A_AC_105_772_ES
Correct misalignment Change languages order
A/AC.105/772 A-AC-105-722-e-.pdf (English)A/AC.105/722 A-AC-105-722-s.pdf (Spanish)
A/AC.105/722 A/CONF.184 /BP/15 United Nations treaties and principles on outer space Text and status of treaties and principles governing the activities of States in the exploration and use of outer space, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly A commemorative edition Published on the occasion of the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III) United Nations, Vienna 1999CONTENTS Page Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I. United Nations Treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and other Celestial Bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects . . . . . . . . . 11 Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 II. Principles adopted by the General Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 III. Status of International Agreements Relating to Activities in Outer Space . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 United Nations treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Other agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Related international agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 IV. Commentary: A collection of extracts of statements made on the occasion of the adoption of the United Nations treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68iii Foreword The progressive development and codification of international law constitutes one of the principal responsibilities of the United Nations in the legal field. An important area for the exercise of such responsibilities is the new environment of outer space and, through the efforts of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its Legal Subcommittee, a number of significant contributions to the law of outer space have been made. The United Nations has, indeed, become a focal point for international cooperation in outer space and for the formulation of necessary international rules. Outer space, extraordinary in many respects, is, in addition, unique from the legal point of view. It is only recently that human activities and international interaction in outer space have become realities and that beginnings have been made in the formulation of international rules to facilitate international relations in outer space. As is appropriate to an environment whose nature is so extraordinary, the extension of international law to outer space has been gradual and evolutionary—commencing with the study of questions relating to legal aspects, proceeding to the formulation of principles of a legal nature and, then, incorporating such principles in general multilateral treaties. A significant first step was the adoption by the General Assembly in 1963 of the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space. The years that followed saw the elaboration within the United Nations of five general multilateral treaties, which incorporated and developed concepts included in the Declaration of Legal Principles: The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (General Assembly resolution 2222 (XXI), annex)—adopted on 19 December 1966, opened for signature on 27 January 1967, entered into force on 10 October 1967; The Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space (resolution 2345 (XXII), annex)—adopted on 19 December 1967, opened for signature on 22 April 1968, entered into force on 3 December 1968; The Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects (resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex)—adopted on 29 November 1971, opened for signature on 29 March 1972, entered into force on 1 September 1972; The Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space (resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex)—adopted on 12 November 1974, opened for signature on 14 January 1975, entered into force on 15 September 1976; The Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (resolution 34/68, annex)—adopted on 5 December 1979, opened for signature on 18 December 1979, entered into force on 11 July 1984. The United Nations oversaw the drafting, formulation and adoption of five General Assembly resolutions, including the Declaration of Legal Principles. These are: The Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, adopted on 13 December 1963 (resolution 1962 (XVIII));2See the report of the Secretary-General on international cooperation in space activities for enhancing s 1 ecurity in the post-cold-war era (A/48/221), and also General Assembly resolution 48/39, para. 2. 3 The Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting, adopted on 10 December 1982 (resolution 37/92); The Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space, adopted on 3 December 1986 (resolution 41/65); The Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space, adopted on 14 December 1992 (resolution 47/68); The Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries, adopted on 13 December 1996 (resolution 51/122). The 1967 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, could be viewed as furnishing a general legal basis for the peaceful uses of outer space and providing a framework for the developing law of outer space. The four other treaties may be said to deal specifically with certain concepts included in the 1967 Treaty. The space treaties have been ratified by many Governments and many others abide by their principles. In view of the importance of international cooperation in developing the norms of space law and their important role in promoting international cooperation in the use of outer space for peaceful purposes, the General Assembly and the Secretary-General of the United Nations have called upon all Member States of the United Nations not yet parties to the international treaties governing the uses of outer space to ratify or accede to those treaties as soon as feasible.1 From 19 to 30 July 1999, the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III) will consider the past achievements and current status of humankind’s activities in outer space and seek to map out a blueprint for future such activities, leading into the next century. One of the issues that will be discussed in that context is promotion of international cooperation, including the key aspect of the current status and future development of international space law. The purpose of the present publication is to set out again in a single volume the five outer space treaties so far adopted by the United Nations and the five sets of principles. Also included in this publication is a table listing the current parties to and the status of the five outer space treaties as well as other related international agreements governing space activities as at 1 February 1999. Furthermore, a commentary, consisting of a collection of statements made on the occasion of the adoption of the five outer space treaties, appears at the end of the publication. It is hoped that this collection will serve as a valuable reference document for the participants of the Conference in their deliberations on issues relating to international space law and its future development. In addition, it is hoped that this publication will serve to remind all readers interested in the legal aspects of outer space of the spirit of goodwill and cooperation that formed the basis for the legal instruments formulated and inspired the holding of this, the final United Nations conference of the twentieth century.4 I. United Nations Treaties Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies The States Parties to this Treaty, Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man’s entry into outer space, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the benefit of all peoples irrespective of the degree of their economic or scientific development, Desiring to contribute to broad international cooperation in the scientific as well as the legal aspects of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that such cooperation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between States and peoples, Recalling resolution 1962 (XVIII), entitled “Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space”, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 December 1963, Recalling resolution 1884 (XVIII), calling upon States to refrain from placing in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction or from installing such weapons on celestial bodies, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 17 October 1963, Taking account of United Nations General Assembly resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space, Convinced that a Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, will further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Have agreed on the following:5 Article I The exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind. Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies. There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigation. Article II Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means. Article III States Parties to the Treaty shall carry on activities in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding. Article IV States Parties to the Treaty undertake not to place in orbit around the Earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner. The Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used by all States Parties to the Treaty exclusively for peaceful purposes. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration of the Moon and other celestial bodies shall also not be prohibited. Article V States Parties to the Treaty shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of another State Party or on the high seas. When astronauts make such a landing, they shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle. In carrying on activities in outer space and on celestial bodies, the astronauts of one State Party shall render all possible assistance to the astronauts of other States Parties. States Parties to the Treaty shall immediately inform the other States Parties to the Treaty or the Secretary-General of the United Nations of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, which could constitute a danger to the life or health of astronauts.6 Article VI States Parties to the Treaty shall bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in the present Treaty. The activities of non-governmental entities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the appropriate State Party to the Treaty. When activities are carried on in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with this Treaty shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States Parties to the Treaty participating in such organization. Article VII Each State Party to the Treaty that launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and each State Party from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to another State Party to the Treaty or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air space or in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies. Article VIII A State Party to the Treaty on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and over any personnel thereof, while in outer space or on a celestial body. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, including objects landed or constructed on a celestial body, and of their component parts, is not affected by their presence in outer space or on a celestial body or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State Party to the Treaty on whose registry they are carried shall be returned to that State Party, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return. Article IX In the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, States Parties to the Treaty shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties to the Treaty. States Parties to the Treaty shall pursue studies of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination and also adverse changes in the environment of the Earth resulting from the introduction of extraterrestrial matter and, where necessary, shall adopt appropriate measures for this purpose. If a State Party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State Party to the Treaty which has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by another State Party in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment.7 Article X In order to promote international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, in conformity with the purposes of this Treaty, the States Parties to the Treaty shall consider on a basis of equality any requests by other States Parties to the Treaty to be afforded an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by those States. The nature of such an opportunity for observation and the conditions under which it could be afforded shall be determined by agreement between the States concerned. Article XI In order to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States Parties to the Treaty conducting activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, agree to inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of the nature, conduct, locations and results of such activities. On receiving the said information, the Secretary-General of the United Nations should be prepared to disseminate it immediately and effectively. Article XII All stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on a basis of reciprocity. Such representatives shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited. Article XIII The provisions of this Treaty shall apply to the activities of States Parties to the Treaty in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by a single State Party to the Treaty or jointly with other States, including cases where they are carried on within the framework of international intergovernmental organizations. Any practical questions arising in connection with activities carried on by international intergovernmental organizations in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be resolved by the States Parties to the Treaty either with the appropriate international organization or with one or more States members of that international organization, which are Parties to this Treaty. Article XIV 1. This Treaty shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Treaty before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Treaty shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments.8 3. This Treaty shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Treaty. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Treaty, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Treaty, the date of its entry into force and other notices. 6. This Treaty shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article XV Any State Party to the Treaty may propose amendments to this Treaty. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Treaty accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Treaty and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Treaty on the date of acceptance by it. Article XVI Any State Party to the Treaty may give notice of its withdrawal from the Treaty one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XVII This Treaty, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Treaty shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. INWITNESSWHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Treaty. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, D.C., the twenty-seventh day of January, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven.1Resolution 2222 (XXI), annex. 9 Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space The Contracting Parties, Noting the great importance of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 which calls for the rendering of all possible assistance to astronauts in the event of accident, distress or emergency landing, the prompt and safe return of astronauts, and the return of objects launched into outer space, Desiring to develop and give further concrete expression to these duties, Wishing to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, Prompted by sentiments of humanity, Have agreed on the following: Article 1 Each Contracting Party which receives information or discovers that the personnel of a spacecraft have suffered accident or are experiencing conditions of distress or have made an emergency or unintended landing in territory under its jurisdiction or on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State shall immediately: (a) Notify the launching authority or, if it cannot identify and immediately communicate with the launching authority, immediately make a public announcement by all appropriate means of communication at its disposal; (b) Notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who should disseminate the information without delay by all appropriate means of communication at his disposal. Article 2 If, owing to accident, distress, emergency or unintended landing, the personnel of a spacecraft land in territory under the jurisdiction of a Contracting Party, it shall immediately take all possible steps to rescue them and render them all necessary assistance. It shall inform the launching authority and also the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the steps it is taking and of their progress. If assistance by the launching authority would help to effect a prompt rescue or would contribute substantially to the effectiveness of search and rescue operations, the launching authority shall cooperate with the Contracting Party with a view to the effective conduct of search and rescue operations. Such operations shall be subject to the direction and control of the Contracting Party, which shall act in close and continuing consultation with the launching authority.10 Article 3 If information is received or it is discovered that the personnel of a spacecraft have alighted on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State, those Contracting Parties which are in a position to do so shall, if necessary, extend assistance in search and rescue operations for such personnel to assure their speedy rescue. They shall inform the launching authority and the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the steps they are taking and of their progress. Article 4 If, owing to accident, distress, emergency or unintended landing, the personnel of a spacecraft land in territory under the jurisdiction of a Contracting Party or have been found on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State, they shall be safely and promptly returned to representatives of the launching authority. Article 5 1. Each Contracting Party which receives information or discovers that a space object or its component parts has returned to Earth in territory under its jurisdiction or on the high seas or in any other place not under the jurisdiction of any State, shall notify the launching authority and the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 2. Each Contracting Party having jurisdiction over the territory on which a space object or its component parts has been discovered shall, upon the request of the launching authority and with assistance from that authority if requested, take such steps as it finds practicable to recover the object or component parts.3. Upon request of the launching authority, objects launched into outer space or their component parts found beyond the territorial limits of the launching authority shall be returned to or held at the disposal of representatives of the launching authority, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return. 4. Notwithstanding paragraphs 2 and 3 of this article, a Contracting Party which has reason to believe that a space object or its component parts discovered in territory under its jurisdiction, or recovered by it elsewhere, is of a hazardous or deleterious nature may so notify the launching authority, which shall immediately take effective steps, under the direction and control of the said Contracting Party, to eliminate possible danger of harm. 5. Expenses incurred in fulfilling obligations to recover and return a space object or its component parts under paragraphs 2 and 3 of this article shall be borne by the launching authority. Article 6 For the purposes of this Agreement, the term “launching authority” shall refer to the State responsible for launching, or, where an international intergovernmental organization is responsible for launching, that organization, provided that that organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Agreement and a majority of the States members of that organization are Contracting Parties to this Agreement and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies.11 Article 7 1. This Agreement shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Agreement before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Agreement shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments. 3. This Agreement shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Agreement. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Agreement, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Agreement, the date of its entry into force and other notices. 6. This Agreement shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article 8 Any State Party to the Agreement may propose amendments to this Agreement. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Agreement accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Agreement and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Agreement on the date of acceptance by it. Article 9 Any State Party to the Agreement may give notice of its withdrawal from the Agreement one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article 10 This Agreement, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Agreement shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Agreement. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, D.C., the twenty-second day of April, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-eight.12 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects The States Parties to this Convention, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in furthering the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Recalling the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, Taking into consideration that, notwithstanding the precautionary measures to be taken by States and international intergovernmental organizations involved in the launching of space objects, damage may on occasion be caused by such objects, Recognizing the need to elaborate effective international rules and procedures concerning liability for damage caused by space objects and to ensure, in particular, the prompt payment under the terms of this Convention of a full and equitable measure of compensation to victims of such damage, Believing that the establishment of such rules and procedures will contribute to the strengthening of international cooperation in the field of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Have agreed on the following: Article I For the purposes of this Convention: (a) The term “damage” means loss of life, personal injury or other impairment of health; or loss of or damage to property of States or of persons, natural or juridical, or property of international intergovernmental organizations; (b) The term “launching” includes attempted launching; (c) The term “launching State” means: (i) A State which launches or procures the launching of a space object; (ii) A State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched; (d) The term “space object” includes component parts of a space object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof. Article II A launching State shall be absolutely liable to pay compensation for damage caused by its space object on the surface of the Earth or to aircraft flight.13 Article III In the event of damage being caused elsewhere than on the surface of the Earth to a space object of one launching State or to persons or property on board such a space object by a space object of another launching State, the latter shall be liable only if the damage is due to its fault or the fault of persons for whom it is responsible. Article IV 1. In the event of damage being caused elsewhere than on the surface of the Earth to a space object of one launching State or to persons or property on board such a space object by a space object of another launching State, and of damage thereby being caused to a third State or to its natural or juridical persons, the first two States shall be jointly and severally liable to the third State, to the extent indicated by the following: (a) If the damage has been caused to the third State on the surface of the Earth or to aircraft in flight, their liability to the third State shall be absolute; (b) If the damage has been caused to a space object of the third State or to persons or property on board that space object elsewhere than on the surface of the Earth, their liability to the third State shall be based on the fault of either of the first two States or on the fault of persons for whom either is responsible. 2. In all cases of joint and several liability referred to in paragraph 1 of this article, the burden of compensation for the damage shall be apportioned between the first two States in accordance with the extent to which they were at fault; if the extent of the fault of each of these States cannot be established, the burden of compensation shall be apportioned equally between them. Such apportionment shall be without prejudice to the right of the third State to seek the entire compensation due under this Convention from any or all of the launching States which are jointly and severally liable. Article V 1. Whenever two or more States jointly launch a space object, they shall be jointly and severally liable for any damage caused. 2. A launching State which has paid compensation for damage shall have the right to present a claim for indemnification to other participants in the joint launching. The participants in a joint launching may conclude agreements regarding the apportioning among themselves of the financial obligation in respect of which they are jointly and severally liable. Such agreements shall be without prejudice to the right of a State sustaining damage to seek the entire compensation due under this Convention from any or all of the launching States which are jointly and severally liable. 3. A State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched shall be regarded as a participant in a joint launching. Article VI 1. Subject to the provisions of paragraph 2 of this article, exoneration from absolute liability shall be granted to the extent that a launching State establishes that the damage has resulted either wholly or partially from gross negligence or from an act or omission done with intent to cause damage on the part of a claimant State or of natural or juridical persons it represents. 2. No exoneration whatever shall be granted in cases where the damage has resulted from activities conducted by a launching State which are not in conformity with international law including, in particular,14 the Charter of the United Nations and the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. Article VII The provisions of this Convention shall not apply to damage caused by a space object of a launching State to: (a) Nationals of that launching State; (b) Foreign nationals during such time as they are participating in the operation of that space object from the time of its launching or at any stage thereafter until its descent, or during such time as they are in the immediate vicinity of a planned launching or recovery area as the result of an invitation by that launching State. Article VIII 1. A State which suffers damage, or whose natural or juridical persons suffer damage, may present to a launching State a claim for compensation for such damage. 2. If the State of nationality has not presented a claim, another State may, in respect of damage sustained in its territory by any natural or juridical person, present a claim to a launching State. 3. If neither the State of nationality nor the State in whose territory the damage was sustained has presented a claim or notified its intention of presenting a claim, another State may, in respect of damage sustained by its permanent residents, present a claim to a launching State. Article IX A claim for compensation for damage shall be presented to a launching State through diplomatic channels. If a State does not maintain diplomatic relations with the launching State concerned, it may request another State to present its claim to that launching State or otherwise represent its interests under this Convention. It may also present its claim through the Secretary-General of the United Nations, provided the claimant State and the launching State are both Members of the United Nations. Article X 1. A claim for compensation for damage may be presented to a launching State not later than one year following the date of the occurrence of the damage or the identification of the launching State which is liable. 2. If, however, a State does not know of the occurrence of the damage or has not been able to identify the launching State which is liable, it may present a claim within one year following the date on which it learned of the aforementioned facts; however, this period shall in no event exceed one year following the date on which the State could reasonably be expected to have learned of the facts through the exercise of due diligence. 3. The time limits specified in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article shall apply even if the full extent of the damage may not be known. In this event, however, the claimant State shall be entitled to revise the claim and submit additional documentation after the expiration of such time limits until one year after the full extent of the damage is known. Article XI15 1. Presentation of a claim to a launching State for compensation for damage under this Convention shall not require the prior exhaustion of any local remedies which may be available to a claimant State or to natural or juridical persons it represents. 2. Nothing in this Convention shall prevent a State, or natural or juridical persons it might represent, from pursuing a claim in the courts or administrative tribunals or agencies of a launching State. A State shall not, however, be entitled to present a claim under this Convention in respect of the same damage for which a claim is being pursued in the courts or administrative tribunals or agencies of a launching State or under another international agreement which is binding on the States concerned. Article XII The compensation which the launching State shall be liable to pay for damage under this Convention shall be determined in accordance with international law and the principles of justice and equity, in order to provide such reparation in respect of the damage as will restore the person, natural or juridical, State or international organization on whose behalf the claim is presented to the condition which would have existed if the damage had not occurred. Article XIII Unless the claimant State and the State from which compensation is due under this Convention agree on another form of compensation, the compensation shall be paid in the currency of the claimant State or, if that State so requests, in the currency of the State from which compensation is due. Article XIV If no settlement of a claim is arrived at through diplomatic negotiations as provided for in article IX, within one year from the date on which the claimant State notifies the launching State that it has submitted the documentation of its claim, the parties concerned shall establish a Claims Commission at the request of either party. Article XV 1. The Claims Commission shall be composed of three members: one appointed by the claimant State, one appointed by the launching State and the third member, the Chairman, to be chosen by both parties jointly. Each party shall make its appointment within two months of the request for the establishment of the Claims Commission. 2. If no agreement is reached on the choice of the Chairman within four months of the request for the establishment of the Commission, either party may request the Secretary-General of the United Nations to appoint the Chairman within a further period of two months. Article XVI 1. If one of the parties does not make its appointment within the stipulated period, the Chairman shall, at the request of the other party, constitute a single-member Claims Commission. 2. Any vacancy which may arise in the Commission for whatever reason shall be filled by the same procedure adopted for the original appointment. 3. The Commission shall determine its own procedure.16 4. The Commission shall determine the place or places where it shall sit and all other administrative matters. 5. Except in the case of decisions and awards by a single-member Commission, all decisions and awards of the Commission shall be by majority vote. Article XVII No increase in the membership of the Claims Commission shall take place by reason of two or more claimant States or launching States being joined in any one proceeding before the Commission. The claimant States so joined shall collectively appoint one member of the Commission in the same manner and subject to the same conditions as would be the case for a single claimant State. When two or more launching States are so joined, they shall collectively appoint one member of the Commission in the same way. If the claimant States or the launching States do not make the appointment within the stipulated period, the Chairman shall constitute a single-member Commission. Article XVIII The Claims Commission shall decide the merits of the claim for compensation and determine the amount of compensation payable, if any. Article XIX 1. The Claims Commission shall act in accordance with the provisions of article XII. 2. The decision of the Commission shall be final and binding if the parties have so agreed; otherwise the Commission shall render a final and recommendatory award, which the parties shall consider in good faith. The Commission shall state the reasons for its decision or award. 3. The Commission shall give its decision or award as promptly as possible and no later than one year from the date of its establishment, unless an extension of this period is found necessary by the Commission. 4. The Commission shall make its decision or award public. It shall deliver a certified copy of its decision or award to each of the parties and to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Article XX The expenses in regard to the Claims Commission shall be borne equally by the parties, unless otherwise decided by the Commission.17 Article XXI If the damage caused by a space object presents a large-scale danger to human life or seriously interferes with the living conditions of the population or the functioning of vital centres, the States Parties, and in particular the launching State, shall examine the possibility of rendering appropriate and rapid assistance to the State which has suffered the damage, when it so requests. However, nothing in this article shall affect the rights or obligations of the States Parties under this Convention. Article XXII 1. In this Convention, with the exception of articles XXIV to XXVII, references to States shall be deemed to apply to any international intergovernmental organization which conducts space activities if the organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Convention and if a majority of the States members of the organization are States Parties to this Convention and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. 