instrument of ratification. 4. For each State depositing its instrument of ratification or accession after the entry into force of this Agreement, it shall enter into force on the thirtieth day following the date of deposit of any such instrument. 5. The Secretary-General shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification or accession to this Agreement, the date of its entry into force and other notices. Article 20 Any State Party to this Agreement may give notice of its withdrawal from the Agreement one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article 21 The original of this Agreement, of which the Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who shall send certified copies thereof to all signatory and acceding States.30 IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, being duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments, have signed this Agreement, opened for signature at New York on the eighteenth day of December, one thousand nine hundred and seventy-nine.31 II. Principles adopted by the General Assembly Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space The General Assembly, Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man’s entry into outer space, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the betterment of mankind and for the benefit of States irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, Desiring to contribute to broad international cooperation in the scientific as well as in the legal aspects of exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that such cooperation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between nations and peoples, Recalling its resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space, Taking into consideration its resolutions 1721 (XVI) of 20 December 1961 and 1802 (XVII) of 14 December 1962, adopted unanimously by the States Members of the United Nations, Solemnly declares that in the exploration and use of outer space States should be guided by the following principles: 1. The exploration and use of outer space shall be carried on for the benefit and in the interests of all mankind. 2. Outer space and celestial bodies are free for exploration and use by all States on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law. 3. Outer space and celestial bodies are not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means. 4. The activities of States in the exploration and use of outer space shall be carried on in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding. 5. States bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, whether carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried on in conformity with the principles set forth in the present Declaration. The activities of non-governmental32 entities in outer space shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the State concerned. When activities are carried on in outer space by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with the principles set forth in this Declaration shall be borne by the international organization and by the States participating in it. 6. In the exploration and use of outer space, States shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space with due regard for the corresponding interests of other States. If a State has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State which has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by another State would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment. 7. The State on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and any personnel thereon, while in outer space. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, and of their component parts, is not affected by their passage through outer space or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State of registry shall be returned to that State, which shall furnish identifying data upon request prior to return. 8. Each State which launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, and each State from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to a foreign State or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air space, or in outer space. 9. States shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space, and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of a foreign State or on the high seas. Astronauts who make such a landing shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle.33 Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting The General Assembly, Recalling its resolution 2916 (XXVII) of 9 November 1972, in which it stressed the necessity of elaborating principles governing the use by States of artificial Earth satellites for international direct television broadcasting, and mindful of the importance of concluding an international agreement or agreements, Recalling further its resolutions 3182 (XXVIII) of 18 December 1973, 3234 (XXIX) of 12 November 1974, 3388 (XXX) of 18 November 1975, 31/8 of 8 November 1976, 32/196 of 20 December 1977, 33/16 of 10 November 1978, 34/66 of 5 December 1979 and 35/14 of 3 November 1980, and its resolution 36/35 of 18 November 1981 in which it decided to consider at its thirty-seventh session the adoption of a draft set of principles governing the use by States of artificial Earth satellites for international direct television broadcasting, Noting with appreciation the efforts made in the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its Legal Subcommittee to comply with the directives issued in the above-mentioned resolutions, Considering that several experiments of direct broadcasting by satellite have been carried out and that a number of direct broadcasting satellite systems are operational in some countries and may be commercialized in the very near future, Taking into consideration that the operation of international direct broadcasting satellites will have significant international political, economic, social and cultural implications, Believing that the establishment of principles for international direct television broadcasting will contribute to the strengthening of international cooperation in this field and further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Adopts the Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting set forth in the annex to the present resolution. Annex Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting A. Purposes and objectives 1. Activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be carried out in a manner compatible with the sovereign rights of States, including the principle of non-intervention, as well as with the right of everyone to seek, receive and impart information and ideas as enshrined in the relevant United Nations instruments. 2. Such activities should promote the free dissemination and mutual exchange of information and knowledge in cultural and scientific fields, assist in educational, social and economic development,34 particularly in the developing countries, enhance the qualities of life of all peoples and provide recreation with due respect to the political and cultural integrity of States. 3. These activities should accordingly be carried out in a manner compatible with the development of mutual understanding and the strengthening of friendly relations and cooperation among all States and peoples in the interest of maintaining international peace and security. B. Applicability of international law 4. Activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be conducted in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, of 27 January 1967, the relevant 1 provisions of the International Telecommunication Convention and its Radio Regulations and of international instruments relating to friendly relations and cooperation among States and to human rights. C. Rights and benefits 5. Every State has an equal right to conduct activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite and to authorize such activities by persons and entities under its jurisdiction. All States and peoples are entitled to and should enjoy the benefits from such activities. Access to the technology in this field should be available to all States without discrimination on terms mutually agreed by all concerned. D. International cooperation 6. Activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be based upon and encourage international cooperation. Such cooperation should be the subject of appropriate arrangements. Special consideration should be given to the needs of the developing countries in the use of international direct television broadcasting by satellite for the purpose of accelerating their national development. E. Peaceful settlement of disputes 7. Any international dispute that may arise from activities covered by these principles should be settled through established procedures for the peaceful settlement of disputes agreed upon by the parties to the dispute in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations. F. State responsibility 8. States should bear international responsibility for activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite carried out by them or under their jurisdiction and for the conformity of any such activities with the principles set forth in this document. 9. When international direct television broadcasting by satellite is carried out by an international intergovernmental organization, the responsibility referred to in paragraph 8 above should be borne both by that organization and by the States participating in it.35 G. Duty and right to consult 10. Any broadcasting or receiving State within an international direct television broadcasting satellite service established between them requested to do so by any other broadcasting or receiving State within the same service should promptly enter into consultations with the requesting State regarding its activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite, without prejudice to other consultations which these States may undertake with any other State on that subject. H. Copyright and neighbouring rights 11. Without prejudice to the relevant provisions of international law, States should cooperate on a bilateral and multilateral basis for protection of copyright and neighbouring rights by means of appropriate agreements between the interested States or the competent legal entities acting under their jurisdiction. In such cooperation they should give special consideration to the interests of developing countries in the use of direct television broadcasting for the purpose of accelerating their national development. I. Notification to the United Nations 12. In order to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States conducting or authorizing activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations, to the greatest extent possible, of the nature of such activities. On receiving this information, the Secretary-General should disseminate it immediately and effectively to the relevant specialized agencies, as well as to the public and the international scientific community. J. Consultations and agreements between States 13. A State which intends to establish or authorize the establishment of an international direct television broadcasting satellite service shall without delay notify the proposed receiving State or States of such intention and shall promptly enter into consultation with any of those States which so requests. 14. An international direct television broadcasting satellite service shall only be established after the conditions set forth in paragraph 13 above have been met and on the basis of agreements and/or arrangements in conformity with the relevant instruments of the International Telecommunication Union and in accordance with these principles. 15. With respect to the unavoidable overspill of the radiation of the satellite signal, the relevant instruments of the International Telecommunication Union shall be exclusively applicable.Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-first Session, Supplement 6 No. 20 (A/41/20 and Corr.1). 36 Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space The General Assembly, Recalling its resolution 3234 (XXIX) of 12 November 1974, in which it recommended that the Legal Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space should consider the question of the legal implications of remote sensing of the Earth from space, as well as its resolutions 3388 (XXX) of 18 November 1975, 31/8 of 8 November 1976, 32/196 A of 20 December 1977, 33/16 of 10 November 1978, 34/66 of 5 December 1979, 35/14 of 3 November 1980, 36/35 of 18 November 1981, 37/89 of 10 December 1982, 38/80 of 15 December 1983, 39/96 of 14 December 1984 and 40/162 of 16 December 1985, in which it called for a detailed consideration of the legal implications of remote sensing of the Earth from space, with the aim of formulating draft principles relating to remote sensing, Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on the work of its twenty-ninth session6 and the text of the draft principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space, annexed thereto, Noting with satisfaction that the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, on the basis of the deliberations of its Legal Subcommittee, has endorsed the text of the draft principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space, Believing that the adoption of the principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space will contribute to the strengthening of international cooperation in this field, Adopts the principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space set forth in the annex to the present resolution. Annex Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space Principle I For the purposes of these principles with respect to remote sensing activities: (a) The term “remote sensing” means the sensing of the Earth’s surface from space by making use of the properties of electromagnetic waves emitted, reflected or diffracted by the sensed objects, for the purpose of improving natural resources management, land use and the protection of the environment; (b) The term “primary data” means those raw data that are acquired by remote sensors borne by a space object and that are transmitted or delivered to the ground from space by telemetry in the form of electromagnetic signals, by photographic film, magnetic tape or any other means; (c) The term “processed data” means the products resulting from the processing of the primary data, needed to make such data usable;37 (d) The term “analysed information” means the information resulting from the interpretation of processed data, inputs of data and knowledge from other sources; (e) The term “remote sensing activities” means the operation of remote sensing space systems, primary data collection and storage stations, and activities in processing, interpreting and disseminating the processed data. Principle II Remote sensing activities shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic, social or scientific and technological development, and taking into particular consideration the needs of the developing countries. Principle III Remote sensing activities shall be conducted in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, and t 1 he relevant instruments of the International Telecommunication Union. Principle IV Remote sensing activities shall be conducted in accordance with the principles contained in article I of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, which, in particular, provides that the exploration and use of outer space shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and stipulates the principle of freedom of exploration and use of outer space on the basis of equality. These activities shall be conducted on the basis of respect for the principle of full and permanent sovereignty of all States and peoples over their own wealth and natural resources, with due regard to the rights and interests, in accordance with international law, of other States and entities under their jurisdiction. Such activities shall not be conducted in a manner detrimental to the legitimate rights and interests of the sensed State. Principle V States carrying out remote sensing activities shall promote international cooperation in these activities. To this end, they shall make available to other States opportunities for participation therein. Such participation shall be based in each case on equitable and mutually acceptable terms. Principle VI In order to maximize the availability of benefits from remote sensing activities, States are encouraged, through agreements or other arrangements, to provide for the establishment and operation of data collecting and storage stations and processing and interpretation facilities, in particular within the framework of regional agreements or arrangements wherever feasible. Principle VII States participating in remote sensing activities shall make available technical assistance to other interested States on mutually agreed terms.38 Principle VIII The United Nations and the relevant agencies within the United Nations system shall promote international cooperation, including technical assistance and coordination in the area of remote sensing. Principle IX In accordance with article IV of the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space4 and article XI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, a State carrying out a programme of remote sensing shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations. It shall, moreover, make available any other relevant information to the greatest extent feasible and practicable to any other State, particularly any developing country that is affected by the programme, at its request. Principle X Remote sensing shall promote the protection of the Earth’s natural environment. To this end, States participating in remote sensing activities that have identified information in their possession that is capable of averting any phenomenon harmful to the Earth’s natural environment shall disclose such information to States concerned.Principle XI Remote sensing shall promote the protection of mankind from natural disasters. To this end, States participating in remote sensing activities that have identified processed data and analysed information in their possession that may be useful to States affected by natural disasters, or likely to be affected by impending natural disasters, shall transmit such data and information to States concerned as promptly as possible. Principle XII As soon as the primary data and the processed data concerning the territory under its jurisdiction are produced, the sensed State shall have access to them on a non-discriminatory basis and on reasonable cost terms. The sensed State shall also have access to the available analysed information concerning the territory under its jurisdiction in the possession of any State participating in remote sensing activities on the same basis and terms, taking particularly into account the needs and interests of the developing countries. Principle XIII To promote and intensify international cooperation, especially with regard to the needs of developing countries, a State carrying out remote sensing of the Earth from space shall, upon request, enter into consultations with a State whose territory is sensed in order to make available opportunities for participation and enhance the mutual benefits to be derived therefrom. Principle XIV In compliance with article VI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, States operating remote sensing satellites shall bear international responsibility for their activities and assure that such activities are39 conducted in accordance with these principles and the norms of international law, irrespective of whether such activities are carried out by governmental or non-governmental entities or through international organizations to which such States are parties. This principle is without prejudice to the applicability of the norms of international law on State responsibility for remote sensing activities. Principle XV Any dispute resulting from the application of these principles shall be resolved through the established procedures for the peaceful settlement of disputes.Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-seventh Session, 7 Supplement No. 20 (A/47/20). 8Ibid., annex. 40 Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources In Outer Space The General Assembly, Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on the work of its thirty-fifth session7 and the text of the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space as approved by the Committee and annexed to its report,8 Recognizing that for some missions in outer space nuclear power sources are particularly suited or even essential owing to their compactness, long life and other attributes, Recognizing also that the use of nuclear power sources in outer space should focus on those applications which take advantage of the particular properties of nuclear power sources, Recognizing further that the use of nuclear power sources in outer space should be based on a thorough safety assessment, including probabilistic risk analysis, with particular emphasis on reducing the risk of accidental exposure of the public to harmful radiation or radioactive material, Recognizing the need, in this respect, for a set of principles containing goals and guidelines to ensure the safe use of nuclear power sources in outer space, Affirming that this set of Principles applies to nuclear power sources in outer space devoted to the generation of electric power on board space objects for non-propulsive purposes, which have characteristics generally comparable to those of systems used and missions performed at the time of the adoption of the Principles, Recognizing that this set of Principles will require future revision in view of emerging nuclear power applications and of evolving international recommendations on radiological protection, Adopts the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space as set forth below. Principle 1. Applicability of international law Activities involving the use of nuclear power sources in outer space shall be carried out in accordance with international law, including in particular the Charter of the United Nations and the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies.1 Principle 2. Use of terms 1. For the purpose of these Principles, the terms “launching State” and “State launching” mean the State which exercises jurisdiction and control over a space object with nuclear power sources on board at a given point in time relevant to the principle concerned.41 2. For the purpose of principle 9, the definition of the term “launching State” as contained in that principle is applicable. 3. For the purposes of principle 3, the terms “foreseeable” and “all possible” describe a class of events or circumstances whose overall probability of occurrence is such that it is considered to encompass only credible possibilities for purposes of safety analysis. The term “general concept of defence-in-depth” when applied to nuclear power sources in outer space refers to the use of design features and mission operations in place of or in addition to active systems, to prevent or mitigate the consequences of system malfunctions. Redundant safety systems are not necessarily required for each individual component to achieve this purpose. Given the special requirements of space use and of varied missions, no particular set of systems or features can be specified as essential to achieve this objective. For the purposes of paragraph 2 (d) of principle 3, the term “made critical” does not include actions such as zero-power testing which are fundamental to ensuring system safety. Principle 3. Guidelines and criteria for safe use In order to minimize the quantity of radioactive material in space and the risks involved, the use of nuclear power sources in outer space shall be restricted to those space missions which cannot be operated by non-nuclear energy sources in a reasonable way. 1. General goals for radiation protection and nuclear safety (a) States launching space objects with nuclear power sources on board shall endeavour to protect individuals, populations and the biosphere against radiological hazards. The design and use of space objects with nuclear power sources on board shall ensure, with a high degree of confidence, that the hazards, in foreseeable operational or accidental circumstances, are kept below acceptable levels as defined in paragraphs 1 (b) and (c). Such design and use shall also ensure with high reliability that radioactive material does not cause a significant contamination of outer space. (b) During the normal operation of space objects with nuclear power sources on board, including reentry from the sufficiently high orbit as defined in paragraph 2 (b), the appropriate radiation protection objective for the public recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection shall be observed. During such normal operation there shall be no significant radiation exposure. (c) To limit exposure in accidents, the design and construction of the nuclear power source systems shall take into account relevant and generally accepted international radiological protection guidelines. Except in cases of low-probability accidents with potentially serious radiological consequences, the design for the nuclear power source systems shall, with a high degree of confidence, restrict radiation exposure to a limited geographical region and to individuals to the principal limit of 1 mSv in a year. It is permissible to use a subsidiary dose limit of 5 mSv in a year for some years, provided that the average annual effective dose equivalent over a lifetime does not exceed the principal limit of 1 mSv in a year. The probability of accidents with potentially serious radiological consequences referred to above shall be kept extremely small by virtue of the design of the system. Future modifications of the guidelines referred to in this paragraph shall be applied as soon as practicable. 42 (d) Systems important for safety shall be designed, constructed and operated in accordance with the general concept of defence-in-depth. Pursuant to this concept, foreseeable safety-related failures or malfunctions must be capable of being corrected or counteracted by an action or a procedure, possibly automatic. The reliability of systems important for safety shall be ensured, inter alia, by redundancy, physical separation, functional isolation and adequate independence of their components. Other measures shall also be taken to raise the level of safety. 2. Nuclear reactors (a) Nuclear reactors may be operated: (i) On interplanetary missions; (ii) In sufficiently high orbits as defined in paragraph 2 (b); (iii) In low-Earth orbits if they are stored in sufficiently high orbits after the operational part of their mission. (b) The sufficiently high orbit is one in which the orbital lifetime is long enough to allow for a sufficient decay of the fission products to approximately the activity of the actinides. The sufficiently high orbit must be such that the risks to existing and future outer space missions and of collision with other space objects are kept to a minimum. The necessity for the parts of a destroyed reactor also to attain the required decay time before re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere shall be considered in determining the sufficiently high orbit altitude. (c) Nuclear reactors shall use only highly enriched uranium 235 as fuel. The design shall take into account the radioactive decay of the fission and activation products. (d) Nuclear reactors shall not be made critical before they have reached their operating orbit or interplanetary trajectory. (e) The design and construction of the nuclear reactor shall ensure that it cannot become critical before reaching the operating orbit during all possible events, including rocket explosion, re-entry, impact on ground or water, submersion in water or water intruding into the core. (f) In order to reduce significantly the possibility of failures in satellites with nuclear reactors on board during operations in an orbit with a lifetime less than in the sufficiently high orbit (including operations for transfer into the sufficiently high orbit), there shall be a highly reliable operational system to ensure an effective and controlled disposal of the reactor. 3. Radioisotope generators (a) Radioisotope generators may be used for interplanetary missions and other missions leaving the gravity field of the Earth. They may also be used in Earth orbit if, after conclusion of the operational part of their mission, they are stored in a high orbit. In any case ultimate disposal is necessary. (b) Radioisotope generators shall be protected by a containment system that is designed and constructed to withstand the heat and aerodynamic forces of re-entry in the upper atmosphere under foreseeable orbital conditions, including highly elliptical or hyperbolic orbits where relevant. Upon impact,43 the containment system and the physical form of the isotope shall ensure that no radioactive material is scattered into the environment so that the impact area can be completely cleared of radioactivity by a recovery operation. Principle 4. Safety assessment 1. A launching State as defined in principle 2, paragraph 1, at the time of launch shall, prior to the launch, through cooperative arrangements, where relevant, with those which have designed, constructed or manufactured the nuclear power sources, or will operate the space object, or from whose territory or facility such an object will be launched, ensure that a thorough and comprehensive safety assessment is conducted. This assessment shall cover as well all relevant phases of the mission and shall deal with all systems involved, including the means of launching, the space platform, the nuclear power source and its equipment and the means of control and communication between ground and space. 2. This assessment shall respect the guidelines and criteria for safe use contained in principle 3. 3. Pursuant to article XI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, the results of this safety assessment, together with, to the extent feasible, an indication of the approximate intended time-frame of the launch, shall be made publicly available prior to each launch, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations shall be informed on how States may obtain such results of the safety assessment as soon as possible prior to each launch. Principle 5. Notification of re-entry 1. Any State launching a space object with nuclear power sources on board shall in a timely fashion inform States concerned in the event this space object is malfunctioning with a risk of re-entry of radioactive materials to the Earth. The information shall be in accordance with the following format: (a) System parameters: (i) Name of launching State or States, including the address of the authority which may be contacted for additional information or assistance in case of accident; (ii) International designation; (iii) Date and territory or location of launch; (iv) Information required for best prediction of orbit lifetime, trajectory and impact region; (v) General function of spacecraft; (b) Information on the radiological risk of nuclear power source(s): (i) Type of nuclear power source: radioisotopic/reactor; (ii) The probable physical form, amount and general radiological characteristics of the fuel and contaminated and/or activated components likely to reach the ground. The term “fuel” refers to the nuclear material used as the source of heat or power. This information shall also be transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations.44 2. The information, in accordance with the format above, shall be provided by the launching State as soon as the malfunction has become known. It shall be updated as frequently as practicable and the frequency of dissemination of the updated information shall increase as the anticipated time of re-entry into the dense layers of the Earth’s atmosphere approaches so that the international community will be informed of the situation and will have sufficient time to plan for any national response activities deemed necessary. 3. The updated information shall also be transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations with the same frequency. Principle 6. Consultations States providing information in accordance with principle 5 shall, as far as reasonably practicable, respond promptly to requests for further information or consultations sought by other States. Principle 7. Assistance to States 1. Upon the notification of an expected re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere of a space object containing a nuclear power source on board and its components, all States possessing space monitoring and tracking facilities, in the spirit of international cooperation, shall communicate the relevant information that they may have available on the malfunctioning space object with a nuclear power source on board to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and the State concerned as promptly as possible to allow States that might be affected to assess the situation and take any precautionary measures deemed necessary. 2. After re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere of a space object containing a nuclear power source on board and its components: (a) The launching State shall promptly offer and, if requested by the affected State, provide promptly the necessary assistance to eliminate actual and possible harmful effects, including assistance to identify the location of the area of impact of the nuclear power source on the Earth’s surface, to detect the re-entered material and to carry out retrieval or clean-up operations; (b) All States, other than the launching State, with relevant technical capabilities and international organizations with such technical capabilities shall, to the extent possible, provide necessary assistance upon request by an affected State. In providing the assistance in accordance with subparagraphs (a) and (b) above, the special needs of developing countries shall be taken into account. Principle 8. Responsibility In accordance with article VI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, States shall bear international responsibility for national activities involving the use of nuclear power sources in outer space, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that such national activities are carried out in conformity with that Treaty and the recommendations contained in these Principles. When activities in outer space involving the use of nuclear power sources are carried on by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with the aforesaid Treaty and the recommendations contained in these Principles shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States participating in it. 45 Principle 9. Liability and compensation 1. In accordance with article VII of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, and the provisions of the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, 3 each State which launches or procures the launching of a space object and each State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched shall be internationally liable for damage caused by such space objects or their component parts. This fully applies to the case of such a space object carrying a nuclear power source on board. Whenever two or more States jointly launch such a space object, they shall be jointly and severally liable for any damage caused, in accordance with article V of the above-mentioned Convention. 2. The compensation that such States shall be liable to pay under the aforesaid Convention for damage shall be determined in accordance with international law and the principles of justice and equity, in order to provide such reparation in respect of the damage as will restore the person, natural or juridical, State or international organization on whose behalf a claim is presented to the condition which would have existed if the damage had not occurred. 3. For the purposes of this principle, compensation shall include reimbursement of the duly substantiated expenses for search, recovery and clean-up operations, including expenses for assistance received from third parties. Principle 10. Settlement of disputes Any dispute resulting from the application of these Principles shall be resolved through negotiations or other established procedures for the peaceful settlement of disputes, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. Principle 11. Review and revision These Principles shall be reopened for revision by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space no later than two years after their adoption.Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-first 9 Session, Supplement No. 20 (A/51/20). 10Ibid., annex IV. 11See Report of the Second United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, Vienna, 9-21 August 1982 and corrigenda (A/CONF.101/10 and Corr.1 and 2). 46 Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries The General Assembly, Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on the work of its thirty-ninth session9 and the text of the Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries, as approved by the Committee and annexed to its report,10 Bearing in mind the relevant provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, Recalling notably the provisions of the Treaty on the Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 Recalling also its relevant resolutions relating to activities in outer space, Bearing in mind the recommendations of the Second United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space,11 and of other international conferences relevant in this field, Recognizing the growing scope and significance of international cooperation among States and between States and international organizations in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Considering experiences gained in international cooperative ventures, Convinced of the necessity and the significance of further strengthening international cooperation in order to reach a broad and efficient collaboration in this field for the mutual benefit and in the interest of all parties involved, Desirous of facilitating the application of the principle that the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind, Adopts the Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries, set forth in the annex to the present resolution.47 Annex Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of all States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries 1. International cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes (hereafter “international cooperation”) shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of international law, including the Charter of the United Nations and the Treaty on the Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. It shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all States, irrespective of their degree of economic, social or scientific and technological development, and shall be the province of all mankind. Particular account should be taken of the needs of developing countries. 2. States are free to determine all aspects of their participation in international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis. Contractual terms in such cooperative ventures should be fair and reasonable and they should be in full compliance with the legitimate rights and interests of the parties concerned as, for example, with intellectual property rights. 3. All States, particularly those with relevant space capabilities and with programmes for the exploration and use of outer space, should contribute to promoting and fostering international cooperation on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis. In this context, particular attention should be given to the benefit for and the interests of developing countries and countries with incipient space programmes stemming from such international cooperation conducted with countries with more advanced space capabilities. 4. International cooperation should be conducted in the modes that are considered most effective and appropriate by the countries concerned, including, inter alia, governmental and non-governmental; commercial and non-commercial; global, multilateral, regional or bilateral; and international cooperation among countries in all levels of development. 5. International cooperation, while taking into particular account the needs of developing countries, should aim, inter alia, at the following goals, considering their need for technical assistance and rational and efficient allocation of financial and technical resources: (a) Promoting the development of space science and technology and of its applications; (b) Fostering the development of relevant and appropriate space capabilities in interested States; (c) Facilitating the exchange of expertise and technology among States on a mutually acceptable basis. 6. National and international agencies, research institutions, organizations for development aid, and developed and developing countries alike should consider the appropriate use of space applications and the potential of international cooperation for reaching their development goals. 7. The Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space should be strengthened in its role, among others, as a forum for the exchange of information on national and international activities in the field of international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space. 8. All States should be encouraged to contribute to the United Nations Programme on Space Applications and to other initiatives in the field of international cooperation in accordance with their space capabilities and their participation in the exploration and use of outer space.United States Treaties 12 and Other International Agremeents. 13Treaties and Other International Acts Series. 14United Nations Treaty Series. 48 III. Status of international agreements relating to activities in outer space United Nations treaties 1. 1967 OST -Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (Outer Space Treaty) Adoption by the United Nations 19 December 1966 General Assembly: (resolution 2222 (XXI), annex) Opened for signature: 27 January 1967, London, Moscow, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 10 October 1967 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 18 UST12 2410; TIAS13 6347; 610 UNTS14 205) 2. 1968 ARRA -Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space (Rescue Agreement) Adoption by the United Nations 19 December 1967 General Assembly: (resolution 2345 (XXII), annex) Opened for signature: 22 April 1968, London, Moscow, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 3 December 1968 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 19 UST 7570; TIAS 6599; 672 UNTS 119)15International Legal Materials. 49 3. 1972 LIAB -Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects (Liability Convention) Adoption by the United Nations 29 November 1971 General Assembly: (resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex) Opened for signature: 29 March 1972, London, Moscow, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 1 September 1972 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 24 UST 2389; TIAS 7762; 961 UNTS 187) 4. 1975 REG -Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space (Registration Convention) Adoption by the United Nations 12 November 1974 General Assembly: (resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex) Opened for signature: 14 January 1975, New York Entry into force: 15 September 1976 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: 28 UST 695; TIAS 8480; 1023 UNTS 15) 5. 1979 MOON -Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (Moon Agreement) Adoption by the United Nations 5 December 1979 General Assembly: (resolution 34/68), annex) Opened for signature: 18 December 1979, New York Entry into force: 11 July 1984 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: 18 ILM15 1434; 1363 UNTS 3)50 Other agreements General 6. 1963 NTB -Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water Opened for signature: 5 August 1963, Moscow Entry into force: 10 October 1963 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 14 UST 1313; TIAS 5433; 480 UNTS 43) 7. 1974 BRUS -Convention Relating to the Distribution of Programme-Carrying Signals Transmitted by Satellite (Brussels Convention) Opened for signature: 21 May 1974, Brussels Entry into force: 25 August 1979 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Source: 1144 UNTS 3) Institutions 8. 1971 INTL -Agreement Relating to the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT), with annexes, and Operating Agreement Relating to the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, with annex Opened for signature: 20 August 1971, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 12 February 1973 Depositary: United States of America (Sources: 23 UST 3813 and 4091; TIAS 7532) 9. 1971 INTR -Agreement on the Establishment of the INTERSPUTNIK International System and Organization of Space Communications Opened for signature: 15 November 1971, Moscow Entry into force: 12 July 1972 Depositary: Russian Federation (Source: 862 UNTS 3)51 10. 1975 ESA -Convention for the Establishment of a European Space Agency (ESA), with annexes Opened for signature: 30 May 1975, Paris Entry into force: 30 October 1980 Depositary: France (Source: 14 ILM 864) 11. 1976 ARBS -Agreement of the Arab Corporation for Space Communications (ARABSAT) Opened for signature: 14 April 1976 (14 Rabi’ II 1396 H), Cairo Entry into force: 16 July 1976 Depositary: League of Arab States (Source: Space Law and Related Documents, US Senate, 101st Congress, 2nd Session, 395 (1990)) 12. 1976 INTC -Agreement on Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for Peaceful Purposes (INTERCOSMOS) Opened for signature: 13 July 1976, Moscow Entry into force: 25 March 1977 Depositary: Russian Federation (Source: 16 ILM 1) 13. 1976 IMO -Convention on the International Mobile Satellite Organization (Inmarsat), with annex, and the Operating Agreement on the International Mobile Satellite Organization (Inmarsat), with annex Opened for signature: 3 September 1976, London Entry into force: 16 July 1979 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization (Source: 31 UST 1; TIAS 9605) 14. 1982 EUTL -Convention Establishing the European Telecommunications Satellite Organization (EUTELSAT) Opened for signature: 15 July 1982, Paris Entry into force: 1 September 1985 Depositary: France (Sources: UK Misc. No. 4, Cmnd. 9154 (1984))52 15. 1983 EUMT -Convention for the Establishment of a European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) Opened for signature: 24 May 1983, Geneva Entry into force: 19 June 1986 Depositary: Switzerland (Source: Germany, “ Bundesgesetzblatt”, Jahrgang 1987, Teil 11 (1987), p. 256. This Convention has been published in the national bulletins of the ratifying States.) 16. 1992 ITU -International Telecommunication Constitution and Convention Opened for signature: 22 December 1992, Geneva Entry into force: 1 July 1994 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union (Source: ITU Secretariat, Place des Nations, CH-1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland)53 Status of international agreements relating to activities in outer space (as at 1 February 1999)a United Nations treaties Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Afghanistan R Albania Algeria R S Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda R R R R Argentina R R R R Armenia Australia R R R R R Austria R R R R R Azerbaijan Bahamas R R Bahrain Bangladesh R Barbados R R R Belarus R R R R Belgium R R R R Belize Benin R R54 Other agreements (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R S R R R R R R RR S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R RR R R R55 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Bhutan Bolivia S S Bosnia and Herzegovina R R Botswana S R R Brazil R R R Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria R R R R Burkina Faso R Burundi S S S Cambodia S Cameroon S R Canada R R R R Cape Verde Central African Republic S S Chad Chile R R R R R China R R R R Colombia S S S Comoros Congo S Costa Rica S S Côte d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba R R R R Cyprus R R R R Czech Republic R R R R Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Democratic Republic of the Congo S S S Denmark R R R R56(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R S RR S R R R R R R R b R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R57 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic R S R Ecuador R R R Egypt R R S El Salvador R R S Equatorial Guinea R Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia S Fiji R R R Finland R R R France R R R R S Gabon R R Gambia S R S Georgia R Germany R R R R Ghana S S S Greece R R R Grenada Guatemala S S Guinea Guinea-Bissau R R Guyana S R Haiti S S S Holy See S Honduras S S Hungary R R R R Iceland R R S India R R R R S Indonesia S R R58(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R c R S R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R59 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Iran (Islamic Republic of) S R R S Iraq R R R Ireland R R R Israel R R R Italy R R R Jamaica R S Japan R R R R Jordan S S S Kazakhstan R R R Kenya R R Kiribati Kuwait R R R Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic R R R Latvia Lebanon R R S Lesotho S S Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya R Liechtenstein R Lithuania Luxembourg S S R Madagascar R R Malawi Malaysia S S Maldives R Mali R R Malta S R Marshall Islands Mauritania60(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR S R R R R R R R R R R R R R61 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Mauritius R R Mexico R R R R R Micronesia, Federated States of Monaco S Mongolia R R R R Morocco R R R R Mozambique Myanmar R S Namibia Nauru Nepal R R S Netherlands R R R R R New Zealand R R R Nicaragua S S S S Niger R R R R Nigeria R R Norway R R R R Oman S Pakistan R R R R R Panama S R Papua New Guinea R R R Paraguay Peru R R S R S Philippines S S S R Poland R R R R Portugal R R Qatar R Republic of Korea R R R R Republic of Moldova Romania R R R S62(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R63 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Russian Federation R R R R Rwanda S S S Saint Lucia San Marino R R Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia R R Senegal S R Seychelles R R R R Sierra Leone R S S Singapore R R R S Slovakia R R R R Slovenia R R Solomon Islands Somalia S S South Africa R R S Spain R R R Sri Lanka R R Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Sudan Suriname Swaziland R Sweden R R R R Switzerland R R R R Syrian Arab Republic R R R Tajikistan Thailand R R The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Togo R R64(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R S R R R RRR R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R65 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Tonga R R Trinidad and Tobago S R Tunisia R R R Turkey R S Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda R Ukraine R R R R United Arab Emirates United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland R R R R United Republic of Tanzania S United States of America R R R R Uruguay R R R R R Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela R S R Viet Nam R S Western Samoa Yemen R S Yugoslavia S R R R Zambia R R R Zimbabwe Palestine European Space Agency D D D European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites D European Telecommunications Satellite Organization D R = Ratification, a acceptance, approval, accession or succession. S = Signature only. D = Declaration of acceptance of rights and obligations. When no entry appears in a column opposite the name of a country, area or organization, that country, area or organization has either not signed that agreement, is not a party to it or has withdrawn from it. b Canada has a cooperation agreement with the European Space Agency, but is not a member of the Agency. c The accession procedures for Estonia are ongoing.66(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R67 Related international agreements 1. 1959 ANT -The Antarctic Treaty Opened for signature: 1 December 1959, Washington, D.C. Date of entry into force: 23 June 1961 Depositary: United States of America (Sources: 402 UNTS 71; 12 UST 794; TIAS 4780) 2. 1977 ENMOD -Convention on the Prohibition of Military or Any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques Adopted by the United Nations General Assembly: 10 December 1976 (resolution 31/72, annex) Opened for signature: 18 May 1977, Geneva Date of entry into force: 5 October 1978 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: 1108 UNTS 151; 31 UST 333; 16 ILM 88) 3. 1982 UNCLOS -United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Opened for signature: 10 December 1982, Montego Bay Date of entry into force: 16 November 1994 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: UN doc. A/CONF. 62/122 (1982); 21 ILM 1261) 4. 1982 ITU -International Telecommunication Convention Opened for signature: 6 November 1982, Nairobi Date of entry into force: 1 January 1984 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union 5. 1986 ENNA -Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident Opened for signature: 26 September 1986, Vienna Date of entry into force: 27 October 1986 Depositary: Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Source: 25 ILM 1370)68 6. 1986 ACNA -Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency Opened for signature: 26 September 1986, Vienna Date of entry into force: 26 February 1987 Depositary: Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Source: 25 ILM 1377) 7. 1992 ITU-WARC -Final Acts of the World Administrative Radio Conference for Dealing with Frequency Allocations in Certain Parts of the Spectrum (WARC-92) Opened for signature: 3 March 1992, Malaga-Torremolinos Date of entry into force: 12 October 1993 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union69 IV. Commentary: a collection of extracts of statements made on the occasion of the adoption of the United Nations treaties Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies Twenty-first session of the General Assembly (A/PV.1499): Mr. Goldberg (United States of America): “This is, in every sense of word, a United Nations treaty, in which all Member nations can justly take great pride. It has been negotiated under the auspices of the Organization and is the fruit of its labours. The treaty furthers the aims of the Charter by greatly reducing the danger of international conflict and by promoting the prospects of international cooperation for the common interest in the newest realm of human activity. This treaty is an important step towards peace.” Mr. Fedorenko (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) (interpretation from Russian): “In evaluating the treaty, we would like to stress the point that we regard the preparation of the treaty and its approval by the General Assembly as a victory for the peace-loving forces in the struggle against those who advocate using outer space for purposes of provocation and aggression.” Mr. Vinci (Italy): “For the first time in the history of mankind, all countries, and in first instance the two world Powers of the day, are not searching for new territorial conquests or for the expansion of their sovereign rights. On the contrary, they aim only at scientific and technological conquests in the new continents of outer space, which become not the province of single Powers, but the province of mankind as a whole. For the first time in the wake of our first space explorations, national, religious and ideological concepts are put aside, and in their place the ideas of peace and the unity of all men, regardless of their religion, creed or colour, are solemnly affirmed.” Mr. Seydoux (France) (interpretation from French): “We were ... among those who, following our colleague, Mr. Manfred Lachs, pointed out that this treaty is only, as it were, the first chapter of the law of outer space on which much still remains to be done.” 1491st meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/SR.1491): Mr. Lachs (Poland), speaking as Chairman of the Legal Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, stated that, with the adoption of the treaty, international law would acquire a new dimension. That was the result of the extension of States’ activities into the new domain of outer space, since there could be no legal vacuum in any field or activity. 1492nd meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/SR.1492): Mr. Goldberg (United States of America) stated that the United States regarded the treaty as an important step towards peace, for it would greatly reduce the danger of international conflict and improve the prospects for international cooperation in the common interest in one of the newest and most unfamiliar realms of human activity ... . The spirit of compromise shown by the space Powers and the other Powers had produced a treaty which established a fair balance between the interests and obligations of all concerned, including the countries that had as yet undertaken no space activities.70 Mr. Waldheim (Austria) stated that the scientific and technical achievements in outer space must be matched by legal and political agreements. The treaty met that requirement, for it was a most important milestone in the endeavour to provide for law and order in outer space and to furnish a substantial basis for further work in that field. Mr. Fuentealba (Chile) stated that the chief merit of the space treaty was that it not only laid down rules governing the activities of States in outer space but at the same time provided a solution for potential problems whose seriousness was only too obvious. Mr. de Carvalcho Silos (Brazil) stated that the treaty was a landmark in the work of the United Nations ... . The proposed treaty was perhaps the most important political event since the signing of the partial test-ban treaty. 1493rd meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/SR.1493): Mr. Gowland (Argentina) stated that the treaty would lay the basis for the legal regulation of man’s activities in space. It provided for the exploration and use of space on a basis of universality and equality, thus promoting friendship and understanding in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. Mr. Tilakaratna (Ceylon) stated that the treaty was a major step towards the establishment of rules governing the activities of States in peaceful exploration of space. Mr. Matsui (Japan) stated that the treaty was of historic importance, for it not only ensured that outer space, the Moon and other celestial bodies would be used for peaceful purposes only, but provided for cooperation among all States, both large and small, in space research ... . He hoped that all States would accede to the treaty in order to achieve the widest possible degree of international cooperation, and that the spirit of progress and understanding that had guided the preparation of the treaty would lead to the solution of other problems afflicting mankind. Mr. Burns (Canada) stated that the treaty was the result of serious endeavours both in and outside the Legal Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. It represented a significant effort to achieve a regime of law for outer space ... . The treaty as a whole would provide a firm foundation for subsequent and more detailed agreements. The measure of agreement reached on principles governing the activities of States in outer space was a great encouragement and source of hope for all who were working for effective measures of disarmament. Mr. Schuurmans (Belgium) stated that he welcomed the elaboration of an instrument that brought into play the active cooperation of the whole international community under the auspices of the United Nations. Belgium was firmly convinced that unanimous approval of the treaty by the United Nations would do much to encourage States to seek, in other fields besides that of space, peaceful solutions to the serious problems that continued to divide them. Mr. Odhiambo (Kenya) observed that space exploration, like nuclear science, was a two-edge sword that could prove both harmful and useful to mankind. It was therefore gratifying that the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space had succeeded in reaching agreement on a treaty that would ensure that outer space, the Moon and other celestial bodies would be used for peaceful purposes only and that the benefits of space exploration would be made available to all. Mr. Tarabanov (Bulgaria) stated that the treaty, as a legal instrument designed to stimulate international cooperation in the exploration and peaceful utilization of outer space, was a historic71 achievement; it was not, however, an end in itself but a promising beginning ... . The treaty not only affirmed the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and of international law, but established the concept of peace as a legal rule with regard to space activities. Mr. Rossides (Cyprus) stated that the treaty was a bold and important step forward. Scientific progress in outer space was now matched by legal progress, so that international law and the Charter of the United Nations would apply fully to space activities. Mr. Lopez (Philippines) said that the treaty represented the culmination of United Nations efforts to reach agreement on binding legal principles applicable in an area where scientific technology had taken such swift and startling strides. Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space Twenty-second session of the General Assembly (A/PV.1640): Mr. Waldheim (Austria), speaking as Chairman of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space: “I should like to express our hope that the draft resolution will receive the unanimous approval of the General Assembly and thus open the way for an early entry into force of the Agreement on rescue and return of astronauts. We are convinced that this would represent not only an important step forward in the elaboration of the law of outer space, but also evidence of the cooperation and unity of all nations in the great venture of man in the exploration of outer space.” Mr. Wyzner (Poland): “My colleagues will, no doubt, appreciate the significance, in humanitarian terms, of the Agreement for those brave and gallant men who are, in the words of Article V of the Outer Space Treaty, the ‘envoys of mankind in outer space’, who are risking their lives, as recent tragic accidents have demonstrated, in endeavours which serve the interests of all. The Agreement is also important as a further step in the gradual development of the law of outer space ... . With its frightening potentialities for war, outer space cannot be allowed to become the field of competition other than peaceful competition. The Agreement on rescue and return is also a further collective step in the quest for peace since, among others, it eliminates possible sources of dispute and friction between States.” Mr. Vinci (Italy): “We consider the Agreement before us important both intrinsically and as forming part of a wider design, namely, the legal discipline of space activities, the space activities which every day increase their impact on our life on Earth and which are bound to do so increasingly in the near future. “The task of the United Nations in this field is very clear: to safeguard and promote not only the interests of a specific group of countries, but rather the general interests of all nations, whether they are engaged or not in space activities either individually or as members of a multilateral organization. The formulation of a law for space will create a framework that will facilitate the carrying out of space activities for peaceful purposes and make such activities not a cause of disputes and tensions, but rather the source of benefits for everyone and for international cooperation.” Mr. Goldberg (United States of America): “It is a good and sound treaty and one which will stand the test of time and experience. The United States regards the action of the Assembly in endorsing this treaty as a historic action. The treaty text represents agreement on implementing that famous phrase from the Outer Space Treaty that astronauts are ‘envoys of mankind’.72 “My delegation believes that endorsement of the treaty by the General Assembly constitutes one of the major achievements of this Assembly. The United States considers that the Assistance and Return Agreement which we have adopted represents a just balancing of the interests of all Members of the United Nations, the space Powers, the near-space Powers, the cooperating space Powers and all who are interested in outer space—which, indeed, means the entire membership of our Organization. This Agreement bears witness to the fact the United Nations can make a real contribution to extending the rule of law to new areas and ensuring the positive and peaceful ordering of man’s efforts in science and the building of a better world. “It is, not least, a tribute of those who venture forward into the new world of outer space. We shall work to make that venture one of benefit to all, as we hope it will be.” Mr. C.O.E. Cole (Sierra Leone): “The Sierra Leone delegation voted in favour of the draft resolution we have just adopted. The very laudable humanitarian and juridical principles involved, as well as the fact that my Government is a signatory to the Outer Space Treaty, impelled my delegation to take this stand. It is the least tribute we can pay to all those who bravely venture into outer space for peaceful uses and all those who work so diligently to that end.” Mr. Fedorenko (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) (interpretation from Russian): “In adopting the draft Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space, the Soviet delegation is convinced that the conclusion of that Agreement will be of great importance in connection with the rapid progress of space technology, the development of space research and the ever wider use of space objects for such practical purposes as communications, weather forecasting, navigation and so forth. The Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts will certainly be of great practical importance, ensuring the speedy rescue of astronauts in case of breakdowns, accidents or forced landings, for, as scientific and technological advance continues, manned space flights will become longer and more complex every year ... . The Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts can truly be called a humanitarian act of international law on the part of the Member States of the United Nations towards the courageous explorers of those vast cosmic expanses, the men who are, in the words of the Outer Space Treaty, ‘envoys of mankind’ in space.” Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects Twenty-sixth session of the General Assembly (A/PV.1998): Mr. Migliuolo (Italy), as Rapporteur of the First Committee: “The draft convention represents the outcome of lengthy and persistent efforts made by a distinguished group of international jurists and diplomatists who for years have tried to take a new step forward in expanding the corpus juris concerning the international aspects of the peaceful uses of outer space.” Mr. Shepard (United States of America): “The draft convention is a sound treaty based upon realistic perceptions of mutual interest and mutual benefit. We believe it will take a place alongside the much-praised Outer Space Treaty of 1967 and the Astronaut Agreement of 1968. The Liability Convention should make possible reasonable expectation of the payment of prompt and fair compensation in the event of damage caused by the launching, flight or re-entry of man-made space vehicles.” 