2. States members of any such organization which are States Parties to this Convention shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the organization makes a declaration in accordance with the preceding paragraph. 3. If an international intergovernmental organization is liable for damage by virtue of the provisions of this Convention, that organization and those of its members which are States Parties to this Convention shall be jointly and severally liable; provided, however, that: (a) Any claim for compensation in respect of such damage shall be first presented to the organization; (b) Only where the organization has not paid, within a period of six months, any sum agreed or determined to be due as compensation for such damage, may the claimant State invoke the liability of the members which are States Parties to this Convention for the payment of that sum. 4. Any claim, pursuant to the provisions of this Convention, for compensation in respect of damage caused to an organization which has made a declaration in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article shall be presented by a State member of the organization which is a State Party to this Convention. Article XXIII 1. The provisions of this Convention shall not affect other international agreements in force insofar as relations between the States Parties to such agreements are concerned. 2. No provision of this Convention shall prevent States from concluding international agreements reaffirming, supplementing or extending its provisions. Article XXIV 1. This Convention shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Convention before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Convention shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics,18 the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments. 3. This Convention shall enter into force on the deposit of the fifth instrument of ratification. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Convention, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession. 5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Convention, the date of its entry into force and other notices. 6. This Convention shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Article XXV Any State Party to this Convention may propose amendments to this Convention. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Convention accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Convention and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Convention on the date of acceptance by it. Article XXVI Ten years after the entry into force of this Convention, the question of the review of this Convention shall be included in the provisional agenda of the United Nations General Assembly in order to consider, in the light of past application of the Convention, whether it requires revision. However, at any time after the Convention has been in force for five years, and at the request of one third of the States Parties to the Convention, and with the concurrence of the majority of the States Parties, a conference of the States Parties shall be convened to review this Convention. Article XXVII Any State Party to this Convention may give notice of its withdrawal from the Convention one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XXVIII This Convention, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Convention shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized thereto, have signed this Convention. DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, D.C., this twenty-ninth day of March, one thousand nine hundred and seventy-two.2Resolution 2345 (XXII), annex. 3Resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex. 19 Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space The States Parties to this Convention, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in furthering the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Recalling that the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 of 27 January 1967 affirms that States shall bear international responsibility for their national activities in outer space and refers to the State on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried, Recalling also that the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space2 of 22 April 1968 provides that a launching authority shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to the return of an object it has launched into outer space found beyond the territorial limits of the launching authority, Recalling further that the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects3 of 29 March 1972 establishes international rules and procedures concerning the liability of launching States for damage caused by their space objects, Desiring, in the light of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, to make provision for the national registration by launching States of space objects launched into outer space, Desiring further that a central register of objects launched into outer space be established and maintained, on a mandatory basis, by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Desiring also to provide for States Parties additional means and procedures to assist in the identification of space objects, Believing that a mandatory system of registering objects launched into outer space would, in particular, assist in their identification and would contribute to the application and development of international law governing the exploration and use of outer space, Have agreed on the following: Article I For the purposes of this Convention: (a) The term “launching State” means: (i) A State which launches or procures the launching of a space object;20 (ii) A State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched; (b) The term “space object” includes component parts of a space object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof; (c) The term “State of registry” means a launching State on whose registry a space object is carried in accordance with article II. Article II 1. When a space object is launched into Earth orbit or beyond, the launching State shall register the space object by means of an entry in an appropriate registry which it shall maintain. Each launching State shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the establishment of such a registry. 2. Where there are two or more launching States in respect of any such space object, they shall jointly determine which one of them shall register the object in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article, bearing in mind the provisions of article VIII of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, and without prejudice to appropriate agreements concluded or to be concluded among the launching States on jurisdiction and control over the space object and over any personnel thereof. 3. The contents of each registry and the conditions under which it is maintained shall be determined by the State of registry concerned. Article III 1. The Secretary-General of the United Nations shall maintain a Register in which the information furnished in accordance with article IV shall be recorded. 2. There shall be full and open access to the information in this Register. Article IV 1. Each State of registry shall furnish to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as soon as practicable, the following information concerning each space object carried on its registry: (a) Name of launching State or States; (b) An appropriate designator of the space object or its registration number; (c) Date and territory or location of launch; (d) Basic orbital parameters, including: (i) Nodal period, (ii) Inclination, (iii) Apogee, (iv) Perigee; (e) General function of the space object. 2. Each State of registry may, from time to time, provide the Secretary-General of the United Nations with additional information concerning a space object carried on its registry.21 3. Each State of registry shall notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations, to the greatest extent feasible and as soon as practicable, of space objects concerning which it has previously transmitted information, and which have been but no longer are in Earth orbit. Article V Whenever a space object launched into Earth orbit or beyond is marked with the designator or registration number referred to in article IV, paragraph 1 (b), or both, the State of registry shall notify the Secretary-General of this fact when submitting the information regarding the space object in accordance with article IV. In such case, the Secretary-General of the United Nations shall record this notification in the Register. Article VI Where the application of the provisions of this Convention has not enabled a State Party to identify a space object which has caused damage to it or to any of its natural or juridical persons, or which may be of a hazardous or deleterious nature, other States Parties, including in particular States possessing space monitoring and tracking facilities, shall respond to the greatest extent feasible to a request by that State Party, or transmitted through the Secretary-General on its behalf, for assistance under equitable and reasonable conditions in the identification of the object. A State Party making such a request shall, to the greatest extent feasible, submit information as to the time, nature and circumstances of the events giving rise to the request. Arrangements under which such assistance shall be rendered shall be the subject of agreement between the parties concerned. Article VII 1. In this Convention, with the exception of articles VIII to XII inclusive, references to States shall be deemed to apply to any international intergovernmental organization which conducts space activities if the organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Convention and if a majority of the States members of the organization are States Parties to this Convention and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. 2. States members of any such organization which are States Parties to this Convention shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the organization makes a declaration in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article. Article VIII 1. This Convention shall be open for signature by all States at United Nations Headquarters in New York. Any State which does not sign this Convention before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. 2. This Convention shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 3. This Convention shall enter into force among the States which have deposited instruments of ratification on the deposit of the fifth such instrument with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Convention, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession.22 5. The Secretary-General shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Convention, the date of its entry into force and other notices. Article IX Any State Party to this Convention may propose amendments to the Convention. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Convention accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Convention and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Convention on the date of acceptance by it. Article X Ten years after the entry into force of this Convention, the question of the review of the Convention shall be included in the provisional agenda of the United Nations General Assembly in order to consider, in the light of past application of the Convention, whether it requires revision. However, at any time after the Convention has been in force for five years, at the request of one third of the States Parties to the Convention and with the concurrence of the majority of the States Parties, a conference of the States Parties shall be convened to review this Convention. Such review shall take into account in particular any relevant technological developments, including those relating to the identification of space objects. Article XI Any State Party to this Convention may give notice of its withdrawal from the Convention one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article XII The original of this Convention, of which the Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who shall send certified copies thereof to all signatory and acceding States. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, being duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments, have signed this Convention, opened for signature at New York on the fourteenth day of January, one thousand nine hundred and seventy-five.4Resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex. 23 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies The States Parties to this Agreement, Noting the achievements of States in the exploration and use of the Moon and other celestial bodies, Recognizing that the Moon, as a natural satellite of the Earth, has an important role to play in the exploration of outer space, Determined to promote on the basis of equality the further development of cooperation among States in the exploration and use of the Moon and other celestial bodies, Desiring to prevent the Moon from becoming an area of international conflict, Bearing in mind the benefits which may be derived from the exploitation of the natural resources of the Moon and other celestial bodies, Recalling the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space,2 the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects,3 and the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space,4 Taking into account the need to define and develop the provisions of these international instruments in relation to the Moon and other celestial bodies, having regard to further progress in the exploration and use of outer space, Have agreed on the following: Article 1 1. The provisions of this Agreement relating to the Moon shall also apply to other celestial bodies within the solar system, other than the Earth, except insofar as specific legal norms enter into force with respect to any of these celestial bodies. 2. For the purposes of this Agreement reference to the Moon shall include orbits around or other trajectories to or around it. 3. This Agreement does not apply to extraterrestrial materials which reach the surface of the Earth by natural means. Article 2 All activities on the Moon, including its exploration and use, shall be carried out in accordance with international law, in particular the Charter of the United Nations, and taking into account the Declaration on5Resolution 2625 (XXV), annex. 24 Principles of International Law concerning Friendly Relations and Cooperation among States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations,5 adopted by the General Assembly on 24 October 1970, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and mutual understanding, and with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties. Article 3 1. The Moon shall be used by all States Parties exclusively for peaceful purposes. 2. Any threat or use of force or any other hostile act or threat of hostile act on the Moon is prohibited. It is likewise prohibited to use the Moon in order to commit any such act or to engage in any such threat in relation to the Earth, the Moon, spacecraft, the personnel of spacecraft or man-made space objects. 3. States Parties shall not place in orbit around or other trajectory to or around the Moon objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction or place or use such weapons on or in the Moon. 4. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on the Moon shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration and use of the Moon shall also not be prohibited. Article 4 1. The exploration and use of the Moon shall be the province of all mankind and shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development. Due regard shall be paid to the interests of present and future generations as well as to the need to promote higher standards of living and conditions of economic and social progress and development in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. 2. States Parties shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance in all their activities concerning the exploration and use of the Moon. International cooperation in pursuance of this Agreement should be as wide as possible and may take place on a multilateral basis, on a bilateral basis or through international intergovernmental organizations. Article 5 1. States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of their activities concerned with the exploration and use of the Moon. Information on the time, purposes, locations, orbital parameters and duration shall be given in respect of each mission to the Moon as soon as possible after launching, while information on the results of each mission, including scientific results, shall be furnished upon completion of the mission. In the case of a mission lasting more than sixty days, information on conduct of the mission, including any scientific results, shall be given periodically, at thirty-day intervals. For missions lasting more than six months, only significant additions to such information need be reported thereafter.25 2. If a State Party becomes aware that another State Party plans to operate simultaneously in the same area of or in the same orbit around or trajectory to or around the Moon, it shall promptly inform the other State of the timing of and plans for its own operations. 3. In carrying out activities under this Agreement, States Parties shall promptly inform the Secretary-General, as well as the public and the international scientific community, of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the Moon, which could endanger human life or health, as well as of any indication of organic life. Article 6 1. There shall be freedom of scientific investigation on the Moon by all States Parties without discrimination of any kind, on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law. 2. In carrying out scientific investigations and in furtherance of the provisions of this Agreement, the States Parties shall have the right to collect on and remove from the Moon samples of its mineral and other substances. Such samples shall remain at the disposal of those States Parties which caused them to be collected and may be used by them for scientific purposes. States Parties shall have regard to the desirability of making a portion of such samples available to other interested States Parties and the international scientific community for scientific investigation. States Parties may in the course of scientific investigations also use mineral and other substances of the Moon in quantities appropriate for the support of their missions. 3. States Parties agree on the desirability of exchanging scientific and other personnel on expeditions to or installations on the Moon to the greatest extent feasible and practicable. Article 7 1. In exploring and using the Moon, States Parties shall take measures to prevent the disruption of the existing balance of its environment, whether by introducing adverse changes in that environment, by its harmful contamination through the introduction of extra-environmental matter or otherwise. States Parties shall also take measures to avoid harmfully affecting the environment of the Earth through the introduction of extraterrestrial matter or otherwise. 2. States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the measures being adopted by them in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article and shall also, to the maximum extent feasible, notify him in advance of all placements by them of radioactive materials on the Moon and of the purposes of such placements. 3. States Parties shall report to other States Parties and to the Secretary-General concerning areas of the Moon having special scientific interest in order that, without prejudice to the rights of other States Parties, consideration may be given to the designation of such areas as international scientific preserves for which special protective arrangements are to be agreed upon in consultation with the competent bodies of the United Nations. Article 8 1. States Parties may pursue their activities in the exploration and use of the Moon anywhere on or below its surface, subject to the provisions of this Agreement. 2. For these purposes States Parties may, in particular: (a) Land their space objects on the Moon and launch them from the Moon;26 (b) Place their personnel, space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations anywhere on or below the surface of the Moon. Personnel, space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations may move or be moved freely over or below the surface of the Moon. 3. Activities of States Parties in accordance with paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article shall not interfere with the activities of other States Parties on the Moon. Where such interference may occur, the States Parties concerned shall undertake consultations in accordance with article 15, paragraphs 2 and 3, of this Agreement. Article 9 1. States Parties may establish manned and unmanned stations on the Moon. A State Party establishing a station shall use only that area which is required for the needs of the station and shall immediately inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the location and purposes of that station. Subsequently, at annual intervals that State shall likewise inform the Secretary-General whether the station continues in use and whether its purposes have changed. 2. Stations shall be installed in such a manner that they do not impede the free access to all areas of the Moon of personnel, vehicles and equipment of other States Parties conducting activities on the Moon in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement or of article I of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. Article 10 1. States Parties shall adopt all practicable measures to safeguard the life and health of persons on the Moon. For this purpose they shall regard any person on the Moon as an astronaut within the meaning of article V of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies and as part of the personnel of a spacecraft within the meaning of the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space. 2. States Parties shall offer shelter in their stations, installations, vehicles and other facilities to persons in distress on the Moon. Article 11 1. The Moon and its natural resources are the common heritage of mankind, which finds its expression in the provisions of this Agreement, in particular in paragraph 5 of this article. 2. The Moon is not subject to national appropriation by any claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means. 3. Neither the surface nor the subsurface of the Moon, nor any part thereof or natural resources in place, shall become property of any State, international intergovernmental or non-governmental organization, national organization or non-governmental entity or of any natural person. The placement of personnel, space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations on or below the surface of the Moon, including structures connected with its surface or subsurface, shall not create a right of ownership over the surface or the subsurface of the Moon or any areas thereof. The foregoing provisions are without prejudice to the international regime referred to in paragraph 5 of this article.27 4. States Parties have the right to exploration and use of the Moon without discrimination of any kind, on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law and the terms of this Agreement. 5. States Parties to this Agreement hereby undertake to establish an international regime, including appropriate procedures, to govern the exploitation of the natural resources of the Moon as such exploitation is about to become feasible. This provision shall be implemented in accordance with article 18 of this Agreement. 6. In order to facilitate the establishment of the international regime referred to in paragraph 5 of this article, States Parties shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of any natural resources they may discover on the Moon. 7. The main purposes of the international regime to be established shall include: (a) The orderly and safe development of the natural resources of the Moon; (b) The rational management of those resources; (c) The expansion of opportunities in the use of those resources; (d) An equitable sharing by all States Parties in the benefits derived from those resources, whereby the interests and needs of the developing countries, as well as the efforts of those countries which have contributed either directly or indirectly to the exploration of the Moon, shall be given special consideration. 8. All the activities with respect to the natural resources of the Moon shall be carried out in a manner compatible with the purposes specified in paragraph 7 of this article and the provisions of article 6, paragraph 2, of this Agreement. Article 12 1. States Parties shall retain jurisdiction and control over their personnel, vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations on the Moon. The ownership of space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations shall not be affected by their presence on the Moon. 2. Vehicles, installations and equipment or their component parts found in places other than their intended location shall be dealt with in accordance with article 5 of the Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space. 3. In the event of an emergency involving a threat to human life, States Parties may use the equipment, vehicles, installations, facilities or supplies of other States Parties on the Moon. Prompt notification of such use shall be made to the Secretary-General of the United Nations or the State Party concerned. Article 13 A State Party which learns of the crash landing, forced landing or other unintended landing on the Moon of a space object, or its component parts, that were not launched by it, shall promptly inform the launching State Party and the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Article 1428 1. States Parties to this Agreement shall bear international responsibility for national activities on the Moon, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in this Agreement. States Parties shall ensure that non-governmental entities under their jurisdiction shall engage in activities on the Moon only under the authority and continuing supervision of the appropriate State Party. 2. States Parties recognize that detailed arrangements concerning liability for damage caused on the Moon, in addition to the provisions of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies and the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, may become necessary as a result of more extensive activities on the Moon. Any such arrangements shall be elaborated in accordance with the procedure provided for in article 18 of this Agreement. Article 15 1. Each State Party may assure itself that the activities of other States Parties in the exploration and use of the Moon are compatible with the provisions of this Agreement. To this end, all space vehicles, equipment, facilities, stations and installations on the Moon shall be open to other States Parties. Such States Parties shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited. In pursuance of this article, any State Party may act on its own behalf or with the full or partial assistance of any other State Party or through appropriate international procedures within the framework of the United Nations and in accordance with the Charter. 2. A State Party which has reason to believe that another State Party is not fulfilling the obligations incumbent upon it pursuant to this Agreement or that another State Party is interfering with the rights which the former State has under this Agreement may request consultations with that State Party. A State Party receiving such a request shall enter into such consultations without delay. Any other State Party which requests to do so shall be entitled to take part in the consultations. Each State Party participating in such consultations shall seek a mutually acceptable resolution of any controversy and shall bear in mind the rights and interests of all States Parties. The Secretary-General of the United Nations shall be informed of the results of the consultations and shall transmit the information received to all States Parties concerned. 3. If the consultations do not lead to a mutually acceptable settlement which has due regard for the rights and interests of all States Parties, the parties concerned shall take all measures to settle the dispute by other peaceful means of their choice appropriate to the circumstances and the nature of the dispute. If difficulties arise in connection with the opening of consultations or if consultations do not lead to a mutually acceptable settlement, any State Party may seek the assistance of the Secretary-General, without seeking the consent of any other State Party concerned, in order to resolve the controversy. A State Party which does not maintain diplomatic relations with another State Party concerned shall participate in such consultations, at its choice, either itself or through another State Party or the Secretary-General as intermediary. Article 16 With the exception of articles 17 to 21, references in this Agreement to States shall be deemed to apply to any international intergovernmental organization which conducts space activities if the organization declares its acceptance of the rights and obligations provided for in this Agreement and if a majority of the States members of the organization are States Parties to this Agreement and to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. States members of any such organization which are States Parties to this Agreement shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the organization makes a declaration in accordance with the foregoing.29 Article 17 Any State Party to this Agreement may propose amendments to the Agreement. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Agreement accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Agreement and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Agreement on the date of acceptance by it. Article 18 Ten years after the entry into force of this Agreement, the question of the review of the Agreement shall be included in the provisional agenda of the General Assembly of the United Nations in order to consider, in the light of past application of the Agreement, whether it requires revision. However, at any time after the Agreement has been in force for five years, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as depositary, shall, at the request of one third of the States Parties to the Agreement and with the concurrence of the majority of the States Parties, convene a conference of the States Parties to review this Agreement. A review conference shall also consider the question of the implementation of the provisions of article 11, paragraph 5, on the basis of the principle referred to in paragraph 1 of that article and taking into account in particular any relevant technological developments. Article 19 1. This Agreement shall be open for signature by all States at United Nations Headquarters in New York.2. This Agreement shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Any State which does not sign this Agreement before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at any time. Instruments of ratification or accession shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. 3. This Agreement shall enter into force on the thirtieth day following the date of deposit of the fifth instrument of ratification. 4. For each State depositing its instrument of ratification or accession after the entry into force of this Agreement, it shall enter into force on the thirtieth day following the date of deposit of any such instrument. 5. The Secretary-General shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification or accession to this Agreement, the date of its entry into force and other notices. Article 20 Any State Party to this Agreement may give notice of its withdrawal from the Agreement one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification. Article 21 The original of this Agreement, of which the Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who shall send certified copies thereof to all signatory and acceding States.30 IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, being duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments, have signed this Agreement, opened for signature at New York on the eighteenth day of December, one thousand nine hundred and seventy-nine.31 II. Principles adopted by the General Assembly Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space The General Assembly, Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man’s entry into outer space, Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the betterment of mankind and for the benefit of States irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, Desiring to contribute to broad international cooperation in the scientific as well as in the legal aspects of exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Believing that such cooperation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between nations and peoples, Recalling its resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space, Taking into consideration its resolutions 1721 (XVI) of 20 December 1961 and 1802 (XVII) of 14 December 1962, adopted unanimously by the States Members of the United Nations, Solemnly declares that in the exploration and use of outer space States should be guided by the following principles: 1. The exploration and use of outer space shall be carried on for the benefit and in the interests of all mankind. 2. Outer space and celestial bodies are free for exploration and use by all States on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law. 3. Outer space and celestial bodies are not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means. 4. The activities of States in the exploration and use of outer space shall be carried on in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and understanding. 5. States bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, whether carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried on in conformity with the principles set forth in the present Declaration. The activities of non-governmental32 entities in outer space shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the State concerned. When activities are carried on in outer space by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with the principles set forth in this Declaration shall be borne by the international organization and by the States participating in it. 6. In the exploration and use of outer space, States shall be guided by the principle of cooperation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space with due regard for the corresponding interests of other States. If a State has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State which has reason to believe that an outer space activity or experiment planned by another State would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment. 7. The State on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and any personnel thereon, while in outer space. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, and of their component parts, is not affected by their passage through outer space or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State of registry shall be returned to that State, which shall furnish identifying data upon request prior to return. 8. Each State which launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, and each State from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to a foreign State or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air space, or in outer space. 9. States shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space, and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of a foreign State or on the high seas. Astronauts who make such a landing shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle.33 Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting The General Assembly, Recalling its resolution 2916 (XXVII) of 9 November 1972, in which it stressed the necessity of elaborating principles governing the use by States of artificial Earth satellites for international direct television broadcasting, and mindful of the importance of concluding an international agreement or agreements, Recalling further its resolutions 3182 (XXVIII) of 18 December 1973, 3234 (XXIX) of 12 November 1974, 3388 (XXX) of 18 November 1975, 31/8 of 8 November 1976, 32/196 of 20 December 1977, 33/16 of 10 November 1978, 34/66 of 5 December 1979 and 35/14 of 3 November 1980, and its resolution 36/35 of 18 November 1981 in which it decided to consider at its thirty-seventh session the adoption of a draft set of principles governing the use by States of artificial Earth satellites for international direct television broadcasting, Noting with appreciation the efforts made in the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its Legal Subcommittee to comply with the directives issued in the above-mentioned resolutions, Considering that several experiments of direct broadcasting by satellite have been carried out and that a number of direct broadcasting satellite systems are operational in some countries and may be commercialized in the very near future, Taking into consideration that the operation of international direct broadcasting satellites will have significant international political, economic, social and cultural implications, Believing that the establishment of principles for international direct television broadcasting will contribute to the strengthening of international cooperation in this field and further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, Adopts the Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting set forth in the annex to the present resolution. Annex Principles Governing the Use by States of Artificial Earth Satellites for International Direct Television Broadcasting A. Purposes and objectives 1. Activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be carried out in a manner compatible with the sovereign rights of States, including the principle of non-intervention, as well as with the right of everyone to seek, receive and impart information and ideas as enshrined in the relevant United Nations instruments. 2. Such activities should promote the free dissemination and mutual exchange of information and knowledge in cultural and scientific fields, assist in educational, social and economic development,34 particularly in the developing countries, enhance the qualities of life of all peoples and provide recreation with due respect to the political and cultural integrity of States. 3. These activities should accordingly be carried out in a manner compatible with the development of mutual understanding and the strengthening of friendly relations and cooperation among all States and peoples in the interest of maintaining international peace and security. B. Applicability of international law 4. Activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be conducted in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, of 27 January 1967, the relevant 1 provisions of the International Telecommunication Convention and its Radio Regulations and of international instruments relating to friendly relations and cooperation among States and to human rights. C. Rights and benefits 5. Every State has an equal right to conduct activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite and to authorize such activities by persons and entities under its jurisdiction. All States and peoples are entitled to and should enjoy the benefits from such activities. Access to the technology in this field should be available to all States without discrimination on terms mutually agreed by all concerned. D. International cooperation 6. Activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should be based upon and encourage international cooperation. Such cooperation should be the subject of appropriate arrangements. Special consideration should be given to the needs of the developing countries in the use of international direct television broadcasting by satellite for the purpose of accelerating their national development. E. Peaceful settlement of disputes 7. Any international dispute that may arise from activities covered by these principles should be settled through established procedures for the peaceful settlement of disputes agreed upon by the parties to the dispute in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations. F. State responsibility 8. States should bear international responsibility for activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite carried out by them or under their jurisdiction and for the conformity of any such activities with the principles set forth in this document. 9. When international direct television broadcasting by satellite is carried out by an international intergovernmental organization, the responsibility referred to in paragraph 8 above should be borne both by that organization and by the States participating in it.35 G. Duty and right to consult 10. Any broadcasting or receiving State within an international direct television broadcasting satellite service established between them requested to do so by any other broadcasting or receiving State within the same service should promptly enter into consultations with the requesting State regarding its activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite, without prejudice to other consultations which these States may undertake with any other State on that subject. H. Copyright and neighbouring rights 11. Without prejudice to the relevant provisions of international law, States should cooperate on a bilateral and multilateral basis for protection of copyright and neighbouring rights by means of appropriate agreements between the interested States or the competent legal entities acting under their jurisdiction. In such cooperation they should give special consideration to the interests of developing countries in the use of direct television broadcasting for the purpose of accelerating their national development. I. Notification to the United Nations 12. In order to promote international cooperation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States conducting or authorizing activities in the field of international direct television broadcasting by satellite should inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations, to the greatest extent possible, of the nature of such activities. On receiving this information, the Secretary-General should disseminate it immediately and effectively to the relevant specialized agencies, as well as to the public and the international scientific community. J. Consultations and agreements between States 13. A State which intends to establish or authorize the establishment of an international direct television broadcasting satellite service shall without delay notify the proposed receiving State or States of such intention and shall promptly enter into consultation with any of those States which so requests. 14. An international direct television broadcasting satellite service shall only be established after the conditions set forth in paragraph 13 above have been met and on the basis of agreements and/or arrangements in conformity with the relevant instruments of the International Telecommunication Union and in accordance with these principles. 15. With respect to the unavoidable overspill of the radiation of the satellite signal, the relevant instruments of the International Telecommunication Union shall be exclusively applicable.Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-first Session, Supplement 6 No. 20 (A/41/20 and Corr.1). 36 Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space The General Assembly, Recalling its resolution 3234 (XXIX) of 12 November 1974, in which it recommended that the Legal Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space should consider the question of the legal implications of remote sensing of the Earth from space, as well as its resolutions 3388 (XXX) of 18 November 1975, 31/8 of 8 November 1976, 32/196 A of 20 December 1977, 33/16 of 10 November 1978, 34/66 of 5 December 1979, 35/14 of 3 November 1980, 36/35 of 18 November 1981, 37/89 of 10 December 1982, 38/80 of 15 December 1983, 39/96 of 14 December 1984 and 40/162 of 16 December 1985, in which it called for a detailed consideration of the legal implications of remote sensing of the Earth from space, with the aim of formulating draft principles relating to remote sensing, Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on the work of its twenty-ninth session6 and the text of the draft principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space, annexed thereto, Noting with satisfaction that the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, on the basis of the deliberations of its Legal Subcommittee, has endorsed the text of the draft principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space, Believing that the adoption of the principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space will contribute to the strengthening of international cooperation in this field, Adopts the principles relating to remote sensing of the Earth from space set forth in the annex to the present resolution. Annex Principles Relating to Remote Sensing of the Earth from Outer Space Principle I For the purposes of these principles with respect to remote sensing activities: (a) The term “remote sensing” means the sensing of the Earth’s surface from space by making use of the properties of electromagnetic waves emitted, reflected or diffracted by the sensed objects, for the purpose of improving natural resources management, land use and the protection of the environment; (b) The term “primary data” means those raw data that are acquired by remote sensors borne by a space object and that are transmitted or delivered to the ground from space by telemetry in the form of electromagnetic signals, by photographic film, magnetic tape or any other means; (c) The term “processed data” means the products resulting from the processing of the primary data, needed to make such data usable;37 (d) The term “analysed information” means the information resulting from the interpretation of processed data, inputs of data and knowledge from other sources; (e) The term “remote sensing activities” means the operation of remote sensing space systems, primary data collection and storage stations, and activities in processing, interpreting and disseminating the processed data. Principle II Remote sensing activities shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic, social or scientific and technological development, and taking into particular consideration the needs of the developing countries. Principle III Remote sensing activities shall be conducted in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, and t 1 he relevant instruments of the International Telecommunication Union. Principle IV Remote sensing activities shall be conducted in accordance with the principles contained in article I of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, which, in particular, provides that the exploration and use of outer space shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and stipulates the principle of freedom of exploration and use of outer space on the basis of equality. These activities shall be conducted on the basis of respect for the principle of full and permanent sovereignty of all States and peoples over their own wealth and natural resources, with due regard to the rights and interests, in accordance with international law, of other States and entities under their jurisdiction. Such activities shall not be conducted in a manner detrimental to the legitimate rights and interests of the sensed State. Principle V States carrying out remote sensing activities shall promote international cooperation in these activities. To this end, they shall make available to other States opportunities for participation therein. Such participation shall be based in each case on equitable and mutually acceptable terms. Principle VI In order to maximize the availability of benefits from remote sensing activities, States are encouraged, through agreements or other arrangements, to provide for the establishment and operation of data collecting and storage stations and processing and interpretation facilities, in particular within the framework of regional agreements or arrangements wherever feasible. Principle VII States participating in remote sensing activities shall make available technical assistance to other interested States on mutually agreed terms.38 Principle VIII The United Nations and the relevant agencies within the United Nations system shall promote international cooperation, including technical assistance and coordination in the area of remote sensing. Principle IX In accordance with article IV of the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space4 and article XI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, a State carrying out a programme of remote sensing shall inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations. It shall, moreover, make available any other relevant information to the greatest extent feasible and practicable to any other State, particularly any developing country that is affected by the programme, at its request. Principle X Remote sensing shall promote the protection of the Earth’s natural environment. To this end, States participating in remote sensing activities that have identified information in their possession that is capable of averting any phenomenon harmful to the Earth’s natural environment shall disclose such information to States concerned.Principle XI Remote sensing shall promote the protection of mankind from natural disasters. To this end, States participating in remote sensing activities that have identified processed data and analysed information in their possession that may be useful to States affected by natural disasters, or likely to be affected by impending natural disasters, shall transmit such data and information to States concerned as promptly as possible. Principle XII As soon as the primary data and the processed data concerning the territory under its jurisdiction are produced, the sensed State shall have access to them on a non-discriminatory basis and on reasonable cost terms. The sensed State shall also have access to the available analysed information concerning the territory under its jurisdiction in the possession of any State participating in remote sensing activities on the same basis and terms, taking particularly into account the needs and interests of the developing countries. Principle XIII To promote and intensify international cooperation, especially with regard to the needs of developing countries, a State carrying out remote sensing of the Earth from space shall, upon request, enter into consultations with a State whose territory is sensed in order to make available opportunities for participation and enhance the mutual benefits to be derived therefrom. Principle XIV In compliance with article VI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, States operating remote sensing satellites shall bear international responsibility for their activities and assure that such activities are39 conducted in accordance with these principles and the norms of international law, irrespective of whether such activities are carried out by governmental or non-governmental entities or through international organizations to which such States are parties. This principle is without prejudice to the applicability of the norms of international law on State responsibility for remote sensing activities. Principle XV Any dispute resulting from the application of these principles shall be resolved through the established procedures for the peaceful settlement of disputes.Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-seventh Session, 7 Supplement No. 20 (A/47/20). 8Ibid., annex. 40 Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources In Outer Space The General Assembly, Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on the work of its thirty-fifth session7 and the text of the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space as approved by the Committee and annexed to its report,8 Recognizing that for some missions in outer space nuclear power sources are particularly suited or even essential owing to their compactness, long life and other attributes, Recognizing also that the use of nuclear power sources in outer space should focus on those applications which take advantage of the particular properties of nuclear power sources, Recognizing further that the use of nuclear power sources in outer space should be based on a thorough safety assessment, including probabilistic risk analysis, with particular emphasis on reducing the risk of accidental exposure of the public to harmful radiation or radioactive material, Recognizing the need, in this respect, for a set of principles containing goals and guidelines to ensure the safe use of nuclear power sources in outer space, Affirming that this set of Principles applies to nuclear power sources in outer space devoted to the generation of electric power on board space objects for non-propulsive purposes, which have characteristics generally comparable to those of systems used and missions performed at the time of the adoption of the Principles, Recognizing that this set of Principles will require future revision in view of emerging nuclear power applications and of evolving international recommendations on radiological protection, Adopts the Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space as set forth below. Principle 1. Applicability of international law Activities involving the use of nuclear power sources in outer space shall be carried out in accordance with international law, including in particular the Charter of the United Nations and the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies.1 Principle 2. Use of terms 1. For the purpose of these Principles, the terms “launching State” and “State launching” mean the State which exercises jurisdiction and control over a space object with nuclear power sources on board at a given point in time relevant to the principle concerned.41 2. For the purpose of principle 9, the definition of the term “launching State” as contained in that principle is applicable. 3. For the purposes of principle 3, the terms “foreseeable” and “all possible” describe a class of events or circumstances whose overall probability of occurrence is such that it is considered to encompass only credible possibilities for purposes of safety analysis. The term “general concept of defence-in-depth” when applied to nuclear power sources in outer space refers to the use of design features and mission operations in place of or in addition to active systems, to prevent or mitigate the consequences of system malfunctions. Redundant safety systems are not necessarily required for each individual component to achieve this purpose. Given the special requirements of space use and of varied missions, no particular set of systems or features can be specified as essential to achieve this objective. For the purposes of paragraph 2 (d) of principle 3, the term “made critical” does not include actions such as zero-power testing which are fundamental to ensuring system safety. Principle 3. Guidelines and criteria for safe use In order to minimize the quantity of radioactive material in space and the risks involved, the use of nuclear power sources in outer space shall be restricted to those space missions which cannot be operated by non-nuclear energy sources in a reasonable way. 1. General goals for radiation protection and nuclear safety (a) States launching space objects with nuclear power sources on board shall endeavour to protect individuals, populations and the biosphere against radiological hazards. The design and use of space objects with nuclear power sources on board shall ensure, with a high degree of confidence, that the hazards, in foreseeable operational or accidental circumstances, are kept below acceptable levels as defined in paragraphs 1 (b) and (c). Such design and use shall also ensure with high reliability that radioactive material does not cause a significant contamination of outer space. (b) During the normal operation of space objects with nuclear power sources on board, including reentry from the sufficiently high orbit as defined in paragraph 2 (b), the appropriate radiation protection objective for the public recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection shall be observed. During such normal operation there shall be no significant radiation exposure. (c) To limit exposure in accidents, the design and construction of the nuclear power source systems shall take into account relevant and generally accepted international radiological protection guidelines. Except in cases of low-probability accidents with potentially serious radiological consequences, the design for the nuclear power source systems shall, with a high degree of confidence, restrict radiation exposure to a limited geographical region and to individuals to the principal limit of 1 mSv in a year. It is permissible to use a subsidiary dose limit of 5 mSv in a year for some years, provided that the average annual effective dose equivalent over a lifetime does not exceed the principal limit of 1 mSv in a year. The probability of accidents with potentially serious radiological consequences referred to above shall be kept extremely small by virtue of the design of the system. Future modifications of the guidelines referred to in this paragraph shall be applied as soon as practicable. 42 (d) Systems important for safety shall be designed, constructed and operated in accordance with the general concept of defence-in-depth. Pursuant to this concept, foreseeable safety-related failures or malfunctions must be capable of being corrected or counteracted by an action or a procedure, possibly automatic. The reliability of systems important for safety shall be ensured, inter alia, by redundancy, physical separation, functional isolation and adequate independence of their components. Other measures shall also be taken to raise the level of safety. 2. Nuclear reactors (a) Nuclear reactors may be operated: (i) On interplanetary missions; (ii) In sufficiently high orbits as defined in paragraph 2 (b); (iii) In low-Earth orbits if they are stored in sufficiently high orbits after the operational part of their mission. (b) The sufficiently high orbit is one in which the orbital lifetime is long enough to allow for a sufficient decay of the fission products to approximately the activity of the actinides. The sufficiently high orbit must be such that the risks to existing and future outer space missions and of collision with other space objects are kept to a minimum. The necessity for the parts of a destroyed reactor also to attain the required decay time before re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere shall be considered in determining the sufficiently high orbit altitude. (c) Nuclear reactors shall use only highly enriched uranium 235 as fuel. The design shall take into account the radioactive decay of the fission and activation products. (d) Nuclear reactors shall not be made critical before they have reached their operating orbit or interplanetary trajectory. (e) The design and construction of the nuclear reactor shall ensure that it cannot become critical before reaching the operating orbit during all possible events, including rocket explosion, re-entry, impact on ground or water, submersion in water or water intruding into the core. (f) In order to reduce significantly the possibility of failures in satellites with nuclear reactors on board during operations in an orbit with a lifetime less than in the sufficiently high orbit (including operations for transfer into the sufficiently high orbit), there shall be a highly reliable operational system to ensure an effective and controlled disposal of the reactor. 3. Radioisotope generators (a) Radioisotope generators may be used for interplanetary missions and other missions leaving the gravity field of the Earth. They may also be used in Earth orbit if, after conclusion of the operational part of their mission, they are stored in a high orbit. In any case ultimate disposal is necessary. (b) Radioisotope generators shall be protected by a containment system that is designed and constructed to withstand the heat and aerodynamic forces of re-entry in the upper atmosphere under foreseeable orbital conditions, including highly elliptical or hyperbolic orbits where relevant. Upon impact,43 the containment system and the physical form of the isotope shall ensure that no radioactive material is scattered into the environment so that the impact area can be completely cleared of radioactivity by a recovery operation. Principle 4. Safety assessment 1. A launching State as defined in principle 2, paragraph 1, at the time of launch shall, prior to the launch, through cooperative arrangements, where relevant, with those which have designed, constructed or manufactured the nuclear power sources, or will operate the space object, or from whose territory or facility such an object will be launched, ensure that a thorough and comprehensive safety assessment is conducted. This assessment shall cover as well all relevant phases of the mission and shall deal with all systems involved, including the means of launching, the space platform, the nuclear power source and its equipment and the means of control and communication between ground and space. 2. This assessment shall respect the guidelines and criteria for safe use contained in principle 3. 3. Pursuant to article XI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, the results of this safety assessment, together with, to the extent feasible, an indication of the approximate intended time-frame of the launch, shall be made publicly available prior to each launch, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations shall be informed on how States may obtain such results of the safety assessment as soon as possible prior to each launch. Principle 5. Notification of re-entry 1. Any State launching a space object with nuclear power sources on board shall in a timely fashion inform States concerned in the event this space object is malfunctioning with a risk of re-entry of radioactive materials to the Earth. The information shall be in accordance with the following format: (a) System parameters: (i) Name of launching State or States, including the address of the authority which may be contacted for additional information or assistance in case of accident; (ii) International designation; (iii) Date and territory or location of launch; (iv) Information required for best prediction of orbit lifetime, trajectory and impact region; (v) General function of spacecraft; (b) Information on the radiological risk of nuclear power source(s): (i) Type of nuclear power source: radioisotopic/reactor; (ii) The probable physical form, amount and general radiological characteristics of the fuel and contaminated and/or activated components likely to reach the ground. The term “fuel” refers to the nuclear material used as the source of heat or power. This information shall also be transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations.44 2. The information, in accordance with the format above, shall be provided by the launching State as soon as the malfunction has become known. It shall be updated as frequently as practicable and the frequency of dissemination of the updated information shall increase as the anticipated time of re-entry into the dense layers of the Earth’s atmosphere approaches so that the international community will be informed of the situation and will have sufficient time to plan for any national response activities deemed necessary. 3. The updated information shall also be transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations with the same frequency. Principle 6. Consultations States providing information in accordance with principle 5 shall, as far as reasonably practicable, respond promptly to requests for further information or consultations sought by other States. Principle 7. Assistance to States 1. Upon the notification of an expected re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere of a space object containing a nuclear power source on board and its components, all States possessing space monitoring and tracking facilities, in the spirit of international cooperation, shall communicate the relevant information that they may have available on the malfunctioning space object with a nuclear power source on board to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and the State concerned as promptly as possible to allow States that might be affected to assess the situation and take any precautionary measures deemed necessary. 2. After re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere of a space object containing a nuclear power source on board and its components: (a) The launching State shall promptly offer and, if requested by the affected State, provide promptly the necessary assistance to eliminate actual and possible harmful effects, including assistance to identify the location of the area of impact of the nuclear power source on the Earth’s surface, to detect the re-entered material and to carry out retrieval or clean-up operations; (b) All States, other than the launching State, with relevant technical capabilities and international organizations with such technical capabilities shall, to the extent possible, provide necessary assistance upon request by an affected State. In providing the assistance in accordance with subparagraphs (a) and (b) above, the special needs of developing countries shall be taken into account. Principle 8. Responsibility In accordance with article VI of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, States shall bear international responsibility for national activities involving the use of nuclear power sources in outer space, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that such national activities are carried out in conformity with that Treaty and the recommendations contained in these Principles. When activities in outer space involving the use of nuclear power sources are carried on by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with the aforesaid Treaty and the recommendations contained in these Principles shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States participating in it. 45 Principle 9. Liability and compensation 1. In accordance with article VII of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, and the provisions of the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, 3 each State which launches or procures the launching of a space object and each State from whose territory or facility a space object is launched shall be internationally liable for damage caused by such space objects or their component parts. This fully applies to the case of such a space object carrying a nuclear power source on board. Whenever two or more States jointly launch such a space object, they shall be jointly and severally liable for any damage caused, in accordance with article V of the above-mentioned Convention. 2. The compensation that such States shall be liable to pay under the aforesaid Convention for damage shall be determined in accordance with international law and the principles of justice and equity, in order to provide such reparation in respect of the damage as will restore the person, natural or juridical, State or international organization on whose behalf a claim is presented to the condition which would have existed if the damage had not occurred. 3. For the purposes of this principle, compensation shall include reimbursement of the duly substantiated expenses for search, recovery and clean-up operations, including expenses for assistance received from third parties. Principle 10. Settlement of disputes Any dispute resulting from the application of these Principles shall be resolved through negotiations or other established procedures for the peaceful settlement of disputes, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. Principle 11. Review and revision These Principles shall be reopened for revision by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space no later than two years after their adoption.Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-first 9 Session, Supplement No. 20 (A/51/20). 10Ibid., annex IV. 11See Report of the Second United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, Vienna, 9-21 August 1982 and corrigenda (A/CONF.101/10 and Corr.1 and 2). 46 Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries The General Assembly, Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on the work of its thirty-ninth session9 and the text of the Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries, as approved by the Committee and annexed to its report,10 Bearing in mind the relevant provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, Recalling notably the provisions of the Treaty on the Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies,1 Recalling also its relevant resolutions relating to activities in outer space, Bearing in mind the recommendations of the Second United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space,11 and of other international conferences relevant in this field, Recognizing the growing scope and significance of international cooperation among States and between States and international organizations in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, Considering experiences gained in international cooperative ventures, Convinced of the necessity and the significance of further strengthening international cooperation in order to reach a broad and efficient collaboration in this field for the mutual benefit and in the interest of all parties involved, Desirous of facilitating the application of the principle that the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind, Adopts the Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of All States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries, set forth in the annex to the present resolution.47 Annex Declaration on International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for the Benefit and in the Interest of all States, Taking into Particular Account the Needs of Developing Countries 1. International cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes (hereafter “international cooperation”) shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of international law, including the Charter of the United Nations and the Treaty on the Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. It shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all States, irrespective of their degree of economic, social or scientific and technological development, and shall be the province of all mankind. Particular account should be taken of the needs of developing countries. 2. States are free to determine all aspects of their participation in international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis. Contractual terms in such cooperative ventures should be fair and reasonable and they should be in full compliance with the legitimate rights and interests of the parties concerned as, for example, with intellectual property rights. 