1826th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1826):73 Mr. Van Ussel (Belgium) (interpretation from French): “Members of the Committee are aware that the negotiations were hard, and often a great deal of imagination and concessions, even sacrifices, were required to draft the articles of the convention. If we have reached an agreement after so many years of meetings, consultations and exchanges of views, it is because all the members of the Legal Subcommittee, under the enlightened and efficient chairmanship of Mr. Wyzner, were inspired by a constructive spirit and a will to reach a text in accord with the sacred principles of international law. The Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects ... is, above all, the result of compromise which, as I indicated in my statement at the 1823rd meeting, is the outcome of a happy marriage between law and diplomacy.” Mr. Williams (Jamaica): “My delegation wishes to express its appreciation to the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space for its work over the years on the draft convention and for finally presenting a document for our endorsement. We appreciate the almost insuperable difficulties that were involved. With the increasing number of objects being launched into outer space there was certainly an element of urgency in agreeing to some rules of conduct in the event that a space object should cause damage on returning to Earth. The Committee has sought to solve the outstanding problems by resorting to compromise.” Mr. Seaton (United Republic of Tanzania): “My delegation wishes to congratulate the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on its agreement on a draft convention regarding international liability for damage caused by space objects. We believe that the draft convention deserves the careful consideration of all States.” Mr. Farhang (Afghanistan): “The delegation of Afghanistan welcomes the efforts made by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its Legal Subcommittee. We commend also the spirit of compromise shown by the major space Powers, which has made possible the preparation of the draft Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects.” Mr. Issraelyan (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) (interpretation from Russian): “We are particularly happy to note the adoption of draft resolution A/C.1/L.570/Rev.1, approving the draft Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects in the version which, over a long period of time, was successfully drafted in the Outer Space Committee. We hope that, since the matter has now been settled in the draft resolution we have adopted, as many countries as possible will accede to this Convention.” Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space 1988th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1988): Mr. Jankowitsch (Austria), as Chairman of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space: “The Committee ... has now once again made a contribution to this important new body of law by the adoption of a registration convention which will be submitted to this session of the General Assembly for consideration and adoption ... . It does not, and of course cannot, satisfy everyone completely, but it represents not only several years of hard and dedicated work but also, I believe, the optimum level of compromise that could be reached at the present stage of technology. That is why the draft convention received the unanimous approval of the members of the Committee ... . The draft convention on registration is therefore an indispensable instrument for ensuring that claims of innocent victims under the Liability Convention could be met promptly and effectively. It complements the body of rules provided by the Liability Convention, in the sense that it would facilitate procedures for identification of space objects in case of doubt. In that sense the draft convention on registration is a significant contribution, we believe, to complement the existing body of74 international law in this field; hence it represents an important step forward in the progressive development and codification of international space law.” Mr. Wyzner (Poland), as Chairman of the Legal Subcommittee: “The draft convention is a carefully thought-over and formulated instrument. It was brought into being through long hours of detailed consultations and negotiations between delegations holding different points of view and representing different schools of thought, yet endeavouring to define the widest possible area of agreement.” 1990th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1990): Mr. Kuchel (United States of America): “Many difficult compromises were reached in the negotiation of this convention, and we believe the agreement that resulted is a reasonable one accommodating diverse interests, which will prove to be useful addition to the developing body of international law relating to the peaceful exploration and use of outer space.” Mr. Frazao (Brazil) (interpretation from French): “The adoption by the Legal Subcommittee of a draft Convention on the registration of objects launched into outer space is of course a remarkable achievement, and we should like warmly to congratulate the Subcommittee and, in particular, its tireless Chairman, Ambassador Wyzner. Thanks to the spirit of understanding and compromise prevailing at the last session of the Legal Subcommittee, it will now be possible for this session of the Assembly to proceed to the adoption of the final text of a convention the need for which requires no further demonstration.” 1991st meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1991): Mr. Datcu (Romania) (interpretation from French): “That convention, which supplements the stipulations of the convention on the responsibility of States for objects launched into space, is an important step forward towards the establishment of a general legal framework for inter-state cooperation in space.” Mr. Rydbeck (Sweden): “We note with great satisfaction that the Outer Space Committee this year presents us with concrete results in the form of a draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space. The text before us has required many years of preparatory efforts in the Legal Subcommittee. It marks a new milestone in the achievements of the United Nations in the outer space field ... . We see the convention on registration as a valuable complement to the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects. With the adoption of the convention on registration there might well be better chances also for additional ratifications to the Liability Convention and to the other United Nations instruments adopted in the outer space field.” Mr. Todorov (Bulgaria) (interpretation from Russian): “The achievement of an agreement in the Legal Subcommittee on sober and well-balanced formulations has once again confirmed the reputation of that body as an organ that is making an important contribution to the development and codification of international space law.” 1992nd meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1992): Mr. Charvet (France) (interpretation from French): “I should like to emphasize that the results achieved with regard to the registration of objects launched into outer space can be an example for the other issues before the Outer Space Committee. In fact, these results prove what can be done if there is a desire among States to reach a compromise in a spirit of cooperation.”75 Mr. Brankovic (Yugoslavia): “There is no doubt that this [the draft convention] is a major accomplishment in the field of legislation concerning outer space. The adoption and putting into effect of that convention will greatly contribute to and represent a very important step towards the attainment of one of the basic objectives: the use of outer space for peaceful purposes.” 1994th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1994): Mr. Yokota (Japan): “The completion of the draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space is another memorable event in the history of the Outer Space Committee ... . I sincerely hope that the Committee will approve unanimously the draft registration convention, which in our view marks another milestone in the progressive development of outer space law ... . My delegation considers that the international community may draw an important lesson from a careful analysis of the long and difficult negotiations which led this year to the successful completion of the draft registration convention.” 1995th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1995): Mr. Isa (Pakistan): “This draft convention is a necessary complement to the Liability Convention, and constitutes a valuable addition to the body of space law. Liability for injury from a space object can be correctly ascribed only if there is some system to determine the origin of the space objects.” Mr. Al-Masri (Syrian Arab Republic) (interpretation from Arabic): “The encouraging results that have been achieved by the Legal Subcommittee—primarily that of the draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space—give us every reason to hope that the obstacles which continue to impede a number of achievements in this area—particularly the elaboration of international regulations concerning the Moon, direct television broadcasting through Earth satellites, and remote sensing—will now be eliminated, thanks to our good intentions and sincere faith in the principles of international cooperation and friendly relations among peoples of the world.” Mr. Yango (Philippines): “This draft convention is one more outstanding contribution of the Outer Space Committee to the development of international law for the peaceful uses of outer space. In our view, the draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space is a necessary complement to previous agreements ... . A mandatory system of registering objects launched into outer space is established under the draft convention not only at the national but also at the international level. Such registers are a source of vital and necessary information in the continuing efforts of mankind in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space.” 1996th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1996): Mr. Plaja (Italy): “The agreement reached on [the] text [of the Convention] has not been an easy one and, as is normal in such international negotiations, it is the result of several compromises which reflect the spirit of accommodation of many members who sacrificed their original positions in order to achieve general consensus. “The draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space represents another small step not only towards the completion of the new body of space laws we have been working for, but also towards a new ‘Magna Carta’ of global laws and regulations which will be used and respected in the future for the determination of the conduct of international relations among the people of the world.”76 1997th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1997): Mr. Azzout (Algeria) (interpretation from French): “This is a result that is indeed of prime importance, for this legal document is a contribution, in definite practical terms, to the new legislation that is gradually being built up, and forms a harmonious complement to the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects.” Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies 15th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.15): Mr. Ahmed (India) stated that the adoption of the treaty by the General Assembly would ensure the exploitation of natural resources of the Moon and other celestial bodies in an orderly and rational manner through the creation of an international regime to ensure that such resources, as the common heritage of mankind, were exploited for the benefit of all mankind. Mr. Enterlein (German Democratic Republic) stated that the draft agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon, adopted by consensus at the twenty-second session of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, contained valuable concrete provisions governing the use of outer space. It was of special importance that, as article III of the draft agreement provided, the Moon was to be used by all States Parties exclusively for peaceful purposes. It was vital for peace and détente that the draft agreement should confirm the demilitarized status of the Moon and other celestial bodies and forbid the placing in orbit around such bodies of objects carrying nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction. With the adoption of that agreement, another significant part of outer space and the scope of activities therein would be covered by specific and detailed provisions binding under international law. The fact that it had been possible to evolve the draft agreement by consensus gave striking proof of the value of the consensus principle in drawing up legal provisions concerning outer space. 16th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.16): Mr. Barton (Canada) noted with satisfaction that the Committee had finally completed the drafting of a Moon treaty, which reiterated the principle laid down in the 1967 Treaty on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space that the Moon and other celestial bodies would be used exclusively for peaceful purposes. The draft treaty would explicitly prohibit any threat or use of force, and would mean that the benefits derived from the exploitation of the resources of celestial bodies would be equitably shared by all parties. Mr. Fujita (Japan) stated that the draft agreement contained a number of important principles, which would be legally binding and would be effective in promoting greater cooperation among States for further progress in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes. Mrs. Nowotny (Austria) stated that at its most recent session, the Committee had been able, on the basis of the work of the Legal Subcommittee, to complete the elaboration of the draft agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies, its most important step in the codification of international outer space law. As a result of such an agreement, the use of the natural resources of celestial bodies and outer space, which might relieve some of the immense pressures now facing mankind due to the limited resources of the Earth, could take place in a predominantly peaceful environment, in an orderly fashion, in accordance with international law, on the basis of international cooperation and mutual77 understanding and in accordance with previously agreed procedures. Only in those circumstances would the whole of mankind be able to benefit therefrom.78 17th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.17): Mrs. Oliveros (Argentina) stated that, with regard to the draft treaty relating to the Moon, the sometimes seemingly irreconcilable differences of opinion that had been apparent from the outset had been overcome, proving once that negotiations between States were the most effective way of dealing with such obstacles. The draft treaty reflected a good balance of the different interests in that connection, and her delegation believed that the developed and the developing countries could feel satisfied with its contents. The draft treaty also restored the credibility of the Outer Space Committee and showed that it was one of the most efficient United Nations organs, having drafted five extremely important international instruments in its relatively short existence. The treaty was also an excellent example of how to make headway in the progressive development of international law and its codification in accordance with Article 13 (a) of the Charter. Mr. Roslyakov (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) stated that the draft agreement was a meticulous and balanced document which met the needs of all countries, irrespective of their level of economic development and degree of participation in outer space activities. Mr. Cotton (New Zealand) stated that the draft treaty, which laid down guidelines for the conduct of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies, would represent significant progress in international cooperation. 18th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.18): Mr. Albornoz (Ecuador) stated that the preparation of a draft agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies represented a certain degree of progress. It was encouraging to note that that instrument provided not only that the exploration and use of the Moon should be the province of all mankind but also that they should be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degrees of development. The States parties to that agreement should likewise undertake to use the Moon exclusively for peaceful purposes and not to place in orbit around the Moon any object carrying nuclear weapons. Mr. Kalina (Czechoslovakia) stated that his delegation welcomed the completion of the work on the agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies. The completion of that endeavour was proof that where there was the political will, even the most difficult and sensitive issues could be resolved. The Moon agreement contained the concept of the common heritage of mankind, thus recognizing the need for broad international cooperation in outer space of all countries irrespective of the level of their development. 19th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.19): Mr. Petree (United States of America) stated that the draft Moon treaty was based to a considerable extent on the 1967 Outer Space Treaty and in no way limited the latter’s provisions. It also represented, in its own right, a meaningful advance in the codification of international law dealing with outer space, containing obligations which were of both immediate and long-term application. Mr. Kolbasin (Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic) stated that the draft treaty on the Moon, besides being a major contribution to international law, would be an important element in the development of mutual trust among States and would help to strengthen world peace.79 Mr. Gómez Robledo (Mexico) stated that, in his delegation’s opinion, the draft treaty had achieved a difficult balance between idealism and realism in establishing rules to guide mankind’s activities on the Moon.Mr. Suryokusumo (Indonesia) stated that Indonesia welcomed the draft agreement relating to the Moon, which was undoubtedly a milestone in the development of space law and which demonstrated the progress that could be made in resolving issues through the recognition of mutual interests and a spirit of compromise. Mr. Diez (Chile) stated that the drafting of the agreement was an achievement for both the developed and the developing countries in that it provided for the effective cooperation of States, on an equal footing, in the exploration and future utilization of the Moon for the benefit of all mankind.80 Office for Outer Space Affairs Vienna International Centre P.O. Box 500, A-1400 Vienna, Austria Telephone: +(43) (1) 26060-4950 Fax: +(43) (1) 26060-5830V.99-84431 A/AC.105/722 A/CONF.184/BP/15 Traités et principes des Nations Unies relatifs à l’espace extra-atmosphérique Texte et état des traités et des principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique adoptés par l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies Édition commémorative publiée à l’occasion de la troisième Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (UNISPACE III) Nations Unies, Vienne 1999iii TABLE DES MATIÈRES Page Avant-propos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I. Traités des Nations Unies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 II. Principes adoptés par l’Assemblée générale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Principes sur la télédétection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Déclaration sur la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, compte tenu en particulier des besoins des pays en développement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 III. État des accords internationaux relatifs aux activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Traités des Nations Unies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Autres accords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Accords internationaux connexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 IV. Commentaire: recueil d’extraits de déclarations faites à l’occasion de l’adoption des traités des Nations Unies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70Avant-propos Le développement progressif et la codification du droit international constituent l’une des principales responsabilités de l’Organisation des Nations Unies dans le domaine juridique. Un des secteurs importants où elle doit exercer de telles responsabilités est le nouvel environnement que représente l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Ainsi, le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique de l’ONU et son Sous-Comité juridique ont, par leurs efforts, fait oeuvre très utile en matière de droit de l’espace. L’Organisation des Nations Unies est enfin devenue un centre de coordination pour les activités de coopération internationale dans le domaine de l’espace et pour la formulation des règles internationales nécessaires. L’espace extra-atmosphérique, extraordinaire par de nombreux aspects, est en outre sans équivalent sur le plan juridique. Il n’y a pas longtemps que les activités humaines et l’interaction des pays dans l’espace sont devenues des réalités et que l’on a entrepris de formuler des règles internationales pour faciliter les relations mondiales dans ce milieu.Comme il convient pour un environnement dont la nature est si extraordinaire, l’élargissement du droit international à l’espace extra-atmosphérique s’est fait de manière progressive et évolutive en commençant par l’étude des questions liées aux aspects juridiques, en continuant par la formulation de principes d’un caractère juridique pour arriver à l’incorporation de ces principes dans des traités multilatéraux généraux. L’adoption par l’Assemblée générale, en 1963, de la Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique a constitué un premier pas important. Au cours des années qui ont suivi, l’Organisation des Nations Unies a élaboré cinq traités multilatéraux de caractère général incorporant et développant les concepts qui figuraient dans la Déclaration des principes juridiques: Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes (annexe de la résolution 2222 (XXI) de l’Assemblée générale) – adopté le 19 décembre 1966, ouvert à la signature le 27 janvier 1967, entré en vigueur le 10 octobre 1967; Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (annexe de la résolution 2345 (XXII)) – adopté le 19 décembre 1967, ouvert à la signature le 22 avril 1968, entré en vigueur le 3 décembre 1968; Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux (annexe de la résolution 2777 (XXVI)) – adoptée le 29 novembre 1971, ouverte à la signature le 29 mars 1972, entrée en vigueur le 1er septembre 1972; Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (annexe de la résolution 3235 (XXIX)) – adoptée le 12 novembre 1974, ouverte à la signature le 14 janvier 1975, entrée en vigueur le 15 septembre 1976; Accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes (annexe de la résolution 34/68) – adopté le 5 décembre 1979, ouvert à la signature le 18 décembre 1979, entré en vigueur le 11 juillet 1984. L’Organisation des Nations Unies a supervisé la rédaction, la formulation et l’adoption de cinq séries de principes, y compris la Déclaration des principes juridiques, à savoir:Voir le rapport du Secrétaire général sur 1 la coopération internationale dans les activités spatiales pour le renforcement de la sécurité dans la période de l’après-guerre froide (A/48/221) et résolution 48/39 de l’Assemblée générale, par. 2. 2 Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, adoptée le 13 décembre 1963 (résolution 1962 (XVIII)); Principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale, adoptés le 10 décembre 1982 (résolution 37/92); Principes sur la télédétection, adoptés le 3 décembre 1986 (résolution 41/65); Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace, adoptés le 14 décembre 1992 (résolution 47/68); Déclaration sur la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, compte tenu en particulier des besoins des pays en développement, adoptée le 13 décembre 1996 (résolution 51/122). On peut considérer que le Traité de 1967 sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes fournit une base juridique générale pour les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace et constitue un cadre pour le développement du droit de l’espace. On peut dire que les quatre autres traités sont axés plus particulièrement sur certains concepts figurant dans le Traité de 1967. Les traités relatifs à l’espace ont été ratifiés par de nombreux pays et beaucoup d’autres en respectent les principes. Étant donné l’importance de la coopération internationale en vue de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, l’Assemblée générale et le Secrétaire général de l’ONU ont invité les États Membres de l’Organisation qui ne sont pas encore parties aux traités internationaux régissant les utilisations de l’espace à les ratifier ou y adhérer le plus tôt possible1. Du 19 au 30 juillet 1999, la troisième Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (UNISPACE III) examinera les acquis passés et l’état actuel des activités menées par l’homme dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et s’efforcera d’élaborer un schéma directeur de ces activités pour le siècle prochain. Une des questions qui seront examinées dans ce contexte est la promotion de la coopération internationale, y compris l’aspect essentiel que constituent l’état actuel et le développement futur du droit international de l’espace. La présente publication vise à rassembler de nouveau en un seul volume les cinq traités relatifs à l’espace extra-atmosphérique adoptés à ce jour par l’Organisation des Nations Unies ainsi que les cinq séries de principes. On y trouvera également un tableau indiquant l’état de ces traités et les pays qui en sont actuellement parties ainsi que d’autres accords internationaux connexes régissant les activités dans l’espace au 1er avril 1999. De surcroît, à la fin de la publication se trouve un commentaire consistant en un recueil de déclarations faites à l’occasion de l’adoption des cinq traités relatifs à l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Le Bureau des affaires spatiales espère que le présent recueil pourra servir utilement de référence aux participants à la Conférence lorsqu’ils débattront les questions ayant trait au droit international de l’espace et à son développement futur. En outre, on compte que la publication servira à rappeler, à tous les lecteurs qui s’intéressent aux aspects juridiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, l’esprit de bonne volonté et de coopération qui a servi de base à l’élaboration des instruments juridiques et a suscité la tenue de la présente Conférence des Nations Unies, qui sera la dernière du vingtième siècle.3 I. Traités des Nations Unies Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes Les États parties au présent Traité, S’inspirant des vastes perspectives qui s’offrent à l’humanité du fait de la découverte de l’espace extra-atmosphérique par l’homme, Reconnaissant l’intérêt que présente pour l’humanité tout entière le progrès de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Estimant que l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique devraient s’effectuer pour le bien de tous les peuples, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique, Désireux de contribuer au développement d’une large coopération internationale en ce qui concerne les aspects scientifiques aussi bien que juridiques de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Estimant que cette coopération contribuera à développer la compréhension mutuelle et à consolider les relations amicales entre les États et entre les peuples, Rappelant la résolution 1962 (XVIII), intitulée “Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique”, que l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adoptée à l’unanimité le 13 décembre 1963, Rappelant la résolution 1884 (XVIII), qui engage les États à s’abstenir de mettre sur orbite autour de la Terre tous objets porteurs d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive et d’installer de telles armes sur des corps célestes, résolution que l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a adoptée à l’unanimité le 17 octobre 1963, Tenant compte de la résolution 110 (II) de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies en date du 3 novembre 1947, résolution qui condamne la propagande destinée ou de nature à provoquer ou à encourager toute menace à la paix, toute rupture de la paix ou tout acte d’agression, et considérant que ladite résolution est applicable à l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Convaincus que le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, contribuera à la réalisation des buts et principes de la Charte des Nations Unies, Sont convenus de ce qui suit:4 Article premier L’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent se faire pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique; elles sont l’apanage de l’humanité tout entière. L’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, peut être exploré et utilisé librement par tous les États sans aucune discrimination, dans des conditions d’égalité et conformément au droit international, toutes les régions des corps célestes devant être librement accessibles. Les recherches scientifiques sont libres dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et les États doivent faciliter et encourager la coopération internationale dans ces recherches. Article II L’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, ne peut faire l’objet d’appropriation nationale par proclamation de souveraineté, ni par voie d’utilisation ou d’occupation, ni par aucun autre moyen. Article III Les activités des États parties au Traité relatives à l’exploration et à l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent s’effectuer conformément au droit international, y compris la Charte des Nations Unies, en vue de maintenir la paix et la sécurité internationales et de favoriser la coopération et la compréhension internationales. Article IV Les États parties au Traité s’engagent à ne mettre sur orbite autour de la Terre aucun objet porteur d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive, à ne pas installer de telles armes sur des corps célestes et à ne pas placer de telles armes, de toute autre manière, dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Tous les États parties au Traité utiliseront la Lune et les autres corps célestes exclusivement à des fins pacifiques. Sont interdits sur les corps célestes l’aménagement de bases et installations militaires et de fortifications, les essais d’armes de tous types et l’exécution de manoeuvres militaires. N’est pas interdite l’utilisation de personnel militaire à des fins de recherche scientifique ou à toute autre fin pacifique. N’est pas interdite non plus l’utilisation de tout équipement ou installation nécessaire à l’exploration pacifique de la Lune et des autres corps célestes. Article V Les États parties au Traité considéreront les astronautes comme des envoyés de l’humanité dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et leur prêteront toute l’assistance possible en cas d’accident, de détresse ou d’atterrissage forcé sur le territoire d’un autre État partie au Traité ou d’amerrissage en haute mer. En cas d’un tel atterrissage ou amerrissage, le retour des astronautes à l’État d’immatriculation de leur véhicule spatial devra être effectué promptement et en toute sécurité. Lorsqu’ils poursuivront des activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et sur les corps célestes, les astronautes d’un État partie au Traité prêteront toute l’assistance possible aux astronautes des autres États parties au Traité.5 Les États parties au Traité porteront immédiatement à la connaissance des autres États parties au Traité ou du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies tout phénomène découvert par eux dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les corps célestes, qui pourrait présenter un danger pour la vie ou la santé des astronautes. Article VI Les États parties au Traité ont la responsabilité internationale des activités nationales dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, qu’elles soient entreprises par des organismes gouvernementaux ou par des entités non gouvernementales, et de veiller à ce que les activités nationales soient poursuivies conformément aux dispositions énoncées dans le présent Traité. Les activités des entités non gouvernementales dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent faire l’objet d’une autorisation et d’une surveillance continue de la part de l’État approprié partie au Traité. En cas d’activités poursuivies par une organisation internationale dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, la responsabilité du respect des dispositions du présent Traité incombera à cette organisation internationale et aux États parties au Traité qui font partie de ladite organisation. Article VII Tout État partie au Traité qui procède ou fait procéder au lancement d’un objet dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et tout État partie dont le territoire ou les installations servent au lancement d’un objet, est responsable du point de vue international des dommages causés par ledit objet ou par ses éléments constitutifs, sur la Terre, dans l’atmosphère ou dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, à un autre État partie au Traité ou aux personnes physiques ou morales qui relèvent de cet autre État. Article VIII L’État partie au Traité sur le registre duquel est inscrit un objet lancé dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique conservera sous sa juridiction et son contrôle ledit objet et tout le personnel dudit objet, alors qu’ils se trouvent dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique ou sur un corps céleste. Les droits de propriété sur les objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris les objets amenés ou construits sur un corps céleste, ainsi que sur leurs éléments constitutifs, demeurent entiers lorsque ces objets ou éléments se trouvent dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique ou sur un corps céleste, et lorsqu’ils reviennent sur la Terre. Les objets ou éléments constitutifs d’objets trouvés au-delà des limites de l’État partie au Traité sur le registre duquel ils sont inscrits doivent être restitués à cet État partie au Traité, celui-ci étant tenu de fournir, sur demande, des données d’identification avant la restitution. Article IX En ce qui concerne l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, les États parties au Traité devront se fonder sur les principes de la coopération et de l’assistance mutuelle et poursuivront toutes leurs activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, en tenant dûment compte des intérêts correspondants de tous les autres États parties au Traité. Les États parties au Traité effectueront l’étude de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et procéderont à leur exploration de manière à éviter les effets préjudiciables de leur contamination ainsi que les modifications nocives du milieu terrestre résultant de l’introduction de substances extraterrestres et, en cas de besoin, ils prendront les mesures appropriées à cette fin. Si un État partie au Traité a lieu de croire qu’une activité ou expérience envisagée par lui-même ou par ses ressortissants dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, causerait une gêne potentiellement nuisible aux activités d’autres États parties au Traité en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace6extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, il devra engager les consultations internationales appropriées avant d’entreprendre ladite activité ou expérience. Tout État partie au Traité ayant lieu de croire qu’une activité ou expérience envisagée par un autre État partie au Traité dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, causerait une gêne potentiellement nuisible aux activités poursuivies en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, peut demander que des consultations soient ouvertes au sujet de ladite activité ou expérience. Article X Pour favoriser la coopération en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, conformément aux buts du présent Traité, les États parties au Traité examineront dans des conditions d’égalité les demandes des autres États parties au Traité tendant à obtenir des facilités pour l’observation du vol des objets spatiaux lancés par ces États. La nature de telles facilités d’observation et les conditions dans lesquelles elles pourraient être consenties seront déterminées d’un commun accord par les États intéressés. Article XI Pour favoriser la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, les États parties au Traité qui mènent des activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, conviennent, dans toute la mesure où cela est possible et réalisable, d’informer le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, de la nature et de la conduite de ces activités, des lieux où elles sont poursuivies et de leurs résultats. Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies devra être prêt à assurer, aussitôt après les avoir reçus, la diffusion effective de ces renseignements. Article XII Toutes les stations et installations, tout le matériel et tous les véhicules spatiaux se trouvant sur la Lune ou sur d’autres corps célestes seront accessibles, dans des conditions de réciprocité, aux représentants des autres États au Traité. Ces représentants notifieront au préalable toute visite projetée, de façon que les consultations voulues puissent avoir lieu et que le maximum de précautions puissent être prises pour assurer la sécurité et éviter de gêner les opérations normales sur les lieux de l’installation à visiter. Article XIII Les dispositions du présent Traité s’appliquent aux activités poursuivies par les États parties au Traité en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, que ces activités soient menées par un État partie au Traité seul ou en commun avec d’autres États, notamment dans le cadre d’organisations intergouvernementales internationales. Toutes questions pratiques se posant à l’occasion des activités poursuivies par des organisations intergouvernementales internationales en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, seront réglées par les États parties au Traité soit avec l’organisation internationale compétente, soit avec un ou plusieurs des États membres de ladite organisation qui sont parties au Traité. Article XIV7 1. Le présent Traité est ouvert à la signature de tous les États. Tout État qui n’aura pas signé le présent Traité avant son entrée en vigueur conformément au paragraphe 3 du présent article pourra y adhérer à tout moment. 2. Le présent Traité sera soumis à la ratification des États signataires. Les instruments de ratification et les instruments d’adhésion seront déposés auprès des Gouvernements des États-Unis d’Amérique, du Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord et de l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques, qui sont, dans le présent Traité, désignés comme étant les gouvernements dépositaires. 3. Le présent Traité entrera en vigueur lorsque cinq gouvernements, y compris ceux qui sont désignés comme étant les gouvernements dépositaires aux termes du présent Traité, auront déposé leurs instruments de ratification. 4. Pour les États dont les instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion seront déposés après l’entrée en vigueur du présent Traité, celui-ci entrera en vigueur à la date du dépôt de leurs instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion. 5. Les gouvernements dépositaires informeront sans délai tous les États qui auront signé le présent Traité ou y auront adhéré de la date de chaque signature, de la date du dépôt de chaque instrument de ratification du présent Traité ou d’adhésion au présent Traité, de la date d’entrée en vigueur du Traité ainsi que de toute autre communication. 6. Le présent Traité sera enregistré par les gouvernements dépositaires conformément à l’Article 102 de la Charte des Nations Unies. Article XV Tout État partie au présent Traité peut proposer des amendements au Traité. Les amendements prendront effet à l’égard de chaque État partie au Traité acceptant les amendements dès qu’ils auront été acceptés par la majorité des États parties au Traité et, par la suite, pour chacun des autres États parties au Traité, à la date de son acceptation desdits amendements. Article XVI Tout État partie au présent Traité peut, un an après l’entrée en vigueur du Traité, communiquer son intention de cesser d’y être partie par voie de notification écrite adressée aux gouvernements dépositaires. Cette notification prendra effet un an après la date à laquelle elle aura été reçue. Article XVII Le présent Traité, dont les textes anglais, chinois, espagnol, français et russe font également foi, sera déposé dans les archives des gouvernements dépositaires. Des copies dûment certifiées du présent Traité seront adressées par les gouvernements dépositaires aux gouvernements des États qui auront signé le Traité ou qui y auront adhéré. EN FOI DE QUOI les soussignés, dûment habilités à cet effet, ont signé le présent Traité. FAIT en trois exemplaires, à Londres, Moscou et Washington, D.C., le vingt-sept janvier mil neuf cent soixante-sept.Annexe 1 de la résolution 2222 (XXI). 8 Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique Les Parties contractantes, Notant l’importance considérable du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes1, qui prévoit que toute l’assistance possible sera prêtée aux astronautes en cas d’accident, de détresse ou d’atterrissage forcé, que le retour des astronautes sera effectué promptement et en toute sécurité, et que les objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique seront restitués, Désireuses de développer et de matérialiser davantage encore ces obligations, Soucieusesde favoriser la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Animées par des sentiments d’humanité, Sont convenues de ce qui suit: Article premier Chaque Partie contractante qui apprend ou constate que l’équipage d’un engin spatial a été victime d’un accident, ou se trouve en détresse, ou a fait un atterrissage forcé ou involontaire sur un territoire relevant de sa juridiction ou un amerrissage forcé en haute mer, ou a atterri en tout autre lieu qui ne relève pas de la juridiction d’un État: a) En informera immédiatement l’autorité de lancement ou, si elle ne peut l’identifier et communiquer immédiatement avec elle, diffusera immédiatement cette information par tous les moyens de communication appropriés dont elle dispose; b) En informera immédiatement le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies à qui il appartiendra de diffuser cette information sans délai par tous les moyens de communication appropriés dont il dispose. Article 2 Dans le cas où, par suite d’un accident, de détresse ou d’un atterrissage forcé ou involontaire, l’équipage d’un engin spatial atterrit sur un territoire relevant de la juridiction d’une Partie contractante, cette dernière prendra immédiatement toutes les mesures possibles pour assurer son sauvetage et lui apporter toute l’aide nécessaire. Elle informera l’autorité de lancement ainsi que le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies des mesures qu’elle prend et des progrès réalisés. Si l’aide de l’autorité de lancement peut faciliter un prompt sauvetage ou contribuer sensiblement à l’efficacité des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage, l’autorité de lancement coopérera avec la Partie contractante afin que ces opérations de recherche et de sauvetage soient menées avec efficacité. Ces9 opérations auront lieu sous la direction et le contrôle de la Partie contractante, qui agira en consultation étroite et continue avec l’autorité de lancement. Article 3 Si l’on apprend ou si l’on constate que l’équipage d’un engin spatial a amerri en haute mer ou a atterri en tout autre lieu qui ne relève pas de la juridiction d’un État, les Parties contractantes qui sont en mesure de le faire fourniront leur concours, si c’est nécessaire, pour les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage de cet équipage afin d’assurer son prompt sauvetage. Elles informeront l’autorité de lancement et le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies des mesures qu’elles prennent et des progrès réalisés. Article 4 Dans le cas où, par suite d’un accident, de détresse ou d’un atterrissage ou d’un amerrissage forcé ou involontaire, l’équipage d’un engin spatial atterrit sur un territoire relevant de la juridiction d’une Partie contractante ou a été trouvé en haute mer ou en tout autre lieu qui ne relève pas de la juridiction d’un État, il sera remis rapidement et dans les conditions voulues de sécurité aux représentants de l’autorité de lancement. Article 5 1. Chaque Partie contractante qui apprend ou constate qu’un objet spatial ou des éléments constitutifs dudit objet sont retombés sur la Terre dans un territoire relevant de sa juridiction, ou en haute mer, ou en tout autre lieu qui ne relève pas de la juridiction d’un État en informera l’autorité de lancement et le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. 2. Chaque Partie contractante qui exerce sa juridiction sur le territoire sur lequel a été découvert un objet spatial ou des éléments constitutifs dudit objet prendra, sur la demande de l’autorité de lancement et avec l’assistance de cette autorité, si elle est demandée, les mesures qu’elle jugera possibles pour récupérer l’objet ou ses éléments constitutifs. 3. Sur la demande de l’autorité de lancement, les objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique ou les éléments constitutifs desdits objets trouvés au-delà des limites territoriales de l’autorité de lancement seront remis aux représentants de l’autorité de lancement ou tenus à leur disposition, ladite autorité devant fournir, sur demande, des données d’identification avant que ces objets ne lui soient restitués. 4. Nonobstant les dispositions des paragraphes 2 et 3 du présent article, toute Partie contractante qui a des raisons de croire qu’un objet spatial ou des éléments constitutifs dudit objet qui ont été découverts sur un territoire relevant de sa juridiction ou qu’elle a récupérés en tout autre lieu sont, par leur nature, dangereux ou délétères, peut en informer l’autorité de lancement, qui prendra immédiatement des mesures efficaces, sous la direction et le contrôle de ladite Partie contractante, pour éliminer tout danger possible de préjudice. 5. Les dépenses engagées pour remplir les obligations concernant la récupération et la restitution d’un objet spatial ou d’éléments constitutifs dudit objet conformément aux dispositions des paragraphes 2 et 3 du présent article seront à la charge de l’autorité de lancement. Article 6 Aux fins du présent Accord, l’expression “autorité de lancement” vise l’État responsable du lancement, ou, si une organisation intergouvernementale internationale est responsable du lancement, ladite organisation, pourvu qu’elle déclare accepter les droits et obligations prévus dans le présent Accord et qu’une majorité des États membres10 de cette organisation soient Parties contractantes au présent Accord et au Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes. Article 7 1. Le présent Accord est ouvert à la signature de tous les États. Tout État qui n’aura pas signé le présent Accord avant son entrée en vigueur conformément au paragraphe 3 du présent article pourra y adhérer à tout moment. 2. Le présent Accord sera soumis à la ratification des États signataires. Les instruments de ratification et les instruments d’adhésion seront déposés auprès des Gouvernements des États-Unis d’Amérique, du Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord et de l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques, qui sont désignés comme étant les gouvernements dépositaires. 3. Le présent Accord entrera en vigueur lorsque cinq gouvernements, y compris ceux qui sont désignés comme étant les gouvernements dépositaires aux termes du présent Accord, auront déposé leurs instruments de ratification. 4. Pour les États dont les instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion seront déposés après l’entrée en vigueur du présent Accord, celui-ci prendra effet à la date du dépôt de leurs instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion. 5. Les gouvernements dépositaires informeront sans délai tous les États qui auront signé le présent Accord ou y auront adhéré de la date de chaque signature, de la date du dépôt de chaque instrument de ratification du présent Accord ou d’adhésion au présent Accord, de la date d’entrée en vigueur de l’Accord ainsi que de toute autre communication. 6. Le présent Accord sera enregistré par les gouvernements dépositaires conformément à l’Article 102 de la Charte des Nations Unies. Article 8 Tout État partie au présent Accord peut proposer des amendements à l’Accord. Les amendements prendront effet à l’égard de chaque État partie à l’Accord acceptant les amendements dès qu’ils auront été acceptés par la majorité des États parties à l’Accord, et par la suite, pour chacun des autres États parties à l’Accord, à la date de son acceptation desdits amendements. Article 9 Tout État partie à l’Accord pourra notifier par écrit aux gouvernements dépositaires son retrait de l’Accord un an après son entrée en vigueur. Ce retrait prendra effet un an après le jour où ladite notification aura été reçue. Article 10 Le présent Accord, dont les textes anglais, chinois, espagnol, français et russe font également foi, sera déposé dans les archives des gouvernements dépositaires. Des copies dûment certifiées du présent Accord seront adressées par les gouvernements dépositaires aux gouvernements des États qui auront signé l’Accord ou qui y auront adhéré. EN FOI DE QUOI les soussignés, à ce dûment habilités, ont signé le présent Accord.11 FAIT en trois exemplaires, à Londres, Moscou et Washington, D.C., le vingt-deux avril mil neuf cent soixante-huit.12 Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux Les États parties à la présente Convention, Reconnaissant qu’il est de l’intérêt commun de l’humanité tout entière de favoriser l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Rappelantle Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, Tenant compte de ce que, malgré les mesures de précaution que doivent prendre les États et les organisations internationales intergouvernementales qui se livrent au lancement d’objets spatiaux, ces objets peuvent éventuellement causer des dommages, Reconnaissant la nécessité d’élaborer des règles et procédures internationales efficaces relatives à la responsabilité pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux et d’assurer, en particulier, le prompt versement, aux termes de la présente Convention, d’une indemnisation totale et équitable aux victimes de ces dommages, Convaincus que l’établissement de telles règles et procédures contribuera à renforcer la coopération internationale dans le domaine de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Sont convenus de ce qui suit: Article premier Aux fins de la présente Convention: a) Le terme “dommage” désigne la perte de vies humaines, les lésions corporelles ou autres atteintes à la santé, ou la perte de biens d’État ou de personnes, physiques ou morales, ou de biens d’organisations internationales intergouvernementales, ou les dommages causés auxdits biens; b) Le terme “lancement” désigne également la tentative de lancement; c) L’expression “État de lancement” désigne: i) Un État qui procède ou fait procéder au lancement d’un objet spatial; ii) Un État dont le territoire ou les installations servent au lancement d’un objet spatial; d) L’expression “objet spatial” désigne également les éléments constitutifs d’un objet spatial, ainsi que son lanceur et les éléments de ce dernier. Article II Un État de lancement a la responsabilité absolue de verser réparation pour le dommage causé par son objet spatial à la surface de la Terre ou aux aéronefs en vol.13 Article III En cas de dommage causé, ailleurs qu’à la surface de la Terre, à un objet spatial d’un État de lancement ou à des personnes ou à des biens se trouvant à bord d’un tel objet spatial, par un objet spatial d’un autre État de lancement, ce dernier État n’est responsable que si le dommage est imputable à sa faute ou à la faute des personnes dont il doit répondre. Article IV 1. En cas de dommage causé, ailleurs qu’à la surface de la Terre, à un objet spatial d’un État de lancement ou à des personnes ou à des biens se trouvant à bord d’un tel objet spatial, par un objet spatial d’un autre État de lancement, et en cas de dommage causé de ce fait à un État tiers ou à des personnes physiques ou morales relevant de lui, les deux premiers États sont solidairement responsables envers l’État tiers dans les limites indiquées ci-après: a) Si le dommage a été causé à l’État tiers à la surface de la Terre ou à un aéronef en vol, leur responsabilité envers l’État est absolue; b) Si le dommage a été causé à un objet spatial d’un État tiers ou à des personnes ou à des biens se trouvant à bord d’un tel objet spatial, ailleurs qu’à la surface de la Terre, leur responsabilité envers l’État tiers est fondée sur la faute de l’un d’eux ou sur la faute de personnes dont chacun d’eux doit répondre. 2. Dans tous les cas de responsabilité solidaire prévue au paragraphe 1 du présent article, la charge de la réparation pour le dommage est répartie entre les deux premiers États selon la mesure dans laquelle ils étaient en faute; s’il est impossible d’établir dans quelle mesure chacun de ces États était en faute, la charge de la réparation est répartie entre eux de manière égale. Cette répartition ne peut porter atteinte au droit de l’État tiers de chercher à obtenir de l’un quelconque des États de lancement ou de tous les États de lancement qui sont solidairement responsables la pleine et entière réparation due en vertu de la présente Convention. Article V 1. Lorsque deux ou plusieurs États procèdent en commun au lancement d’un objet spatial, ils sont solidairement responsables de tout dommage qui peut en résulter. 2. Un État de lancement qui a réparé le dommage a un droit de recours contre les autres participants au lancement en commun. Les participants au lancement en commun peuvent conclure des accords relatifs à la répartition entre eux de la charge financière pour laquelle ils sont solidairement responsables. Lesdits accords ne portent pas atteinte au droit d’un État auquel a été causé un dommage de chercher à obtenir de l’un quelconque des États de lancement ou de tous les États de lancement qui sont solidairement responsables la pleine et entière réparation due en vertu de la présente Convention. 3. Un État dont le territoire ou les installations servent au lancement d’un objet spatial est réputé participant à un lancement commun. Article VI 1. Sous réserve des dispositions du paragraphe 2 du présent article, un État de lancement est exonéré de la responsabilité absolue dans la mesure où il établit que le dommage résulte, en totalité ou en partie, d’une faute lourde ou d’un acte ou d’une omission commis dans l’intention de provoquer un dommage, de la part d’un État demandeur ou des personnes physiques ou morales que ce dernier État représente.14 2. Aucune exonération, quelle qu’elle soit, n’est admise dans les cas où le dommage résulte d’activités d’un État de lancement qui ne sont pas conformes au droit international, y compris, en particulier, à la Charte des Nations Unies et au Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes. Article VII Les dispositions de la présente Convention ne s’appliquent pas au dommage causé par un objet spatial d’un État de lancement: a) Aux ressortissants de cet État de lancement; b) Aux ressortissants étrangers pendant qu’ils participent aux opérations de fonctionnement de cet objet spatial à partir du moment de son lancement ou à une phase ultérieure quelconque jusqu’à sa chute, ou pendant qu’ils se trouvent à proximité immédiate d’une zone envisagée comme devant servir au lancement ou à la récupération, à la suite d’une invitation de cet État de lancement. Article VIII 1. Un État qui subit un dommage ou dont des personnes physiques ou morales subissent un dommage peut présenter à un État de lancement une demande en réparation pour ledit dommage. 2. Si l’État dont les personnes physiques ou morales possèdent la nationalité n’a pas présenté de demande en réparation, un autre État peut, à raison d’un dommage subi sur son territoire par une personne physique ou morale, présenter une demande à un État de lancement. 3. Si ni l’État dont les personnes physiques ou morales possèdent la nationalité ni l’État sur le territoire duquel le dommage a été subi n’ont présenté de demande en réparation ou notifié son intention de présenter une demande, un autre État peut, à raison du dommage subi par ses résidents permanents, présenter une demande à un État de lancement. Article IX La demande en réparation est présentée à l’État de lancement par la voie diplomatique. Tout État qui n’entretient pas de relations diplomatiques avec cet État de lancement peut prier un État tiers de présenter sa demande et de représenter de toute autre manière ses intérêts en vertu de la présente Convention auprès de cet État de lancement. Il peut également présenter sa demande par l’intermédiaire du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, à condition que l’État demandeur et l’État de lancement soient l’un et l’autre Membres de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Article X 1. La demande en réparation peut être présentée à l’État de lancement dans le délai d’un an à compter de la date à laquelle s’est produit le dommage ou à compter de l’identification de l’État de lancement qui est responsable. 2. Si toutefois un État n’a pas connaissance du fait que le dommage s’est produit ou n’a pas pu identifier l’État de lancement qui est responsable, sa demande est recevable dans l’année qui suit la date à laquelle il prend connaissance des faits susmentionnés; toutefois, le délai ne saurait en aucun cas dépasser une année à compter de15 la date à laquelle l’État, agissant avec toute diligence, pouvait raisonnablement être censé avoir eu connaissance des faits. 3. Les délais précisés aux paragraphes 1 et 2 du présent article s’appliquent même si l’étendue du dommage n’est pas exactement connue. En pareil cas, toutefois, l’État demandeur a le droit de réviser sa demande et de présenter des pièces additionnelles au-delà du délai précisé, jusqu’à expiration d’un délai d’un an à compter du moment où l’étendue du dommage est exactement connue. Article XI 1. La présentation d’une demande en réparation à l’État de lancement en vertu de la présente Convention n’exige pas l’épuisement préalable des recours internes qui seraient ouverts à l’État demandeur ou aux personnes physiques ou morales dont il représente les intérêts. 2. Aucune disposition de la présente Convention n’empêche un État ou une personne physique ou morale qu’il peut représenter de former une demande auprès des instances juridictionnelles ou auprès des organes administratifs d’un État de lancement. Toutefois, un État n’a pas le droit de présenter une demande en vertu de la présente Convention à raison d’un dommage pour lequel une demande est déjà introduite auprès des instances juridictionnelles ou auprès des organes administratifs d’un État de lancement, ni en application d’un autre accord international par lequel les États intéressés seraient liés. Article XII Le montant de la réparation que l’État de lancement sera tenu de payer pour le dommage en application de la présente Convention sera déterminé conformément au droit international et aux principes de justice et d’équité, de telle manière que la réparation pour le dommage soit de nature à rétablir la personne, physique ou morale, l’État ou l’organisation internationale demandeur dans la situation qui aurait existé si le dommage ne s’était pas produit. Article XIII À moins que l’État demandeur et l’État qui est tenu de réparer en vertu de la présente Convention ne conviennent d’un autre mode de réparation, le montant de la réparation est payé dans la monnaie de l’État demandeur ou, à la demande de celui-ci, dans la monnaie de l’État qui est tenu de réparer le dommage. Article XIV Si, dans un délai d’un an à compter de la date à laquelle l’État demandeur a notifié à l’État de lancement qu’il a soumis les pièces justificatives de sa demande, une demande en réparation n’est pas réglée par voie de négociations diplomatiques selon l’article IX, les parties intéressées constituent, sur la demande de l’une d’elles, une Commission de règlement des demandes. Article XV 1. La Commission de règlement des demandes se compose de trois membres: un membre désigné par l’État demandeur, un membre désigné par l’État de lancement et le troisième membre, le Président, choisi d’un commun accord par les deux parties. Chaque partie procède à cette désignation dans un délai de deux mois à compter de la demande de constitution de la Commission de règlement des demandes.16 2. Si aucun accord n’intervient sur le choix du Président dans un délai de quatre mois à compter de la demande de constitution de la Commission, l’une ou l’autre des parties peut prier le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies de nommer le Président dans un délai supplémentaire de deux mois. Article XVI 1. Si l’une des parties ne procède pas, dans le délai prévu, à la désignation qui lui incombe, le Président, sur la demande de l’autre partie, constituera à lui seul la Commission de règlement des demandes. 2. Si, pour une raison quelconque, une vacance survient dans la Commission, il y est pourvu suivant la procédure adoptée pour la désignation initiale. 3. La Commission détermine sa propre procédure. 4. La Commission décide du ou des lieux où elle siège, ainsi que de toutes autres questions administratives. 5. Exception faite des décisions et sentences rendues dans les cas où la Commission n’est composée que d’un seul membre, toutes les décisions et sentences de la Commission sont rendues à la majorité. Article XVII La composition de la Commission de règlement des demandes n’est pas élargie du fait que deux ou plusieurs États demandeurs ou que deux ou plusieurs États de lancement sont parties à une procédure engagée devant elle. Les États demandeurs parties à une telle procédure nomment conjointement un membre de la Commission de la même manière et sous les mêmes conditions que s’il n’y avait qu’un seul État demandeur. Si deux ou plusieurs États de lancement sont parties à une telle procédure, ils nomment conjointement un membre de la Commission, de la même manière. Si les États demandeurs ou les États de lancement ne procèdent pas, dans les délais prévus, à la désignation qui leur incombe, le Président constituera à lui seul la Commission. Article XVIII La Commission de règlement des demandes décide du bien-fondé de la demande en réparation et fixe, s’il y a lieu, le montant de la réparation à verser. Article XIX 1. La Commission de règlement des demandes agit en conformité des dispositions de l’article XII. 2. La décision de la Commission a un caractère définitif et obligatoire si les parties en sont convenues ainsi; dans le cas contraire, la Commission rend une sentence définitive valant recommandation, que les parties prennent en considération de bonne foi. La Commission motive sa décision ou sa sentence. 3. La Commission rend sa décision ou sa sentence aussi rapidement que possible et au plus tard dans un délai d’un an à compter de la date à laquelle elle a été constituée, à moins que la Commission ne juge nécessaire de proroger ce délai. 4. La Commission rend publique sa décision ou sa sentence. Elle en fait tenir une copie certifiée conforme à chacune des parties et au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies.17 Article XX Les dépenses relatives à la Commission de règlement des demandes sont réparties également entre les parties, à moins que la Commission n’en décide autrement.Article XXI Si le dommage causé par un objet spatial met en danger, à grande échelle, les vies humaines ou compromet sérieusement les conditions de vie de la population ou le fonctionnement des centres vitaux, les États parties, et notamment l’État de lancement, examineront la possibilité de fournir une assistance appropriée et rapide à l’État qui aurait subi le dommage, lorsque ce dernier en formule la demande. Cet article, cependant, est sans préjudice des droits et obligations des États parties en vertu de la présente Convention. Article XXII 1. Dans la présente Convention, à l’exception des articles XXIV à XXVII, les références aux États s’appliquent à toute organisation internationale intergouvernementale qui se livre à des activités spatiales, si cette organisation déclare accepter les droits et les obligations prévus dans la présente Convention et si la majorité des États membres de l’organisation sont des États parties à la présente Convention et au Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes. 2. Les États membres d’une telle organisation qui sont des États parties à la présente Convention prennent toutes les dispositions voulues pour que l’organisation fasse une déclaration en conformité du paragraphe précédent. 3. Si une organisation internationale intergouvernementale est responsable d’un dommage aux termes des dispositions de la présente Convention, cette organisation et ceux de ses membres qui sont des États parties à la présente Convention sont solidairement responsables, étant entendu toutefois que: a) Toute demande en réparation pour ce dommage doit être présentée d’abord à l’organisation; et b) Seulement dans le cas où l’organisation n’aurait pas versé dans le délai de six mois la somme convenue ou fixée comme réparation pour le dommage, l’État demandeur peut invoquer la responsabilité des membres qui sont des États parties à la présente Convention pour le paiement de ladite somme. 4. Toute demande en réparation formulée conformément aux dispositions de la présente Convention pour le dommage causé à une organisation qui a fait une déclaration conformément au paragraphe 1 du présent article doit être présentée par un État membre de l’organisation qui est un État partie à la présente Convention. Article XXIII 1. Les dispositions de la présente Convention ne portent pas atteinte aux autres accords internationaux en vigueur dans les rapports entre les États parties à ces accords. 2. Aucune disposition de la présente Convention ne saurait empêcher les États de conclure des accords internationaux confirmant, complétant ou développant ses dispositions.18 Article XXIV 1. La présente Convention est ouverte à la signature de tous les États. Tout État qui n’aura pas signé la présente Convention avant son entrée en vigueur conformément au paragraphe 3 du présent article pourra y adhérer à tout moment. 2. La présente Convention sera soumise à la ratification des États signataires. Les instruments de ratification et les instruments d’adhésion seront déposés auprès des Gouvernements des États-Unis d’Amérique, du Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord et de l’Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques, qui sont ainsi désignés comme gouvernements dépositaires. 3. La présente Convention entrera en vigueur à la date du dépôt du cinquième instrument de ratification. 4. Pour les États dont les instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion seront déposés après l’entrée en vigueur de la présente Convention, celle-ci entrera en vigueur à la date du dépôt de leurs instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion. 5. Les gouvernements dépositaires informeront sans délai tous les États qui auront signé la présente Convention ou y auront adhéré de la date de chaque signature, de la date du dépôt de chaque instrument de ratification de la présente Convention ou d’adhésion à la présente Convention, de la date d’entrée en vigueur de la Convention, ainsi que de toute autre communication. 6. La présente Convention sera enregistrée par les gouvernements dépositaires conformément à l’Article 102 de la Charte des Nations Unies. Article XXV Tout État partie à la présente Convention peut proposer des amendements à la Convention. Les amendements prendront effet à l’égard de chaque État partie à la Convention acceptant les amendements dès qu’ils auront été acceptés par la majorité des États parties à la Convention et, par la suite, pour chacun des autres États parties à la Convention, à la date de son acceptation desdits amendements. Article XXVI Dix ans après l’entrée en vigueur de la présente Convention, la question de l’examen de la Convention sera inscrite à l’ordre du jour provisoire de l’Assemblée générale de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, à l’effet d’examiner, à la lumière de l’application de la Convention pendant la période écoulée, si elle appelle une révision. Toutefois, cinq ans après la date d’entrée en vigueur de la Convention, une conférence des États parties à la Convention sera convoquée, à la demande d’un tiers des États parties à la Convention, et avec l’assentiment de la majorité d’entre eux, afin de réexaminer la présente Convention. Article XXVII Tout État partie à la présente Convention peut, un an après l’entrée en vigueur de la Convention, communiquer son intention de cesser d’y être partie par voie de notification écrite adressée aux gouvernements dépositaires. Cette notification prendra effet un an après la date à laquelle elle aura été reçue.19 Article XXVIII La présente Convention, dont les textes anglais, chinois, espagnol, français et russe font également foi, sera déposée dans les archives des gouvernements dépositaires. Des copies dûment certifiées de la présente Convention seront adressées par les gouvernements dépositaires aux gouvernements des États qui auront signé la Convention ou qui y auront adhéré. EN FOI DE QUOI les soussignés, dûment habilités à cet effet, ont signé la présente Convention. FAIT en trois exemplaires, à Londres, Moscou et Washington, D.C., le vingt-neuf mars mil neuf cent soixante-douze.Annexe 2 de la résolution 2345 (XXII). 3Annexe de la résolution 2777 (XXVI). 20 Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique Les États parties à la présente Convention, Reconnaissant qu’il est de l’intérêt commun de l’humanité tout entière de favoriser l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Rappelant que le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes1, en date du 27 janvier 1967, affirme que les États ont la responsabilité internationale des activités nationales dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et mentionne l’État sur le registre duquel est inscrit un objet lancé dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Rappelant également que l’Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique2, en date du 22 avril 1968, prévoit que l’autorité de lancement doit fournir sur demande, des données d’identification avant qu’un objet qu’elle a lancé dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et qui est trouvé au-delà de ses limites territoriales ne lui soit restitué, Rappelant en outre que la Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux3, en date du 29 mars 1972, établit des règles et des procédures internationales relatives à la responsabilité qu’assument les États de lancement pour les dommages causés par leurs objets spatiaux, Désireux, compte tenu du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, de prévoir l’immatriculation nationale par les États de lancement des objets spatiaux lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Désireux en outre d’établir un registre central des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, où l’inscription soit obligatoire et qui soit tenu par le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, Désireux également de fournir aux États parties des moyens et des procédures supplémentaires pour aider à identifier des objets spatiaux, Estimant qu’un système obligatoire d’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique faciliterait, en particulier, l’identification desdits objets et contribuerait à l’application et au développement du droit international régissant l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Sont convenus de ce qui suit: Article premier Aux fins de la présente Convention: a) L’expression “État de lancement” désigne:21 i) Un État qui procède ou fait procéder au lancement d’un objet spatial; ii) Un État dont le territoire ou les installations servent au lancement d’un objet spatial; b) L’expression “objet spatial” désigne également les éléments constitutifs d’un objet spatial, ainsi que son lanceur et les éléments de ce dernier; c) L’expression “État d’immatriculation” désigne un État de lancement sur le registre duquel un objet spatial est inscrit conformément à l’article II. Article II 1. Lorsqu’un objet spatial est lancé sur une orbite terrestre ou au-delà, l’État de lancement l’immatricule au moyen d’une inscription sur un registre approprié dont il assure la tenue. L’État de lancement informe le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies de la création dudit registre. 2. Lorsque, pour un objet spatial lancé sur une orbite terrestre ou au-delà, il existe deux ou plusieurs États de lancement, ceux-ci déterminent conjointement lequel d’entre eux doit immatriculer ledit objet conformément au paragraphe 1 du présent article, en tenant compte des dispositions de l’article VIII du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et sans préjudice des accords appropriés qui ont été ou qui seront conclus entre les États de lancement au sujet de la juridiction et du contrôle sur l’objet spatial et sur tout personnel de ce dernier. 3. La teneur de chaque registre et les conditions dans lesquelles il est tenu sont déterminées par l’État d’immatriculation intéressé. Article III 1. Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies assure la tenue d’un registre dans lequel sont consignés les renseignements fournis conformément à l’article IV. 2. L’accès à tous les renseignements figurant sur ce registre est entièrement libre. Article IV 1. Chaque État d’immatriculation fournit au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, dès que cela est réalisable, les renseignements ci-après concernant chaque objet spatial inscrit sur son registre: a) Nom de l’État ou des États de lancement; b) Indicatif approprié ou numéro d’immatriculation de l’objet spatial; c) Date et territoire ou lieu de lancement; d) Principaux paramètres de l’orbite, y compris: i) La période nodale, ii) L’inclinaison, iii) L’apogée, iv) Le périgée;22 e) Fonction générale de l’objet spatial. 2. Chaque État d’immatriculation peut de temps à autre communiquer au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies des renseignements supplémentaires concernant un objet spatial inscrit sur son registre. 3. Chaque État d’immatriculation informe le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, dans toute la mesure possible et dès que cela est réalisable, des objets spatiaux au sujet desquels il a antérieurement communiqué des renseignements et qui ont été mais qui ne sont plus sur une orbite terrestre. Article V Chaque fois qu’un objet spatial lancé sur une orbite terrestre ou au-delà est marqué au moyen de l’indicatif ou du numéro d’immatriculation mentionnés à l’alinéa b du paragraphe 1 de l’article IV, ou des deux, l’État d’immatriculation notifie ce fait au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies lorsqu’il lui communique les renseignements concernant l’objet spatial conformément à l’article IV. Dans ce cas, le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies inscrit cette notification dans le registre. Article VI Dans le cas où l’application des dispositions de la présente Convention n’aura pas permis à un État partie d’identifier un objet spatial qui a causé un dommage audit État partie ou à une personne physique ou morale relevant de sa juridiction, ou qui risque d’être dangereux ou nocif, les autres États parties, y compris en particulier les États qui disposent d’installations pour l’observation et la poursuite des objets spatiaux, devront répondre dans toute la mesure possible à toute demande d’assistance en vue d’identifier un tel objet, à laquelle il pourra être accédé dans des conditions équitables et raisonnables et qui leur sera présentée par ledit État partie ou par le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies en son nom. L’État partie présentant une telle demande communiquera, dans toute la mesure possible, des renseignements sur la date, la nature et les circonstances des événements ayant donné lieu à la demande. Les modalités de cette assistance feront l’objet d’un accord entre les parties intéressées. Article VII 1. Dans la présente Convention, à l’exception des articles VIII à XII inclus, les références aux États s’appliquent à toute organisation internationale intergouvernementale qui se livre à des activités spatiales, si cette organisation déclare accepter les droits et les obligations prévus dans la présente Convention et si la majorité des États membres de l’organisation sont des États parties à la présente Convention et au Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes. 2. Les États membres d’une telle organisation qui sont des États parties à la présente Convention prennent toutes les dispositions voulues pour que l’organisation fasse une déclaration en conformité du paragraphe 1 du présent article. Article VIII 1. La présente Convention sera ouverte à la signature de tous les États au Siège de l’Organisation des Nations Unies à New York. Tout État qui n’aura pas signé la présente Convention avant son entrée en vigueur conformément au paragraphe 3 du présent article pourra y adhérer à tout moment.23 2. La présente Convention sera soumise à la ratification des États signataires. Les instruments de ratification et les instruments d’adhésion seront déposés auprès du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies.3. La présente Convention entrera en vigueur entre les États qui auront déposé leurs instruments de ratification à la date du dépôt du cinquième instrument de ratification auprès du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. 4. Pour les États dont les instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion seront déposés après l’entrée en vigueur de la présente Convention, celle-ci entrera en vigueur à la date du dépôt de leurs instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion. 5. Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies informera sans délai tous les États qui auront signé la présente Convention ou y auront adhéré de la date de chaque signature, de la date du dépôt de chaque instrument de ratification de la présente Convention ou d’adhésion à la présente Convention, de la date d’entrée en vigueur de la Convention, ainsi que de toute autre communication. Article IX Tout État partie à la présente Convention peut proposer des amendements à la Convention. Les amendements prendront effet à l’égard de chaque État partie à la Convention acceptant les amendements dès qu’ils auront été acceptés par la majorité des États parties à la Convention et, par la suite, pour chacun des autres États parties à la Convention, à la date de son acceptation desdits amendements. Article X Dix ans après l’entrée en vigueur de la présente Convention, la question de l’examen de la Convention sera inscrite à l’ordre du jour provisoire de l’Assemblée générale de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, à l’effet d’examiner, à la lumière de l’application de la Convention pendant la période écoulée, si elle appelle une révision. Toutefois, cinq ans au moins après la date d’entrée en vigueur de la présente Convention, une conférence des États parties à la présente Convention sera convoquée, à la demande d’un tiers desdits États et avec l’assentiment de la majorité d’entre eux, afin de réexaminer la présente Convention. Ce réexamen tiendra compte en particulier de tous progrès techniques pertinents, y compris ceux ayant trait à l’identification des objets spatiaux. Article XI Tout État partie à la présente Convention peut, un an après l’entrée en vigueur de la Convention, communiquer son intention de cesser d’y être partie par voie de notification écrite adressée au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Cette notification prendra effet un an après la date à laquelle elle aura été reçue. Article XII La présente Convention, dont les textes anglais, arabe, chinois, espagnol, français et russe font également foi, sera déposée auprès du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, qui en enverra des copies dûment certifiées à tous les États qui auront signé la Convention ou y auront adhéré. EN FOI DE QUOI les soussignés, dûment habilités à cet effet par leurs gouvernements respectifs, ont signé la présente Convention, ouverte à la signature à New York, le quatorze janvier mil neuf cent soixante-quinze.Annexe 4 de la résolution 3235 (XXIX). 24 Accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes Les États parties au présent Accord, Notant les succès obtenus par les États dans l'exploration et l'utilisation de la Lune et des autres corps célestes, Reconnaissant que la Lune, satellite naturel de la Terre, joue à ce titre un rôle important dans l'exploration de l'espace, Fermement résolus à favoriser dans des conditions d'égalité le développement continu de la coopération entre États aux fins de l'exploration et de l'utilisation de la Lune et des autres corps célestes, Désireux, d'éviter que la Lune ne puisse servir d'arène à des conflits internationaux, Tenant compte des avantages qui peuvent être retirés de l'exploitation des ressources naturelles de la Lune et des autres corps célestes, Rappelantle Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d'exploration et d'utilisation de l'espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes1, l'Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l'espace extra-atmosphérique2, la Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux3 et Convention sur l'immatriculation des objets lancés dans l'espace extra-atmosphérique4, Prenant en considération la nécessité de définir et de développer, en ce qui concerne la Lune et les autres corps célestes, les dispositions de ces documents internationaux, eu égard aux progrès futurs de l'exploration et de l'utilisation de l'espace, Sont convenus de ce qui suit: Article premier 1. Les dispositions du présent Accord relatives à la Lune s'appliquent également aux autres corps célestes à l'intérieur du système solaire, excepté la Terre, à moins que des normes juridiques spécifiques n'entrent en vigueur en ce qui concerne l'un ce ces corps célestes. 2. Aux fins du présent Accord, toute référence à la Lune est réputée s'appliquer aux orbites autour de la Lune et aux autres trajectoires en direction ou autour de la Lune. 3. Le présent Accord ne s'applique pas aux matières extraterrestres qui atteignent la surface de la Terre par des moyens naturels. Article 2 Toutes les activités sur la Lune, y compris les activités d'exploration et d'utilisation, sont menées en conformité avec le droit international, en particulier la Charte des Nations Unies, et compte tenu de la Déclaration5Annexe de la résolution 2625 (XXV). 25 relative aux principes du droit international touchant les relations amicales et la coopération entre les États conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies5, adoptée par l'Assemblée générale le 24 octobre 1970, dans l'intérêt du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales et pour encourager la coopération internationale et la compréhension mutuelle, les intérêts respectifs de tous les autres États parties étant dûment pris en considération. Article 3 1. Tous les États parties utilisent la Lune exclusivement à des fins pacifiques. 2. Est interdit tout recours à la menace ou à l'emploi de la force ou à tout autre acte d'hostilité ou menace d'hostilité sur la Lune. Il est interdit de même d'utiliser la Lune pour se livrer à un acte de cette nature ou recourir à une menace de cette nature à l'encontre de la Terre, de la Lune, d'engins spatiaux, de l'équipage d'engins spatiaux ou d'objets spatiaux créés par l'homme. 3. Les États parties ne mettent sur orbite autour de la Lune, ni sur une autre trajectoire en direction ou autour de la Lune, aucun objet porteur d'armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d'armes de destruction massive, ni ne placent ou n'utilisent de telles armes à la surface ou dans le sol de la Lune. 4. Sont interdits sur la Lune l'aménagement de bases, installations et fortifications militaires, les essais d'armes de tous types et l'exécution de manoeuvres militaires. N'est pas interdite l'utilisation de personnel militaire à des fins de recherche scientifique ou à toute autre fin pacifique. N'est pas interdite non plus l'utilisation de tout équipement ou installation nécessaire à l'exploration et à l'utilisation pacifiques de la Lune. Article 4 1. L'exploration et l'utilisation de la Lune sont l'apanage de l'humanité tout entière et se font pour le bien et dans l'intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit leur degré de développement économique ou scientifique. Il est dûment tenu compte des intérêts de la génération actuelle et des générations futures, ainsi que de la nécessité de favoriser le relèvement des niveaux de vie et des conditions de progrès et de développement économique et social conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies. 2. Dans toutes leurs activités concernant l'exploration et l'utilisation de la Lune, les États parties se fondent sur le principe de la coopération et de l'assistance mutuelle. La coopération internationale en application du présent Accord doit être la plus large possible et peut se faire sur une base multilatérale, sur une base bilatérale ou par l'intermédiaire d'organisations intergouvernementales internationales. Article 5 1. Les États parties informent le Secrétaire général de l'Organisation des Nations Unies, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, autant qu'il est possible et réalisable, de leurs activités d'exploration et d'utilisation de la Lune. Des renseignements concernant le calendrier, les objectifs, les lieux de déroulement, les paramètres d'orbites et la durée de chaque mission vers la Lune sont communiqués le plus tôt possible après le début de la mission, et des renseignements sur les résultats de chaque mission, y compris les résultats scientifiques, doivent être communiqués dès la fin de la mission. Au cas où une mission durerait plus de soixante jours, des renseignements sur son déroulement, y compris le cas échéant, sur ses résultats scientifiques, sont donnés périodiquement, tous les trente jours. Si la mission dure plus de six mois, il n'y a lieu de communiquer par la suite que des renseignements complémentaires importants.26 2. Si un État partie apprend qu'un autre État partie envisage de mener des activités simultanément dans la même région de la Lune, sur la même orbite autour de la Lune ou sur une même trajectoire en direction ou autour de la Lune, il informe promptement l'autre État du calendrier et du plan de ses propres activités. 3. Dans les activités qu'ils exercent en vertu du présent Accord, les États parties informent sans délai le Secrétaire général, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, de tout phénomène qu'ils ont constaté dans l'espace, y compris la Lune, qui pourrait présenter un danger pour la vie et la santé de l'homme, ainsi que de tous signes de vie organique. Article 6 1. Tous les États parties ont, sans discrimination d'aucune sorte, dans des conditions d'égalité et conformément au droit international, la liberté de recherche scientifique sur la Lune. 2. Dans les recherches scientifiques et conformément aux dispositions du présent Accord, les États parties ont le droit de recueillir et de prélever sur la Lune des échantillons de minéraux et d'autres substances. Ces échantillons restent à la disposition des États parties qui les ont fait recueillir, lesquels peuvent les utiliser à des fins pacifiques. Les États parties tiennent compte de ce qu'il est souhaitable de mettre une partie desdits échantillons à la disposition d'autres États parties intéressés et de la communauté scientifique internationale aux fins de recherche scientifique. Les États parties peuvent, au cours de leurs recherches scientifiques, utiliser aussi en quantités raisonnables pour le soutien de leurs missions des minéraux et d'autres substances de la Lune. 3. Les États parties conviennent qu'il est souhaitable d'échanger, autant qu'il est possible et réalisable, du personnel scientifique et autre au cours des expéditions vers la Lune ou dans les installations qui s'y trouvent. Article 7 1. Lorsqu'ils explorent et utilisent la Lune, les États parties prennent des mesures pour éviter de perturber l'équilibre existant du milieu en lui faisant subir des transformations nocives, en le contaminant dangereusement par l'apport de matière étrangère ou d'une autre façon. Les États parties prennent aussi des mesures pour éviter toute dégradation du milieu terrestre par l'apport de matière extraterrestre ou d'une autre façon. 2. Les États parties informent le Secrétaire général de l'Organisation des Nations Unies des mesures qu'ils prennent en application du paragraphe 1 du présent article et, dans toute la mesure possible, lui notifient à l'avance leurs plans concernant le placement de substances radioactives sur la Lune et l'objet de cette opération. 3. Les États parties font rapport aux autres États parties et au Secrétaire général au sujet des régions de la Lune qui présentent un intérêt scientifique particulier afin qu'on puisse, sans préjudice des droits des autres États parties, envisager de désigner lesdites régions comme réserves scientifiques internationales pour lesquelles on conviendra d'accords spéciaux de protection, en consultation avec les organismes compétents des Nations Unies. Article 8 1. Les États parties peuvent exercer leurs activités d'exploration et d'utilisation de la Lune en n'importe quel point de sa surface ou sous sa surface, sous réserve des dispositions du présent Accord. 2. À cette fin, les États parties peuvent notamment: a) Poser leurs objets spatiaux sur la Lune et les lancer à partir de la Lune;27 b) Placer leur personnel ainsi que leurs véhicules, matériel, stations, installations et équipements spatiaux en n'importe quel point à la surface ou sous la surface de la Lune. Le personnel ainsi que les véhicules, le matériel, les stations, les installations et les équipements spatiaux peuvent se déplacer ou être déplacés librement à la surface ou sous la surface de la Lune. 3. Les activités menées par les États parties conformément aux paragraphes 1 et 2 du présent article ne doivent pas gêner les activités menées par d'autres États parties sur la Lune. Au cas où ces activités risqueraient de causer une gêne, les États parties intéressés doivent procéder à des consultations conformément aux paragraphes 2 et 3 de l'article 15 du présent Accord. Article 9 1. Les États parties peuvent installer des stations habitées ou inhabitées sur la Lune. Un État partie qui installe une station n'utilise que la surface nécessaire pour répondre aux besoins de la station et fait connaître immédiatement au Secrétaire général de l'Organisation des Nations Unies l'emplacement et les buts de ladite station. De même, par la suite, il fait savoir chaque année au Secrétaire général si cette station continue d'être utilisée et si ses buts ont changé. 2. Les stations sont disposées de façon à ne pas empêcher le libre accès à toutes les parties de la Lune du personnel, des véhicules et du matériel d'autres États parties qui poursuivent des activités sur la Lune conformément aux dispositions du présent Accord ou de l'article premier du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d'exploration et d'utilisation de l'espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes. Article 10 1. Les États parties prennent toutes les mesures possibles pour sauvegarder la vie et la santé des personnes se trouvant sur la Lune. À cette fin, ils considèrent toute personne se trouvant sur la Lune comme étant un astronaute au sens de l'article V du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d'exploration et d'utilisation de l'espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et comme étant un membre de l'équipage d'un engin spatial au sens de l'Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l'espace extra-atmosphérique. 2. Les États parties recueillent dans leurs stations, leurs installations, leurs véhicules et autres équipements les personnes en détresse sur la Lune. Article 11 1. La Lune et ses ressources naturelles constituent le patrimoine commun de l'humanité, qui trouve son expression dans les dispositions du présent Accord, en particulier au paragraphe 5 du présent article. 2. La Lune ne peut faire l'objet d'aucune appropriation nationale par proclamation de souveraineté, ni par voie d'utilisation ou d'occupation, ni par aucun autre moyen. 3. Ni la surface ni le sous-sol de la Lune, ni une partie quelconque de celle-ci ou les ressources naturelles qui s'y trouvent, ne peuvent devenir la propriété d'États, d'organisations internationales intergouvernementales ou non gouvernementales, d'organisations nationales ou d'entités gouvernementales, ou de personnes physiques. L'installation à la surface ou sous la surface de la Lune de personnel ou de véhicules, matériel, stations, installations ou équipements spatiaux, y compris d'ouvrages reliés à sa surface ou à son sous-sol, ne crée pas de droits de28 propriété sur la surface ou le sous-sol de la Lune ou sur une partie quelconque de celle-ci. Les dispositions qui précèdent sont sans préjudice du régime international visé au paragraphe 5 du présent article. 4. Les États parties ont le droit d'explorer et d'utiliser la Lune, sans discrimination d'aucune sorte, dans des conditions d'égalité et conformément au droit international et aux dispositions du présent Accord. 5. Les États parties au présent Accord s'engagent à établir un régime international, y compris des procédures appropriées, régissant l'exploitation des ressources naturelles de la Lune lorsque cette exploitation sera sur le point de devenir possible. Cette disposition sera appliquée conformément à l'article 18 du présent Accord. 6. Pour faciliter l'établissement du régime international visé au paragraphe 5 du présent article, les États parties informent le Secrétaire général de l'Organisation des Nations Unies, ainsi que le public et la communauté scientifique internationale, autant qu'il est possible et réalisable, de toutes ressources naturelles qu'ils peuvent découvrir sur la Lune. 7. Ledit régime international a notamment pour buts principaux: a) D'assurer la mise en valeur méthodique et sans danger des ressources naturelles de la Lune; b) D'assurer la gestion rationnelle de ces ressources; c) De développer les possibilités d'utilisation de ces ressources; et d) De ménager une répartition équitable entre tous les États parties des avantages qui résulteront de ces ressources, une attention spéciale étant accordée aux intérêts et aux besoins des pays en développement, ainsi qu'aux efforts des pays qui ont contribué, soit directement, soit indirectement, à l'exploration de la Lune. 8. Toutes les activités relatives aux ressources naturelles de la Lune sont exercées d'une manière compatible avec les buts énoncés au paragraphe 7 du présent article et avec les dispositions du paragraphe 2 de l'article 6 du présent Accord. Article 12 1. Les États parties conservent la juridiction ou le contrôle sur leur personnel, ainsi que sur leurs véhicules, matériel, stations, installations et équipements spatiaux se trouvant sur la Lune. La présence sur la Lune desdits véhicules, matériel, stations, installations et équipements ne modifie pas les droits de propriété les concernant. 2. Les dispositions de l'article 5 de l'Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l'espace dans l'espace extra-atmosphérique sont applicables aux véhicules, aux installations et au matériel, ou à leurs éléments constitutifs, trouvés dans des endroits autres que ceux où ils devraient être. 3. Dans les cas d'urgence mettant en danger la vie humaine, les États parties peuvent utiliser le matériel, les véhicules, les installations, l'équipement ou les réserves d'autres États parties se trouvant sur la Lune. Le Secrétaire général de l'Organisation des Nations Unies ou l'État partie intéressé en est informé sans retard. Article 1329 Tout État partie qui constate qu'un objet spatial ou des éléments constitutifs d'un tel objet qu'il n'a pas lancé ont fait sur la Lune un atterrissage accidentel, forcé ou imprévu, en avise sans tarder l'État partie qui a procédé au lancement et le Secrétaire général de l'Organisation des Nations Unies. Article 14 1. Les États parties au présent Accord ont la responsabilité internationale des activités nationales sur la Lune, qu'elles soient menées par des organismes gouvernementaux ou par des entités non gouvernementales, et veillent à ce que lesdites activités soient menées conformément aux dispositions du présent Accord. Les États parties s'assurent que les entités non gouvernementales relevant de leur juridiction n'entreprennent des activités sur la Lune qu'avec l'autorisation de l'État partie intéressé et sous sa surveillance continue. 2. Les États parties reconnaissent que des arrangements détaillés concernant la responsabilité en cas de dommages causés sur la Lune, venant s'ajouter aux dispositions du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d'exploration et d'utilisation de l'espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et à celles de la Convention relative à la responsabilité concernant les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux, pourraient devenir nécessaires par suite du développement des activités sur la Lune. Lesdits arrangements seront élaborés conformément à la procédure prévue à l'article 18 du présent Accord. Article 15 1. Chaque État partie peut s'assurer que les activités des autres États parties relatives à l'exploration et à l'utilisation de la Lune sont compatibles avec les dispositions du présent Accord. À cet effet, tous les véhicules, le matériel, les stations, les installations et les équipements spatiaux se trouvant sur la Lune sont accessibles aux autres États parties. Ces derniers notifient au préalable toute visite projetée, afin que les consultations voulues puissent avoir lieu et que le maximum de précautions puissent être prises pour assurer la sécurité et éviter de gêner les opérations normales sur les lieux de l'installation à visiter. En exécution du présent article, un État partie peut agir en son nom propre ou avec l'assistance entière ou partielle d'un autre État partie, ou encore par des procédures internationales appropriées dans le cadre de l'Organisation des Nations Unies et conformément à la Charte. 2. Un État partie qui a lieu de croire qu’un autre État partie ou bien ne s’acquitte pas des obligations qui lui incombent en vertu du présent Accord ou bien porte atteinte aux droits qu’il tient du présent Accord peut demander l’ouverture de consultations avec cet autre État partie. L’État partie qui reçoit cette demande de consultations doit engager lesdites consultations sans tarder. Tout autre État partie qui en fait la demande est en droit de prendre part à ces consultations. Chacun des États parties qui participent à ces consultations doit rechercher une solution mutuellement acceptable au litige et tient compte des droits et intérêts de tous les États parties. Le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies est informé des résultats des consultations et communique les renseignements reçus à tous les États parties intéressés. 3. Si les consultations n’aboutissent pas à un règlement mutuellement acceptable et tenant compte des droits et intérêts de tous les États parties, les parties intéressées prennent toutes les dispositions nécessaires pour régler ce différend par d’autres moyens pacifiques de leur choix adaptés aux circonstances et à la nature du différend. Si des difficultés surgissent à l’occasion de l’ouverture de consultations, ou si les consultations n’aboutissent pas à un règlement mutuellement acceptable, un État partie peut demander l’assistance du Secrétaire général, sans le consentement d’aucun autre État partie intéressé, afin de régler le litige. Un État partie qui n’entretient pas de relations diplomatiques avec un autre État partie intéressé participe auxdites consultations, à sa préférence, soit par lui-même, soit par l’intermédiaire d’un autre État partie ou du Secrétaire général.30 Article 16 Dans le présent Accord, à l’exception des articles 17 à 21, les références aux États s’appliquent à toute organisation internationale intergouvernementale qui se livre à des activités spatiales si cette organisation déclare accepter les droits et les obligations prévus dans le présent Accord et si la majorité des États membres de l’organisation sont des États parties au présent Accord et au Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes. Les États membres d’une telle organisation qui sont parties au présent Accord prennent toutes les mesures voulues pour que l’organisation fasse une déclaration en conformité des dispositions du présent article. Article 17 Tout État partie au présent Accord peut proposer des amendements à l’Accord. Les amendements prennent effet à l’égard de chaque État partie à l’Accord acceptant les amendements dès qu’ils sont acceptés par la majorité des États parties à l’Accord et par la suite, pour chacun des autres États parties à l’Accord, à la date de son acceptation desdits amendements. Article 18 Dix ans après l’entrée en vigueur du présent Accord, la question de la révision de l’Accord sera inscrite à l’ordre du jour provisoire de l’Assemblée générale de l’Organisation des Nations Unies afin de déterminer, eu égard à l’expérience acquise en ce qui concerne l’application de l’Accord, si celui-ci doit être révisé. Il est entendu toutefois que, dès que le présent Accord aura été en vigueur pendant cinq ans, le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, en sa qualité de dépositaire de l’Accord, peut, sur la demande d’un tiers des États parties à l’Accord et avec l’assentiment de la majorité d’entre eux, convoquer une conférence des États parties afin de revoir le présent Accord. La conférence de révision étudiera aussi la question de l’application des dispositions du paragraphe 5 de l’article 11, sur la base du principe visé au paragraphe 1 dudit article et compte tenu, en particulier, de tout progrès technique pertinent. Article 19 1. Le présent Accord est ouvert à la signature de tous les États au Siège de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, à New York. 2. Le présent Accord est soumis à la ratification des États signataires. Tout État qui n’a pas signé le présent Accord avant son entrée en vigueur conformément au paragraphe 3 du présent article peut y adhérer à tout moment. Les instruments de ratification ou d’adhésion sont déposés auprès du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. 