3. All States, particularly those with relevant space capabilities and with programmes for the exploration and use of outer space, should contribute to promoting and fostering international cooperation on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis. In this context, particular attention should be given to the benefit for and the interests of developing countries and countries with incipient space programmes stemming from such international cooperation conducted with countries with more advanced space capabilities. 4. International cooperation should be conducted in the modes that are considered most effective and appropriate by the countries concerned, including, inter alia, governmental and non-governmental; commercial and non-commercial; global, multilateral, regional or bilateral; and international cooperation among countries in all levels of development. 5. International cooperation, while taking into particular account the needs of developing countries, should aim, inter alia, at the following goals, considering their need for technical assistance and rational and efficient allocation of financial and technical resources: (a) Promoting the development of space science and technology and of its applications; (b) Fostering the development of relevant and appropriate space capabilities in interested States; (c) Facilitating the exchange of expertise and technology among States on a mutually acceptable basis. 6. National and international agencies, research institutions, organizations for development aid, and developed and developing countries alike should consider the appropriate use of space applications and the potential of international cooperation for reaching their development goals. 7. The Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space should be strengthened in its role, among others, as a forum for the exchange of information on national and international activities in the field of international cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space. 8. All States should be encouraged to contribute to the United Nations Programme on Space Applications and to other initiatives in the field of international cooperation in accordance with their space capabilities and their participation in the exploration and use of outer space.United States Treaties 12 and Other International Agremeents. 13Treaties and Other International Acts Series. 14United Nations Treaty Series. 48 III. Status of international agreements relating to activities in outer space United Nations treaties 1. 1967 OST -Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (Outer Space Treaty) Adoption by the United Nations 19 December 1966 General Assembly: (resolution 2222 (XXI), annex) Opened for signature: 27 January 1967, London, Moscow, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 10 October 1967 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 18 UST12 2410; TIAS13 6347; 610 UNTS14 205) 2. 1968 ARRA -Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space (Rescue Agreement) Adoption by the United Nations 19 December 1967 General Assembly: (resolution 2345 (XXII), annex) Opened for signature: 22 April 1968, London, Moscow, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 3 December 1968 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 19 UST 7570; TIAS 6599; 672 UNTS 119)15International Legal Materials. 49 3. 1972 LIAB -Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects (Liability Convention) Adoption by the United Nations 29 November 1971 General Assembly: (resolution 2777 (XXVI), annex) Opened for signature: 29 March 1972, London, Moscow, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 1 September 1972 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 24 UST 2389; TIAS 7762; 961 UNTS 187) 4. 1975 REG -Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space (Registration Convention) Adoption by the United Nations 12 November 1974 General Assembly: (resolution 3235 (XXIX), annex) Opened for signature: 14 January 1975, New York Entry into force: 15 September 1976 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: 28 UST 695; TIAS 8480; 1023 UNTS 15) 5. 1979 MOON -Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (Moon Agreement) Adoption by the United Nations 5 December 1979 General Assembly: (resolution 34/68), annex) Opened for signature: 18 December 1979, New York Entry into force: 11 July 1984 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: 18 ILM15 1434; 1363 UNTS 3)50 Other agreements General 6. 1963 NTB -Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water Opened for signature: 5 August 1963, Moscow Entry into force: 10 October 1963 Depositaries: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America (Sources: 14 UST 1313; TIAS 5433; 480 UNTS 43) 7. 1974 BRUS -Convention Relating to the Distribution of Programme-Carrying Signals Transmitted by Satellite (Brussels Convention) Opened for signature: 21 May 1974, Brussels Entry into force: 25 August 1979 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Source: 1144 UNTS 3) Institutions 8. 1971 INTL -Agreement Relating to the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT), with annexes, and Operating Agreement Relating to the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, with annex Opened for signature: 20 August 1971, Washington, D.C. Entry into force: 12 February 1973 Depositary: United States of America (Sources: 23 UST 3813 and 4091; TIAS 7532) 9. 1971 INTR -Agreement on the Establishment of the INTERSPUTNIK International System and Organization of Space Communications Opened for signature: 15 November 1971, Moscow Entry into force: 12 July 1972 Depositary: Russian Federation (Source: 862 UNTS 3)51 10. 1975 ESA -Convention for the Establishment of a European Space Agency (ESA), with annexes Opened for signature: 30 May 1975, Paris Entry into force: 30 October 1980 Depositary: France (Source: 14 ILM 864) 11. 1976 ARBS -Agreement of the Arab Corporation for Space Communications (ARABSAT) Opened for signature: 14 April 1976 (14 Rabi’ II 1396 H), Cairo Entry into force: 16 July 1976 Depositary: League of Arab States (Source: Space Law and Related Documents, US Senate, 101st Congress, 2nd Session, 395 (1990)) 12. 1976 INTC -Agreement on Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space for Peaceful Purposes (INTERCOSMOS) Opened for signature: 13 July 1976, Moscow Entry into force: 25 March 1977 Depositary: Russian Federation (Source: 16 ILM 1) 13. 1976 IMO -Convention on the International Mobile Satellite Organization (Inmarsat), with annex, and the Operating Agreement on the International Mobile Satellite Organization (Inmarsat), with annex Opened for signature: 3 September 1976, London Entry into force: 16 July 1979 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization (Source: 31 UST 1; TIAS 9605) 14. 1982 EUTL -Convention Establishing the European Telecommunications Satellite Organization (EUTELSAT) Opened for signature: 15 July 1982, Paris Entry into force: 1 September 1985 Depositary: France (Sources: UK Misc. No. 4, Cmnd. 9154 (1984))52 15. 1983 EUMT -Convention for the Establishment of a European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) Opened for signature: 24 May 1983, Geneva Entry into force: 19 June 1986 Depositary: Switzerland (Source: Germany, “ Bundesgesetzblatt”, Jahrgang 1987, Teil 11 (1987), p. 256. This Convention has been published in the national bulletins of the ratifying States.) 16. 1992 ITU -International Telecommunication Constitution and Convention Opened for signature: 22 December 1992, Geneva Entry into force: 1 July 1994 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union (Source: ITU Secretariat, Place des Nations, CH-1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland)53 Status of international agreements relating to activities in outer space (as at 1 February 1999)a United Nations treaties Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Afghanistan R Albania Algeria R S Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda R R R R Argentina R R R R Armenia Australia R R R R R Austria R R R R R Azerbaijan Bahamas R R Bahrain Bangladesh R Barbados R R R Belarus R R R R Belgium R R R R Belize Benin R R54 Other agreements (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R S R R R R R R RR S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R RR R R R55 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Bhutan Bolivia S S Bosnia and Herzegovina R R Botswana S R R Brazil R R R Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria R R R R Burkina Faso R Burundi S S S Cambodia S Cameroon S R Canada R R R R Cape Verde Central African Republic S S Chad Chile R R R R R China R R R R Colombia S S S Comoros Congo S Costa Rica S S Côte d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba R R R R Cyprus R R R R Czech Republic R R R R Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Democratic Republic of the Congo S S S Denmark R R R R56(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R S RR S R R R R R R R b R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R57 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic R S R Ecuador R R R Egypt R R S El Salvador R R S Equatorial Guinea R Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia S Fiji R R R Finland R R R France R R R R S Gabon R R Gambia S R S Georgia R Germany R R R R Ghana S S S Greece R R R Grenada Guatemala S S Guinea Guinea-Bissau R R Guyana S R Haiti S S S Holy See S Honduras S S Hungary R R R R Iceland R R S India R R R R S Indonesia S R R58(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R c R S R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R59 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Iran (Islamic Republic of) S R R S Iraq R R R Ireland R R R Israel R R R Italy R R R Jamaica R S Japan R R R R Jordan S S S Kazakhstan R R R Kenya R R Kiribati Kuwait R R R Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic R R R Latvia Lebanon R R S Lesotho S S Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya R Liechtenstein R Lithuania Luxembourg S S R Madagascar R R Malawi Malaysia S S Maldives R Mali R R Malta S R Marshall Islands Mauritania60(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR S R R R R R R R R R R R R R61 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Mauritius R R Mexico R R R R R Micronesia, Federated States of Monaco S Mongolia R R R R Morocco R R R R Mozambique Myanmar R S Namibia Nauru Nepal R R S Netherlands R R R R R New Zealand R R R Nicaragua S S S S Niger R R R R Nigeria R R Norway R R R R Oman S Pakistan R R R R R Panama S R Papua New Guinea R R R Paraguay Peru R R S R S Philippines S S S R Poland R R R R Portugal R R Qatar R Republic of Korea R R R R Republic of Moldova Romania R R R S62(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R63 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Russian Federation R R R R Rwanda S S S Saint Lucia San Marino R R Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia R R Senegal S R Seychelles R R R R Sierra Leone R S S Singapore R R R S Slovakia R R R R Slovenia R R Solomon Islands Somalia S S South Africa R R S Spain R R R Sri Lanka R R Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Sudan Suriname Swaziland R Sweden R R R R Switzerland R R R R Syrian Arab Republic R R R Tajikistan Thailand R R The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Togo R R64(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R S R R R RRR R R R R R R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R S R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R65 Country, area or organization OST ARRA LIAB REG MOON (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Tonga R R Trinidad and Tobago S R Tunisia R R R Turkey R S Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda R Ukraine R R R R United Arab Emirates United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland R R R R United Republic of Tanzania S United States of America R R R R Uruguay R R R R R Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela R S R Viet Nam R S Western Samoa Yemen R S Yugoslavia S R R R Zambia R R R Zimbabwe Palestine European Space Agency D D D European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites D European Telecommunications Satellite Organization D R = Ratification, a acceptance, approval, accession or succession. S = Signature only. D = Declaration of acceptance of rights and obligations. When no entry appears in a column opposite the name of a country, area or organization, that country, area or organization has either not signed that agreement, is not a party to it or has withdrawn from it. b Canada has a cooperation agreement with the European Space Agency, but is not a member of the Agency. c The accession procedures for Estonia are ongoing.66(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 NTB BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC IMO EUTL EUMT ITU R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R S R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R67 Related international agreements 1. 1959 ANT -The Antarctic Treaty Opened for signature: 1 December 1959, Washington, D.C. Date of entry into force: 23 June 1961 Depositary: United States of America (Sources: 402 UNTS 71; 12 UST 794; TIAS 4780) 2. 1977 ENMOD -Convention on the Prohibition of Military or Any Other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques Adopted by the United Nations General Assembly: 10 December 1976 (resolution 31/72, annex) Opened for signature: 18 May 1977, Geneva Date of entry into force: 5 October 1978 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: 1108 UNTS 151; 31 UST 333; 16 ILM 88) 3. 1982 UNCLOS -United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Opened for signature: 10 December 1982, Montego Bay Date of entry into force: 16 November 1994 Depositary: Secretary-General of the United Nations (Sources: UN doc. A/CONF. 62/122 (1982); 21 ILM 1261) 4. 1982 ITU -International Telecommunication Convention Opened for signature: 6 November 1982, Nairobi Date of entry into force: 1 January 1984 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union 5. 1986 ENNA -Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident Opened for signature: 26 September 1986, Vienna Date of entry into force: 27 October 1986 Depositary: Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Source: 25 ILM 1370)68 6. 1986 ACNA -Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency Opened for signature: 26 September 1986, Vienna Date of entry into force: 26 February 1987 Depositary: Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Source: 25 ILM 1377) 7. 1992 ITU-WARC -Final Acts of the World Administrative Radio Conference for Dealing with Frequency Allocations in Certain Parts of the Spectrum (WARC-92) Opened for signature: 3 March 1992, Malaga-Torremolinos Date of entry into force: 12 October 1993 Depositary: Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union69 IV. Commentary: a collection of extracts of statements made on the occasion of the adoption of the United Nations treaties Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies Twenty-first session of the General Assembly (A/PV.1499): Mr. Goldberg (United States of America): “This is, in every sense of word, a United Nations treaty, in which all Member nations can justly take great pride. It has been negotiated under the auspices of the Organization and is the fruit of its labours. The treaty furthers the aims of the Charter by greatly reducing the danger of international conflict and by promoting the prospects of international cooperation for the common interest in the newest realm of human activity. This treaty is an important step towards peace.” Mr. Fedorenko (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) (interpretation from Russian): “In evaluating the treaty, we would like to stress the point that we regard the preparation of the treaty and its approval by the General Assembly as a victory for the peace-loving forces in the struggle against those who advocate using outer space for purposes of provocation and aggression.” Mr. Vinci (Italy): “For the first time in the history of mankind, all countries, and in first instance the two world Powers of the day, are not searching for new territorial conquests or for the expansion of their sovereign rights. On the contrary, they aim only at scientific and technological conquests in the new continents of outer space, which become not the province of single Powers, but the province of mankind as a whole. For the first time in the wake of our first space explorations, national, religious and ideological concepts are put aside, and in their place the ideas of peace and the unity of all men, regardless of their religion, creed or colour, are solemnly affirmed.” Mr. Seydoux (France) (interpretation from French): “We were ... among those who, following our colleague, Mr. Manfred Lachs, pointed out that this treaty is only, as it were, the first chapter of the law of outer space on which much still remains to be done.” 1491st meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/SR.1491): Mr. Lachs (Poland), speaking as Chairman of the Legal Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, stated that, with the adoption of the treaty, international law would acquire a new dimension. That was the result of the extension of States’ activities into the new domain of outer space, since there could be no legal vacuum in any field or activity. 1492nd meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/SR.1492): Mr. Goldberg (United States of America) stated that the United States regarded the treaty as an important step towards peace, for it would greatly reduce the danger of international conflict and improve the prospects for international cooperation in the common interest in one of the newest and most unfamiliar realms of human activity ... . The spirit of compromise shown by the space Powers and the other Powers had produced a treaty which established a fair balance between the interests and obligations of all concerned, including the countries that had as yet undertaken no space activities.70 Mr. Waldheim (Austria) stated that the scientific and technical achievements in outer space must be matched by legal and political agreements. The treaty met that requirement, for it was a most important milestone in the endeavour to provide for law and order in outer space and to furnish a substantial basis for further work in that field. Mr. Fuentealba (Chile) stated that the chief merit of the space treaty was that it not only laid down rules governing the activities of States in outer space but at the same time provided a solution for potential problems whose seriousness was only too obvious. Mr. de Carvalcho Silos (Brazil) stated that the treaty was a landmark in the work of the United Nations ... . The proposed treaty was perhaps the most important political event since the signing of the partial test-ban treaty. 1493rd meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/SR.1493): Mr. Gowland (Argentina) stated that the treaty would lay the basis for the legal regulation of man’s activities in space. It provided for the exploration and use of space on a basis of universality and equality, thus promoting friendship and understanding in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. Mr. Tilakaratna (Ceylon) stated that the treaty was a major step towards the establishment of rules governing the activities of States in peaceful exploration of space. Mr. Matsui (Japan) stated that the treaty was of historic importance, for it not only ensured that outer space, the Moon and other celestial bodies would be used for peaceful purposes only, but provided for cooperation among all States, both large and small, in space research ... . He hoped that all States would accede to the treaty in order to achieve the widest possible degree of international cooperation, and that the spirit of progress and understanding that had guided the preparation of the treaty would lead to the solution of other problems afflicting mankind. Mr. Burns (Canada) stated that the treaty was the result of serious endeavours both in and outside the Legal Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. It represented a significant effort to achieve a regime of law for outer space ... . The treaty as a whole would provide a firm foundation for subsequent and more detailed agreements. The measure of agreement reached on principles governing the activities of States in outer space was a great encouragement and source of hope for all who were working for effective measures of disarmament. Mr. Schuurmans (Belgium) stated that he welcomed the elaboration of an instrument that brought into play the active cooperation of the whole international community under the auspices of the United Nations. Belgium was firmly convinced that unanimous approval of the treaty by the United Nations would do much to encourage States to seek, in other fields besides that of space, peaceful solutions to the serious problems that continued to divide them. Mr. Odhiambo (Kenya) observed that space exploration, like nuclear science, was a two-edge sword that could prove both harmful and useful to mankind. It was therefore gratifying that the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space had succeeded in reaching agreement on a treaty that would ensure that outer space, the Moon and other celestial bodies would be used for peaceful purposes only and that the benefits of space exploration would be made available to all. Mr. Tarabanov (Bulgaria) stated that the treaty, as a legal instrument designed to stimulate international cooperation in the exploration and peaceful utilization of outer space, was a historic71 achievement; it was not, however, an end in itself but a promising beginning ... . The treaty not only affirmed the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and of international law, but established the concept of peace as a legal rule with regard to space activities. Mr. Rossides (Cyprus) stated that the treaty was a bold and important step forward. Scientific progress in outer space was now matched by legal progress, so that international law and the Charter of the United Nations would apply fully to space activities. Mr. Lopez (Philippines) said that the treaty represented the culmination of United Nations efforts to reach agreement on binding legal principles applicable in an area where scientific technology had taken such swift and startling strides. Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space Twenty-second session of the General Assembly (A/PV.1640): Mr. Waldheim (Austria), speaking as Chairman of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space: “I should like to express our hope that the draft resolution will receive the unanimous approval of the General Assembly and thus open the way for an early entry into force of the Agreement on rescue and return of astronauts. We are convinced that this would represent not only an important step forward in the elaboration of the law of outer space, but also evidence of the cooperation and unity of all nations in the great venture of man in the exploration of outer space.” Mr. Wyzner (Poland): “My colleagues will, no doubt, appreciate the significance, in humanitarian terms, of the Agreement for those brave and gallant men who are, in the words of Article V of the Outer Space Treaty, the ‘envoys of mankind in outer space’, who are risking their lives, as recent tragic accidents have demonstrated, in endeavours which serve the interests of all. The Agreement is also important as a further step in the gradual development of the law of outer space ... . With its frightening potentialities for war, outer space cannot be allowed to become the field of competition other than peaceful competition. The Agreement on rescue and return is also a further collective step in the quest for peace since, among others, it eliminates possible sources of dispute and friction between States.” Mr. Vinci (Italy): “We consider the Agreement before us important both intrinsically and as forming part of a wider design, namely, the legal discipline of space activities, the space activities which every day increase their impact on our life on Earth and which are bound to do so increasingly in the near future. “The task of the United Nations in this field is very clear: to safeguard and promote not only the interests of a specific group of countries, but rather the general interests of all nations, whether they are engaged or not in space activities either individually or as members of a multilateral organization. The formulation of a law for space will create a framework that will facilitate the carrying out of space activities for peaceful purposes and make such activities not a cause of disputes and tensions, but rather the source of benefits for everyone and for international cooperation.” Mr. Goldberg (United States of America): “It is a good and sound treaty and one which will stand the test of time and experience. The United States regards the action of the Assembly in endorsing this treaty as a historic action. The treaty text represents agreement on implementing that famous phrase from the Outer Space Treaty that astronauts are ‘envoys of mankind’.72 “My delegation believes that endorsement of the treaty by the General Assembly constitutes one of the major achievements of this Assembly. The United States considers that the Assistance and Return Agreement which we have adopted represents a just balancing of the interests of all Members of the United Nations, the space Powers, the near-space Powers, the cooperating space Powers and all who are interested in outer space—which, indeed, means the entire membership of our Organization. This Agreement bears witness to the fact the United Nations can make a real contribution to extending the rule of law to new areas and ensuring the positive and peaceful ordering of man’s efforts in science and the building of a better world. “It is, not least, a tribute of those who venture forward into the new world of outer space. We shall work to make that venture one of benefit to all, as we hope it will be.” Mr. C.O.E. Cole (Sierra Leone): “The Sierra Leone delegation voted in favour of the draft resolution we have just adopted. The very laudable humanitarian and juridical principles involved, as well as the fact that my Government is a signatory to the Outer Space Treaty, impelled my delegation to take this stand. It is the least tribute we can pay to all those who bravely venture into outer space for peaceful uses and all those who work so diligently to that end.” Mr. Fedorenko (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) (interpretation from Russian): “In adopting the draft Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts, the Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Outer Space, the Soviet delegation is convinced that the conclusion of that Agreement will be of great importance in connection with the rapid progress of space technology, the development of space research and the ever wider use of space objects for such practical purposes as communications, weather forecasting, navigation and so forth. The Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts will certainly be of great practical importance, ensuring the speedy rescue of astronauts in case of breakdowns, accidents or forced landings, for, as scientific and technological advance continues, manned space flights will become longer and more complex every year ... . The Agreement on the Rescue of Astronauts can truly be called a humanitarian act of international law on the part of the Member States of the United Nations towards the courageous explorers of those vast cosmic expanses, the men who are, in the words of the Outer Space Treaty, ‘envoys of mankind’ in space.” Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects Twenty-sixth session of the General Assembly (A/PV.1998): Mr. Migliuolo (Italy), as Rapporteur of the First Committee: “The draft convention represents the outcome of lengthy and persistent efforts made by a distinguished group of international jurists and diplomatists who for years have tried to take a new step forward in expanding the corpus juris concerning the international aspects of the peaceful uses of outer space.” Mr. Shepard (United States of America): “The draft convention is a sound treaty based upon realistic perceptions of mutual interest and mutual benefit. We believe it will take a place alongside the much-praised Outer Space Treaty of 1967 and the Astronaut Agreement of 1968. The Liability Convention should make possible reasonable expectation of the payment of prompt and fair compensation in the event of damage caused by the launching, flight or re-entry of man-made space vehicles.” 1826th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1826):73 Mr. Van Ussel (Belgium) (interpretation from French): “Members of the Committee are aware that the negotiations were hard, and often a great deal of imagination and concessions, even sacrifices, were required to draft the articles of the convention. If we have reached an agreement after so many years of meetings, consultations and exchanges of views, it is because all the members of the Legal Subcommittee, under the enlightened and efficient chairmanship of Mr. Wyzner, were inspired by a constructive spirit and a will to reach a text in accord with the sacred principles of international law. The Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects ... is, above all, the result of compromise which, as I indicated in my statement at the 1823rd meeting, is the outcome of a happy marriage between law and diplomacy.” Mr. Williams (Jamaica): “My delegation wishes to express its appreciation to the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space for its work over the years on the draft convention and for finally presenting a document for our endorsement. We appreciate the almost insuperable difficulties that were involved. With the increasing number of objects being launched into outer space there was certainly an element of urgency in agreeing to some rules of conduct in the event that a space object should cause damage on returning to Earth. The Committee has sought to solve the outstanding problems by resorting to compromise.” Mr. Seaton (United Republic of Tanzania): “My delegation wishes to congratulate the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on its agreement on a draft convention regarding international liability for damage caused by space objects. We believe that the draft convention deserves the careful consideration of all States.” Mr. Farhang (Afghanistan): “The delegation of Afghanistan welcomes the efforts made by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its Legal Subcommittee. We commend also the spirit of compromise shown by the major space Powers, which has made possible the preparation of the draft Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects.” Mr. Issraelyan (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) (interpretation from Russian): “We are particularly happy to note the adoption of draft resolution A/C.1/L.570/Rev.1, approving the draft Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects in the version which, over a long period of time, was successfully drafted in the Outer Space Committee. We hope that, since the matter has now been settled in the draft resolution we have adopted, as many countries as possible will accede to this Convention.” Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space 1988th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1988): Mr. Jankowitsch (Austria), as Chairman of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space: “The Committee ... has now once again made a contribution to this important new body of law by the adoption of a registration convention which will be submitted to this session of the General Assembly for consideration and adoption ... . It does not, and of course cannot, satisfy everyone completely, but it represents not only several years of hard and dedicated work but also, I believe, the optimum level of compromise that could be reached at the present stage of technology. That is why the draft convention received the unanimous approval of the members of the Committee ... . The draft convention on registration is therefore an indispensable instrument for ensuring that claims of innocent victims under the Liability Convention could be met promptly and effectively. It complements the body of rules provided by the Liability Convention, in the sense that it would facilitate procedures for identification of space objects in case of doubt. In that sense the draft convention on registration is a significant contribution, we believe, to complement the existing body of74 international law in this field; hence it represents an important step forward in the progressive development and codification of international space law.” Mr. Wyzner (Poland), as Chairman of the Legal Subcommittee: “The draft convention is a carefully thought-over and formulated instrument. It was brought into being through long hours of detailed consultations and negotiations between delegations holding different points of view and representing different schools of thought, yet endeavouring to define the widest possible area of agreement.” 1990th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1990): Mr. Kuchel (United States of America): “Many difficult compromises were reached in the negotiation of this convention, and we believe the agreement that resulted is a reasonable one accommodating diverse interests, which will prove to be useful addition to the developing body of international law relating to the peaceful exploration and use of outer space.” Mr. Frazao (Brazil) (interpretation from French): “The adoption by the Legal Subcommittee of a draft Convention on the registration of objects launched into outer space is of course a remarkable achievement, and we should like warmly to congratulate the Subcommittee and, in particular, its tireless Chairman, Ambassador Wyzner. Thanks to the spirit of understanding and compromise prevailing at the last session of the Legal Subcommittee, it will now be possible for this session of the Assembly to proceed to the adoption of the final text of a convention the need for which requires no further demonstration.” 1991st meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1991): Mr. Datcu (Romania) (interpretation from French): “That convention, which supplements the stipulations of the convention on the responsibility of States for objects launched into space, is an important step forward towards the establishment of a general legal framework for inter-state cooperation in space.” Mr. Rydbeck (Sweden): “We note with great satisfaction that the Outer Space Committee this year presents us with concrete results in the form of a draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space. The text before us has required many years of preparatory efforts in the Legal Subcommittee. It marks a new milestone in the achievements of the United Nations in the outer space field ... . We see the convention on registration as a valuable complement to the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects. With the adoption of the convention on registration there might well be better chances also for additional ratifications to the Liability Convention and to the other United Nations instruments adopted in the outer space field.” Mr. Todorov (Bulgaria) (interpretation from Russian): “The achievement of an agreement in the Legal Subcommittee on sober and well-balanced formulations has once again confirmed the reputation of that body as an organ that is making an important contribution to the development and codification of international space law.” 1992nd meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1992): Mr. Charvet (France) (interpretation from French): “I should like to emphasize that the results achieved with regard to the registration of objects launched into outer space can be an example for the other issues before the Outer Space Committee. In fact, these results prove what can be done if there is a desire among States to reach a compromise in a spirit of cooperation.”75 Mr. Brankovic (Yugoslavia): “There is no doubt that this [the draft convention] is a major accomplishment in the field of legislation concerning outer space. The adoption and putting into effect of that convention will greatly contribute to and represent a very important step towards the attainment of one of the basic objectives: the use of outer space for peaceful purposes.” 