3. Le présent Accord entrera en vigueur le trentième jour qui suivra le dépôt du cinquième instrument de ratification. 4. Pour chaque État dont l’instrument de ratification ou d’adhésion sera déposé après l’entrée en vigueur du présent Accord, celui-ci entre en vigueur le trentième jour qui suivra la date du dépôt dudit instrument. 5. Le Secrétaire général informera sans délai tous les États qui auront signé le présent Accord ou y auront adhéré de la date de chaque signature, de la date du dépôt de chaque instrument de ratification ou d’adhésion, de la date d’entrée en vigueur du présent Accord ainsi que de toute autre communication.31 Article 20 Tout État partie au présent Accord peut, un an après l’entrée en vigueur de l’Accord, communiquer son intention de le dénoncer, moyennant notification écrite à cet effet au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Cette dénonciation prend effet un an après la date à laquelle elle a été reçue. Article 21 L’original du présent Accord, dont les textes anglais, arabe, chinois, espagnol, français et russe font également foi, sera déposé auprès du Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, qui en adressera des copies certifiées à tous les États qui auront signé l’Accord ou qui y auront adhéré. EN FOI DE QUOI les soussignés, à ce dûment habilités par leurs gouvernements respectifs, ont signé le présent Accord, ouvert à la signature à New York, le dix-huit décembre mil neuf cent soixante-dix-neuf.32 II. Principes adoptés par l’Assemblée générale Déclaration des principes juridiques régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique L’Assemblée générale, S’inspirant des vastes perspectives qui s’offrent à l’humanité du fait de la découverte de l’espace extra-atmosphérique par l’homme, Reconnaissantl’intérêt que présente pour l’humanité tout entière le progrès de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Estimantque l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique devraient s’effectuer pour favoriser le progrès de l’humanité et au bénéfice des États, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique, Désirantcontribuer à une large coopération internationale en ce qui concerne les aspects scientifiques aussi bien que juridiques de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, Estimant qu’une telle coopération contribuera au développement de la compréhension mutuelle et au renforcement des relations amicales entre nations et entre peuples, Rappelantsa résolution 110 (II) du 3 novembre 1947, qui condamnait la propagande destinée ou de nature à provoquer ou à encourager toute menace à la paix, toute rupture de la paix ou tout acte d’agression, et considérant que la résolution susmentionnée est applicable à l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Tenant compte de ses résolutions 1721 (XVI) du 20 décembre 1961 et 1802 (XVII) du 14 décembre 1962, adoptées à l’unanimité par les États Membres de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, Déclare solennellement qu’en ce qui concerne l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique les États devraient être guidés par les principes suivants: 1. L’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique seront effectuées pour le bienfait et dans l’intérêt de l’humanité tout entière. 2. L’espace extra-atmosphérique et les corps célestes peuvent être librement explorés et utilisés par tous les États sur la base de l’égalité et conformément au droit international. 3. L’espace extra-atmosphérique et les corps célestes ne peuvent faire l’objet d’appropriation nationale par proclamation de souveraineté, ni par voie d’utilisation ou d’occupation, ni par tout autre moyen. 4. Les activités des États relatives à l’exploration et à l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique s’effectueront conformément au droit international, y compris la Charte des Nations Unies, en vue de maintenir la paix et la sécurité internationales et de favoriser la coopération et la compréhension internationales.33 5. Les États ont la responsabilité internationale des activités nationales dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, qu’elles soient poursuivies par des organismes gouvernementaux ou non gouvernementaux, et doivent veiller à ce que les activités nationales s’exercent conformément aux principes énoncés dans la présente Déclaration. Les activités des organismes non gouvernementaux dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique devront faire l’objet d’une autorisation et d’une surveillance continue de la part de l’État intéressé. En cas d’activités conduites dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique par une organisation internationale, la responsabilité du respect des principes énoncés dans la présente Déclaration incombera à l’organisation internationale et aux États qui en font partie. 6. En ce qui concerne l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, les États devront se fonder sur les principes de la coopération et de l’assistance mutuelle et conduiront toutes leurs activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique en tenant dûment compte des intérêts correspondants des autres États. Si un État a des raisons de croire qu’une activité ou expérience dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, envisagée par lui-même ou par ses ressortissants, risquerait de faire obstacle aux activités d’autres États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifique de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, il devra engager les consultations internationales appropriées avant d’entreprendre ladite activité ou expérience. Tout État ayant des raisons de croire qu’une activité ou expérience dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, envisagée par un autre État, risquerait de faire obstacle aux activités poursuivies en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique peut demander que des consultations soient ouvertes au sujet de ladite activité ou expérience. 7. L’État sur le registre duquel est inscrit un objet lancé dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique conservera sous sa juridiction et son contrôle ledit objet, et tout personnel occupant ledit objet, alors qu’ils se trouvent dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Il n’est pas porté atteinte à la propriété d’objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, et de leurs éléments constitutifs, du fait de leur passage dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique ou de leur retour à la Terre. De tels objets ou éléments constitutifs trouvés au-delà des limites de l’État d’immatriculation devront être restitués à cet État, qui devra fournir l’identification voulue, sur demande, préalablement à la restitution. 8. Tout État qui procède ou fait procéder au lancement d’un objet dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, et tout État dont le territoire où les installations servent au lancement d’un objet, est responsable du point de vue international des dommages causés à un État étranger ou à ses personnes physiques ou morales par ledit objet ou par ses éléments constitutifs sur terre, dans l’atmosphère ou dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. 9. Les États considéreront les astronautes comme les envoyés de l’humanité dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, et leur prêteront toute l’assistance possible en cas d’accident, de détresse ou d’atterrissage forcé sur le territoire d’un État étranger ou en haute mer. Les astronautes qui font un tel atterrissage doivent être assurés d’un retour prompt et à bon port dans l’État d’immatriculation de leur véhicule spatial.34 Principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale L’Assemblée générale, Rappelant sa résolution 2916 (XXVII) du 9 novembre 1972, dans laquelle elle a souligné la nécessité d’élaborer des principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale et consciente du fait qu’il importe de conclure un accord ou des accords internationaux, Rappelant en outre ses résolutions 3182 (XXVIII) du 18 décembre 1973, 3234 (XXIX) du 12 novembre 1974, 3388 (XXX) du 18 novembre 1975, 31/8 du 8 novembre 1976, 32/196 du 20 décembre 1977, 33/16 du 10 novembre 1978, 34/66 du 5 décembre 1979 et 35/14 du 3 novembre 1980, ainsi que sa résolution 36/35 du 18 novembre 1981, dans laquelle elle a décidé d’envisager à sa trente-septième session d’adopter un projet d’ensemble de principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale, Notant avec satisfaction les efforts faits par le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique et par son Sous-Comité juridique pour se conformer aux directives énoncées dans les résolutions susmentionnées, Constatant que plusieurs expériences de télévision directe par satellite ont eu lieu et qu’un certain nombre de systèmes de satellites de télévision directe sont opérationnels dans certains pays et seront peut-être commercialisés dans un avenir très proche, Tenant compte du fait que l’exploitation de satellites de télévision directe internationale aura des répercussions mondiales importantes sur les plans politique, économique, social et culturel, Estimantque l’élaboration de principes relatifs à la télévision directe internationale contribuera à renforcer la coopération internationale dans ce domaine et à promouvoir les buts et principes de la Charte des Nations Unies, Adopte les Principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale, tels qu’ils figurent dans l’annexe à la présente résolution. Annexe Principes régissant l’utilisation par les États de satellites artificiels de la Terre aux fins de la télévision directe internationale A. Buts et objectifs 1. Les activités menées dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite devraient l’être d’une manière compatible avec les droits souverains des États, y compris le principe de la non-ingérence, et avec le droit de toute personne de rechercher, de recevoir et de répandre des informations et des idées proclamées dans les instruments pertinents des Nations Unies. 2. Ces activités devraient favoriser la libre diffusion et l’échange d’informations et de connaissances dans les domaines culturel et scientifique, contribuer au développement de l’éducation et au progrès social et économique,35 en particulier dans les pays en développement, améliorer la qualité de la vie de tous les peuples et procurer une distraction, dans le respect dû à l’intégrité politique et culturelle des États. 3. Ces activités devraient, en conséquence, être menées d’une manière compatible avec le développement de la compréhension mutuelle et le renforcement des relations amicales et de la coopération entre tous les États et tous les peuples dans l’intérêt du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales. B. Applicabilité du droit international 4. Les activités dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite devraient être menées conformément au droit international, y compris la Charte des Nations Unies, le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes , du 27 janvier 1967, et les dispositions pertinentes 1 de la Convention internationale des télécommunications et du Règlement des radiocommunications qui la complète et des instruments internationaux relatifs aux relations amicales et à la coopération entre les États et aux droits de l’homme. C. Droits et avantages 5. Tout État à un droit égal à mener des activités dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite et à autoriser que de telles activités soient entreprises par des personnes physiques ou morales relevant de sa juridiction. Tous les États et tous les peuples sont en droit de bénéficier, et devraient bénéficier, desdites activités. L’accès à la technique dans ce domaine devrait être ouvert à tous les États sans discrimination, à des conditions arrêtées d’un commun accord par tous les intéressés. D. Coopération internationale 6. Les activités dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite devraient être fondées sur la coopération internationale et l’encourager. Cette coopération devrait faire l’objet d’arrangements appropriés. Il faudrait tenir spécialement compte du besoin que les pays en développement ont d’utiliser la télévision directe internationale par satellite pour accélérer leur développement national. E. Règlement pacifique des différends 7. Tout différend international qui pourrait naître d’activités relevant des présents principes devrait être réglé selon les procédures établies pour le règlement pacifique des différends dont les parties au différend seraient convenues conformément aux dispositions de la Charte des Nations Unies. F. Responsabilité des États 8. Les États devraient assumer la responsabilité internationale des activités menées par eux ou sous leur juridiction dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite ainsi que de la conformité de ces activités avec les principes énoncés dans le présent document. 9. Lorsque la diffusion de la télévision directe internationale par satellite est assurée par une organisation internationale intergouvernementale, la responsabilité visée au paragraphe 8 ci-dessus devrait incomber à la fois à cette organisation et aux États qui en font partie.36 G. Obligation et droit d’engager des consultations 10. Tout État émetteur ou récepteur participant à un service de télévision directe internationale par satellite établi entre États devrait, à la demande de tout autre État émetteur ou récepteur participant au même service, engager promptement des consultations avec l’État demandeur au sujet des activités qu’il mène dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite, sans préjudice des autres consultations que ces États peuvent engager avec tout autre État sur ce sujet. H. Droits d’auteur et droits analogues 11. Sans préjudice des dispositions pertinentes du droit international, les États devraient coopérer pour assurer la protection des droits d’auteur et des droits analogues sur une base bilatérale et multilatérale, au moyen d’accords appropriés entre les États intéressés ou les personnes morales compétentes agissant sous leur juridiction. Dans le cadre de cette coopération, ils devraient tenir spécialement compte de l’intérêt que les pays en développement ont à utiliser la télévision directe pour accélérer leur développement national. I. Notification à l’Organisation des Nations Unies 12. Afin de favoriser la coopération internationale dans le domaine de l’exploration et de l’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, les États menant ou autorisant des activités dans le domaine de la télévision directe internationale par satellite devraient informer le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies, dans toute la mesure possible, de la nature de ces activités. À la réception desdits renseignements, le Secrétaire général devrait les diffuser immédiatement et de façon efficace aux institutions spécialisées compétentes ainsi qu’au grand public et à la communauté scientifique internationale. J. Consultations et accords entre États 13. Tout État qui se propose d’établir un service de télévision directe internationale par satellite ou d’en autoriser l’établissement doit notifier immédiatement son intention à l’État ou aux États récepteurs et entrer rapidement en consultation avec tout État parmi ceux-ci qui en fait la demande. 14. Un service de télévision directe internationale par satellite ne sera établi que lorsque les conditions énoncées au paragraphe 13 ci-dessus auront été satisfaites et sur la base d’accords ou d’arrangements, ainsi que le requièrent les instruments pertinents de l’Union internationale des télécommunications et conformément à ces principes. 15. En ce qui concerne le débordement inévitable du rayonnement du signal provenant du satellite, les instruments pertinents de l’Union internationale des télécommunications sont exclusivement applicables.Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quarante et unième session, 6 Supplément n° 20 (A/41/20 et Corr.1). 37 Principes sur la télédétection L’Assemblée générale, Rappelant sa résolution 3234 (XXIX) du 12 novembre 1974, dans laquelle elle a prié le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique et son Sous-Comité juridique d’examiner la question des incidences juridiques de la téléobservation de la Terre à partir de l’espace, ainsi que ses résolutions 3388 (XXX) du 18 novembre 1975, 31/8 du 8 novembre 1976, 32/196 A du 20 décembre 1977, 33/16 du 10 novembre 1978, 34/66 du 5 décembre 1979, 35/14 du 3 novembre 1980, 36/35 du 18 novembre 1981, 37/89 du 10 décembre 1982, 38/80 du 15 décembre 1983, 39/96 du 14 décembre 1984 et 40/162 du 16 décembre 1985, dans lesquelles elle a demandé un examen détaillé des conséquences juridiques de la télédétection spatiale en vue de formuler un projet de principes en la matière, Ayant examiné le rapport du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique sur les travaux de sa vingt-neuvième session6 et le texte du projet de principes sur la télédétection qui y est annexé, Notant avec satisfaction que le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique a approuvé, sur la base des délibérations de son Sous-Comité juridique, le texte du projet de principes sur la télédétection, Convaincue que l’adoption des principes sur la télédétection contribuera à renforcer la coopération internationale dans ce domaine, Adopte les Principes sur la télédétection figurant en annexe à la présente résolution. Annexe Principes sur la télédétection Principe I Aux fins des présents principes concernant les activités de télédétection: a) L’expression “télédétection” désigne l’observation de la surface terrestre à partir de l’espace en utilisant les propriétés des ondes électromagnétiques émises, réfléchies ou diffractées par les corps observés, à des fins d’amélioration de la gestion des ressources naturelles, d’aménagement du territoire ou de protection de l’environnement; b) L’expression “données primaires” désigne les données brutes recueillies par des capteurs placés à bord d’un objet spatial et transmises ou communiquées au sol depuis l’espace par télémesure sous forme de signaux électromagnétiques, par film photographique, bande magnétique, ou par tout autre support; c) L’expression “données traitées” désigne les produits issus du traitement des données primaires, nécessaire pour rendre ces données exploitables;38 d) L’expression “informations analysées” désigne les informations issues de l’interprétation des données traitées, d’apports de données et de connaissances provenant d’autres sources; e) L’expression “activités de télédétection” désigne les activités d’exploitation des systèmes de télédétection spatiale, des stations de réception et d’archivage des données primaires, ainsi que les activités de traitement, d’interprétation et de distribution des données traitées. Principe II Les activités de télédétection sont menées pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quelque soit leur niveau de développement économique, social ou scientifique et technologique et compte dûment tenu des besoins des pays en développement. Principe III Les activités de télédétection sont menées conformément au droit international, y compris la Charte des Nations Unies, le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes , 1 et les instruments pertinents de l’Union internationale des télécommunications. Principe IV Les activités de télédétection sont menées conformément aux principes énoncés à l’article premier du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, qui prévoit en particulier que l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique doivent se faire pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit leur stade de développement économique et scientifique, et énonce le principe de la liberté de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique dans des conditions d’égalité. Ces activités sont menées sur la base du respect du principe de la souveraineté permanente, pleine et entière de tous les États et de tous les peuples sur leurs richesses et leurs ressources naturelles propres, compte dûment tenu des droits et intérêts, conformément au droit international, des autres États et des entités relevant de leur juridiction. Ces activités ne doivent pas être menées d’une manière préjudiciable aux droits et intérêts légitimes de l’État observé. Principe V Les États conduisant des activités de télédétection encouragent la coopération internationale dans ces activités. À cette fin, ils donnent à d’autres États la possibilité d’y participer. Cette participation est fondée dans chaque cas sur des conditions équitables et mutuellement acceptables. Principe VI Pour retirer le maximum d’avantages de la télédétection, les États sont encouragés à créer et exploiter, au moyen d’accords ou autres arrangements, des stations de réception et d’archivage et des installations de traitement et d’interprétation des données, notamment dans le cadre d’accords ou d’arrangements régionaux chaque fois que possible. Principe VII Les États participant à des activités de télédétection offrent une assistance technique aux autres États intéressés à des conditions arrêtées d’un commun accord.39 Principe VIII L’Organisation des Nations Unies et les organismes intéressés des Nations Unies doivent promouvoir la coopération internationale, y compris l’assistance technique et la coordination dans le domaine de la télédétection. Principe IX Conformément à l’article IV de la Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et à l’article XI du Traité sur les principes régissant les 4 activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, un État conduisant un programme de télédétection en informe le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. En outre, dans toute la mesure où cela est possible et réalisable, il communique tous autres renseignements pertinents à tout État, et notamment à tout pays en développement concerné par ce programme, qui en fait la demande. Principe X La télédétection doit promouvoir la protection de l’environnement naturel de la Terre. À cette fin, les États participant à des activités de télédétection qui ont identifié des indications en leur possession susceptibles de prévenir tout phénomène préjudiciable à l’environnement naturel de la Terre font connaître ces indications aux États concernés. Principe XI La télédétection doit promouvoir la protection de l’humanité contre les catastrophes naturelles. À cette fin, les États participant à des activités de télédétection qui ont identifié des données traitées et des informations analysées en leur possession pouvant être utiles à des États victimes de catastrophes naturelles, ou susceptibles d’en être victimes de façon imminente, transmettent ces données et ces informations aux États concernés aussitôt que possible. Principe XII Dès que les données primaires et les données traitées concernant le territoire relevant de sa juridiction sont produites, l’État observé a accès à ces données sans discrimination et à des conditions de prix raisonnables. L’État observé a également accès aux informations analysées disponibles concernant le territoire relevant de sa juridiction qui sont en possession de tout État participant à des activités de télédétection sans discrimination et aux mêmes conditions, compte dûment tenu des besoins et intérêts des pays en développement. Principe XIII Afin de promouvoir et d’intensifier la coopération internationale, notamment en ce qui concerne les besoins des pays en développement, un État conduisant un programme de télédétection spatiale entre en consultation, sur sa demande, avec tout État dont le territoire est observé afin de lui permettre de participer à ce programme et de multiplier les avantages mutuels qui en résultent. Principe XIV Conformément à l’article VI du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, les40 États exploitant des satellites de télédétection ont la responsabilité internationale de leurs activités et s’assurent que ces activités sont menées conformément à ces principes et aux normes du droit international, qu’elles soient entreprises par des organismes gouvernementaux, des entités non gouvernementales ou par l’intermédiaire d’organisations internationales auxquelles ces États sont parties. Ce principe s’applique sans préjudice de l’application des normes du droit international sur la responsabilité des États en ce qui concerne les activités de télédétection. Principe XV Tout différend pouvant résulter de l’application des présents principes sera résolu au moyen des procédures établies pour le règlement pacifique des différends.Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, quarante-septième 7 session, Supplément n° 20 (A/47/20). 8Ibid., annexe. 41 Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace L’Assemblée générale, Ayant examiné le rapport du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique sur les travaux de sa trente-cinquième session7 et le texte des principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace tel qu’il a été approuvé par le Comité et figure en annexe à son rapport8, Considérantque, pour certaines missions dans l’espace, les sources d’énergie nucléaires sont particulièrement adaptées ou même essentielles du fait de leur compacité, de leur longue durée de vie et d’autres caractéristiques, Considérant également que l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace devrait être axée sur les applications qui tirent avantage des propriétés particulières de ces sources, Considérant en outre que l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace devrait se fonder sur une évaluation minutieuse de leur sûreté, comprenant une analyse probabiliste des risques, une attention particulière devant être accordée à la réduction des risques d’exposition accidentelle du public à des radiations ou à des matières radioactives nocives, Considérantqu’il faut, à cet égard, établir un ensemble de principes prévoyant des objectifs et des directives visant à assurer la sûreté de l’utilisation des sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace, Affirmantque cet ensemble de principes s’applique aux sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace destinées à la production d’électricité à bord d’engins spatiaux à des fins autres que la propulsion, et ayant des caractéristiques comparables à celles des systèmes utilisés et des missions réalisées au moment de l’adoption des principes, Reconnaissant qu’il faudra réviser cet ensemble de principes, compte tenu des nouvelles applications de l’énergie nucléaire et de l’évolution des recommandations internationales en matière de protection radiologique, Adopte les Principes relatifs à l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace qui figurent ci-dessous. Principe 1. Applicabilité du droit international Les activités entraînant l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace sont menées conformément au droit international, y compris, en particulier, la Charte des Nations Unies et le Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes1. Principe 2. Définition des termes 1. Aux fins des présents principes, les expressions “État de lancement” ou “État lanceur” s’entendent de l’État qui exerce juridiction et contrôle sur un objet spatial ayant à bord une source d’énergie nucléaire à un moment donné dans le temps, eu égard au principe concerné.42 2. Aux fins du principe 9, la définition de l’expression “État de lancement” donnée dans ledit principe est applicable. 3. Aux fins du principe 3, les expressions “prévisibles” et “toutes les éventualités” s’appliquent à un type d’événements ou de circonstances dont la probabilité d’occurrence en général est telle qu’elle est considérée comme s’étendant uniquement aux possibilités crédibles pour l’analyse de sûreté. L’expression “concept général de défense en profondeur”, appliquée à une source d’énergie nucléaire dans l’espace, vise le recours à des caractéristiques de conception et à des opérations en mission se substituant aux systèmes actifs ou les complétant pour prévenir ou atténuer les conséquences de défauts de fonctionnement des systèmes. Il n’est pas nécessairement requis à cet effet de systèmes de sûreté redondants pour chacun des composants. Vu les exigences particulières de l’utilisation dans l’espace et des différentes missions, aucun ensemble particulier de systèmes ou de caractéristiques ne peut être qualifié d’essentiel à cet effet. Aux fins de l’alinéa d) du paragraphe 2 du principe 3, l’expression “passer à l’état critique” ne s’entend pas d’actions telles que les essais à puissance nulle, indispensables pour garantir la sûreté des systèmes. Principe 3. Directives et critères d’utilisation sûre En vue de réduire au minimum la quantité de matières radioactives dans l’espace et les risques qu’elles entraînent, l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace doit être limitée aux missions spatiales qui ne peuvent raisonnablement être effectuées à l’aide de sources d’énergie non nucléaires. 1. Objectifs généraux en matière de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire a) Les États qui lancent des objets spatiaux ayant à bord des sources d’énergie nucléaires doivent s’efforcer de protéger les individus, les collectivités et la biosphère contre les dangers radiologiques. Les objets spatiaux ayant à bord des sources d’énergie nucléaires doivent donc être conçus et utilisés de manière à garantir, avec un degré de confiance élevé, que les risques – dans les circonstances prévisibles, en cours d’exploration ou en cas d’accident – sont maintenus au-dessous des seuils acceptables tels que définis aux alinéas b) et c) du paragraphe 1. Ils doivent être également conçus et utilisés de manière à assurer, avec une haute fiabilité, que les matières radioactives n’entraînent pas une contamination notable de l’espace. b) Durant le fonctionnement normal des objets spatiaux ayant à bord des sources d’énergie nucléaires, y compris lors de la rentrée dans l’atmosphère à partir d’une orbite suffisamment haute telle que définie à l’alinéa b) du paragraphe 2, il y a lieu de respecter les objectifs appropriés de radioprotection du public qui ont été recommandés par la Commission internationale de protection radiologique. Durant l’exploitation normale, il ne doit exister aucune radioexposition notable. c) En vue de limiter la radioexposition dans les accidents, les systèmes de sources d’énergie nucléaires doivent être conçus et construits de manière à tenir compte des directives internationales pertinentes et généralement acceptées en matière de radioprotection. Excepté dans les cas – dont la probabilité est faible – d’accidents pouvant avoir de graves conséquences radiologiques, la conception des systèmes de sources d’énergie nucléaires doit restreindre, avec un niveau élevé de confiance, la radioexposition à une région géographique limitée et, pour ce qui est des individus, à la limite principale de 1 mSv par an. Il est acceptable d’utiliser une limite de dose subsidiaire de 5 mSv par an pendant quelques années, à condition que l’équivalent effectif moyen de dose ne dépasse pas, au cours de la vie des individus, la limite principale de 1 mSv par an. La probabilité d’accidents pouvant avoir des conséquences radiologiques graves dont il est question plus haut doit être maintenue extrêmement réduite grâce à la conception du système.43 Les modifications qui seront apportées dans l’avenir aux directives mentionnées dans le présent paragraphe seront appliquées dès que possible. d) Les systèmes importants pour la sûreté doivent être conçus, construits et utilisés en conformité avec le concept général de défense en profondeur. Suivant ce principe, les défaillances ou défauts de fonctionnement prévisibles et ayant des incidences en matière de sûreté doivent pouvoir être corrigés ou contrecarrés par une action ou une procédure, éventuellement automatique. La fiabilité des systèmes importants pour la sûreté doit être assurée, notamment, par la redondance, la séparation physique, l’isolation fonctionnelle et une indépendance suffisante de leurs composants. D’autres mesures doivent être prises pour élever le niveau de sûreté. 