1994th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1994): Mr. Yokota (Japan): “The completion of the draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space is another memorable event in the history of the Outer Space Committee ... . I sincerely hope that the Committee will approve unanimously the draft registration convention, which in our view marks another milestone in the progressive development of outer space law ... . My delegation considers that the international community may draw an important lesson from a careful analysis of the long and difficult negotiations which led this year to the successful completion of the draft registration convention.” 1995th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1995): Mr. Isa (Pakistan): “This draft convention is a necessary complement to the Liability Convention, and constitutes a valuable addition to the body of space law. Liability for injury from a space object can be correctly ascribed only if there is some system to determine the origin of the space objects.” Mr. Al-Masri (Syrian Arab Republic) (interpretation from Arabic): “The encouraging results that have been achieved by the Legal Subcommittee—primarily that of the draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space—give us every reason to hope that the obstacles which continue to impede a number of achievements in this area—particularly the elaboration of international regulations concerning the Moon, direct television broadcasting through Earth satellites, and remote sensing—will now be eliminated, thanks to our good intentions and sincere faith in the principles of international cooperation and friendly relations among peoples of the world.” Mr. Yango (Philippines): “This draft convention is one more outstanding contribution of the Outer Space Committee to the development of international law for the peaceful uses of outer space. In our view, the draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space is a necessary complement to previous agreements ... . A mandatory system of registering objects launched into outer space is established under the draft convention not only at the national but also at the international level. Such registers are a source of vital and necessary information in the continuing efforts of mankind in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space.” 1996th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1996): Mr. Plaja (Italy): “The agreement reached on [the] text [of the Convention] has not been an easy one and, as is normal in such international negotiations, it is the result of several compromises which reflect the spirit of accommodation of many members who sacrificed their original positions in order to achieve general consensus. “The draft convention on registration of objects launched into outer space represents another small step not only towards the completion of the new body of space laws we have been working for, but also towards a new ‘Magna Carta’ of global laws and regulations which will be used and respected in the future for the determination of the conduct of international relations among the people of the world.”76 1997th meeting of the First Committee (A/C.1/PV.1997): Mr. Azzout (Algeria) (interpretation from French): “This is a result that is indeed of prime importance, for this legal document is a contribution, in definite practical terms, to the new legislation that is gradually being built up, and forms a harmonious complement to the Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects.” Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies 15th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.15): Mr. Ahmed (India) stated that the adoption of the treaty by the General Assembly would ensure the exploitation of natural resources of the Moon and other celestial bodies in an orderly and rational manner through the creation of an international regime to ensure that such resources, as the common heritage of mankind, were exploited for the benefit of all mankind. Mr. Enterlein (German Democratic Republic) stated that the draft agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon, adopted by consensus at the twenty-second session of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, contained valuable concrete provisions governing the use of outer space. It was of special importance that, as article III of the draft agreement provided, the Moon was to be used by all States Parties exclusively for peaceful purposes. It was vital for peace and détente that the draft agreement should confirm the demilitarized status of the Moon and other celestial bodies and forbid the placing in orbit around such bodies of objects carrying nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction. With the adoption of that agreement, another significant part of outer space and the scope of activities therein would be covered by specific and detailed provisions binding under international law. The fact that it had been possible to evolve the draft agreement by consensus gave striking proof of the value of the consensus principle in drawing up legal provisions concerning outer space. 16th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.16): Mr. Barton (Canada) noted with satisfaction that the Committee had finally completed the drafting of a Moon treaty, which reiterated the principle laid down in the 1967 Treaty on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space that the Moon and other celestial bodies would be used exclusively for peaceful purposes. The draft treaty would explicitly prohibit any threat or use of force, and would mean that the benefits derived from the exploitation of the resources of celestial bodies would be equitably shared by all parties. Mr. Fujita (Japan) stated that the draft agreement contained a number of important principles, which would be legally binding and would be effective in promoting greater cooperation among States for further progress in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes. Mrs. Nowotny (Austria) stated that at its most recent session, the Committee had been able, on the basis of the work of the Legal Subcommittee, to complete the elaboration of the draft agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies, its most important step in the codification of international outer space law. As a result of such an agreement, the use of the natural resources of celestial bodies and outer space, which might relieve some of the immense pressures now facing mankind due to the limited resources of the Earth, could take place in a predominantly peaceful environment, in an orderly fashion, in accordance with international law, on the basis of international cooperation and mutual77 understanding and in accordance with previously agreed procedures. Only in those circumstances would the whole of mankind be able to benefit therefrom.78 17th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.17): Mrs. Oliveros (Argentina) stated that, with regard to the draft treaty relating to the Moon, the sometimes seemingly irreconcilable differences of opinion that had been apparent from the outset had been overcome, proving once that negotiations between States were the most effective way of dealing with such obstacles. The draft treaty reflected a good balance of the different interests in that connection, and her delegation believed that the developed and the developing countries could feel satisfied with its contents. The draft treaty also restored the credibility of the Outer Space Committee and showed that it was one of the most efficient United Nations organs, having drafted five extremely important international instruments in its relatively short existence. The treaty was also an excellent example of how to make headway in the progressive development of international law and its codification in accordance with Article 13 (a) of the Charter. Mr. Roslyakov (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) stated that the draft agreement was a meticulous and balanced document which met the needs of all countries, irrespective of their level of economic development and degree of participation in outer space activities. Mr. Cotton (New Zealand) stated that the draft treaty, which laid down guidelines for the conduct of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies, would represent significant progress in international cooperation. 18th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.18): Mr. Albornoz (Ecuador) stated that the preparation of a draft agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies represented a certain degree of progress. It was encouraging to note that that instrument provided not only that the exploration and use of the Moon should be the province of all mankind but also that they should be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degrees of development. The States parties to that agreement should likewise undertake to use the Moon exclusively for peaceful purposes and not to place in orbit around the Moon any object carrying nuclear weapons. Mr. Kalina (Czechoslovakia) stated that his delegation welcomed the completion of the work on the agreement governing the activities of States on the Moon and other celestial bodies. The completion of that endeavour was proof that where there was the political will, even the most difficult and sensitive issues could be resolved. The Moon agreement contained the concept of the common heritage of mankind, thus recognizing the need for broad international cooperation in outer space of all countries irrespective of the level of their development. 19th meeting of the Special Political Committee (A/SPC/34/SR.19): Mr. Petree (United States of America) stated that the draft Moon treaty was based to a considerable extent on the 1967 Outer Space Treaty and in no way limited the latter’s provisions. It also represented, in its own right, a meaningful advance in the codification of international law dealing with outer space, containing obligations which were of both immediate and long-term application. Mr. Kolbasin (Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic) stated that the draft treaty on the Moon, besides being a major contribution to international law, would be an important element in the development of mutual trust among States and would help to strengthen world peace.79 Mr. Gómez Robledo (Mexico) stated that, in his delegation’s opinion, the draft treaty had achieved a difficult balance between idealism and realism in establishing rules to guide mankind’s activities on the Moon.Mr. Suryokusumo (Indonesia) stated that Indonesia welcomed the draft agreement relating to the Moon, which was undoubtedly a milestone in the development of space law and which demonstrated the progress that could be made in resolving issues through the recognition of mutual interests and a spirit of compromise. Mr. Diez (Chile) stated that the drafting of the agreement was an achievement for both the developed and the developing countries in that it provided for the effective cooperation of States, on an equal footing, in the exploration and future utilization of the Moon for the benefit of all mankind.80 Office for Outer Space Affairs Vienna International Centre P.O. Box 500, A-1400 Vienna, Austria Telephone: +(43) (1) 26060-4950 Fax: +(43) (1) 26060-5830A/AC.105/722 A/CONF.184/BP/15 TRATADOS Y PRINCIPIOS DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS SOBRE EL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE Texto y situación de los tratados y principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, aprobados por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas Edición conmemorativa publicada con ocasión de la celebración de la Tercera Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Utilización y Exploración del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos (UNISPACE III) Naciones Unidas, Viena 1999 V.99-84433-III -Índice Página Prefacio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I. Tratados de las Naciones Unidas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 II. Principios aprobados por la Asamblea General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Declaración sobre la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 III. Situación de los acuerdos internacionales relativos a las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 IV. Comentario: Recopilación de extractos de declaraciones formuladas con ocasión de la aprobación de los tratados de las Naciones Unidas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531 Véase el informe del Secretario General sobre cooperación internacional en materia de actividades espaciales para fortalecer la seguridad en la era posterior a la guerra fría (A/48/221) y también el párrafo 2 de la resolución 48/39 de la Asamblea General. -1 -Prefacio Una de las principales responsabilidades de las Naciones Unidas en la esfera jurídica es impulsar el desarrollo progresivo del derecho internacional y su codificación. Un importante sector para el ejercicio de este mandato es el nuevo medio ambiente del espacio ultraterrestre y las Naciones Unidas han hecho varias importantes contribuciones al derecho del espacio ultraterrestre, gracias a los esfuerzos de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos y su Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos. Las Naciones Unidas, en realidad, se han convertido en el centro de coordinación para la colaboración internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre y para la formulación de las reglas de derecho internacional necesarias. El espacio ultraterrestre, un medio extraordinario en muchos respectos es, por añadidura, único en su género desde el punto de vista jurídico. Sólo recientemente las actividades humanas y la interacción internacional en el espacio ultraterrestre se han convertido en realidad y se ha comenzado a formular las reglas de conducta internacionales para facilitar las relaciones internacionales en el espacio ultraterrestre. Como corresponde a un medio cuya naturaleza es tan fuera de lo común, la extensión del derecho internacional al espacio ultraterrestre se ha hecho en forma gradual y evolutiva, a partir del estudio de cuestiones relativas a los aspectos jurídicos, para seguir luego con la formulación de los principios de naturaleza jurídica y, por último, incorporar dichos principios en tratados multilaterales generales. El primer paso importante en dicho sentido fue la aprobación por la Asamblea General en 1963 de la Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre. En los años siguientes se elaboraron en las Naciones Unidas cinco tratados generales multilaterales que incorporan y desarrollan conceptos contenidos en la Declaración de los principios jurídicos: El Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes (resolución 2222 (XXI) de la Asamblea General, anexo), aprobado el 19 de diciembre de 1966, abierto a la firma el 27 de enero de 1967, entró en vigor el 10 de octubre de 1967; El Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre (resolución 2345 (XXII) de la Asamblea General, anexo), aprobado el 19 de diciembre de 1967, abierto a la firma el 22 de abril de 1968, entró en vigor el 3 de diciembre de 1968; El Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales (resolución 2777 (XXVI) de la Asamblea General, anexo), aprobado el 29 de noviembre de 1971, abierto a la firma el 29 de marzo de 1972, entró en vigor el 1º de septiembre de 1972; El Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre (resolución 3235 de la Asamblea General, anexo), aprobado el 12 de noviembre de 1974, abierto a la firma el 14 de enero de 1975, entró en vigor el 15 de septiembre de 1976; y El Acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes (resolución 34/68 de la Asamblea General, anexo), aprobado el 5 de diciembre de 1979, abierto a la firma el 18 de diciembre de 1979, entró en vigor el 11 de julio de 1984. Las Naciones Unidas han supervisado la redacción, formulación y aprobación de cinco resoluciones de la Asamblea General, comprendida la Declaración de los principios jurídicos. Se trata de lo siguiente: La Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, aprobada el 13 de diciembre de 1963 (resolución 1962 (XVII) de la Asamblea General; Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión, aprobados el 10 de diciembre de 1982 (resolución 37/92 de la Asamblea General); Los Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio, aprobados el 3 de diciembre de 1986 (resolución 41/65 de la Asamblea General); Los Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre, aprobados el 14 de diciembre de 1992 (resolución 47/68 de la Asamblea General). La Declaración sobre la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo, aprobada el 13 de diciembre de 1996 (resolución 51/122 de la Asamblea General). El Tratado de 1967 sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, que puede considerarse la base jurídica general para la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, ha proporcionado un marco para el desarrollo del derecho del espacio ultraterrestre. Se puede decir que los otros cuatro tratados tratan específicamente de ciertos conceptos incluidos en el Tratado de 1967. Los tratados relativos al espacio han sido ratificados por muchos gobiernos y muchos más se guían por sus principios. Habida cuenta de la importancia que reviste la cooperación internacional para desarrollar las normas del derecho del espacio, y de su importante función para fomentar la cooperación internacional en la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, la Asamblea General y el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas han exhortado a todos los Estados Miembros de las Naciones Unidas que aún no sean parte en los tratados internacionales que rigen la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre a que ratifiquen esos tratados o se adhieran a ellos lo antes posible1.-2 -Del 19 al 30 de julio de 1999, la Tercera Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos (UNISPACE III) examinará los logros alcanzados y la situación actual de las actividades de la humanidad en el espacio ultraterrestre, y tratará de elaborar un plan maestro para el desarrollo de esas actividades en el futuro, que se extenderá hasta el próximo siglo. Uno de los temas que se tratarán en ese contexto será la promoción de la cooperación internacional, incluido el aspecto clave de la situación actual y el desarrollo futuro del derecho internacional del espacio. La finalidad de la presente publicación es reunir una vez más en un solo volumen los cinco tratados sobre el espacio ultraterrestre aprobados hasta la fecha por las Naciones Unidas, y los cinco conjuntos de principios. En ella figura también un cuadro en el que se enumeran las actuales partes en los cinco tratados sobre el espacio ultraterrestre y la situación de éstos así como de otros acuerdos internacionales conexos que rigen las actividades espaciales al 1º de febrero de 1999. Al final de la publicación figura además un comentario consistente en una recopilación de declaraciones formuladas con ocasión de la aprobación de los cinco tratados sobre el espacio ultraterrestre. Se espera que esta documentación resulte útil como instrumento de referencia para los participantes en la Conferencia en sus deliberaciones sobre cuestiones relacionadas con el derecho internacional del espacio y su futuro desarrollo. Además, se espera que ella contribuya a recordar a los lectores interesados en los aspectos jurídicos del espacio ultraterrestre el espíritu de buena voluntad y cooperación que formó la base de los instrumentos jurídicos formulados e inspiró la celebración de esta última conferencia de las Naciones Unidas en el siglo XX. -3 -I. Tratados de las Naciones Unidas Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes Los Estados Partes en este Tratado, Inspirándose en las grandes perspectivas que se ofrecen a la humanidad como consecuencia de la entrada del hombre en el espacio ultraterrestre, Reconociendo el interés general de toda la humanidad en el proceso de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Estimando que la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre se debe efectuar en bien de todos los pueblos, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, Deseando contribuir a una amplia cooperación internacional en lo que se refiere a los aspectos científicos y jurídicos de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Estimando que tal cooperación contribuirá al desarrollo de la comprensión mutua y al afianzamiento de las relaciones amistosas entre los Estados y pueblos, Recordando la resolución 1962 (XVIII), titulada "Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre", que fue aprobada unánimemente por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas el 13 de diciembre de 1963, Recordando la resolución 1884 (XVIII), en que se insta a los Estados a no poner en órbita alrededor de la Tierra ningún objeto portador de armas nucleares u otras clases de armas de destrucción en masa, ni a emplazar tales armas en los cuerpos celestes, que fue aprobada unánimemente por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas el 17 de octubre de 1963, Tomando nota de la resolución 110 (II), aprobada por la Asamblea General el 3 de noviembre de 1947, que condena la propaganda destinada a provocar o alentar, o susceptible de provocar o alentar cualquier amenaza de la paz, quebrantamiento de la paz o acto de agresión, y considerando que dicha resolución es aplicable al espacio ultraterrestre, Convencidos de que un Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, promoverá los propósitos y principios de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, Han convenido en lo siguiente: Artículo I La exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán hacerse en provecho y en interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, e incumben a toda la humanidad. El espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, estará abierto para su exploración y utilización a todos los Estados sin discriminación alguna en condiciones de igualdad y en conformidad con el derecho internacional, y habrá libertad de acceso a todas las regiones de los cuerpos celestes. El espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, estarán abiertos a la investigación científica, y los Estados facilitarán y fomentarán la cooperación internacional en dichas investigaciones. Artículo II El espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, no podrá ser objeto de apropiación nacional por reivindicación de soberanía, uso u ocupación, ni de ninguna otra manera. Artículo III Los Estados Partes en el Tratado deberán realizar sus actividades de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, de conformidad con el derecho internacional, incluida la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, en interés del mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y del fomento de la cooperación y la comprensión internacionales. Artículo IV Los Estados Partes en el Tratado se comprometen a no colocar en órbita alrededor de la Tierra ningún objeto portador de armas nucleares ni de ningún otro tipo de armas de destrucción en masa, a no emplazar tales armas en los cuerpos celestes y a no colocar tales armas en el espacio ultraterrestre en ninguna otra forma.-4 -La Luna y los demás cuerpos celestes se utilizarán exclusivamente con fines pacíficos por todos los Estados Partes en el Tratado. Queda prohibido establecer en los cuerpos celestes bases, instalaciones y fortificaciones militares, efectuar ensayos con cualquier tipo de armas y realizar maniobras militares. No se prohíbe la utilización de personal militar para investigaciones científicas ni para cualquier otro objetivo pacífico. Tampoco se prohíbe la utilización de cualquier equipo o medios necesarios para la exploración de la Luna y de otros cuerpos celestes con fines pacíficos. Artículo V Los Estados Partes en el Tratado considerarán a todos los astronautas como enviados de la humanidad en el espacio ultraterrestre, y les prestarán toda la ayuda posible en caso de accidente, peligro o aterrizaje forzoso en el territorio de otro Estado Parte o en alta mar. Cuando los astronautas hagan tal aterrizaje serán devueltos con seguridad y sin demora al Estado de registro de su vehículo espacial. Al realizar actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, así como en los cuerpos celestes, los astronautas de un Estado Parte en el Tratado deberán prestar toda la ayuda posible a los astronautas de los demás Estados Partes en el Tratado. Los Estados Partes en el Tratado tendrán que informar inmediatamente a los demás Estados Partes en el Tratado o al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sobre los fenómenos por ellos observados en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, que podrían constituir un peligro para la vida o la salud de los astronautas. Artículo VI Los Estados Partes en el Tratado serán responsables internacionalmente de las actividades nacionales que realicen en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los organismos gubernamentales o las entidades no gubernamentales, y deberán asegurar que dichas actividades se efectúen en conformidad con las disposiciones del presente Tratado. Las actividades de las entidades no gubernamentales en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán ser autorizadas y fiscalizadas constantemente por el pertinente Estado Parte en el Tratado. Cuando se trate de actividades que realiza en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, una organización internacional, la responsable en cuanto al presente Tratado corresponderá a esa organización internacional y a los Estados Partes en el Tratado que pertenecen a ella. Artículo VII Todo Estado Parte en el Tratado que lance o promueva el lanzamiento de un objeto al espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y todo Estado Parte en el Tratado, desde cuyo territorio o cuyas instalaciones se lance un objeto, será responsable internacionalmente de los daños causados a otro Estado Parte en el Tratado o a sus personas naturales o jurídicas por dicho objeto o sus partes componentes en la Tierra, en el espacio aéreo o en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Artículo VIII El Estado Parte en el Tratado, en cuyo registro figura el objeto lanzado al espacio ultraterrestre, retendrá su jurisdicción y control sobre tal objeto, así como sobre todo el personal que vaya en él, mientras se encuentre en el espacio ultraterrestre o en un cuerpo celeste. El derecho de propiedad de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, incluso de los objetos que hayan descendido o se construyan en un cuerpo celeste, y de sus partes componentes, no sufrirá ninguna alteración mientras estén en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso en un cuerpo celeste, ni en su retorno a la Tierra. Cuando esos objetos o esas partes componentes sean hallados fuera de los límites del Estado Parte en el Tratado en cuyo registro figuran, deberán ser devueltos a ese Estado Parte, el que deberá proporcionar los datos de identificación que se le soliciten antes de efectuarse la restitución. Artículo IX En la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los Estados Partes en el Tratado deberán guiarse por el principio de la cooperación y la asistencia mutua, y en todas sus actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán tener debidamente en cuenta los intereses correspondientes de los demás Estados Partes en el Tratado. Los Estados Partes en el Tratado harán los estudios e investigaciones del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y procederán a su exploración de tal forma que no se produzca una contaminación nociva ni cambios desfavorables en el medio ambiente de la Tierra como consecuencia de la introducción en él de materias extraterrestres, y cuando sea necesario adoptarán las medidas pertinentes a tal efecto. Si un Estado Parte en el Tratado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, proyectado por él o por sus nacionales, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de otros Estados Partes en el Tratado en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, incluso en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberá celebrar las consultas internacionales oportunas antes de iniciar esa actividad o ese experimento. Si un Estado Parte en el Tratado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, proyectado por otro Estado Parte en el Tratado, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, incluso en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, podrá pedir que se celebren consultas sobre dicha actividad o experimento. Artículo X A fin de contribuir a la cooperación internacional en la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, conforme a los objetivos del presente Tratado, los Estados Partes en él examinarán, en condiciones de igualdad, las solicitudes formuladas por otros Estados Partes en el Tratado para que se les brinde la oportunidad a fin de observar el vuelo de los objetos espaciales lanzados por dichos Estados. La naturaleza de tal oportunidad y las condiciones en que podría ser concedida se determinarán por acuerdo entre los Estados interesados.-5 -Artículo XI A fin de fomentar la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, los Estados Partes en el Tratado que desarrollan actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, convienen en informar, en la mayor medida posible dentro de lo viable y factible, al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, acerca de la naturaleza, marcha, localización y resultados de dichas actividades. El Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas debe estar en condiciones de difundir eficazmente tal información, inmediatamente después de recibirla. Artículo XII Todas las estaciones, instalaciones, equipo y vehículos espaciales situados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes serán accesibles a los representantes de otros Estados Parte en el presente Tratado, sobre la base de reciprocidad. Dichos representantes notificarán con antelación razonable su intención de hacer una visita, a fin de permitir celebrar las consultas que procedan y adoptar un máximo de precauciones para velar por la seguridad y evitar toda perturbación del funcionamiento normal de la instalación visitada. Artículo XIII Las disposiciones del presente Tratado se aplicarán a las actividades de exploración y utilización de espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, que realicen los Estados Partes en el Tratado, tanto en el caso de que esas actividades las lleve a cabo un Estado Parte en el Tratado por sí solo o junto con otros Estados, incluso cuando se efectúen dentro del marco de organizaciones intergubernamentales internacionales. Los Estados Partes en el Tratado resolverán los problemas prácticos que puedan surgir en relación con las actividades que desarrollen las organizaciones intergubernamentales internacionales en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, con la organización internacional pertinente o con uno o varios Estados miembros de dicha organización internacional que sean Partes en el presente Tratado. Artículo XIV 1. Este Tratado estará abierto a la firma de todos los Estados. El Estado que no firmare este Tratado antes de su entrada en vigor, de conformidad con el párrafo 3 de este artículo, podrá adherirse a él en cualquier momento. 2. Este Tratado estará sujeto a ratificación por los Estados signatarios. Los instrumentos de ratificación y los instrumentos de adhesión se depositarán en los archivos de los Gobiernos de los Estados Unidos de América, del Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte y de la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas, a los que por el presente se designa como Gobiernos depositarios. 3. Este Tratado entrará en vigor cuando hayan depositado los instrumentos de ratificación cinco gobiernos, incluidos los designados como Gobiernos depositarios en virtud del presente Tratado. 4. Para los Estados cuyos instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión se depositaren después de la entrada en vigor de este Tratado, el Tratado entrará en vigor en la fecha del depósito de sus instrumentos de ratificación o adhesión. 5. Los Gobiernos depositarios informarán sin tardanza a todos los Estados signatarios y a todos los Estados que se hayan adherido a este Tratado, de la fecha de cada firma, de la fecha de depósito de cada instrumento de ratificación y de adhesión a este Tratado, de la fecha de su entrada en vigor y de cualquier otra notificación. 6. Este Tratado será registrado por los Gobiernos depositarios, de conformidad con el Artículo 102 de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo XV Cualquier Estado Parte en el Tratado podrá proponer enmiendas al mismo. Las enmiendas entrarán en vigor para cada Estado Parte en el Tratado que las acepte cuando éstas hayan sido aceptadas por la mayoría de los Estados Partes en el Tratado, y en lo sucesivo para cada Estado restante que sea Parte en el Tratado en la fecha en que las acepte. Artículo XVI Todo Estado Parte podrá comunicar su retiro de este Tratado al cabo de un año de su entrada en vigor, mediante notificación por escrito dirigida a los Gobiernos depositarios. Tal retiro surtirá efecto un año después de la fecha en que se reciba la notificación.