2. Réacteurs nucléaires a) Les réacteurs nucléaires peuvent être utilisés: i) Dans le cas de missions interplanétaires; ii) Sur des orbites suffisamment hautes, telles que définies à l’alinéa b) du paragraphe 2; iii) Sur des orbites terrestres basses à condition qu’ils soient garés sur une orbite suffisamment haute après la partie opérationnelle de leur mission; b) L’orbite suffisamment haute est celle où la durée de vie en orbite est suffisamment longue pour permettre aux produits de fission de décroître suffisamment jusqu’à un niveau de radioactivité s’approchant de celui des actinides. Elle doit être choisie de manière à limiter à un minimum les risques pour les missions spatiales en cours ou futures ou les risques de collision avec d’autres objets spatiaux. En déterminant son altitude, il faut tenir compte du fait que les fragments d’un réacteur détruit doivent également atteindre le temps de décroissance requis avant de rentrer dans l’atmosphère terrestre. c) Les réacteurs nucléaires ne doivent utiliser comme combustible que l’uranium 235 fortement enrichi. Lors de leur conception, il faut tenir compte du temps nécessaire pour la décroissance radiologique des produits de fission et d’activation. d) Les réacteurs nucléaires ne doivent pas passer à l’état critique avant d’avoir atteint leur orbite opérationnelle ou leur trajectoire interplanétaire. e) Les réacteurs nucléaires doivent être conçus et construits de manière à assurer qu’ils n’atteignent pas l’état critique avant de parvenir à l’orbite opérationnelle lors de toutes les éventualités, y compris l’explosion d’une fusée, la rentrée dans l’atmosphère, l’impact au sol ou sur un plan d’eau, la submersion ou l’intrusion d’eau dans le coeur du réacteur. f) Afin de réduire sensiblement la possibilité de défaillance des satellites ayant des réacteurs nucléaires à bord pendant les opérations sur une orbite dont la durée de vie est inférieure à celle de l’orbite suffisamment haute (y compris au cours du transfert sur une orbite suffisamment haute), il y a lieu de prévoir un système opérationnel hautement fiable qui assure le retrait effectif et contrôlé du réacteur. 3. Générateurs isotopiques44 a) Les générateurs isotopiques peuvent être utilisés dans les missions interplanétaires ou les autres missions qui s’effectuent en dehors du champ de gravité terrestre. Ils peuvent être également utilisés en orbite terrestre à condition d’être garés sur une orbite élevée au terme de la partie opérationnelle de leur mission. En tout état de cause, leur élimination est nécessaire. b) Les générateurs isotopiques doivent être protégés par un système de confinement conçu et construit de manière à résister à la chaleur et aux forces aérodynamiques au cours de la rentrée dans la haute atmosphère dans les situations orbitales prévisibles, y compris à partir d’orbites hautement elliptiques ou hyperboliques, le cas échéant. Lors de l’impact, le système de confinement et la forme physique des radio-isotopes doivent empêcher que des matières radioactives ne soient dispersées dans l’environnement, de sorte que la radioactivité puisse être complètement éliminée de la zone d’impact par l’équipe de récupération. Principe 4. Évaluation de sûreté 1. Un État lanceur, tel que défini au moment du lancement, conformément au paragraphe 1 du principe 2, doit avant le lancement, et le cas échéant en vertu d’accords de coopération avec ceux qui ont conçu, construit ou fabriqué la source d’énergie nucléaire, ou qui feront fonctionner l’objet spatial, ou a partir du territoire ou de l’installation desquels ledit objet doit être lancé, veiller à ce que soit effectuée une évaluation de sûreté approfondie et détaillée. Cette évaluation doit porter avec la même attention sur toutes les phases pertinentes de la mission et viser tous les systèmes en jeu, y compris les moyens de lancement, la plate-forme spatiale, la source d’énergie nucléaire et ses équipements et les moyens de contrôle et de communication entre le sol et l’espace. 2. Cette évaluation doit s’effectuer dans le respect des directives et critères d’utilisation sûre énoncés au principe 3. 3. Conformément à l’article XI du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, les résultats de cette évaluation de sûreté, ainsi que, dans toute la mesure possible, une indication du moment approximatif prévu pour le lancement, doivent être rendus publics avant chaque lancement et le Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies doit être informé dès que possible, avant chaque lancement, de la manière dont les États peuvent se procurer ces résultats. Principe 5. Notification de retour 1. Tout État qui lance un objet spatial ayant à son bord des sources d’énergie nucléaires doit informer en temps utile les États concernés au cas où cet objet spatial aurait une avarie risquant d’entraîner le retour dans l’atmosphère terrestre de matériaux radioactifs. Ces informations doivent être formulées selon le modèle suivant: a) Paramètres du système: i) Nom de l’État ou des États de lancement, y compris l’adresse de l’organisme à contacter pour renseignements complémentaires ou assistance en cas d’accident; ii) Indicatif international; iii) Date et territoire ou lieu de lancement; iv) Informations nécessaires pour déterminer au mieux la durée de vie en orbite, la trajectoire et la zone d’impact; v) Fonction générale de l’engin spatial;45 b) Informations sur les risques d’irradiation de la source ou des sources d’énergie nucléaires: i) Type de source d’énergie nucléaire: source radio-isotopique ou réacteur nucléaire; ii) Forme physique, quantité et caractéristiques radiologiques générales probables du combustible et des éléments contaminés ou radioactifs susceptibles d’atteindre le sol. Par “combustible”, on entend la matière nucléaire utilisée comme source de chaleur ou d’énergie. Ces informations doivent être également communiquées au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. 2. Les informations prévues ci-dessus doivent être communiquées par l’État de lancement dès que l’avarie est connue. Elles doivent être mises à jour aussi fréquemment que possible et transmises avec une fréquence accrue à mesure qu’approche le moment prévu pour la rentrée dans les couches denses de l’atmosphère terrestre, de manière à tenir la communauté internationale informée de la situation et à lui donner le temps de planifier, à l’échelon national, toute mesure d’intervention jugée nécessaire. 3. Les informations mises à jour doivent également être communiquées, avec la même fréquence, au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies. Principe 6. Consultations Les États qui fournissent des informations en vertu du principe 5 répondent rapidement, dans la mesure où cela est raisonnablement possible, aux demandes d’information supplémentaire ou de consultations que leur adressent d’autres États. Principe 7. Assistance aux États 1. Sur notification de la rentrée attendue dans l’atmosphère terrestre d’un objet spatial ayant à bord une source d’énergie nucléaire et ses éléments, tous les États qui possèdent des installations spatiales de surveillance et de repérage doivent, dans un esprit de coopération internationale, communiquer aussitôt que possible au Secrétaire général de l’Organisation des Nations Unies et à l’État concerné les informations qu’ils pourraient avoir au sujet de l’avarie subie par l’objet spatial, afin de permettre aux États qui risquent d’être affectés d’évaluer la situation et de prendre toutes mesures de précaution jugées nécessaires. 2. Après la rentrée dans l’atmosphère terrestre d’un objet spatial ayant à bord une source d’énergie nucléaire et ses éléments: a) L’État de lancement doit offrir rapidement et, si l’État affecté le lui demande, fournir rapidement l’assistance nécessaire pour éliminer les effets dommageables réels ou éventuels, y compris une assistance pour localiser la zone d’impact de la source d’énergie nucléaire sur la surface terrestre, pour détecter les matériaux rentrés dans l’atmosphère et effectuer les opérations de récupération ou de nettoyage; b) Tous les États autres que l’État de lancement qui en ont les moyens techniques, ainsi que les organisations internationales dotées de ces moyens, doivent, dans la mesure du possible, fournir l’assistance nécessaire, sur demande d’un État affecté. En fournissant l’assistance visée aux alinéas a) et b) ci-dessus, il faudra tenir compte des besoins particuliers des pays en développement. Principe 8. Responsabilité46 Conformément à l’article VI du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités de États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, les États ont la responsabilité internationale des activités nationales qui entraînent l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires dans l’espace, que ces activités soient entreprises par des organismes gouvernementaux ou par des entités non gouvernementales, et de veiller à ce que les activités nationales soient menées conformément audit Traité et aux recommandations contenues dans les présents Principes. Lorsque des activités menées dans l’espace et entraînant l’utilisation de sources d’énergie nucléaires sont menées par une organisation internationale, il incombe tant à cette dernière qu’à ses États membres de veiller au respect dudit Traité et des recommandations contenues dans les présents Principes. Principe 9. Responsabilité et réparation 1. Conformément à l’article VII du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, et aux dispositions de la Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux3, tout État qui procède ou fait procéder au lancement d’un objet spatial et tout État dont le territoire ou des installations servent au lancement d’un objet spatial est responsable du point de vue international des dommages qui pourraient être causés par cet objet spatial ou ses éléments constitutifs. Cette disposition s’applique pleinement au cas d’un objet spatial ayant à bord une source d’énergie nucléaire. Lorsque deux ou plusieurs États procèdent en commun au lancement d’un objet spatial, ils sont solidairement responsables, conformément à l’article V de la Convention susmentionnée, de tout dommage qui peut en résulter. 2. Le montant de la réparation que ces États sont tenus de verser pour le dommage en vertu de la Convention susmentionnée est fixé conformément au droit international et aux principes de justice et d’équité et doit permettre de rétablir la personne, physique ou morale, l’État ou l’organisation internationale demandeur dans la situation qui aurait existé si le dommage ne s’était pas produit. 3. Aux fins du présent principe, la réparation inclut le remboursement des dépenses dûment justifiées qui ont été engagées au titre des opérations de recherche, de récupération et de nettoyage, y compris le coût de l’assistance de tierces parties. Principe 10. Règlement des différends Tout différend résultant de l’application des présents Principes sera réglé par voie de négociation ou au moyen des autres procédures établies pour le règlement pacifique des différends, conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies. Principe 11. Révision Les présents Principes seront soumis à révision par le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extraatmosphérique deux ans au plus tard après leur adoption.Documents officiels de l’Assemblée générale, cinquante et unième 9 session, Supplément n° 20 (A/51/20). 10Ibid., annexe IV. 11Voir Rapport de la deuxième Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, Vienne, 9-21 août 1982, et rectificatif (A/CONF.101/10 et Corr. 1 et 2). 47 Déclaration sur la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, compte tenu en particulier des besoins des pays en développement L’Assemblée générale, Ayant examiné le rapport du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique sur les travaux de sa trente-neuvième session9 et le texte de la Déclaration sur la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, compte tenu en particulier des besoins des pays en développement, tel qu’approuvé par le Comité et annexé à ce rapport10, Ayant à l’esprit les dispositions pertinentes de la Charte des Nations Unies, Rappelant notamment les dispositions du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes1, Rappelant également ses résolutions pertinentes relatives aux activités spatiales, Ayant présentes à l’esprit les recommandations de la deuxième Conférence des Nations Unies sur l’exploration et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique11 et des autres conférences internationales se rapportant à cette question, Reconnaissant la portée et l’importance croissantes de la coopération internationale entre les États et les organisations internationales en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace, Considérant l’expérience acquise en matière de projets coopératifs internationaux, Convaincue qu’il est important et nécessaire de renforcer encore la coopération internationale si l’on veut que se développe une collaboration large et fructueuse dans ce domaine au profit et dans l’intérêt mutuel de toutes les parties concernées, Désireuse de faciliter l’application du principe selon lequel l’exploration et l’utilisation de l’espace, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes, doivent se faire au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit le stade de leur développement économique ou scientifique, et sont l’apanage de l’humanité tout entière, Adopte la Déclaration sur la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, compte tenu en particulier des besoins des pays en développement, figurant en annexe à la présente résolution.48 Annexe Déclaration sur la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, compte tenu en particulier des besoins des pays en développement 1. La coopération internationale dans le domaine de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace à des fins pacifiques (ci-après dénommée “coopération internationale”) sera menée conformément aux dispositions du droit international, notamment de la Charte des Nations Unies et du Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps céleste. Elle se fera au profit et dans l’intérêt de tous les États, quel que soit leur stade de développement économique, social, scientifique et technique, et sera l’apanage de toute l’humanité. Il conviendra de tenir compte en particulier des besoins des pays en développement. 2. Les États peuvent déterminer librement tous les aspects de leur participation à la coopération internationale en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace, sur une base équitable et mutuellement acceptable. Les dispositions contractuelles régissant ces activités de coopération devraient être justes et raisonnables et tenir pleinement compte des droits et intérêts légitimes des parties concernées, tels que par exemple les droits de propriété intellectuelle. 3. Tous les États, en particulier ceux qui disposent de capacités spatiales appropriées et de programmes d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace, devraient contribuer à promouvoir et encourager la coopération internationale sur une base équitable et mutuellement acceptable. À cet égard, il faudrait accorder une attention particulière aux intérêts des pays en développement et des pays ayant des programmes spatiaux naissants et au profit qu’ils peuvent tirer d’une coopération internationale avec des pays ayant des capacités spatiales plus avancées. 4. La coopération internationale devrait se faire selon les modalités jugées les plus efficaces et les plus appropriées par les pays concernés et emprunter les voies tant gouvernementales que non gouvernementales, tant commerciales que non commerciales, qu’elle soit mondiale, multilatérale, régionale ou bilatérale, sans exclure la coopération internationale entre pays à différents stades de développement. 5. La coopération internationale devrait viser les objectifs ci-après, tout en tenant particulièrement compte des besoins des pays en développement en matière d’assistance technique et d’utilisation rationnelle et efficace des ressources financières et techniques: a) Promouvoir le développement des sciences et des techniques spatiales et de leurs applications; b) Favoriser le développement de capacités spatiales pertinentes et appropriées dans les États intéressés; c) Faciliter les échanges de connaissances spécialisées et de techniques entre les États sur une base mutuellement acceptable. 6. Les organismes nationaux et internationaux, les établissements de recherche, les organisations d’aide au développement ainsi que les pays développés et les pays en développement devraient envisager d’utiliser les applications des techniques spatiales et de tirer parti des possibilités offertes par la coopération internationale pour atteindre leurs objectifs de développement. 7. Il faudrait renforcer le rôle du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique en tant que lieu d’échange d’informations sur les activités nationales et internationales de coopération internationale, en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace.49 8. Tous les États devraient être encouragés à fournir une contribution au Programme des Nations Unies pour les applications des techniques spatiales et à d’autres initiatives dans le domaine de la coopération internationale en fonction de leurs capacités spatiales et de leur participation à l’exploration et à l’utilisation de l’espace.United States Treaties 12 and Other International Agreements. 13Treaties and Other International Acts Series. 14Nations Unies – Recueil des Traités. 50 III. État des accords internationaux relatifs aux activités dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique Traités des Nations Unies 1. 1967 TEE – Traité sur les Principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes (Traité sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique) Adoption par l’Assemblée générale 19 décembre 1966 des Nations Unies: (annexe de la résolution 2222 (XXI)) Ouverture à la signature: 27 janvier 1967 Londres, Moscou, Washington, D.C. Entrée en vigueur: 10 octobre 1967 Dépositaires: Fédération de Russie, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, États-Unis d’Amérique (Sources: 18 UST12 2410; TIAS13 6347; 610 RT14 205) 2. 1968 ASRA – Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique (Accord sur le sauvetage) Adoption par l’Assemblée générale 19 décembre 1967 des Nations Unies: (annexe de la résolution 2345 (XXII)) Ouverture à la signature: 22 avril 1968 Londres, Moscou, Washington, D.C. Entrée en vigueur: 3 décembre 1968 Dépositaires: Fédération de Russie, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, États-Unis d’Amérique (Sources: 19 UST 7570; TIAS 6599; 672 RT 119)15International Legal Materials. 51 3. 1972 RESP – Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux (Convention sur la responsabilité) Adoption par l’Assemblée générale 29 novembre 1971 des Nations Unies: (annexe de la résolution 2777 (XXVI)) Ouverture à la signature: 29 mars 1972 Londres, Moscou, Washington, D.C. Entrée en vigueur: 1er septembre 1972 Dépositaires: Fédération de Russie, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, États-Unis d’Amérique (Sources: 24 UST 2389; TIAS 7762; 961 RT 187) 4. 1975 IMM – Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extraatmosphérique (Convention sur l’immatriculation) Adoption par l’Assemblée générale 12 novembre 1974 des Nations Unies: (annexe de la résolution 3235 (XXIX)) Ouverture à la signature: 14 janvier 1975, New York Entrée en vigueur: 15 septembre 1976 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’ONU (Sources: 28 UST 695; TIAS 8480; 1023 RT 15) 5. 1979 LUNE – Accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes (Accord sur la Lune) Adoption par l’Assemblée générale 5 décembre 1979 des Nations Unies: (annexe de la résolution 34/68) Ouverture à la signature: 18 décembre 1979, New York Entrée en vigueur: 11 juillet 1984 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’ONU (Sources: 18 ILM15 1434; 1363 RT 3)52 Autres accords Généraux 6. 1963 TIEN – Traité interdisant les essais d’armes nucléaires dans l’atmosphère, dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique et sous l’eau Ouverture à la signature: 5 août 1963, Moscou Entrée en vigueur: 10 octobre 1963 Dépositaires: Fédération de Russie, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, États-Unis d’Amérique (Sources: 14 UST 1313; TIAS 5433; 480 RT 43) 7. 1974 BRUX – Convention sur la distribution des signaux porteurs de programmes transmis par satellite (Convention de Bruxelles) Ouverture à la signature: 21 mai 1974, Bruxelles Entrée en vigueur: 25 août 1979 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’ONU (Source: 1144 RT 3) Institutions 8. 1971 INTL – Accord relatif à l’Organisation internationale des télécommunications par satellite (INTELSAT), avec annexes, et accord d’exploitation relatif à l’Organisation internationale des télécommunications par satellite, avec annexe Ouverture à la signature: 20 août 1971, Washington, D.C. Entrée en vigueur: 12 février 1973 Dépositaire: États-Unis d’Amérique (Sources: 23 UST 3813 et 4091; TIAS 7532) 9. 1971 INTR – Accord sur la création d’un système international et de l’Organisation des télécommunications spatiales “INTERSPUTNIK” Ouverture à la signature: 15 novembre 1971, Moscou Entrée en vigueur: 12 juillet 1972 Dépositaire: Fédération de Russie (Source: 862 RT 3)53 10. 1975 ESA – Convention portant création d’une agence spatiale européenne (ESA), avec annexes Ouverture à la signature: 30 mai 1975, Paris Entrée en vigueur: 30 octobre 1980 Dépositaire: France (Source: 14 ILM 864) 11. 1976 ARBS – Accord de l’Organisation arabe des télécommunications par satellite (ARABSAT) Ouverture à la signature: 14 avril 1976 (14 Rabî II 1396 de l’hégire), Le Caire Entrée en vigueur: 16 juillet 1976 Dépositaire: Ligue des États arabes (Source: Space Law and Related Documents, Sénat des États-Unis d’Amérique, 101e Congrès, deuxième session, 395 (1990)) 12. 1976 INTC – Accord de coopération pour l’étude et les utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (INTERCOSMOS) Ouverture à la signature: 13 juillet 1976, Moscou Entrée en vigueur: 25 mars 1977 Dépositaire: Fédération de Russie (Source: 16 ILM 1) 13. 1976 OMI – Convention portant création de l’Organisation internationale de télécommunications maritimes par satellites (INMARSAT), avec annexe, et Accord d’exploitation sur l’Organisation de télécommunications maritimes par satellite, avec annexe Ouverture à la signature: 3 septembre 1976, Londres Entrée en vigueur: 16 juillet 1979 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’Organisation maritime internationale (Source: 31 UST 1; TIAS 9605) 14. 1982 EUTL – Convention portant création de l’Organisation européenne de télécommunications par satellite (EUTELSAT) Ouverture à la signature: 15 juillet 1982, Paris Entrée en vigueur: 1er septembre 1985 Dépositaire: France (Sources: UK Misc. n° 4, Cmnd. 9154 (1984))54 15. 1983 EUMT – Convention portant création d’une Organisation européenne pour l’exploitation de satellites météorologiques (EUMETSAT) Ouverture à la signature: 24 mai 1983, Genève Entrée en vigueur: 19 juin 1986 Dépositaire: Suisse (Source: Allemagne, “Bundesgesetzblatt”, 1987, partie 11 (1987), p. 256. Cette convention a été publiée au Journal officiel de chaque État l’ayant ratifiée.) 16. 1992 UIT – Constitution et Convention de l’Union internationale des télécommunications Ouverture à la signature: 22 décembre 1992, Genève Entrée en vigueur: 1er juillet 1994 Dépositaire: Suisse (Source: Secrétariat de l’UIT, Place des Nations, CH-1211 Genève 20, Suisse)55 État des accords internationaux relatifs aux activités dans l'espace extra-atmosphérique (au 1er février 1999)a Traités des Nations Unies Pays, zone ou organisation TEE ASRA RESP IMM LUNE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Afghanistan R Afrique du Sud R R S Albanie Algérie R S Allemagne R R R R Andorre Angola Antigua-et-Barbuda R R R R Arabie saoudite R R Argentine R R R R Arménie Australie R R R R R Autriche R R R R R Azerbaïdjan Bahamas R R Bahreïn Bangladesh R Barbade R R R Bélarus R R R R Belgique R R R R Belize Bénin R R Bhoutan Bolivie S S Bosnie-Herzégovine R R Botswana S R R Brésil R R R Brunéi Darussalam Bulgarie R R R R Burkina Faso R Burundi S S S Cambodge S Cameroun S R56 Autres traités (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TIEN BRUX INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R S RR S R R R57 Pays, zone ou organisation TEE ASRA RESP IMM LUNE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Canada R R R R Cap-Vert Chili R R R R R Chine R R R R Chypre R R R R Colombie S S S Comores Congo S Costa Rica S S Côte d'Ivoire Croatie Cuba R R R R Danemark R R R R Djibouti Dominique Égypte R R S El Salvador R R S Émirats arabes unis Équateur R R R Érythrée Espagne R R R Estonie États-Unis d'Amérique R R R R Éthiopie S Ex-République yougoslave de Macédoine Fédération de Russie R R R R Fidji R R R Finlande R R R France R R R R S Gabon R R Gambie S R S Géorgie R Ghana S S S Grèce R R R Grenade Guatemala S S Guinée Guinée-Bissau R R58 (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TIEN BRUX INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R b R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R S R R R R R R c R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R59 Pays, zone ou organisation TEE ASRA RESP IMM LUNE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Guinée équatoriale R Guyana S R Haïti S S S Honduras S S Hongrie R R R R Îles Marshall Îles Salomon Inde R R R R S Indonésie S R R Iran (République islamique d') S R R S Iraq R R R Irlande R R R Islande R R S Israël R R R Italie R R R Jamahiriya arabe libyenne R Jamaïque R S Japon R R R R Jordanie S S S Kazakhstan R R R Kenya R R Kirghizistan Kiribati Koweït R R R Lesotho S S Lettonie Liban R R S Libéria Liechtenstein R Lituanie Luxembourg S S R Madagascar R R Malaisie S S Malawi Maldives R Mali R R Malte S R Maroc R R R R60 (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TIEN BRUX INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR S R R R R R R R R R R R R61 Pays, zone ou organisation TEE ASRA RESP IMM LUNE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Maurice R R Mauritanie Mexique R R R R R Micronésie (États fédérés de) Monaco S Mongolie R R R R Mozambique Myanmar R S Namibie Nauru Népal R R S Nicaragua S S S S Niger R R R R Nigéria R R Norvège R R R R Nouvelle-Zélande R R R Oman S Ouganda R Ouzbékistan Pakistan R R R R R Panama S R Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée R R R Paraguay Pays-Bas R R R R R Pérou R R S R S Philippines S S S R Pologne R R R R Portugal R R Qatar R République arabe syrienne R R R République centrafricaine S S République de Corée R R R R République démocratique du Congo S S S République démocratique populaire lao R R R République de Moldova République dominicaine R S R République populaire démocratique de Corée République tchèque R R R R62 (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TIEN BRUX INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R63 Pays, zone ou organisation TEE ASRA RESP IMM LUNE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 République-Unie de Tanzanie S Roumanie R R R S Royaume-Uni R R R R Rwanda S S S Sainte-Lucie Saint-Marin R R Saint-Siège S Saint-Vincent-et-les Grenadines Samoa occidental Sao Tomé-et-Principe Sénégal S R Seychelles R R R R Sierra Leone R S S Singapour R R R S Slovaquie R R R R Slovénie R R Somalie S S Soudan Sri Lanka R R Suède R R R R Suisse R R R R Suriname Swaziland R Tadjikistan Tchad Thaïlande R R Togo R R Tonga R R Trinité-et-Tobago S R Tunisie R R R Turkménistan Turquie R S Tuvalu Ukraine R R R R Uruguay R R R R R Vanuatu Venezuela R S R Viet Nam R S64 (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TIEN BRUX INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R S R R R RRR R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R S R R R R R65 Pays, zone ou organisation TEE ASRA RESP IMM LUNE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Yémen R S Yougoslavie S R R R Zambie R R R Zimbabwe Palestine Agence spatiale européenne D D D Organisation européenne des télécommunications par satellite D Organisation européenne pour l’exploitation de satellites météorologiques D R = Ratification, a acceptation, approbation, adhésion ou succession. S = Signature uniquement. D = Déclaration d’acceptation de droits et obligations. Lorsqu’aucune indication n’est portée dans une colonne figurant en regard d’un nom de pays, de zone ou d’organisation, ledit pays, ou ladite zone ou organisation n’a pas signé l’accord, ou n’y est pas partie ou l’a dénoncé. b Le Canada a conclu un accord de coopération avec l'Agence spatiale européenne, mais n'en est pas membre. c La procédure est en cours pour l’adhésion de l’Estonie.66 (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TIEN BRUX INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R67 Accords internationaux connexes 1. 1959 TAN – Traité sur l’Antarctique Ouverture à la signature: 1er décembre 1959, Washington, D.C. Entrée en vigueur: 23 juin 1961 Dépositaire: États-Unis d’Amérique (Sources: 402 RT 71; 12 UST 794; TIAS 4780) 2. 1977 INMOD – Convention sur l’interdiction d’utiliser des techniques de modification de l’environnement à des fins militaires ou à toutes autres fins hostiles Adoption par l’Assemblée générale 10 décembre 1976 des Nations Unies: (annexe de la résolution 31/72) Ouverture à la signature: 18 mai 1977, Genève Entrée en vigueur: 5 octobre 1978 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’ONU (Sources: 1108 RT 151; 21 UST 333; 16 ILM 88) 3. 1982 CDM – Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer Ouverture à la signature: 10 décembre 1982, Montego Bay Entrée en vigueur: 16 novembre 1994 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’ONU (Sources: Document des Nations Unies A/CONF.62/122 (1982); 21 ILM 1261) 4. 1982 UIT – Convention internationale des télécommunications Ouverture à la signature: 6 novembre 1982, Nairobi Entrée en vigueur: 1er janvier 1984 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’Union internationale des télécommunications 5. 1986 NORAN – Convention sur la notification rapide d’un accident nucléaire Ouverture à la signature: 26 septembre 1986, Vienne Entrée en vigueur: 27 octobre 1986 Dépositaire: Directeur général de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (Source: 25 ILM 1370)68 6. 1986 ACAN – Convention sur l’assistance en cas d’accident nucléaire ou de situation d’urgence radiologique Ouverture à la signature: 26 septembre 1986, Vienne Entrée en vigueur: 26 février 1987 Dépositaire: Directeur général de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (Source: 25 ILM 1377) 7. 1992 UIT-CAMR – Acte final de la Conférence administrative mondiale des radiocommunications sur les attributions de fréquences dans certaines parties du spectre (CAMR-92) Ouverture à la signature: 3 mars 1992, Malaga-Torremolinos Entrée en vigueur: 2 octobre 1993 Dépositaire: Secrétaire général de l’Union internationale des télécommunications69 IV. Commentaire: recueil d’extraits de déclarations faites à l’occasion de l’adoption des traités des Nations Unies Traité sur les principes régissant les activités des États en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la Lune et les autres corps célestes Vingt et unième session de l’Assemblée générale (A/PV.1499): M. Goldberg (États-Unis d’Amérique) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Il s’agit là d’un traité des Nations Unies, dans toute l’acception du terme, et dont tous les États Membres sont en droit de s’enorgueillir. Ce traité a été négocié sous les auspices des Nations Unies et il est le fruit de ses efforts; il prolonge les objectifs de la Charte en diminuant considérablement les dangers de conflits internationaux et en améliorant les perspectives de coopération internationale pour le bien commun dans le domaine le plus récent des activités de l’homme. Ce traité représente un pas important vers la paix.” M. Fedorenko (Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques) (interprétation du russe): “Nous voudrions souligner que nous envisageons l’élaboration de ce traité et son approbation par l’Assemblée générale comme une victoire des forces pacifiques dans la lutte menée contre ceux qui voudraient utiliser l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins de provocation et d’agression.” M. Vinci (Italie) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Pour la première fois dans l’histoire de l’humanité, tous les pays, et en premier lieu les deux plus grandes puissances actuelles, recherchent non plus l’expansion de leur souveraineté, mais au contraire poursuivent uniquement des conquêtes scientifiques et techniques sur ces nouveaux continents de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, lesquels deviennent non pas la propriété de l’une ou l’autre puissance mais celle de l’humanité tout entière. Pour la première fois, à la suite des premières explorations spatiales, les concepts nationaux, religieux et idéologiques sont écartés et remplacés solennellement par les idées de paix et d’unité entre tous les hommes, sans distinction de religion, de race ni de couleur.” M. Seydoux (France): “Mais nous avons été également de ceux qui ont souligné à la suite de notre collègue, M. Manfred Lachs, que ce traité ne constitue en quelque sorte que le chapitre premier du droit de l’espace, où beaucoup reste encore à faire.” 