-6 -Artículo XVII Este Tratado, cuyos textos en chino, español, francés, inglés y ruso son igualmente auténticos, se depositará en los archivos de los Gobiernos depositarios. Los Gobiernos depositarios remitirán copias debidamente certificadas de este Tratado a los gobiernos de los Estados signatarios y de los Estados que se adhieran al Tratado. EN TESTIMONIO DE LO CUAL, los infrascritos, debidamente autorizados, firman este Tratado. HECHO en tres ejemplares, en las ciudades de Londres, Moscú y Washington D.C., el día veintisiete de enero de mil novecientos sesenta y siete.1 Resolución 2222 (XXI) de la Asamblea General, anexo. -7 -Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre Las Partes Contratantes, Señalando la gran importancia del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes1, el que dispone la prestación de toda la ayuda posible a los astronautas en caso de accidente, peligro o aterrizaje forzoso, la devolución de los astronautas con seguridad y sin demora, y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, Deseando desarrollar esos deberes y darles expresión más concreta, Deseando fomentar la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Animadas por sentimientos de humanidad, Han convenido en lo siguiente: Artículo 1 Toda parte contratante que sepa o descubra que la tripulación de una nave espacial ha sufrido un accidente, se encuentra en situación de peligro o ha realizado un aterrizaje forzoso o involuntario en un territorio colocado bajo su jurisdicción, en alta mar o en cualquier otro lugar no colocado bajo la jurisdicción de ningún Estado, inmediatamente: a) Lo notificará a la autoridad de lanzamiento o, si no puede identificar a la autoridad de lanzamiento ni comunicarse inmediatamente con ella, lo hará público inmediatamente por todos los medios apropiados de comunicación de que disponga; b) Lo notificará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, a quien correspondería difundir sin tardanza la noticia por todos los medios apropiados de comunicación de que disponga. Artículo 2 Si, debido a accidente, peligro o aterrizaje forzoso o involuntario, la tripulación de una nave espacial desciende en territorio colocado bajo la jurisdicción de una Parte Contratante, ésta adaptará inmediatamente todas las medidas posibles para salvar a la tripulación y prestarle toda la ayuda necesaria. Comunicará a la autoridad de lanzamiento y al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas las medidas que adopte y sus resultados. Si la asistencia de la autoridad de lanzamiento fuere útil para lograr un pronto salvamento o contribuyere en medida importante a la eficacia de las operaciones de búsqueda y salvamento, la autoridad de lanzamiento cooperará con la Parte Contratante con miras a la eficaz realización de las operaciones de búsqueda y salvamento. Tales operaciones se efectuarán bajo la dirección y el control de la Parte Contratante, la que actuará en estrecha y constante consulta con la autoridad de lanzamiento. Artículo 3 Si se sabe o descubre que la tripulación de una nave espacial ha descendido en alta mar o en cualquier otro lugar no colocado bajo la jurisdicción de ningún Estado, las Partes Contratantes que se hallen en condiciones de hacerlo prestarán asistencia, en caso necesario, en las operaciones de búsqueda y salvamento de tal tripulación, a fin de lograr su rápido salvamento. Esas Partes Contratantes informarán a la autoridad de lanzamiento y al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas acerca de las medidas que adopten y de sus resultados. Artículo 4 Si, debido a accidente, peligro, o aterrizaje forzoso o involuntario, la tripulación de una nave espacial desciende en territorio colocado bajo la jurisdicción de una Parte Contratante, o ha sido hallada en alta mar o en cualquier otro lugar no colocado bajo la jurisdicción de ningún Estado, será devuelta con seguridad y sin demora a los representantes de la autoridad de lanzamiento. Artículo 5 1. Toda Parte Contratante que sepa o descubra que un objeto espacial o partes componentes del mismo han vuelto a la Tierra en territorio colocado bajo su jurisdicción, en alta mar o en cualquier otro lugar no colocado bajo la jurisdicción de ningún Estado, lo notificará a la autoridad de lanzamiento y al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. 2. Toda Parte Contratante que tenga jurisdicción sobre el territorio en que un objeto espacial o partes componentes del mismo hayan sido descubiertos deberá adoptar, a petición de la autoridad de lanzamiento y con la asistencia de dicha autoridad, si se la solicitare, todas las medidas que juzgue factibles para recuperar el objeto o las partes componentes.-8 -3. A petición de la autoridad de lanzamiento, los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre o sus partes componentes encontrados fuera de los límites territoriales de la autoridad de lanzamiento serán restituidos a los representantes de la autoridad de lanzamiento o retenidos a disposición de los mismos, quienes, cuando sean requeridos a ello, deberán facilitar datos de identificación antes de la restitución. 4. No obstante lo dispuesto en los párrafos 2 y 3 de este artículo, la Parte Contratante que tenga motivos para creer que un objeto espacial o partes componentes del mismo descubiertos en territorio colocado bajo su jurisdicción, o recuperados por ella en otro lugar, son de naturaleza peligrosa o nociva, podrá notificarlo a la autoridad de lanzamiento, la que deberá adoptar inmediatamente medidas eficaces, bajo la dirección y el control de dicha Parte Contratante, para eliminar el posible peligro de daños. 5. Los gastos realizados para dar cumplimiento a las obligaciones de rescatar y restituir un objeto espacial o sus partes componentes, conforme a los párrafos 2 y 3 de este artículo, estarán a cargo de la autoridad de lanzamiento. Artículo 6 A los efectos de este Acuerdo, se entenderá por "autoridad de lanzamiento" el Estado responsable del lanzamiento o, si una organización internacional intergubernamental fuere responsable del lanzamiento, dicha organización, siempre que declara que acepta los derechos y obligaciones previstos en este Acuerdo y que la mayoría de los Estados miembros de tal organización, sean Partes Contratantes en este Acuerdo y en el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Artículo 7 1. Este Acuerdo estará abierto a la firma de todos los Estados. Todo Estado que no firmare este Acuerdo antes de su entrada en vigor, de conformidad con el párrafo 3 de este artículo, podrá adherirse a él en cualquier momento. 2. Este Acuerdo estará sujeto a ratificación por los Estados signatarios. Los instrumentos de ratificación y los instrumentos de adhesión se depositarán en los archivos de los Gobiernos de los Estados Unidos de América, del Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, y de la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas, a los que por el presente se designa como Gobiernos depositarios. 3. Este Acuerdo entrará en vigor cuando hayan depositados los instrumentos de ratificación cinco gobiernos, incluidos los designados como Gobiernos depositarios en virtud de este Acuerdo. 4. Para los Estados cuyos instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión se depositaren después de la entrada en vigor de este Acuerdo, el Acuerdo entrará en vigor en la fecha del depósito de sus instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión. 5. Los Gobiernos depositarios informarán sin tardanza a todos los Estados signatarios y a todos los Estados que se hayan adherido a este Acuerdo de la fecha de cada firma, de la fecha de depósito de cada instrumento de ratificación y de adhesión a este Acuerdo, de la fecha de su entrada en vigor y de cualquier otra notificación. 6. Este Acuerdo será registrado por los Gobiernos depositarios, de conformidad con el Artículo 102 de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo 8 Todo Estado Parte en el Acuerdo podrá proponer enmiendas al mismo. Las enmiendas entrarán en vigor para cada Estado Parte en el Acuerdo que las aceptare cuando éstas hayan sido aceptadas por la mayoría de los Estados Partes en el Acuerdo, y en lo sucesivo para cada Estado restante que sea Parte en el Acuerdo en la fecha en que las acepte. Artículo 9 Todo Estado Parte en el Acuerdo podrá comunicar su retirada de este Acuerdo al cabo de un año de su entrada en vigor, mediante notificación por escrito dirigida a los Gobiernos depositarios. Tal retirada surtirá efecto un año después de la fecha en que se reciba la notificación. Artículo 10 Este Acuerdo, cuyos textos en chino, español, francés, inglés y ruso son igualmente auténticos, se depositará en los archivos de los Gobiernos depositarios. Los Gobiernos depositarios remitirán copias debidamente certificadas de este Acuerdo a los gobiernos de los Estados signatarios y de los Estados que se adhieran al Acuerdo. EN TESTIMONIO DE LO CUAL, los infrascritos, debidamente autorizados, firman este Acuerdo. HECHO en tres ejemplares, en las ciudades de Londres, Moscú y Washington D.C., el día veintidós de abril de mil novecientos sesenta y ocho.-9 -Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales Los Estados Partes en el presente Convenio, Reconociendo el interés general de toda la humanidad en promover la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Recordando el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, Tomando en consideración que, a pesar de las medidas de precaución que han de adoptar los Estados y las organizaciones internacionales intergubernamentales que participen en el lanzamiento de objetos espaciales, tales objetos pueden ocasionalmente causar daños, Reconociendo la necesidad de elaborar normas y procedimientos internacionales eficaces sobre la responsabilidad por daños causados por objetos espaciales y, en particular, de asegurar el pago rápido, con arreglo a lo dispuesto en el presente Convenio, de una indemnización plena y equitativa a las víctimas de tales daños, Convencidos de que el establecimiento de esas normas y procedimientos contribuirá a reforzar la cooperación internacional en el terreno de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Han convenido en lo siguiente: Artículo I A los efectos del presente Convenio: a) Se entenderá por "daño" la pérdida de vidas humanas, las lesiones corporales u otros perjuicios a la salud, así como la pérdida de bienes o los perjuicios causados a bienes de Estados o de personas físicas o morales, o de organizaciones internacionales intergubernamentales; b) El término "lanzamiento" denotará también todo intento de lanzamiento; c) Se entenderá por "Estado de lanzamiento": i) Un Estado que lance o promueva el lanzamiento de un objeto espacial; ii) Un Estado desde cuyo territorio o desde cuyas instalaciones se lance un objeto espacial; d) El término "objeto espacial" denotará también las partes componentes de un objeto espacial, así como el vehículo propulsor y sus partes. Artículo II Un Estado de lanzamiento tendrá responsabilidad absoluta y responderá de los daños causados por un objeto espacial suyo en la superficie de la Tierra o a las aeronaves en vuelo. Artículo III Cuando el daño sufrido de la superficie de la Tierra por un objeto espacial de un Estado de lanzamiento, o por las personas o los bienes a bordo de dicho objeto espacial, sea causado por un objeto espacial de otro Estado de lanzamiento, este último Estado será responsable únicamente cuando los daños se hayan producido por su culpa o por culpa de las personas de que sea responsable. Artículo IV 1. Cuando los daños sufridos fuera de la superficie de la Tierra por un objeto espacial de un Estado de lanzamiento. o por las personas o los bienes a bordo de ese objeto espacial, sean causados por un objeto espacial de otro Estado de lanzamiento, y cuando de ello se deriven daños para un tercer Estado o para sus personas físicas o morales, los dos primero Estados serán mancomunada y solidariamente responsables ante ese tercer Estado, conforme se indica a continuación: a) Si los daños han sido causados al tercer Estado en la superficie de la Tierra o han sido causados a aeronaves en vuelo, su responsabilidad ante ese tercer Estado será absoluta; b) Si los daños han sido causados a un objeto espacial de un tercer Estado, o a las personas o los bienes a bordo de ese objeto espacial, fuera de la superficie de la Tierra, la responsabilidad ante ese tercer Estado se fundará en la culpa de cualquiera de los dos primeros Estados o en la culpa de las personas de que sea responsable cualquiera de ellos.-10 -2. En todos los casos de responsabilidad solidaria mencionados en el párrafo 1 de este artículo, la carga de la indemnización por los daños se repartirá entre los dos primeros Estados según el grado de la culpa respectiva; si no es posible determinar el grado de la culpa de cada uno de estos Estados, la carga de la indemnización se repartirá por partes iguales entre ellos. Esa repartición no afectará al derecho del tercer Estado a reclamar su indemnización total, en virtud de este Convenio, a cualquiera de los Estados de lanzamiento que sean solidariamente responsables o a todos ellos. Artículo V 1. Si dos o más Estados lanzan conjuntamente un objeto espacial, serán responsables solidariamente por los daños causados. 2. Un Estado de lanzamiento que haya pagado la indemnización por daños tendrá derecho a repetir contra los demás participantes en el lanzamiento conjunto. Los participantes en el lanzamiento conjunto podrán concertar acuerdos acerca de la distribución entre sí de la carga financiera respecto de la cual son solidariamente responsables. Tales acuerdos no afectarán al derecho de un Estado que haya sufrido daños a reclamar su indemnización total, de conformidad con el presente Convenio, a cualquiera o a todos los Estados de lanzamiento que sean solidariamente responsables. 3. Un Estado desde cuyo territorio o instalaciones se lanza un objeto espacial se considerará como participante en un lanzamiento conjunto. Artículo VI 1. Salvo lo dispuesto en el párrafo 2 de este artículo, un Estado de lanzamiento quedará exento de la responsabilidad absoluta en la medida en que demuestre que los daños son total o parcialmente resultado de negligencia grave o de un acto de omisión cometido con la intención de causar daños por parte de un Estados demandante o de personas físicas o morales a quienes este último Estado represente. 2. No se concederá exención alguna en los casos en que los daños sean resultado de actividades desarrolladas por un Estado de lanzamiento en las que no se respete el derecho internacional. incluyendo, en especial, la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Artículo VII Las disposiciones del presente Convenio no se aplicarán a los daños causados por un objeto espacial del Estado de lanzamiento a: a) Nacionales de dicho Estado de lanzamiento; b) Nacionales de un país extranjero mientras participen en las operaciones de ese objeto espacial desde el momento de su lanzamiento o en cualquier fase posterior al mismo hasta su descenso, o mientras se encuentren en las proximidades inmediatas de la zona prevista para el lanzamiento o la recuperación, como resultado de una invitación de dicho Estado de lanzamiento. Artículo VIII 1. Un Estado que haya sufrido daños, o cuyas personas físicas o morales hayan sufrido daños, podrá presentar a un Estado de lanzamiento una reclamación por tales daños. 2. Si el Estado de nacionalidad de las personas afectadas no ha presentado una reclamación, otro Estado podrá presentar a un Estado de lanzamiento una reclamación respecto de daños sufridos en su territorio por cualquier persona física o moral. 3. Si ni el Estado de nacionalidad de las personas afectadas ni el Estado en cuyo territorio se ha producido el daño han presentado una reclamación ni notificado su intención de hacerlo, otro Estado podrá presentar a un Estado de lanzamiento una reclamación respecto de daños sufridos por sus residentes permanentes. Artículo IX Las reclamaciones de indemnización por daños serán presentadas al Estado de lanzamiento por vía diplomática. Cuando un Estado no mantenga relaciones diplomáticas con un Estado de lanzamiento, podrá pedir a otro Estado que presente su reclamación a ese Estado de lanzamiento o que de algún otro modo represente sus intereses conforme a este Convenio. También podrá presentar su reclamación por conducto del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, siempre que el Estado demandante y el Estado de lanzamiento sean ambos Miembros de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo X 1. La reclamación de la indemnización por daños podrá ser presentada a un Estado de lanzamiento a más tardar en el plazo de un año a contar de la fecha en que se produzcan los daños o en que se haya identificado al Estado de lanzamiento que sea responsable. 2. Sin embargo, si el Estado no ha tenido conocimiento de la producción de los daños o no ha podido identificar al Estado de lanzamiento, podrá presentar la reclamación en el plazo de un año a partir de la fecha en que lleguen su conocimiento tales hechos; no obstante, en ningún caso será ese plazo superior a un año a partir de la fecha en que se podría esperar razonablemente que el Estado hubiera llegado a tener conocimiento de los hechos mediante el ejercicio de la debida diligencia.-11 -3. Los plazos mencionados en los párrafos 1 y 2 de este artículo se aplicarán aun cuando no se conozca toda la magnitud de los daños. En este caso, no obstante, el Estado demandante tendrá derecho a revisar la reclamación y a presentar documentación adicional una vez expirado ese plazo, hasta un año después de conocida toda la magnitud de los daños. Artículo XI 1. Para presentar a un Estado de lanzamiento una reclamación de indemnización por daños al amparo del presente Convenio no será necesario haber agotado los recursos locales de que puedan disponer el Estado demandante o las personas físicas o morales que éste represente. 2. Nada de los dispuesto en este Convenio impedirá que un Estado o una persona física o moral a quien éste represente, hagan su reclamación ante los tribunales de justicia o ante los tribunales u órganos administrativos del Estado de lanzamiento. Un Estado no podrá, sin embargo, hacer reclamaciones al amparo del presente Convenio por los mismos daños respecto de los cuales se esté tramitando una reclamación ante los tribunales de justicia o ante los tribunales u órganos administrativos del Estado de lanzamiento, o con arreglo a cualquier otro acuerdo internacional que obligue a los Estados interesados. Artículo XII La indemnización que en virtud del presente Convenio estará obligado a pagar el Estado de lanzamiento por los daños causados se determinará conforme al derecho internacional y a los principios de justicia y equidad, a fin de reparar esos daños de manera tal que se reponga a la persona, física o moral, al Estado o a la organización internacional en cuyo nombre se presente la reclamación en la condición que habría existido de no haber ocurrido los daños. Artículo XIII A menos que el Estado demandante y el Estado que debe pagar la indemnización de conformidad con el presente Convenio acuerden otra forma de indemnización, ésta se pagará en la moneda del Estado demandante o, si ese Estado así lo pide, en la moneda del Estado que deba pagar la indemnización. Artículo XIV Si no se logra resolver una reclamación mediante negociaciones diplomáticas, conforme a lo previsto en el artículo IX, en el plazo de un año a partir de la fecha en que el Estado demandante haya notificado al Estado de lanzamiento que ha presentado la documentación relativa a su reclamación, las partes interesadas, a instancia de cualquiera de ellas, constituirán una Comisión de Reclamaciones. Artículo XV 1. La Comisión de Reclamaciones se compondrá de tres miembros: uno nombrado por el Estado demandante, otro nombrado por el Estado de lanzamiento y el tercer miembro, su Presidente, escogido conjuntamente por ambas partes. Cada una de las partes hará su nombramiento dentro de los dos meses siguientes a la petición de que se constituya la Comisión de Reclamaciones. 2. Si no se llega a un acuerdo con respecto a la selección del Presidente dentro de los cuatro meses siguientes a la petición de que se constituya la Comisión, cualquiera de las partes podrá pedir al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas que nombre al Presidente en un nuevo plazo de dos meses. Artículo XVI 1. Si una de las partes no procede al nombramiento que le corresponde dentro del plazo fijado, el Presidente, a petición de la otra parte, constituirá por sí solo la Comisión de Reclamaciones. 2. Toda vacante que por cualquier motivo se produzca en la Comisión se cubrirá con arreglo al mismo procedimiento adoptado para el primer nombramiento. 3. La Comisión determinará su propio procedimiento. 4. La Comisión determinará el lugar o los lugares en que ha de reunirse y resolverá todas las demás cuestiones administrativas. 5. Exceptuados los laudos y decisiones de la Comisión constituida por un solo miembro, todos los laudos y decisiones de la Comisión se adoptarán por mayoría de votos. Artículo XVII El número de miembros de la Comisión de Reclamaciones no aumentará cuando dos o más Estados demandantes o Estados de lanzamiento sean partes conjuntamente en unas mismas actuaciones ante la Comisión. Los Estados demandantes que actúen conjuntamente nombrarán colectivamente a un miembro de la Comisión en la misma forma y con sujeción a las mismas condiciones que cuando se trata de un solo Estado demandante. Cuando dos o más Estados de lanzamiento actúen conjuntamente, nombrarán colectivamente y en la misma forma a un miembro de la Comisión. Si los Estados demandantes o los Estados de lanzamiento no hacen el nombramiento dentro del plazo fijado, el Presidente constituirá por sí solo la Comisión.-12 -Artículo XVIII La Comisión de Reclamaciones decidirá los fundamentos de la reclamación de indemnización y determinará, en su caso, la cuantía de la indemnización pagadera. Artículo XIX 1. La Comisión de Reclamaciones actuará de conformidad con lo dispuesto en el artículo XII. 2. La decisión de la Comisión será firma y obligatoria si las partes así lo han convenido; en caso contrario, la Comisión formulará un laudo definitivo que tendrá carácter de recomendación y que las partes atenderán de buena fe. La Comisión expondrá los motivos de su decisión o laudo. 3. La Comisión dictará su decisión o laudo lo antes posible y a más tardar en el plazo de un año a partir de la fecha de su constitución, a menos que la Comisión considere necesario prorrogar ese plazo. 4. La Comisión publicará su decisión o laudo. Expedirá una copia certificada de su decisión o laudo a cada una de las partes y al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo XX Las costas relativas a la Comisión de Reclamaciones se dividirán por igual entre las partes, a menos que la Comisión decida otra cosa. Artículo XXI Si los daños causados por un objeto espacial constituyen un peligro, en gran escala, para las vidas humanas o comprometen seriamente las condiciones de vida de la población o el funcionamiento de los centros vitales, los Estados partes, y en particular el Estado de lanzamiento, estudiarán la posibilidad de proporcionar una asistencia apropiada y rápida al Estado que haya sufrido los daños, cuando éste así lo solicite. Sin embargo, lo dispuesto en este artículo no menoscabará los derechos ni las obligaciones de los Estados Partes en virtud del presente Convenio. Artículo XXII 1. En el presente Convenio, salvo los artículos XXIV a XXVII, se entenderá que las referencias que se hacen a los Estados se aplican a cualquier organización intergubernamental internacional que se dedique a actividades espaciales si ésta declara que acepta los derechos y obligaciones previstos en este Convenio y si una mayoría de sus Estados miembros son Estados Partes en este Convenio y en el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. 2. Los Estados miembros de tal organización que sean Estados Partes en el Convenio adoptarán las medidas adecuadas para lograr que la organización formule una declaración de conformidad con el párrafo procedente. 3. Si una organización intergubernamental internacional es responsable de daños en virtud de las disposiciones del presente Convenio, esa organización y sus miembros que sean Estados Partes en el Convenio serán mancomunada y solidariamente responsables, teniendo en cuenta sin embargo: a) Que la demanda de indemnización ha de presentarse en primer lugar contra la organización; b) Que sólo si la organización deja de pagar, dentro de un plazo de seis meses, la cantidad convenida o que se haya fijado como indemnización de los daños, podrá el Estado demandante invocar la responsabilidad de los miembros que sean Estados Partes en este Convenio a los fines del pago de esa cantidad. 4. Toda demanda de indemnización que, conforme a las disposiciones de este Convenio, se haga por daños causados a una organización que haya formulado una declaración en virtud del párrafo 1 de este artículo deberá ser presentada por un Estado miembro de la organización que sea Estado Parte en este Convenio. Artículo XXIII 1. Lo dispuesto en el presente Convenio no afectará a los demás acuerdos internacionales en vigor en las relaciones entre los Estados Partes en esos acuerdos. 2. Nada de los dispuesto en el presente Convenio podrá impedir que los Estados concierten acuerdos internacionales que confirmen, completen o desarrollen sus disposiciones.-13 -Artículo XXIV 1. El presente Convenio estará abierto a la firma de todos los Estados. El Estado que no firmare este Convenio antes de su entrada en vigor, de conformidad con el párrafo 3 de este artículo, podrá adherirse a él en cualquier momento. 2. El presente Convenio estará sujeto a ratificación por los Estados signatarios. Los instrumentos de ratificación y los instrumentos de adhesión serán entregados para su depósito a los Gobiernos de los Estados Unidos de América, el Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte y de la Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas, que por el presente quedan designados Gobiernos depositarios. 3. El presente Convenio entrará en vigor cuando se deposite el quinto instrumento de ratificación. 4. Para los Estados cuyos instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión se depositaren después de la entrada en vigor del presente Convenio, el Convenio entrará en vigor en la fecha del depósito de sus instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión. 5. Los Gobiernos depositarios informarán sin tardanza a todos los Estados signatarios y a todos los Estados que se hayan adherido a este Convenio, de la fecha de cada firma, de la fecha de depósito de cada instrumento de ratificación y de adhesión a este Convenio, de la fecha de su entrada en vigor y de cualquier otra notificación. 6. El presente convenio será registrado por los Gobiernos depositarios, de conformidad con el Artículo 102 de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo XXV Cualquier Estado Parte en el presente Convenio podrá proponer enmiendas al mismo. Las enmiendas entrarán en vigor para cada Estado Parte en el Convenio que las aceptare cuando éstas hayan sido aceptadas por la mayoría de los Estados Partes en el Convenio, y en lo sucesivo para cada Estado restante que sea Parte en el Convenio en la fecha en que las acepte. Artículo XXVI Diez años después de la entrada en vigor del presente Convenio, se incluirá en el programa provisional de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas la cuestión de un nuevo examen de este Convenio, a fin de estudiar, habida cuenta de la anterior aplicación del Convenio si es necesario revisarlo. No obstante, en cualquier momento una vez que el Convenio lleve cinco años en vigor, a petición de un tercio de los Estados Partes en este Convenio y con el asentimiento de la mayoría de ellos, habrá de reunirse una conferencia de los Estados Partes con miras a reexaminar este Convenio. Artículo XXVII Todo Estado Parte podrá comunicar su retiro del presente Convenio al cabo de un año de su entrada en vigor, mediante notificación por escrito dirigida a los Gobiernos depositarios. Tal retiro surtirá efecto un año después de la fecha en que se reciba la notificación. Artículo XXVIII El presente Convenio, cuyos textos en chino, español, francés, inglés y ruso son igualmente auténticos, se depositará en los archivos de los Gobiernos depositarios. Los Gobiernos depositarios remitirán copias debidamente certificadas de este Convenio a los gobiernos de los Estados signatarios y de los Estados que se adhieran al Convenio. EN TESTIMONIO DE LO CUAL, los infrascritos, debidamente autorizados al efecto, firman este Convenio. HECHO en tres ejemplares, en las ciudades de Londres, Moscú y Washington D.C., el día veintinueve de marzo de mil novecientos setenta y dos.2 Resolución 2345 (XXII) de la Asamblea General, anexo. 3 Resolución 2777 (XXVI) de la Asamblea General, anexo. -14 -Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre Los Estados Partes en el presente Convenio, Reconociendo el interés común de toda la humanidad en proseguir la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Recordando que en el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes1, de 27 de enero de 1967, se afirma que los Estados son internacionalmente responsables de las actividades nacionales que realicen en el espacio ultraterrestre y se hace referencia al Estado en cuyo registro se inscriba un objeto lanzado al espacio ultraterrestre, Recordando también que en el Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre2, de 22 de abril de 1968, se dispone que la autoridad de lanzamiento deberá facilitar, a quien lo solicite, datos de identificación antes de la restitución de un objeto que ha lanzado al espacio ultraterrestre y que se ha encontrado fuera de los límites territoriales de la autoridad de lanzamiento, Recordando además que en el Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales3, de 29 de marzo de 1972, se establecen normas y procedimientos internacionales relativos a la responsabilidad de los Estados de lanzamiento por los daños causados por sus objetos espaciales, Deseando, a la luz del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, adoptar disposiciones para el registro nacional por los Estados de lanzamiento de los objetos espaciales lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, Deseando asimismo que un registro central de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre sea establecido y llevado, con carácter obligatorio, por el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, Deseando también suministrar a los Estados Partes medios y procedimientos adicionales para ayudar a la identificación de los objetivos espaciales, Convencidos de que un sistema obligatorio de registro de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre ayudaría, en especial, a su identificación y contribuiría a la aplicación y el desarrollo del derecho internacional que rige la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, Han convenido en lo siguiente: Artículo I A los efectos del presente Convenio: a) Se entenderá por "Estado de lanzamiento": i) Un Estado que lance o promueva el lanzamiento de un objeto espacial; ii) Un Estado desde cuyo territorio o desde cuyas instalaciones se lance un objeto espacial. b) El término "objeto espacial" denotará las partes componentes de un objeto espacial, así como el vehículo propulsor y sus partes; c) Se entenderá por "Estado de registro" un Estado de lanzamiento en cuyo registro se inscriba un objeto espacial de conformidad con el artículo II. Artículo II 1. Cuando un objeto espacial sea lanzado en órbita terrestre o más allá, el Estado de lanzamiento registrará el objeto espacial por medio de su inscripción en un registro apropiado que llevará a tal efecto. Todo Estado de lanzamiento notificará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas la creación de dicho registro. 2. Cuando haya dos o más Estados de lanzamiento con respecto a cualquier objeto espacial lanzado en órbita terrestre o más allá, dichos Estados determinarán conjuntamente cuál de ellos inscribirá el objeto de conformidad con el párrafo 1 del presente artículo, teniendo presentes las disposiciones del artículo VIII del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y dejando a salvo los acuerdos apropiados que se hayan concertado o que hayan de concertarse entre los Estados de lanzamiento acerca de la jurisdicción y el control sobre el objeto espacial y sobre el personal del mismo. 3. El contenido de cada registro y las condiciones en las que éste se llevará serán determinados por el Estado de registro interesado.-15 -Artículo III 1. El Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas llevará un Registro en el que se inscribirá la información proporcionada de conformidad con el artículo IV. 2. El acceso a la información consignada en este Registro será pleno y libre. Artículo IV 1. Todo Estado de registro proporcionará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, en cuanto sea factible, la siguiente información sobre cada objeto espacial inscrito en su registro: a) Nombre del Estado o de los Estados de lanzamiento; b) Una designación apropiada del objeto espacial o su número de registro; c) Fecha y territorio o lugar del lanzamiento; d) Parámetros orbitales básicos, incluso: i) Período nodal; ii) Inclinación; iii) Apogeo; iv) Perigeo. e) Función general del objeto espacial. 2. Todo Estado de registro podrá proporcionar de tiempo en tiempo al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas información adicional relativa a un objeto espacial inscrito en su registro. 3. Todo Estado de registro notificará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, en la mayor medida posible y en cuanto sea factible, acerca de los objetos espaciales respecto de los cuales haya transmitido información previamente y que hayan estado pero que ya no estén en órbita terrestre. Artículo V Cuando un objeto espacial lanzado en órbita terrestre o más allá esté marcado con la designación o el número de registro a que se hace referencia en el apartado b) del párrafo 1 del artículo IV, o con ambos, el Estado de registro notificará este hecho al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas al presentar la información sobre el objeto espacial de conformidad con el artículo IV. En tal caso, el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas inscribirá esa notificación en el Registro. Artículo VI En caso de que la aplicación de las disposiciones del presente Convenio no haya permitido a un Estado Parte identificar un objeto espacial que haya causado daño a dicho Estado o a alguna de sus personas físicas o morales, o que pueda ser de carácter peligroso o nocivo, los otros Estados Partes, en especial los Estados que poseen instalaciones para la observación y el rastreo espaciales, responderán con la mayor amplitud posible a la solicitud formulada por ese Estado Parte, o transmitida por conducto del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas en su nombre, para obtener en condiciones equitativas y razonables asistencia para la identificación de tal objeto. Al formular esa solicitud, el Estado Parte suministrará información, en la mayor medida posible, acerca del momento, la naturaleza y las circunstancias de los hechos que den lugar a la solicitud. Los arreglos según los cuales se prestará tal asistencia serán objeto de acuerdo entre las partes interesadas. Artículo VII 1. En el presente Convenio, salvo los artículos VIII a XII inclusive, se entenderá que las referencias que se hacen a los Estados se aplican a cualquier organización intergubernamental internacional que se dedique a actividades espaciales si ésta declara que acepta los derechos y obligaciones previstos en este Convenio y si una mayoría de sus Estados miembros son Estados Partes en este Convenio y en el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. 2. Los Estados miembros de tal organización que sean Estados Partes en este Convenio adoptarán todas las medidas adecuadas para lograr que la organización formule una declaración de conformidad con el párrafo 1 de este artículo.-16 -Artículo VIII 1. El presente Convenio estará abierto a la firma de todos los Estados en la Sede de las Naciones Unidas, en Nueva York. Todo Estado que no firmare este Convenio antes de su entrada en vigor de conformidad con el párrafo 3 de este artículo podrá adherirse a él en cualquier momento. 2. El presente Convenio estará sujeto a ratificación por los Estados signatarios. Los instrumentos de ratificación y los instrumentos de adhesión serán depositados en poder del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. 3. El presente Convenio entrará en vigor entre los Estados que hayan depositado instrumentos de ratificación cuando se deposite en poder del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas el quinto instrumento de ratificación. 4. Para los Estados cuyos instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión se depositaren después de la entrada en vigor del presente Convenio, éste entrará en vigor en la fecha del depósito de sus instrumentos de ratificación o de adhesión. 5. El Secretario General informará sin tardanza a todos los Estados signatarios y a todos los Estados que se hayan adherido a este Convenio de la fecha de cada firma, la fecha de depósito de cada instrumento de ratificación de este Convenio y de adhesión a este Convenio, la fecha de su entrada en vigor y cualquier otra notificación. Artículo IX Cualquier Estado Parte en el presente Convenio podrá proponer enmiendas al mismo. Las enmiendas entrarán en vigor para cada Estado Parte en el Convenio que las acepte cuando hayan sido aceptadas por la mayoría de los Estados Partes en el Convenio y, en lo sucesivo, para cada uno de los restantes Estados que sea Parte en el Convenio en la fecha en que las acepte. Artículo X Diez años después de la entrada en vigor del presente Convenio, se incluirá en el programa provisional de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas la cuestión de un nuevo examen del Convenio, a fin de estudiar, habida cuenta de la anterior aplicación del Convenio, si es necesario revisarlo. No obstante, en cualquier momento una vez que el Convenio lleve cinco años en vigor, a petición de un tercio de los Estados Partes en el Convenio y con el asentimiento de la mayoría de ellos, habrá de reunirse una conferencia de los Estados Partes con miras a reexaminar este Convenio. Este nuevo examen tendrá en cuenta, en particular, todos los adelantos tecnológicos pertinentes, incluidos los relativos a la identificación de los objetos espaciales. Artículo XI Todo Estado Parte en el presente Convenio podrá comunicar su retiro del mismo al cabo de un año de su entrada en vigor, mediante notificación por escrito dirigida al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. Ese retiro surtirá efecto un año después de la fecha en que se reciba la notificación. Artículo XII El original del presente Convenio, cuyos textos en árabe, chino, español, francés, inglés y ruso son igualmente auténticos, se depositará en poder del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, quien remitirá copias certificadas del Convenio a todos los Estados signatarios y a los Estados que se adhieran a él. EN TESTIMONIO DE LO CUAL, los infrascritos, debidamente autorizados al efecto por sus respectivos gobiernos, han firmado el presente Convenio, abierto a la firma en Nueva York el día catorce de enero de mil novecientos setenta y cinco.4 Resolución 3235 (XXIX) de la Asamblea General, anexo. 5 Resolución 2625 (XXV), anexo. -17 -Acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes Los Estados Partes en el presente Acuerdo, Observando las realizaciones de los Estados en la exploración y utilización de la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, Reconociendo que la Luna, como satélite natural de la Tierra, desempeña un papel importante en la exploración del espacio ultraterrestre, Firmemente resueltos a favorecer, sobre la base de la igualdad, el desarrollo de la colaboración entre los Estados a los efectos de la exploración y utilización de la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, Deseando evitar que la Luna se convierta en zona de conflictos internacionales, Teniendo en cuenta los beneficios que se pueden derivar de la explotación de los recursos naturales de la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, Recordando el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes1, el Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre2, el Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales3 y el Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre4, Teniendo presente la necesidad de aplicar concretamente y desarrollar, en lo concerniente a la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, las disposiciones de esos instrumentos internacionales, habida cuenta de los futuros progresos en la exploración y utilización del espacio, Han convenido en lo siguiente: Artículo 1 1. Las disposiciones del presente Acuerdo relativas a la Luna se aplicarán también a otros cuerpos celestes del sistema solar distintos de la Tierra, excepto en los casos en que con respecto a alguno de esos cuerpos celestes entren en vigor normas jurídicas específicas. 2. Para los fines del presente Acuerdo, las referencias a la Luna incluirán las órbitas alrededor de la Luna u otras trayectorias dirigidas hacia ella o que la rodean. 3. El presente Acuerdo no se aplica a las materias extraterrestres que llegan a la superficie de la Tierra por medios naturales. Artículo 2 Todas las actividades que se desarrollen en la Luna, incluso su exploración y utilización, se realizarán de conformidad con el derecho internacional, en especial la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, y teniendo en cuenta la Declaración sobre los principios de derecho internacional referentes a las relaciones de amistad y a la cooperación entre los Estados de conformidad con la Carta de las Naciones Unidas5, aprobada por la Asamblea General el 24 de octubre de 1970, en interés del mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y del fomento de la cooperación internacional y la comprensión recíproca, y prestando la consideración debida a los respectivos intereses de todos los otros Estados Partes. Artículo 3 1. Todos los Estados Partes utilizarán la Luna exclusivamente con fines pacíficos. 2. Se prohíbe recurrir a la amenaza o al uso de la fuerza, así como a otros actos hostiles o a la amenaza de estos actos, en la Luna. Se prohíbe también utilizar la Luna para cometer tales actos o para hacer tales amenazas con respecto a la Tierra, a la Luna, a naves espaciales, a tripulaciones de naves espaciales o a objetos espaciales artificiales. 3. Los Estados Partes no pondrán en órbita alrededor de la Luna, ni en otra trayectoria hacia la Luna o alrededor de ella, objetos portadores de armas nucleares o de cualquier otro tipo de armas de destrucción en masa, ni colocarán o emplearán esas armas sobre o en la Luna. 4. Queda prohibido establecer bases, instalaciones y fortificaciones militares, efectuar ensayos de cualquier tipo de armas y realizar maniobras militares en la Luna. No se prohíbe la utilización de personal militar para investigaciones científicas ni para cualquier otro fin pacífico. Tampoco se prohíbe la utilización de cualesquier equipo o material necesarios para la exploración y utilización de la Luna con fines pacíficos.-18 -Artículo 4 1. La exploración y utilización de la Luna incumbirán a toda la humanidad y se efectuarán en provecho y en interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico. Se tendrán debidamente en cuenta los intereses de las generaciones actuales y venideras, así como la necesidad de promover niveles de vida más altos y mejores condiciones de progreso y desarrollo económico y social de conformidad con la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. 2. En todas sus actividades relativas a la exploración y utilización de la Luna, los Estados Partes se guiarán por el principio de la cooperación y la asistencia mutua. La cooperación internacional conforme al presente Acuerdo deberá ser lo más amplia posible y podrá llevarse a cabo sobre una base multilateral o bilateral o por conducto de organizaciones internacionales intergubernamentales. Artículo 5 1. Los Estados Partes informarán al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, en toda la medida de lo posible y practicable, de sus actividades relativas a la exploración y utilización de la Luna. Se proporcionará respecto de cada misión a la Luna, a la mayor brevedad posible después del lanzamiento, información sobre la fecha, los objetivos, las localizaciones, los parámetros orbitales y la duración de la misión, en tanto que, después de terminada cada misión, se proporcionará información sobre sus resultados, incluidos los resultados científicos. En cada misión que dure más de sesenta días, se facilitará periódicamente, a intervalos de treinta días, información sobre el desarrollo de la misión, incluidos cualesquiera resultados científicos. En las misiones que duren más de seis meses, sólo será necesario comunicar ulteriormente las adiciones a tal información que sean significativas. 2. Todo Estado Parte que tenga noticia de que otro Estado Parte proyecta operar simultáneamente en la misma zona de la Luna, o en la misma órbita alrededor de la Luna, o en la misma trayectoria hacia la Luna o alrededor de ella, comunicará sin demora al otro Estado las fechas y los planes de sus propias operaciones. 3. Al desarrollar actividades con arreglo al presente Acuerdo, los Estados Partes informarán prontamente al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, de cualquier fenómeno que descubran en el espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna, que pueda poner en peligro la vida o la salud humanas, así como de cualquier indicio de vida orgánica. Artículo 6 1. La investigación científica en la Luna será libre para todos los Estados Partes, sin discriminación de ninguna clase, sobre la base de la igualdad y de conformidad con el derecho internacional. 2. Al realizar investigaciones científicas con arreglo a las disposiciones del presente Acuerdo, los Estados Partes tendrán derecho a recoger y extraer de la Luna muestras de sus minerales y otras sustancias. Esas muestras permanecerán a disposición de los Estados Partes que las hayan hecho recoger y éstos podrán utilizarlas con fines científicos. Los Estados Partes tendrán en cuenta la conveniencia de poner parte de esas muestras a disposición de otros Estados Partes interesados y de la comunidad científica internacional para la investigación científica. Durante las investigaciones científicas, los Estados Partes también podrán utilizar los minerales y otras sustancias de la Luna en cantidades adecuadas para el apoyo de sus misiones. 3. Los Estados Partes están de acuerdo en que conviene intercambiar personal científico y de otra índole, en toda la medida de lo posible y practicable, en las expediciones a la Luna o en las instalaciones allí situadas. Artículo 7 1. Al explorar y utilizar la Luna, los Estados Partes tomarán medidas para que no se perturbe el actual equilibrio de su medio, ya por la introducción de modificaciones nocivas en ese medio, ya por su contaminación perjudicial con sustancias ajenas al medio, ya de cualquier otro modo. Los Estados Partes tomarán también medidas para no perjudicar el medio de la Tierra por la introducción de sustancias extraterrestres o de cualquier otro modo. 2. Los Estados Partes informarán al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas de las medidas que estén adoptando de conformidad con el párrafo 1 del presente artículo y también, en la mayor medida viable, le notificarán por anticipado todos los emplazamientos que hagan de materiales radiactivos en la Luna y los fines de dichos emplazamientos. 3. Los Estados Partes informarán a los demás Estados Partes y al Secretario General acerca de las zonas de la Luna que tengan especial interés científico, a fin de que, sin perjuicio de los derechos de los demás Estados Partes, se considere la posibilidad de declarar esas zonas reservas científicas internacionales para las que han de concertarse acuerdos de protección especiales, en consulta con los órganos competentes de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo 8 1. Los Estados Partes podrán desarrollar sus actividades de exploración y utilización de la Luna en cualquier punto de su superficie o bajo su superficie, sin perjuicio de las demás estipulaciones del presente Acuerdo. 2. A esos fines, los Estados Partes podrán, especialmente: a) Hacer aterrizar sus objetos espaciales en la Luna y proceder a su lanzamiento desde la Luna;-19 -b) Instalar su personal y colocar sus vehículos espaciales, su equipo, su material, sus estaciones y sus instalaciones en cualquier punto de la superficie o bajo la superficie de la Luna. El personal, los vehículos espaciales, el equipo, el material, las estaciones y las instalaciones podrán moverse o ser desplazadas libremente sobre o bajo la superficie de la Luna. 3. Las actividades desarrolladas por los Estados Partes de conformidad con las disposiciones de los párrafos 1 y 2 del presente artículo no deberán entorpecer las actividades desarrolladas en la Luna por otros Estados Partes. En caso de que pudieran constituir un obstáculo, los Estados Partes interesados celebrarán consultas de conformidad con los párrafos 2 y 3 del artículo 15 del presente Acuerdo. Artículo 9 1. Los Estados Partes podrán establecer en la Luna estaciones habitadas o inhabitadas. El Estado Parte que establezca una estación utilizará únicamente el área que sea precisa para las necesidades de la estación y notificará inmediatamente al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas el emplazamiento y objeto de tal estación. Ulteriormente, cada año, dicho Estado notificará asimismo al Secretario General si la estación se sigue utilizando y si se ha modificado su objeto. 2. Las estaciones deberán estar dispuestas de modo que no entorpezcan el libre acceso a todas las zonas de la Luna del personal, los vehículos y el equipo de otros Estados Partes que desarrollan actividades en la Luna de conformidad con lo dispuesto en el presente Acuerdo o en el artículo I del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Artículo 10 1. Los Estados Partes adoptarán todas las medidas practicables para proteger la vida y la salud de las personas que se encuentren en la Luna. A tal efecto, considerarán a toda persona que se encuentre en la Luna como un astronauta en el sentido del artículo V del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y como un miembro de la tripulación de una nave espacial en el sentido del Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre. 2. Los Estados Partes ofrecerán refugio en sus estaciones, instalaciones, vehículos o equipo a las personas que se encuentren en peligro en la Luna. Artículo 11 1. La Luna y sus recursos naturales son patrimonio común de la humanidad conforme a lo enunciado en las disposiciones del presente Acuerdo y en particular en el párrafo 5 del presente artículo. 2. La Luna no puede ser objeto de apropiación nacional mediante reclamaciones de soberanía, por medio del uso o la ocupación, ni por ningún otro medio. 3. Ni la superficie ni la subsuperficie de la Luna, ni ninguna de sus partes o recursos naturales podrán ser propiedad de ningún Estado, organización internacional intergubernamental o no gubernamental, organización nacional o entidad no gubernamental ni de ninguna persona física. El emplazamiento de personal, vehículos espaciales, equipo, material, estaciones e instalaciones sobre o bajo la superficie de la Luna, incluidas las estructuras unidas a su superficie o la subsuperficie, no creará derechos de propiedad sobre la superficie o la subsuperficie de la Luna o parte alguna de ellas. Las disposiciones precedentes no afectan al régimen internacional a que se hace referencia en el párrafo 5 del presente artículo. 4. Los Estados Partes tienen derecho a explorar y utilizar la Luna sin discriminación de ninguna clase, sobre una base de igualdad y de conformidad con el derecho internacional y las condiciones estipuladas en el presente Acuerdo. 5. Los Estados Partes en el presente Acuerdo se comprometen a establecer un régimen internacional, incluidos los procedimientos apropiados, que rija la explotación de los recursos naturales de la Luna, cuando esa explotación esté a punto de llegar a ser viable. Esta disposición se aplicará de conformidad con el artículo 18 del presente Acuerdo. 6. A fin de facilitar el establecimiento del régimen internacional a que se hace referencia en el párrafo 5 del presente artículo, los Estados Partes informarán al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas así como al público y a la comunidad científica internacional, en la forma más amplia posible y viable, sobre los recursos naturales que descubran en la Luna. 7. Entre las principales finalidades del régimen internacional que se ha de establecer figurarán: a) El desarrollo ordenado y seguro de los recursos naturales de la Luna; b) La ordenación racional de esos recursos; c) La ampliación de las oportunidades para el uso de esos recursos; d) Una participación equitativa de todos los Estados Partes en los beneficios obtenidos de esos recursos, teniéndose especialmente en cuenta los intereses y necesidades de los países en desarrollo, así como los esfuerzos de los países que hayan contribuido directa o indirectamente a la explotación de la Luna. 8. Todas las actividades referentes a los recursos naturales de la Luna se realizarán en forma compatible con las finalidades especificadas en el párrafo 7 del presente artículo y con las disposiciones del párrafo 2 del artículo 6 del presente Acuerdo.-20 -Artículo 12 1. Los Estados Partes retendrán la jurisdicción y el control sobre el personal, los vehículos, el equipo, el material, las estaciones y las instalaciones de su pertenencia que se encuentren en la Luna. El derecho de propiedad de los vehículos espaciales, el equipo, el material, las estaciones y las instalaciones no resultará afectado por el hecho de que se hallen en la Luna. 2. Cuando esos vehículos, instalaciones y equipo o sus partes componentes sean hallados fuera del lugar para el que estaban destinados, se les aplicará el artículo 5 del Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre. 3. En caso de emergencia con peligro para la vida humana, los Estados Partes podrán utilizar el equipo, los vehículos, las instalaciones, el material o los suministros de otros Estados Partes en la Luna. Se notificará prontamente tal utilización al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas o al Estado Parte interesado. Artículo 13 El Estado Parte que compruebe que un objeto espacial no lanzado por él o sus partes componentes, han aterrizado en la Luna a causa de una avería o han hecho en ella un aterrizaje forzoso o involuntario informará sin demora al Estado Parte que haya efectuado el lanzamiento y al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. Artículo 14 1. Los Estados Partes en el presente Acuerdo serán responsables internacionalmente de las actividades nacionales que realicen en la Luna los organismos gubernamentales o las entidades no gubernamentales, y deberán asegurar que dichas actividades se efectúen en conformidad con las disposiciones del presente Acuerdo. Los Estados Partes se asegurarán de que las entidades no gubernamentales que se hallen bajo su jurisdicción sólo emprendan actividades en la Luna con la autorización y bajo la constante fiscalización del pertinente Estado Parte. 2. Los Estados Partes reconocen que, además de las disposiciones del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales, puede ser necesario hacer arreglos detallados sobre la responsabilidad por daños causados en la Luna como consecuencia de actividades más extensas en la Luna. Esos arreglos se elaborarán de conformidad con el procedimiento estipulado en el artículo 18 del presente Acuerdo. Artículo 15 1. Todo Estado Parte podrá asegurarse de que las actividades de los otros Estados Partes en la exploración y utilización de la Luna son compatibles con las disposiciones del presente Acuerdo. Con este fin, todos los vehículos espaciales, el equipo, el material, las estaciones y las instalaciones que se encuentren en la Luna serán accesibles a los otros Estados Partes. Dichos Estados Partes notificarán con antelación razonable su intención de hacer una visita, con objeto de que sea posible celebrar las consultas que procedan y adoptar un máximo de precauciones para velar por la seguridad y evitar toda perturbación del funcionamiento normal de la instalación visitada. A los efectos del presente artículo, todo Estado Parte podrá utilizar sus propios medios o podrá actuar con asistencia total o parcial de cualquier otro Estado Parte, o mediante procedimientos internacionales apropiados, dentro del marco de las Naciones Unidas y de conformidad con la Carta. 2. Todo Estado Parte que tenga motivos para creer que otro Estado Parte no cumple las disposiciones que le corresponden con arreglo al presente Acuerdo o que otro Estado Parte vulnera los derechos del primer Estado con arreglo al presente Acuerdo podrá solicitar la celebración de consultas con ese Estado Parte. El Estado Parte que reciba dicha solicitud procederá sin demora a celebrar esas consultas. Todos los Estados Partes que participen en las consultas tratarán de lograr una solución mutuamente aceptable de la controversia y tendrán presentes los derechos e intereses de todos los Estados Partes. El Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas será informado de los resultados de las consultas y transmitirá la información recibida a todos los Estados Partes interesados. 3. Cuando las consultas no permitan llegar a una solución que sea mutuamente aceptable y respete los derechos e intereses de todos los Estados Partes, las partes interesadas tomarán todas las medidas necesarias para resolver la controversia por otros medios pacíficos de su elección adecuados a las circunstancias y a la naturaleza de la controversia. Cuando surjan dificultades en relación con la iniciación de consultas o cuando las consultas no permitan llegar a una solución mutuamente aceptable, todo Estado Parte podrá solicitar la asistencia del Secretario General, sin pedir el consentimiento de ningún otro Estado Parte interesado, para resolver la controversia. El Estado Parte que no mantenga relaciones diplomáticas con otro Estado Parte interesado participará en esas consultas, según prefiera, por sí mismo o por mediación de otro Estado Parte o del Secretario General. Artículo 16 A excepción de los artículos 17 a 21, se entenderá que las referencias que se hagan en el presente Acuerdo a los Estados se aplican a cualquier organización internacional intergubernamental que realice actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, siempre que tal organización declare que acepta los derechos y obligaciones estipulados en el presente Acuerdo y que la mayoría de los Estados miembros de la organización sean Estados Partes en el presente Acuerdo y en el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Los Estados miembros de cualquiera de tales organizaciones que sean Estados Partes en el presente Acuerdo adoptarán todas las medidas pertinentes para que la organización haga una declaración de conformidad con lo que antecede.-21 -Artículo 17 Todo Estado Parte en el presente Acuerdo podrá proponer enmiendas al mismo. Las enmiendas entrarán en vigor para cada Estado Parte en el Acuerdo que las acepte cuando éstas hayan sido aceptadas por la mayoría de los Estados Partes en el Acuerdo y, en lo sucesivo, para cada Estado restante que sea Parte en el Acuerdo en la fecha en que las acepte. Artículo 18 Cuando hayan transcurrido diez años desde la entrada en vigor del presente Acuerdo, se incluirá la cuestión de su reexamen en el programa provisional de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas a fin de considerar, a la luz de cómo se haya aplicado hasta entonces, si es preciso proceder a su revisión. Sin embargo, en cualquier momento, una vez que el presente Acuerdo lleve cinco años en vigor, el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, en su calidad de depositario, convocará, a petición de un tercio de los Estados Partes en el Acuerdo y con el asentimiento de la mayoría de ellos, una conferencia de los Estados Partes para reexaminar el Acuerdo. La conferencia encargada de reexaminarlo estudiará asimismo la cuestión de la aplicación de las disposiciones del párrafo 5 del artículo 11, sobre la base del principio a que se hace referencia en el párrafo 1 de ese artículo y teniendo en cuenta en particular los adelantos tecnológicos que sean pertinentes. Artículo 19 1. El presente Acuerdo estará abierto a la firma de todos los Estados en la Sede de las Naciones Unidas en Nueva York. 2. El presente Acuerdo estará sujeto a ratificación, aprobación o aceptación por los Estados signatarios. Los Estados que no firmen el presente Acuerdo antes de su entrada en vigor de conformidad con el párrafo 3 del presente artículo podrán adherirse a él en cualquier momento. Los instrumentos de ratificación, aprobación, aceptación o adhesión se depositarán ante el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. 3. El presente Acuerdo entrará en vigor a los treinta días de la fecha de depósito del quinto instrumento de ratificación, aprobación o aceptación. 4. Para cada uno de los Estados cuyos instrumentos de ratificación, aprobación, aceptación o adhesión se depositen después de la entrada en vigor del presente Acuerdo, éste entrará en vigor a los treinta días de la fecha del depósito del instrumento respectivo. 5. El Secretario General informará sin tardanza a todos los Estados signatarios y a todos los Estados que se hayan adherido al presente Acuerdo de la fecha de cada firma, de la fecha de depósito de cada instrumento de ratificación, aprobación, aceptación o adhesión al Acuerdo, de la fecha de su entrada en vigor y de cualquier otra notificación. Artículo 20 Todo Estado Parte en el presente Acuerdo podrá comunicar su retiro del Acuerdo al cabo de un año de su entrada en vigor, mediante notificación por escrito dirigida al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. Tal retiro surtirá efecto un año después de la fecha en que se reciba la notificación. Artículo 21 El original del presente Acuerdo, cuyos textos en árabe, chino, español, francés, inglés y ruso son igualmente auténticos, se depositará ante el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, que remitirá copias debidamente certificadas del mismo a los gobiernos de los Estados signatarios y de los Estados que se adhieran al Acuerdo. EN TESTIMONIO DE LO CUAL, los infrascritos, debidamente autorizados por sus respectivos gobiernos, firman este Acuerdo, abierto a la firma en Nueva York, el día dieciocho de diciembre de mil novecientos setenta y nueve.-22 -II. Principios aprobados por la Asamblea General Declaración de los principios jurídicos que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre La Asamblea General, Inspirándose en las grandes posibilidades que ofrece a la humanidad la entrada del hombre en el espacio ultraterrestre, Reconociendo el interés general de toda la humanidad en el progreso de la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Estimando que el espacio ultraterrestre debe explorarse y utilizarse en bien de la humanidad y en provecho de los Estados, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, Deseando contribuir a una amplia cooperación internacional en lo que se refiere a los aspectos científicos y jurídicos de la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Estimando que tal colaboración contribuirá al desarrollo de la comprensión mutua y al afianzamiento de las relaciones amistosas entre los Estados y los pueblos, Recordando su resolución 110 (II) de 3 de noviembre de 1947, por la que condenó toda propaganda destinada a provocar o alentar, o susceptible de provocar o alentar, cualquier amenaza a la paz, quebrantamiento de la paz o acto de agresión, y considerando que la citada resolución es aplicable al espacio ultraterrestre, Teniendo en cuenta sus resoluciones 1721 (XVI) y 1802 (XVII) de 20 de diciembre de 1961 y 14 de diciembre de 1962, aprobadas unánimemente por los Estados Miembros de las Naciones Unidas, Declara solemnemente que en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre los Estados deben guiarse por los principios siguientes: 1. La exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre deberán hacerse en provecho y en interés de toda la humanidad. 2. El espacio ultraterrestre y los cuerpos celestes podrán se libremente explorados y utilizados por todos los Estados en condiciones de igualdad y en conformidad con el derecho internacional. 3. El espacio ultraterrestre y los cuerpos celestes no podrán ser objeto de apropiación nacional mediante reivindicación de soberanía, mediante el uso y la ocupación, ni de ninguna otra manera. 4. Las actividades de los Estados en materia de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre deberán realizarse de conformidad con el derecho internacional, incluida la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, en interés del mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales y del fomento de la cooperación y la comprensión internacionales. 5. Los Estados serán responsables internacionalmente de las actividades nacionales que realicen en el espacio ultraterrestre los organismos gubernamentales o las entidades no gubernamentales, así como de asegurar la observancia, en la ejecución de esas actividades nacionales, de los principios enunciados en la presente Declaración. Las actividades de entidades no gubernamentales en el espacio ultraterrestre deberán ser autorizadas y vigiladas constantemente por el Estado interesado. Cuando se trate de actividades que realice en el espacio ultraterrestre una organización internacional, la responsabilidad en cuanto a la aplicación de los principios proclamados en la presente Declaración corresponderá a esa organización internacional y a los Estados que forman parte de ella. 6. En la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, los Estados se guiarán por el principio de la cooperación y la asistencia mutua y en todas sus actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre deberán tener debidamente en cuenta los intereses correspondientes de los demás Estados. Si un Estado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, proyectado por él o por sus nacionales, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades de otros Estados en materia de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, celebrará las consultas internacionales oportunas antes de emprender esa actividad o ese experimento. Si un Estado tiene motivos para creer que una actividad o un experimento en el espacio ultraterrestre, proyectado por otro Estado, crearía un obstáculo capaz de perjudicar las actividades en materia de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, podrá pedir que se celebren consultas sobre esa actividad o ese experimento. 7. En el Estado en cuyo registro figure el objeto lanzado al espacio ultraterrestre retendrá su jurisdicción y control sobre tal objeto, así como sobre todo el personal que vaya en él, mientras se encuentre en el espacio ultraterrestre. La propiedad de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre y de sus partes componentes no se modificará con motivo de su paso por el espacio ultraterrestre ni de su regreso a la tierra. Cuando esos objetos o esas partes componentes sean hallados fuera de los límites del Estado en cuyo registro figuren, se devolverán a ese Estado, que deberá proporcionar, antes de que se efectúe la devolución, los datos de identificación que en su caso se soliciten. 8. Todo Estado que lance u ocasione el lanzamiento de un objeto al espacio ultraterrestre, y todo Estado desde cuyo territorio o cuyas instalaciones se lance un objeto, serán responsables internacionalmente de los daños causados a otro Estado extranjero o a sus personas naturales o jurídicas por dicho objeto o sus partes componentes en tierra, en el espacio aéreo o en el espacio ultraterrestre. 9. Los Estados considerarán a todos los astronautas como enviados de la humanidad en el espacio ultraterrestre, y les prestarán toda la ayuda posible en caso de accidente, peligro o aterrizaje forzoso en el territorio de un Estado extranjero o en alta mar. Los astronautas que hagan dicho aterrizaje serán devueltos por medio seguro y sin tardanza al Estado de registro de su vehículo espacial.-23 -Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión La Asamblea General, Recordando su resolución 2916 (XXVII) de 9 de noviembre de 1972, en la que destacó la necesidad de elaborar los principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión, y teniendo presente la importancia de concertar un acuerdo o acuerdos internacionales, Recordando además sus resoluciones 3182 (XXVIII) de 18 de diciembre de 1973, 3234 (XXIX) de 12 de noviembre de 1974, 3388 (XXX) de 18 de noviembre de 1975, 31/8 de 8 de noviembre de 1976, 21/196 de 20 de diciembre de 1977, 33/16 de 10 de noviembre de 1978, 34/66 de 5 de diciembre de 1979 y 35/14 de 3 de noviembre de 1980, así como su resolución 36/35 de 18 de noviembre de 1981, en la que decidió considerar, en su trigésimo séptimo período de sesiones, la aprobación por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión, Tomando nota con reconocimiento de los esfuerzos realizados en la Comisión sobre la utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos y su Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos para aplicar las directrices formuladas en las resoluciones mencionadas, Teniendo en cuenta que se han llevado a cabo diversos experimentos de transmisión directa mediante satélites y que en algunos países se hallan en condiciones de entrar en funcionamiento varios sistemas de transmisión directa mediante satélite que pueden ser comercializados en el futuro inmediato, Tomando en consideración que el funcionamiento de satélites internacionales de transmisión directa tendrá importantes consecuencias políticas, económicas, sociales y culturales internacionales, Estimando que el establecimiento de principios para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión contribuirá al fortalecimiento de la cooperación internacional en esta esfera y a promover los propósitos y principios de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, Aprueba los Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión, enunciados en el anexo de la presente resolución. Anexo Principios que han de regir la utilización por los Estados de satélites artificiales de la Tierra para las transmisiones internacionales directas por televisión A. Propósitos y objetivos 1. Las actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites deberán realizarse de manera compatible con los derechos soberanos de los Estados, inclusive el principio de la no intervención, así como con el derecho de toda persona a investigar, recibir y difundir información e ideas, consagrados en los instrumentos pertinentes de las Naciones Unidas. 2. Esas actividades deberán promover la libre difusión y el intercambio mutuo de información y conocimientos en las esferas de la cultura y de la ciencia, contribuir al desarrollo educativo, social y económico, especialmente de los países en desarrollo, elevar la calidad de la vida de todos los pueblos y proporcionar esparcimiento con el debido respeto a la integridad política y cultural de los Estados. 3. Estas actividades deberán desarrollarse de manera compatible con el fomento del entendimiento mutuo y el fortalecimiento de las relaciones de amistad y cooperación entre todos los Estados y pueblos con miras al mantenimiento de la paz y la seguridad internacionales. B. Aplicabilidad del derecho internacional 4. Las actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites deberán realizarse de conformidad con el derecho internacional, incluidos la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes1, de 27 de enero de 1967, las disposiciones pertinentes del Convenio Internacional de Telecomunicaciones y su reglamento de radiocomunicaciones y los instrumentos internacionales relativos a las relaciones de amistad y a la cooperación entre los Estados y a los derechos humanos. C. Derechos y beneficios 5. todo Estado tiene igual derecho a realizar actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites y a autorizar esas actividades por parte de personas naturales y jurídicas bajo su jurisdicción. Todos los Estados y pueblos tienen derecho a gozar y deberán gozar de los beneficios de esas actividades. Todos los Estados, sin discriminación, deberán tener acceso a la tecnología en ese campo en condiciones mutuamente convenidas por todas las partes interesadas.-24 -D. Cooperación internacional 6. Las actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites deberán estar basadas en la cooperación internacional y fomentarla. Esta cooperación deberá ser objeto de acuerdos apropiados. Deberán tenerse especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo en la utilización de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites para acelerar su desarrollo nacional. E. Arreglo pacífico de controversias 7. Toda controversia internacional que pueda derivarse de las actividades a que se refieren estos principios deberá resolverse mediante los procedimientos que para el arreglo pacífico de las controversias hayan establecido, de común acuerdo, las partes en la controversia, de conformidad con las disposiciones de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. F. Responsabilidad de los Estados 8. Los Estados deberán ser internacionalmente responsables de las actividades emprendidas en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites que lleven a cabo o que se realicen bajo su jurisdicción, y de la conformidad de cualesquiera de esas actividades con los principios enunciados en el presente documento. 