1491 séance de la Première Commission e (A/C.1/SR.1491): M. Lachs (Pologne), parlant en sa qualité de Président du Sous-Comité juridique du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, déclare que l’adoption de ce traité donnera une nouvelle dimension au droit international. En effet, les États ont étendu leurs activités au domaine nouveau de l’espace extra-atmosphérique; or, il ne peut y avoir de vide juridique dans quelque domaine d’activité que ce soit. 1492e séance de la Première Commission (A/C.1/SR.1492): M. Goldberg (États-Unis d’Amérique) dit que les États-Unis considèrent le traité comme un progrès important vers la paix, car il diminuera beaucoup le danger de conflits internationaux et laisse bien augurer de la coopération internationale dans l’intérêt commun dans un des domaines les plus nouveaux et les moins familiers de l’activité humaine ... L’esprit de compromis dont ont fait preuve les puissances spatiales et les autres puissances a donné naissance à un traité qui établit un juste équilibre entre les intérêts et les obligations de tous les intéressés, y compris les pays qui n’ont encore entrepris aucune activité spatiale.70 M. Waldheim (Autriche) fait observer que les progrès scientifiques et techniques réalisés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique devaient s’accompagner d’accords juridiques et politiques. À cet égard, le traité en question est un jalon de la plus haute importance sur la voie qui mène à l’instauration du règne du droit dans l’espace extraatmosphérique, et il offre une base importante pour de nouveaux progrès dans ce domaine. M. Fuentealba (Chili) déclare que le principal mérite du traité spatial est que, non content de formuler des normes régissant les activités des États dans ce milieu, il apporte en même temps une solution à des problèmes potentiels dont la gravité n’est que trop apparente. M. de Carvalcho Silos (Brésil) dit que le traité marque une étape décisive dans l’oeuvre des Nations Unies ... Le traité proposé est peut-être l’événement politique le plus important depuis la signature du traité interdisant les essais d’armes nucléaires. 1493 séance de la Première Commission e (A/C.1/SR.1493): M. Gowland (Argentine) déclare que le traité servira de base à la réglementation juridique des activités de l’homme dans l’espace. Ce traité prévoit que l’espace sera exploré et utilisé sur une base universelle et d’égalité, propre à favoriser l’amitié et la compréhension conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies. M. Tilakaratna (Ceylan) dit que le traité représente un pas important vers l’établissement de règles régissant l’activité des États dans le domaine de l’exploration pacifique de l’espace. M. Matsui (Japon) fait observer que ce traité a une importance historique, car non seulement il assure que l’espace extra-atmosphérique, la Lune et les autres corps célestes seront utilisés exclusivement à des fins pacifiques, mais il prévoit la coopération entre tous les États, grands et petits, dans le domaine de la recherche spatiale ... Le représentant du Japon espère que tous les États adhéreront au traité afin de réaliser la coopération internationale la plus large possible, et que le sens du progrès et l’esprit de compréhension qui ont présidé à l’élaboration du traité contribueront à la solution des autres problèmes qui assombrissent l’humanité. M. Burns (Canada) dit que le traité est le fruit de sérieux efforts déployés tant au sein du Sous-Comité juridique du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique qu’au-dehors. Il représente un important effort pour établir le règne de la loi dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique ... L’ensemble du traité fournira une base solide à des accords ultérieurs plus détaillés. L’accord auquel on est parvenu sur les principes régissant les activités des États dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique est un grand encouragement et une source d’espérance pour tous ceux qui oeuvrent en faveur de l’adoption de mesures de désarmement efficaces. M. Schuurmans (Belgique) déclare qu’il faut se réjouir de l’élaboration d’un instrument instaurant la coopération active de toute la communauté internationale, sous l’égide des Nations Unies. La Belgique est fermement convaincue qu’en appuyant le traité par un vote unanime, l’ONU contribuera puissamment à encourager les États à chercher également dans d’autres domaines que celui de l’espace des solutions pacifiques aux autres problèmes graves qui continuent à les séparer. M. Odhiambo (Kenya) fait observer que l’exploration spatiale, tout comme la science de l’atome, est une arme à double tranchant qui peut se révéler à la fois dangereuse et utile pour l’humanité. Il est donc satisfaisant d’apprendre que le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique a réussi à aboutir à un accord sur un traité qui garantira que l’espace extra-atmosphérique, la Lune et les autres corps célestes serviront à des fins exclusivement pacifiques et que les avantages qui résulteront de l’exploration de l’espace seront étendus à tous. M. Tarabanov (Bulgarie) fait remarquer qu’en tant qu’instrument juridique destiné à stimuler la coopération internationale dans le domaine de l’exploration et des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, le71 traité est un événement historique; il n’est pas, toutefois, une fin en soi, mais un commencement prometteur ... Le traité non seulement affirme les principes de la Charte des Nations Unies et du droit international, mais érige la notion de paix en règle juridique pour ce qui est des activités spatiales. M. Rossides (Chypre) dit que le traité est un net et important pas en avant. Le progrès scientifique dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique s’accompagne maintenant d’un progrès juridique, de sorte que le droit international et la Charte des Nations Unies s’appliqueront pleinement aux activités spatiales. M. Lopez (Philippines) dit que ce traité représente l’aboutissement des efforts de l’Organisation pour parvenir à un accord sur des principes juridiques obligatoires applicables dans un domaine où la technique scientifique a avancé de façon si rapide et étonnante. Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique Vingt-deuxième session de l’Assemblée générale (A/PV.1640): M. Waldheim (Autriche), parlant en sa qualité de Président du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (interprétation de l’anglais): “Nous souhaitons que ce projet de résolution reçoive l’approbation unanime de l’Assemblée générale et ouvre ainsi la voie à une prompte application de l’Accord sur le sauvetage et le retour des astronautes. Cela représenterait, nous en sommes convaincus, non seulement un important progrès dans l’établissement du droit de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, mais aussi une preuve évidente de la coopération et de l’unité de toutes les nations dans la grande aventure qu’est, pour l’homme, l’exploration de l’espace extraatmosphérique.” M. Wyzner (Pologne) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Mes collègues comprendront sans aucun doute l’importance au point de vue humanitaire de cet accord pour ces hommes courageux et hardis qui sont, selon les termes de l’article 5 du Traité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, “les envoyés de l’humanité” dans l’espace extraatmosphérique, qui risquent leur vie – comme l’ont montré dernièrement de tragiques accidents – dans des entreprises qui servent les intérêts de tous. Cet accord est important aussi car il constitue une nouvelle étape dans le développement progressif du droit de l’espace extra-atmosphérique ... Étant donné ses possibilités effrayantes en cas de guerre, l’espace extra-atmosphérique ne doit pas devenir un lieu de rivalités autres que pacifiques. L’accord sur le sauvetage et le retour des astronautes est également une nouvelle étape franchie collectivement dans la recherche de la paix, puisqu’il contribue, notamment, à éliminer des sources possibles de désaccord et de frictions entre les États.” M. Vinci (Italie) (interprétation de l’anglais): “À notre avis l’accord dont nous sommes saisis est important, à la fois par lui-même et en tant qu’élément d’un programme plus vaste, à savoir la discipline juridique des activités spatiales – ces activités qui ont chaque jour une influence plus grande sur notre vie terrestre et qui ne manqueront pas d’en avoir davantage encore dans un proche avenir. La tâche des Nations Unies dans ce domaine est parfaitement claire: sauvegarder et favoriser non pas les intérêts d’un groupe particulier de pays seulement, mais au contraire l’intérêt général de toutes les nations, qu’elles soient ou non engagées dans des activités spatiales, individuellement ou en tant que membres d’une organisation multilatérale. L’élaboration d’un droit de l’espace créera un cadre qui facilitera le développement des activités spatiales à des fins pacifiques et qui fera de ces activités non point une cause de litige et de tension, mais plutôt une source de bienfaits pour tous et pour la coopération internationale.” M. Goldberg (États-Unis d’Amérique) (interprétation de l’anglais): “C’est un document solide, qui résistera à l’épreuve du temps et de l’expérience. Les États-Unis considèrent que la décision de l’Assemblée générale72 d’approuver ce traité est un acte historique. Le texte du traité représente une unanimité qui s’est faite pour transposer dans la réalité l’expression fameuse utilisée par le Traité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, selon laquelle les astronautes sont “les envoyés de l’humanité”. La délégation des États-Unis estime que l’approbation du traité par l’Assemblée générale est l’une des grandes réalisations de la présente session. L’Accord sur le sauvetage et le retour des astronautes que nous venons d’adopter représente, pour les États-Unis, un juste équilibre entre les intérêts de tous les Membres des Nations Unies, les puissances spatiales, celles qui le seront bientôt, les puissances qui coopèrent aux activités spatiales et toutes celles qui s’intéressent à l’espace extra-atmosphérique, c’est-à-dire en fait tous les Membres de l’Organisation. Cet accord est la preuve que l’Organisation des Nations Unies peut contribuer de façon tangible à étendre l’application du droit à des domaines nouveaux et à assurer l’organisation positive et pacifique des efforts de l’homme dans le domaine scientifique et l’édification d’un monde meilleur. Enfin, c’est un hommage, et non le moindre, rendu à ceux qui s’aventurent dans ce monde nouveau qu’est l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Nous allons travailler pour que cette aventure serve l’intérêt de tous, car c’est là notre espoir.”M. C. O. E. Cole (Sierra Leone) (interprétation de l’anglais): “La délégation de la Sierra Leone a voté en faveur du projet de résolution que nous venons d’adopter. Les principes humanitaires et juridiques fort louables dont il s’inspire et le fait que notre gouvernement soit signataire du Traité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique obligeaient ma délégation à agir ainsi. C’est le moindre hommage que nous puissions rendre à tous ceux qui s’aventurent courageusement dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique pour son utilisation à des fins pacifiques et à tous ceux qui travaillent avec tant d’assiduité à cette fin.” M. Fedorenko (Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques) (interprétation du russe): “Ayant approuvé le projet présenté par le Comité concernant le sauvetage des astronautes, le retour des astronautes et la restitution des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, la délégation soviétique est convaincue que la conclusion de cet accord aura une importance considérable étant donné les progrès rapides de l’astronautique, le développement de la recherche scientifique dans l’espace et l’application de plus en plus étendue des appareils spatiaux pour des besoins pratiques, dans le domaine des communications, des prévisions météorologiques, de la navigation, etc. L’Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes aura sans aucun doute une grande importance pratique pour le sauvetage rapide des astronautes en cas d’accident, de détresse ou d’atterrissage forcé car, à mesure que progressent la science et la technique, les vols de navires spatiaux ayant des hommes à bord deviendront, d’année en année, plus complexes et plus longs ... C’est à juste titre qu’on peut considérer l’accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes comme un acte de droit international humanitaire, élaboré par les États Membres de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour les vaillants explorateurs des espaces cosmiques qui, selon les termes mêmes du Traité, sont les messagers de l’humanité dans l’espace.” Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux Trente-sixième session de l’Assemblée générale (A/PV.1998): M. Migliuolo (Italie), parlant en sa qualité de Rapporteur de la Première Commission (interprétation de l’anglais): “Le projet de convention est l’aboutissement des longs efforts persistants d’un groupe de juristes et de diplomates internationaux éminents qui, pendant des années, ont essayé de développer et d’étendre le corpus juris concernant les aspects internationaux des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique.”73 M. Shepard (États-Unis d’Amérique) (interprétation de l’anglais): “La convention sur la responsabilité est un traité solide fondé sur une compréhension réaliste des intérêts et des avantages de chacun. Nous croyons qu’elle s’inscrit dans la ligne du Traité fort apprécié de 1967 sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique et dans celle de l’Accord sur le sauvetage des astronautes de 1968. La convention sur la responsabilité devrait rendre possible le paiement d’une indemnité prompte et équitable dans le cas de dommages causés par le lancement, le vol ou le retour des véhicules spatiaux fabriqués par l’homme.” 1826 séance de la Première Commission e (A/C.1/PV.1826): M. Van Ussel (Belgique): “Les membres de la Première Commission n’ignorent pas que les négociations y ont été ardues et qu’il a fallu souvent beaucoup d’imagination, de concessions, voire des sacrifices, pour rédiger les articles de la convention. Si nous sommes arrivés à un accord, après tant d’années de réunions, de consultations ou d’échanges de vues, c’est parce que tous les membres du Sous-Comité juridique, sous la présidence aussi éclairée qu’efficace de son président, M. Wyzner, étaient animés d’un esprit constructif et de la volonté d’aboutir à un texte conforme aux principes sacrés du droit international. La convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux ... est avant tout le résultat d’un compromis qui, comme je le signalais dans mon intervention à la 1823e séance, est le fruit heureux du mariage du droit et de la diplomatie.” M. Williams (Jamaïque) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Ma délégation tient à remercier le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique d’avoir consacré des années de travail à l’élaboration du projet de convention et de nous avoir présenté, en fin de compte, un document à approuver. Nous n’ignorons pas qu’il y a eu des difficultés presque insurmontables. Étant donné l’augmentation du nombre des objets lancés dans l’espace, il était certainement urgent de se mettre d’accord sur certaines règles qui s’appliqueraient au cas où un objet spatial causerait des dommages en revenant sur la Terre. Le Comité s’est efforcé de résoudre les problèmes encore en suspens en recourant à un compromis.” M. Seaton (République-Unie de Tanzanie) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Ma délégation félicite le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique d’avoir mis au point un projet de convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux. Nous estimons que ce projet de convention mérite un examen attentif de tous les États.” M. Farhang (Afghanistan) (interprétation de l’anglais): “La délégation de l’Afghanistan apprécie les efforts déployés par le Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique et par son Sous-Comité juridique. Nous nous félicitons aussi de l’esprit de compromis dont ont fait preuve les grandes puissances spatiales et qui a permis d’élaborer le projet de convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux.” M. Issraelyan (Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques) (interprétation du russe): “Nous notons en particulier avec satisfaction l’adoption du projet de résolution A/C.1/L.570/Rev.1, qui approuve la convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux, dont le texte a été mis au point par le Comité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique au cours d’un travail long et fructueux. De même que la résolution que nous venons d’adopter, nous espérons que le plus grand nombre possible de pays adhéreront à cette convention.” Convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique 1988e séance de la Première Commission (A/C.1/PV.1988): M. Jankowitsch (Autriche), parlant en sa qualité de Président du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique (interprétation de l’anglais): “Une fois de plus, le Comité a fait un apport à cet74 important recueil de droit en adoptant la Convention sur l’enregistrement qui sera présentée à la session actuelle de l’Assemblée générale pour examen et adoption ... Ce texte ne saurait, bien entendu, satisfaire entièrement tout le monde, mais il représente non seulement plusieurs années de travail acharné et dévoué, mais aussi, nous semble-t-il, le niveau optimum de compromis qu’il était possible d’obtenir à l’étape actuelle de la technique. C’est pourquoi le projet de convention a reçu l’approbation unanime des membres du Comité ... Le projet de convention sur l’immatriculation est donc un instrument indispensable permettant de faire en sorte que les revendications des victimes innocentes dans le cadre de la Convention sur la responsabilité puissent trouver une réponse rapide et efficace. Ce texte vient compléter l’ensemble des règles fournies par la Convention sur la responsabilité en ce sens qu’il facilitera la procédure d’identification des objets spatiaux en cas de doute. Sous ce rapport, le projet de convention sur l’immatriculation nous paraît être un complément très utile à l’ensemble de règles de droit international existant dans ce domaine et représente donc une étape importante dans l’évolution progressive et la codification du droit international de l’espace.” M. Wyzner (Pologne), parlant en sa qualité de Président du Sous-Comité juridique (interprétation de l’anglais): “Le projet de convention est un instrument qui a été rédigé avec beaucoup de soin et après mûre réflexion. Il est le fruit de longues consultations détaillées, de négociations entre délégations ayant des opinions divergentes et représentant des façons de penser diverses, tout en recherchant la zone d’accord la plus ample possible.” 1990 séance de la Première Commission e (A/C.1/PV.1990): M. Kuchel (États-Unis d’Amérique) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Beaucoup de compromis délicats ont été obtenus dans la négociation sur la convention et nous croyons que l’accord qui en est résulté est un accord raisonnable tenant compte des intérêts divers, qui se révélera une adjonction utile au recueil de droit international qui est mis au point en ce qui concerne l’exploration et l’utilisation pacifiques de l’espace.” M. Frazao (Brésil): “L’adoption par le Sous-Comité juridique d’un projet de convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique constitue un résultat remarquable et nous tenons à féliciter chaleureusement le Sous-Comité et, en particulier, son infatigable Président, l’Ambassadeur Wyzner. Grâce à l’esprit de compréhension et de compromis qui a régné durant la dernière session du Sous-Comité juridique, l’Assemblée générale pourra, à la présente session, procéder à l’adoption du texte final d’une convention dont la nécessité n’est plus à démontrer.” 1991e séance de la Première Commission (A/C.1/PV.1991): M. Datcu (Roumanie): “Cet accord qui vient compléter les stipulations de la Convention relative à la responsabilité des États pour les objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique représente un pas important en avant vers l’établissement du cadre juridique général de la coopération des États dans le domaine spatial.” M. Rydbeck (Suède) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Nous notons avec une vive satisfaction que le Comité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique nous soumet cette année des résultats concrets, sous la forme d’un projet de convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique. La préparation du texte dont nous sommes saisis a exigé de nombreuses années d’efforts, au sein du Sous-Comité juridique. Il marque un nouveau jalon sur la voie des réalisations des Nations Unies dans le domaine de l’espace extra-atmosphérique ... À notre avis, le projet de convention sur l’immatriculation complète utilement la Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux. L’adoption du projet de convention sur l’immatriculation fournira peut-être également des chances meilleures de ratifications supplémentaires de la Convention sur la responsabilité internationale pour les dommages causés par des objets spatiaux et des autres instruments des Nations Unies adoptés dans le domaine de l’espace extra-atmosphérique.”75 M. Todorov (Bulgarie) (interprétation du russe): “En harmonisant ces textes réalistes et équilibrés, le Sous-Comité juridique a une fois de plus confirmé sa réputation d’organe contribuant abondamment au développement et à la codification du droit spatial international.” 1992 séance de la Première Commission e (A/C.1/PV.1992): M. Charvet (France): “Je voudrais souligner que les résultats acquis en matière d’immatriculation des engins spatiaux ont quelque peu valeur d’exemple pour les autres problèmes figurant à l’ordre du jour du Comité de l’espace. En effet, ces résultats nous apportent la preuve de ce que peuvent réaliser l’esprit de compromis des États et le désir de coopération internationale.” M. Brankovic (Yougoslavie) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Il est hors de doute qu’il s’agit là d’une réalisation de première importance dans le domaine de la législation de l’espace. L’adoption et la mise en oeuvre de la convention contribueront beaucoup à la réalisation de l’un des objectifs fondamentaux, l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques, et constitueront une étape importante dans cette voie.” 1994e séance de la Première Commission (A/C.1/PV.1994): M. Yokota (Japon) (interprétation de l’anglais): “La mise au point du projet de convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique est un événement marquant dans l’histoire du Comité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique ... J’espère sincèrement que la Commission adoptera à l’unanimité le projet de convention sur l’immatriculation, qui nous semble être un jalon de plus sur la voie du développement progressif du droit de l’espace ... Ma délégation pense que la communauté internationale pourrait tirer un grand enseignement d’une analyse soigneuse des longues et délicates négociations qui, cette année, ont permis d’achever le texte d’un projet de convention sur l’immatriculation.” 1995e séance de la Première Commission (A/C.1/PV.1995): M. Isa (Pakistan) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Cette convention est le complément nécessaire à la Convention sur la responsabilité et constitue un apport de valeur au droit de l’espace. La responsabilité pour un dommage causé par un objet spatial ne saurait être correctement mise en oeuvre que s’il existe un système permettant de déterminer l’origine des objets spatiaux.” M. Al-Masri (République arabe syrienne) (interprétation de l’arabe): “Les résultats encourageants obtenus par le Sous-Comité juridique et, en tout premier lieu, le projet de convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique, nous font espérer que les obstacles qui continuent à entraver les réalisations d’un plus grand nombre d’aboutissements en ce domaine, notamment pour ce qui est de l’élaboration des règles internationales relatives à la Lune et aux émissions de télévision directe par des satellites artificiels, ainsi qu’à la télédétection de la Terre, seront éliminés grâce à notre bonne volonté et à notre foi sincère dans les principes de la coopération internationale et des relations humaines entre les peuples du monde.” M. Yango (Philippines) (interprétation de l’anglais): “Ce projet de convention est une nouvelle contribution du Comité de l’espace extra-atmosphérique au développement du droit international en matière d’utilisation pacifique de l’espace extra-atmosphérique. À notre avis, ce projet de convention est un complément nécessaire des accords précédents ... Un système d’enregistrement des objets lancés dans l’espace est établi dans ce projet de convention, non seulement sur le plan national mais aussi sur le plan international. Cet enregistrement représente une source de données nécessaires et vitales dans les efforts continus que déploie l’humanité en vue d’explorer et d’utiliser l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques.”76 1996 séance de la Première Commission e (A/C.1/PV.1996): M. Plaja (Italie) (interprétation de l’anglais): “L’accord réalisé sur [le] texte [de la Convention] n’a pas été facile et, comme il est d’usage dans ces négociations internationales, il est le résultat de plusieurs compromis qui sont à l’image de l’esprit d’accommodement dont ont fait preuve de nombreux membres qui ont sacrifié leur position originale afin de permettre la réalisation d’un consensus général. Le projet de convention sur l’immatriculation des objets lancés dans l’espace représente une autre petite étape non seulement vers l’achèvement d’un nouvel ensemble de droit spatial, comme nous nous y sommes efforcés, mais également vers une nouvelle “Magna Carta” de règles et de dispositions globales qui seront utilisées et respectées à l’avenir pour déterminer la conduite des relations internationales entre les peuples.” 1997e séance de la Première Commission (A/C.1/PV.1997): M. Azzout (Algérie): “Il s’agit là, en effet, d’un résultat de première importance, ce document juridique venant enrichir, sur un plan très pratique, le nouveau droit qui s’édifie petit à petit, et compléter harmonieusement la Convention sur la responsabilité pour les dommages causés par les engins spatiaux.” Accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes 15e séance de la Commission politique spéciale (A/SPC/34/SR.15): M. Ahmed (Inde) déclare que l’adoption de ce traité par l’Assemblée générale permettrait l’exploitation ordonnée et rationnelle des ressources naturelles de la Lune et des autres corps célestes grâce à la création d’un régime international qui garantirait que ces ressources qui sont le patrimoine commun de l’humanité seront exploitées à son profit. M. Enterlein (République démocratique allemande) déclare que le projet d’accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune, adopté par consensus lors de la vingt-deuxième session du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, contient des dispositions concrètes importantes pour la réglementation de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Il est particulièrement important que, conformément à l’article III du projet d’accord, tous les États Parties utilisent la Lune exclusivement à des fins pacifiques. Il est essentiel pour la paix et la détente que le projet d’accord confirme le statut démilitarisé de la Lune et des autres corps célestes, et interdise la mise sur orbite de ces corps d’objets porteurs d’armes nucléaires ou de tout autre type d’armes de destruction massive. Avec l’adoption de ce projet d’accord, un autre aspect important de l’espace extra-atmosphérique et des activités s’y rattachant sera réglementé par des dispositions spécifiques et détaillées ayant force obligatoire en vertu du droit international. Le fait qu’il ait été possible de parvenir à ce projet d’accord par consensus montre de manière éclatante la valeur de ce principe pour la préparation des dispositions juridiques relatives à l’espace extraatmosphérique. 16e séance de la Commission politique spéciale (A/SPC/34/SR.16): M. Barton (Canada) note avec satisfaction que le Comité a enfin achevé la rédaction d’un projet de traité concernant la Lune, dont le texte réitère le principe énoncé dans le Traité de 1967, à savoir que la Lune et les autres corps célestes ne seront utilisés qu’à des fins pacifiques, interdit expressément tout recours à la menace ou à l’emploi de la force et implique que les avantages tirés de l’exploitation des ressources célestes seront équitablement partagés entre toutes les parties.77 M. Fujita (Japon) dit que le projet d’accord contient divers principes capitaux qui, ayant force obligatoire, devraient contribuer efficacement à promouvoir une plus grande coopération entre les États aux fins de l’exploration et de l’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique à des fins pacifiques. M Nowotny (Autriche) dit qu’à sa session précédente, le Comité des utilisations me pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique a pu achever, en se fondant sur les travaux du Sous-Comité juridique, l’élaboration du projet d’accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes, ce qui constitue une étape extrêmement importante de la codification du droit international concernant l’espace extra-atmosphérique. Grâce à un tel accord, l’utilisation des ressources naturelles des corps célestes et de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, qui permettrait d’atténuer les fortes pressions auxquelles doit faire face l’humanité en raison des ressources limitées de la Terre, pourrait se faire dans un environnement spatial essentiellement pacifique, d’une façon ordonnée et conforme au droit international, sur la base d’une coopération et d’une compréhension mutuelles, et selon des modalités appropriées convenues au préalable. Ce n’est que dans ces conditions que l’humanité entière pourra en tirer profit. 17e séance de la Commission politique spéciale (A/SPC/34/SR.17): Mme Oliveros (Argentine) fait observer que, pour ce qui est du projet de traité concernant la Lune, les divergences de vues qui s’étaient fait jour depuis le début et qui semblaient parfois insurmontables ont été résolues, ce qui démontre une fois encore l’efficacité des négociations entre les États à cet égard. Le texte proposé concilie les intérêts des différents groupes et il peut satisfaire aussi bien les pays développés que les pays en développement. Il rétablit en outre la crédibilité du Comité des utilisations pacifiques de l’espace extra-atmosphérique et prouve que c’est l’un des organes les plus efficaces de l’ONU: au cours de son existence relativement brève, il a élaboré cinq instruments internationaux extrêmement importants. Enfin, ce projet de traité est un excellent exemple de la façon de progresser dans le développement graduel du droit international et sa codification, conformément à l’article 13 a) de la Charte. M. Roslyakov (Union des Républiques socialistes soviétiques) déclare que le projet d’accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes, dont l’élaboration a commencé en 1971 sur une proposition de l’Union soviétique, est un document équilibré, établi avec soin et répondant aux besoins de tous les pays, quels que soient leur niveau de développement et leur degré de participation aux activités spatiales. M. Cotton (Nouvelle-Zélande) fait remarquer que le projet de traité, qui énonce des directives pour la conduite des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes, marquera un progrès important dans la coopération internationale. 18e séance de la Commission politique spéciale (A/SPC/34/SR.18): M. Albornoz (Équateur) fait observer que la conclusion d’un projet d’accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes représente un progrès certain. Il est encourageant de constater que cet instrument prévoit non seulement que l’exploration et l’utilisation de la Lune sont l’apanage de toute l’humanité, mais également qu’elles se font pour le bien et dans l’intérêt de tous les pays, quel que soit leur degré de développement. Les États parties à cet accord devront également s’engager à utiliser la Lune exclusivement à des fins pacifiques et à ne pas mettre sur orbite autour de la Lune des objets porteurs d’armes nucléaires. M. Kalina (Tchécoslovaquie) dit que la délégation tchécoslovaque se félicite de la conclusion des travaux sur “l’accord régissant les activités des États sur la Lune et les autres corps célestes”. La conclusion de ce travail montre qu’avec la volonté politique voulue, même les questions les plus difficiles et les plus délicates peuvent être résolues. L’accord concernant la Lune contient la notion de patrimoine commun de l’humanité. C’est là reconnaître la nécessité d’une vaste coopération internationale dans l’espace extra-atmosphérique de tous les pays quel que soit le niveau de leur développement.78 19 séance de la Commission politique e spéciale (A/SPC/34/SR.19): M. Petree (États-Unis d’Amérique) fait observer que le projet de traité concernant la Lune se fonde dans une très large mesure sur le Traité de 1967 sur l’espace extra-atmosphérique et ne limite en aucun cas les dispositions de ce dernier. Il représente en soi un progrès concret dans la codification du droit international dans le domaine de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, avec des obligations susceptibles d’application immédiate et à long terme. M. Kolbasin (République socialiste soviétique de Biélorussie) déclare que le projet de traité concernant la Lune, outre qu’il représente une contribution majeure au droit international, sera un élément important pour l’instauration de la confiance mutuelle entre les États et contribuera à consolider la paix mondiale. M. Gómez Robledo (Mexique) dit que, de l’avis de la délégation mexicaine, le projet de traité a réussi à maintenir un équilibre délicat entre l’idéalisme et le réalisme, en établissant des règles visant à régir les activités de l’humanité sur la Lune. M. Suryokusumo (Indonésie) fait observer que l’Indonésie accueille favorablement le projet d’accord concernant la Lune, lequel marque de toute évidence une étape importante dans le développement du droit spatial et atteste qu’on peut progresser dans le règlement des problèmes, en reconnaissant les intérêts mutuels et en faisant preuve d’un esprit de compromis. M. Diez (Chili) déclare que l’élaboration de l’accord constitue un succès à la fois pour les pays développés et pour les pays en développement, dans la mesure où il prévoit la coopération efficace des États sur un pied d’égalité en ce qui concerne l’exploration et l’utilisation future de la Lune au profit de l’humanité tout entière.79 Bureau des affaires spatiales Centre international de Vienne B.P. 500, A-1400 Vienne (Autriche) Téléphone: (+43) (1) 26060-4950 Télécopieur: (+43) (1) 26060-5830