9. Cuando las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites sean efectuadas por una organización internacional intergubernamental, la responsabilidad mencionada en el párrafo 8 supra deberá recaer sobre dicha organización y sobre los Estados que participen en ella. G. Derecho y deber de consulta 10. Todo Estado transmisor o receptor, perteneciente a un servicio de transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites establecido entre Estados, celebrará con prontitud, a solicitud de cualquier otro Estado transmisor o receptor perteneciente al mismo servicio, consultas con el Estado solicitante acerca de sus actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites, sin perjuicio de otras consultas que estos Estados puedan celebrar sobre este tema con cualquier otro Estado. H. Derechos de autor y derechos conexos 11. Sin perjuicio de las disposiciones pertinentes del derecho internacional, los Estados deberán cooperar bilateral y multilateralmente para velar por la protección de los derechos de autor y derechos conexos mediante la concertación de acuerdos apropiados entre los Estados interesados o las personas jurídicas competentes que actúen bajo su jurisdicción. En esta cooperación deberán tener especialmente en cuenta los intereses de los países en desarrollo en la utilización de las transmisiones directas de televisión para acelerar su desarrollo nacional. I. Notificación a las Naciones Unidas 12. A fin de promover la cooperación internacional en la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, los Estados que realicen o autoricen actividades en el campo de las transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites deberán informar en la mayor medida posible al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas acerca de la índole de dichas actividades. Al recibir esa información, el Secretario General deberá darle difusión inmediata y eficaz, transmitiéndola a los organismos especializados competentes, a la comunidad científica internacional y al público en general. J. Consultas y acuerdos entre los Estados 13. Un Estado que se proponga establecer un servicio de transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites, o autorizar su establecimiento, notificará sin demora su intención al Estado o a los Estados receptores e iniciará prontamente consultas con cualquiera de los Estados que lo solicite. 14. Sólo se establecerá un servicio de transmisiones internacionales directas de televisión mediante satélites tras haberse cumplido las condiciones enunciadas en el párrafo 13 supra, y sobre la base de los acuerdos y/o arreglos previstos en los instrumentos pertinentes de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones y de conformidad con estos principios. 15. Por lo que respecta al desbordamiento inevitable de la irradiación de la señal del satélite, se aplicarán exclusivamente los instrumentos pertinentes de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones.6 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, cuadragésimo primer período de sesiones, Suplemento Nº 20 (A/41/20 y Corr.1). -25 -Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio La Asamblea General, Recordando su resolución 3234 (XXIX) de 12 de noviembre de 1974, en la que pedía a la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos y a su Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos que examinaran la cuestión de las consecuencias jurídicas de la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio, así como sus resoluciones 3388 (XXX) de 18 de noviembre de 1975, 31/8 de 8 de noviembre de 1976, 32/196 A de 20 de diciembre de 1977, 33/16 de 10 de noviembre de 1978, 34/66 de 5 de diciembre de 1979, 35/14 de 3 de noviembre de 1980, 36/35 de 18 de noviembre de 1981, 37/89 de 10 de diciembre de 1982, 38/80 de 15 de diciembre de 1983, 39/96 de 14 de diciembre de 1984 y 40/162 de 16 de diciembre de 1985, en las que pedía un examen pormenorizado de las consecuencias jurídicas de la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio, con el objeto de formular proyectos de principios relativos a la teleobservación, Habiendo examinado el informe de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos sobre la labor realizada en su 29º período de sesiones6 y el texto del proyecto de principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio que figura como anexo al mismo, Tomando nota con satisfacción de que la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, sobre la base de las deliberaciones de su Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos, ha hecho suyo el texto del proyecto de principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio, Estimando que la aprobación de los principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio contribuirá al fortalecimiento de la cooperación internacional en esa esfera, Aprueba los Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio que figuran en el anexo a la presente resolución. Anexo Principios relativos a la teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio Principio I A los efectos de los presentes principios sobre las actividades de teleobservación: a) Por "teleobservación" se entiende la observación de la superficie terrestre desde el espacio, utilizando las propiedades de las ondas electromagnéticas emitidas, reflejadas o difractadas por los objetos observados, para fines de mejoramiento de la ordenación de los recursos naturales, de utilización de tierras y de protección del medio ambiente; b) Por "datos primarios" se entiende los datos brutos recogidos mediante equipos de teleobservación transportados en un objeto espacial y que se transmiten o se hacen llegar al suelo desde el espacio por telemetría, en forma de señales electromagnéticas, mediante película fotográfica, cinta magnética, o por cualquier otro medio; c) Por "datos elaborados" se entiende los productos resultantes de la elaboración de los datos primarios necesaria para hacer utilizables esos datos; d) Por "información analizada" se entiende la información resultante de la interpretación de los datos elaborados, otros datos básicos e información procedente de otras fuentes; e) Por "actividades de teleobservación" se entiende la explotación de sistemas espaciales de teleobservación, de estaciones de recepción y archivo de datos primarios y las actividades de elaboración, interpretación y difusión de datos elaborados. Principio II Las actividades de teleobservación se realizarán en provecho e interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico, social o científico y tecnológico y teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo. Principio III Las actividades de teleobservación se realizarán de conformidad con el derecho internacional, inclusive la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes1, y los instrumentos pertinentes de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones.-26 -Principio IV Las actividades de teleobservación se realizarán de conformidad con los principios contenidos en el artículo I del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, en el cual se dispone en particular que la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre deberán hacerse en provecho y en interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, y se establece el principio de que el espacio ultraterrestre estará abierto para su exploración y utilización en condiciones de igualdad. Estas actividades se realizarán sobre la base del respeto del principio de la soberanía plena y permanente de todos los Estados y pueblos sobre su propia riqueza y sus propios recursos naturales, teniendo debidamente en cuenta los derechos e intereses, conforme al derecho internacional, de otros Estados y entidades bajo la jurisdicción de éstos. Tales actividades no deberán realizarse en forma perjudicial para los legítimos derechos e intereses del Estado observado. Principio V Los Estados que realicen actividades de teleobservación promoverán la cooperación internacional en esas actividades. Con tal fin, esos Estados darán a otros Estados oportunidades de participar en esas actividades. Esa participación se basará en cada caso en condiciones equitativas y mutuamente aceptables. Principio VI Para obtener el máximo de beneficios de las actividades de teleobservación, se alienta a los Estados a que, por medio de acuerdos u otros arreglos, establezcan y exploten estaciones de recepción y archivo de datos e instalaciones de elaboración e interpretación de datos, particularmente en el marco de acuerdos o arreglos regionales, cuando ello sea posible. Principio VII Los Estados que participen en actividades de teleobservación prestarán asistencia técnica a los otros Estados interesados, en condiciones mutuamente convenidas. Principio VIII Las Naciones Unidas y los organismos pertinentes del sistema de las Naciones Unidas fomentarán la cooperación internacional, incluidas la asistencia técnica y la coordinación en la esfera de la teleobservación. Principio IX De conformidad con el artículo IV del Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre4 y con el artículo XI del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, el Estado que realice un programa de teleobservación informará de ello al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. Comunicará también, en la mayor medida posible dentro de lo viable y factible, toda la demás información pertinente a cualquier Estado, y especialmente a todo país en desarrollo afectado por ese programa, que lo solicite. Principio X La teleobservación deberá promover la protección del medio ambiente natural de la Tierra. Con tal fin, los Estados que participen en actividades de teleobservación y que tengan en su poder información que pueda prevenir fenómenos perjudiciales para el medio ambiente natural de la Tierra la darán a conocer a los Estados interesados. Principio XI La teleobservación deberá promover la protección de la humanidad contra los desastres naturales. Con tal fin, los Estados que participen en actividades de teleobservación y que tengan en su poder datos elaborados e información analizada que puedan ser útiles a Estados que hayan sido afectados por desastres naturales o probablemente hayan de ser afectados por un desastre natural inminente, los transmitirán a los Estados interesados lo antes posible. Principio XII Tan pronto como sean producidos los datos primarios y los datos elaborados que correspondan al territorio bajo su jurisdicción, el Estado objeto de la teleobservación tendrá acceso a ellos sin discriminación y a un costo razonable. Tendrá acceso asimismo, sin discriminación y en idénticas condiciones, teniendo particularmente en cuenta las necesidades y los intereses de los países en desarrollo, a la información analizada disponible que corresponda al territorio bajo su jurisdicción y que posea cualquier Estado que participe en actividades de teleobservación.-27 -Principio XIII Con el fin de promover e intensificar la cooperación internacional, especialmente en relación con las necesidades de los países en desarrollo, el Estado que realice actividades de teleobservación de la Tierra desde el espacio ultraterrestre celebrará consultas con el Estado cuyo territorio esté observando, cuando éste lo solicite, con miras a ofrecer oportunidades de participación y a aumentar los beneficios mutuos que produzcan estas actividades. Principio XIV De conformidad con el artículo VI del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los Estados que utilicen satélites de teleobservación serán responsables internacionalmente de sus actividades y deberán asegurar que ellas se efectúen de conformidad con los presentes principios y con las normas del derecho internacional, independientemente de que sean realizadas por organismos gubernamentales o entidades no gubernamentales o por conducto de organizaciones internacionales de las que formen parte esos Estados. El presente principio deberá entenderse sin perjuicio de la aplicabilidad de las normas del derecho internacional sobre la responsabilidad de los Estados en lo que respecta a las actividades de teleobservación. Principio XV Las controversias que surjan en relación con la aplicación de los presentes principios serán resueltas mediante los procedimientos establecidos para el arreglo pacífico de controversias.7 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, cuadragésimo séptimo período de sesiones, Suplemento Nº 20 (A/47/20). 8 Ibíd., anexo. -28 -Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre La Asamblea General, Habiendo examinado el informe de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos sobre la labor realizada en su 35º período de sesiones7 y el texto de los Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre aprobado por la Comisión y reproducido en el anexo de su informe8, Reconociendo que para algunas misiones en el espacio ultraterrestre las fuentes de energía nuclear son especialmente idóneas o incluso indispensables debido a que son compactas, de larga vida y tienen otras características apropiadas, Reconociendo también que la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre debería centrarse en las aplicaciones en que se aprovechen las propiedades particulares de dichas fuentes de energía, Reconociendo asimismo que la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre debe basarse en una evaluación exhaustiva en materia de seguridad, incluido el análisis probabilístico del riesgo, con especial hincapié en la reducción del riesgo de exposición accidental del público a radiación o materiales radiactivos nocivos, Reconociendo la necesidad a ese respecto de un conjunto de principios que entrañe objetivos y directrices para garantizar que la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre se haga en condiciones de seguridad, Afirmando que el presente conjunto de Principios se aplica a las fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre destinadas a la generación de energía eléctrica a bordo de objetos espaciales para fines distintos de la propulsión, cuyas características sean en general comparables a las de los sistemas utilizados y las misiones realizadas en el momento de la aprobación de los Principios, Reconociendo que el presente conjunto de Principios estará sujeto a revisiones futuras a la luz de las nuevas aplicaciones de la energía nuclear y de las recomendaciones internacionales sobre protección radiológica que vayan surgiendo, Aprueba los Principios pertinentes a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre que se enuncian a continuación. Principio 1. Aplicabilidad del derecho internacional Las actividades relativas a la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre se efectuarán de conformidad con el derecho internacional, particularmente de conformidad con la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. Principio 2. Uso de expresiones 1. A los efectos de los presentes Principios, las expresiones "Estado de lanzamiento" o "Estado que lance un objeto espacial" denotan el Estado que ejerza la jurisdicción y el control sobre un objeto espacial con fuentes de energía nuclear a bordo en un momento determinado, en relación con el principio de que se trate. 2. A los efectos del principio 9, se aplicará la definición de la expresión "Estado de lanzamiento" que figura en ese principio. 3. A los efectos del principio 3, los términos "previsible" y "posible" denotan un tipo de acontecimientos o circunstancias cuya probabilidad general de producirse es tal que se considera que incluye sólo posibilidades creíbles a efectos de los análisis de seguridad. La expresión "principio general de defensa en profundidad", aplicada a fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre, se refiere al uso de características de diseño y funcionamiento en la misión que sustituyan a los sistemas activos o se añadan a ellos para impedir desperfectos de los sistemas o mitigar sus consecuencias. Para lograr este fin no se requieren necesariamente sistemas de seguridad duplicados para cada componente determinado. Dadas las necesidades especiales del uso en el espacio y de las diversas misiones, ningún conjunto particular de sistemas o características puede considerarse indispensable para lograr ese objetivo. A los efectos del inciso d) del párrafo 2 del principio 3, la expresión "etapa crítica" no incluye medidas como el ensayo con potencia cero, que son fundamentales para garantizar la seguridad de los sistemas. Principio 3. Directrices y criterios para la utilización en condiciones de seguridad A fin de reducir al mínimo la cantidad de material radiactivo en el espacio y los riesgos que éste entraña, la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre se limitará a las misiones espaciales que no puedan funcionar en forma razonable con fuentes de energía no nucleares.-29 -1. Objetivos generales de protección contra la radiación y seguridad nuclear a) Los Estados que lancen objetos espaciales con fuentes de energía nuclear a bordo se esforzarán por proteger a las personas, la población y la biosfera de los peligros radiológicos. El diseño y la utilización de objetos espaciales con fuentes de energía nuclear a bordo garantizarán, con un alto grado de fiabilidad, que los riesgos, en circunstancias operacionales o accidentales previsibles, se mantengan por debajo de los niveles aceptables definidos en los incisos b) y c) del párrafo 1; Las fuentes de energía nuclear deberán diseñarse también y utilizarse de modo que se garantice con un alto grado de fiabilidad que el material radiactivo no produzca una contaminación importante del espacio ultraterrestre. b) Durante el funcionamiento normal de objetivos espaciales con fuentes de energía nuclear a bordo, incluido el reingreso desde una órbita suficientemente alta según se define en el inciso b) del párrafo 2, deberá observarse el objetivo de la protección adecuada contra la radiación recomendado por la Comisión Internacional de Protección contra las Radiaciones. Durante dicho funcionamiento no habrá una exposición radiológica apreciable; c) Para limitar la exposición en caso de accidente, en el diseño y la construcción de los sistemas de fuente de energía nuclear se tendrán en cuenta las directrices internacionales generalmente aceptadas y pertinentes sobre la protección contra las radiaciones; Excepto en los casos de poca probabilidad de accidentes con consecuencias radiológicas potencialmente graves, el diseño de los sistemas de fuente de energía nuclear deberá limitar, con un alto grado de confianza, la exposición a la radiación a una región geográfica reducida y, en lo que respecta a las personas, al límite principal de 1 mSv por año. Es admisible utilizar un límite subsidiario de 5 mSv por año durante algunos años, siempre que la dosis equivalente efectiva anual media durante una vida no supere el límite principal de 1 mSv por año. La probabilidad de accidentes con consecuencias radiológicas potencialmente graves mencionada anteriormente se mantendrá a un nivel sumamente bajo por medio del diseño del sistema. Las modificaciones futuras de las directrices a que se hace referencia en este apartado se aplicarán lo antes posible. d) Los sistemas importantes para la seguridad se diseñarán, construirán y utilizarán de conformidad con el principio general de defensa en profundidad. Según este principio, las fallas o desperfectos previsibles que guarden relación con la seguridad deben poder corregirse y contrarrestarse mediante una acción o un procedimiento, posiblemente automático. La fiabilidad de los sistemas importantes para la seguridad quedará asegurada, entre otras cosas, mediante la redundancia, la separación física, el aislamiento funcional y una independencia suficiente de sus componentes. También se adoptarán otras medidas para elevar el nivel de seguridad. 2. Reactores nucleares a) Los reactores nucleares podrán funcionar: i) En misiones interplanetarias; ii) En órbitas suficientemente altas definidas en el inciso b) del párrafo 2; iii) En órbitas terrestres bajas si se estacionan en una órbita suficientemente alta después de la parte operacional de su misión. b) Una órbita suficientemente alta es aquella en que la vida orbital es lo suficientemente larga para que se produzca una desintegración suficiente de los productos de la fisión hasta llegar a una actividad del orden de la de los actínidos. La órbita debe ser tal que se reduzcan al mínimo los riesgos para las misiones al espacio ultraterrestre actuales y futuras y los riesgos de colisión con otros objetos espaciales. Para la determinación de la altura de una órbita suficientemente alta se tendrá en cuenta la necesidad de que las piezas de un reactor destruido alcancen también el nivel necesario de desintegración antes de reingresar a la atmósfera terrestre; c) En los reactores nucleares sólo se deberá usar como combustible uranio 235 altamente enriquecido. En la concepción deberá tenerse en cuenta la desintegración radiológica de los productos de fisión y de activación; d) Los reactores nucleares no deberán alcanzar la etapa crítica antes de haber llegado a la órbita operacional o haber alcanzado la trayectoria interplanetaria; e) El diseño y la construcción del reactor nuclear deberán garantizar que éste no pueda alcanzar la etapa crítica antes de llegar a la órbita operacional en todas las circunstancias posibles, entre ellas la explosión del cohete, el reingreso, el impacto en tierra o agua, la inmersión en agua o la penetración de agua en el núcleo del reactor; f) A fin de reducir en grado considerable la posibilidad de desperfectos en los satélites con reactores nucleares a bordo durante el funcionamiento en una órbita que tenga una vida más corta que una órbita suficientemente alta (incluido el funcionamiento durante la transferencia a la órbita suficientemente alta), deberá haber un sistema operacional muy fiable que garantice la destrucción eficaz y controlable del reactor. 3. Generadores isotópicos a) Los generadores isotópicos podrían utilizarse para misiones interplanetarias u otras misiones más allá del campo gravitatorio de la Tierra. También pueden utilizarse en órbitas terrestres si se estacionan en una órbita alta luego de concluir la parte operacional de su misión. En todo caso, es necesario, en última instancia, destruirlos;-30 -b) Los generadores isotópicos deberán estar protegidos por un sistema de contención concebido y construido para que soporte el calor y las fuerzas aerodinámicas durante el reingreso en la atmósfera superior en todas las condiciones orbitales previsibles, incluidas órbitas muy elípticas o hiperbólicas, en su caso. El sistema de contención y la forma física del isótopo deberán garantizar que no se produzca la dispersión de material radiactivo en el medio ambiente, de modo que la zona de impacto pueda quedar totalmente libre de radiactividad mediante una operación de recuperación. Principio 4. Evaluaciones de seguridad 1. En la etapa de lanzamiento, el Estado de lanzamiento definido en el párrafo 1 del principio 2 tomará disposiciones para que, antes del lanzamiento, se proceda a una evaluación a fondo y exhaustiva de las condiciones de seguridad, en colaboración, cuando proceda, con quienes hayan diseñado, construido o fabricado la fuente de energía nuclear o quienes hayan de encargarse del funcionamiento del objeto espacial que lleve la fuente de energía nuclear a bordo o desde cuyo territorio o instalaciones se lance ese objeto. La evaluación abarcará también todas las fases pertinentes de la misión y todos los sistemas correspondientes, incluidos los medios de lanzamiento, la plataforma espacial, la fuente de energía nuclear y su equipo, y los medios de control y comunicación entre la Tierra y el espacio. 2. La evaluación se ajustará a las directrices y los criterios para la utilización en condiciones de seguridad enunciados en el principio 3. 3. De conformidad con el artículo XI del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los resultados de las evaluaciones de seguridad, junto con una indicación del período aproximado del lanzamiento, en la medida en que ello sea posible, se harán públicos antes de cada lanzamiento y se informará al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas sobre la forma en que los Estados puedan llegar a conocer tales resultados de las evaluaciones de seguridad, a la mayor brevedad posible, antes de cada lanzamiento. Principio 5. Notificación del reingreso 1. El Estado que lance un objeto espacial con fuentes de energía nuclear a bordo deberá informar oportunamente a los Estados interesados en caso de que hubiera fallas de funcionamiento que entrañaran el riesgo de reingreso a la Tierra de materiales radiactivos. La información debe ajustarse al siguiente modelo: a) Parámetros del sistema: i) Nombre del Estado o los Estados de lanzamiento, incluida la dirección de la autoridad a la que pudiera pedirse información adicional o asistencia en caso de accidente; ii) Designación internacional; iii) Fecha y territorio o lugar de lanzamiento; iv) Información necesaria para poder predecir con la mayor exactitud posible la duración en órbita, la trayectoria y la zona de impacto; v) Función general del vehículo espacial. b) Información sobre los riesgos radiológicos de la fuente o las fuentes de energía nuclear: i) Tipo de fuente (fuente radioisotópica o reactor); ii) Forma física probable, cantidad y características radiológicas generales del combustible y de los componentes contaminados o activados que tengan probabilidades de llegar a la superficie terrestre. El término "combustible" se refiere al material nuclear utilizado como fuente de calor o de energía. Esa información deberá transmitirse también al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas. 2. El Estado de lanzamiento deberá suministrar la información de conformidad con el formato de notificación descrito en el párrafo precedente tan pronto se tenga conocimiento del desperfecto. La información deberá actualizarse con tanta frecuencia como sea posible y la información actualizada deberá difundirse cada vez con mayor frecuencia a medida que se acerque el momento previsto de reingreso en las capas densas de la atmósfera terrestre, de manera que la comunidad internacional esté al corriente de la situación y tenga tiempo suficiente para planificar las actividades que se consideren necesarias en cada país. 3. La información actualizada deberá transmitirse también al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas con la misma frecuencia. Principio 6. Consultas Los Estados que suministren información en virtud del principio 5 responderán prontamente, en la medida de lo posible, a las solicitudes de información adicional o consultas que formulen otros Estados.-31 -Principio 7. Asistencia a los Estados 1. Tras la notificación del reingreso previsto en la atmósfera terrestre de un objeto espacial portador de una fuente de energía nuclear y sus componentes, todos los Estados que posean instalaciones de vigilancia y de rastreo comunicarán lo más rápidamente posible al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas y al Estado interesado, de conformidad con el espíritu de cooperación internacional, la información pertinente de que dispongan sobre el funcionamiento defectuoso del objeto espacial portador de una fuente de energía nuclear, a fin de que los Estados que puedan resultar afectados evalúen la situación y tomen las medidas de precaución que consideren necesarias. 2. Después del reingreso en la atmósfera terrestre de un objeto espacial portador de una fuente de energía nuclear y sus componentes: a) El Estado de lanzamiento ofrecerá inmediatamente y, si así lo solicita el Estado afectado, prestará inmediatamente la asistencia necesaria para eliminar los efectos nocivos efectivos y posibles, incluida asistencia para determinar la ubicación de la zona de impacto de la fuente de energía nuclear en la superficie terrestre, detectar el material que reingrese y realizar operaciones de recuperación y limpieza; b) Todos los demás Estados que tengan la capacidad técnica pertinente y las organizaciones internacionales que posean esa capacidad técnica proporcionarán, en la medida de lo posible y previa solicitud del Estado afectado, la asistencia necesaria. Cuando se facilite asistencia de conformidad con lo dispuesto en los apartados a) y b) supra, deberán tenerse en cuenta las necesidades especiales de los países en desarrollo. Principio 8. Responsabilidad De conformidad con el artículo VI del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, los Estados serán responsables internacionalmente de las actividades nacionales que supongan la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear en el espacio ultraterrestre, realizadas por organismos gubernamentales o entidades no gubernamentales, y deberán asegurar que dichas actividades nacionales se efectúen de conformidad con dicho Tratado y con las recomendaciones contenidas en estos Principios. Cuando una organización internacional realice en el espacio ultraterrestre actividades que supongan la utilización de fuentes de energía nuclear, la responsabilidad por la observancia de dicho Tratado y de las recomendaciones contenidas en estos Principios corresponderá a esa organización y a los Estados que participen en ella. Principio 9. Responsabilidad e indemnización 1. De conformidad con el artículo VII del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, y las disposiciones del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales3, cada Estado que lance un objeto espacial, o que gestione su lanzamiento, y cada Estado desde cuyo territorio o desde cuyas instalaciones se lance un objeto espacial, serán internacionalmente responsables por los daños causados por esos objetos espaciales o sus componentes. Esto se aplica plenamente al caso en que tal objeto espacial lleve a bordo una fuente de energía nuclear. Cuando dos o más Estados lancen conjuntamente un objeto espacial, serán responsables solidariamente por los daños causados, de conformidad con el artículo V del mencionado Convenio. 2. La indemnización que estarán obligados a pagar esos Estados por el daño en virtud del mencionado Convenio se determinará conforme al derecho internacional y a los principios de justicia y equidad, a fin de reparar el daño de manera tal que la persona física o jurídica, el Estado o la organización internacional en cuyo nombre se presente la demanda quede en la misma situación en que habría estado de no haber ocurrido el daño. 3. A los efectos de este principio, la indemnización incluirá el reembolso de los gastos debidamente justificados que se hayan realizado en operaciones de búsqueda, recuperación y limpieza, incluidos los gastos por concepto de asistencia recibida de terceros. Principio 10. Arreglo de controversias Las controversias que surjan en relación con la aplicación de los presentes Principios serán resueltas mediante negociaciones u otros procedimientos establecidos para el arreglo pacífico de controversias, de conformidad con la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. Principio 11. Examen y revisión Los presentes Principios quedarán abiertos a la revisión por la Comisión sobre Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos a más tardar dos años después de su aprobación.9 Documentos Oficiales de la Asamblea General, quincuagésimo primer período de sesiones, Suplemento Nº 20 (A/51/20). 10 Ibíd., anexo IV. 11 Véase Informe de la Segunda Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, Viena, 9 a 21 de agosto de 1982, y correcciones (A/CONF.101/10 y Corr.1 y 2). -32 -Declaración sobre la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo La Asamblea General Habiendo examinado el informe de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos sobre la labor realizada en su 39º período de sesiones9 y el texto de la Declaración sobre la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo, que fue aprobado por la Comisión y figura como anexo de su informe10, Teniendo presentes las disposiciones pertinentes de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, Recordando especialmente las disposiciones del Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes1, Recordando asimismo sus resoluciones pertinentes relativas a las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre, Teniendo presentes las recomendaciones de la Segunda Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos11 y de las demás conferencias internacionales pertinentes sobre este tema, Reconociendo el alcance e importancia cada vez mayores de la cooperación internacional entre los Estados y entre los Estados y las organizaciones internacionales en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, Teniendo en cuenta la experiencia adquirida en actividades internacionales de cooperación, Convencida de la necesidad y de la importancia de seguir fortaleciendo la cooperación internacional a fin de establecer una colaboración amplia y eficiente en esa esfera en beneficio e interés de todas las partes involucradas, Deseosa de facilitar la aplicación del principio de que la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, deberán realizarse en beneficio e interés de todos los países, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico y científico, e incumben a toda la humanidad, Aprueba la Declaración sobre la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo, que figura en el anexo de la presente resolución. Anexo Declaración sobre la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, teniendo especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo 1. La cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos (en lo sucesivo “cooperación internacional”) se realizará de conformidad con las disposiciones del derecho internacional, incluidos la Carta de las naciones Unidas y el Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. La cooperación internacional se realizará en beneficio e interés de todos los Estados, sea cual fuere su grado de desarrollo económico, social, científico o técnico, e incumbirá a toda la humanidad. Deberán tenerse en cuenta especialmente las necesidades de los países en desarrollo. 2. Los Estados pueden determinar libremente todos los aspectos de su participación en la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre sobre una base equitativa y mutuamente aceptable. Los aspectos contractuales de esas actividades de cooperación deben ser equitativos y razonables, y deben respetar plenamente los derechos e intereses legítimos de las partes interesadas, como, por ejemplo, los derechos de propiedad intelectual.-33 -3. Todos los Estados, en particular los que tienen la capacidad espacial necesaria y programas de exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, deben contribuir a promover y fomentar la cooperación internacional sobre una base equitativa y mutuamente aceptable. En este contexto, se debe prestar especial atención a los beneficios y los intereses de los países en desarrollo y los países con programas espaciales incipientes o derivados de la cooperación internacional con países con capacidad espacial más avanzada. 4. La cooperación internacional se debe llevar a cabo según las modalidades que los países interesados consideren más eficaces y adecuadas, incluidas, entre otras, la cooperación gubernamental y no gubernamental; comercial y no comercial; mundial, multilateral, regional o bilateral; y la cooperación internacional entre países de distintos niveles de desarrollo. 5. La cooperación internacional, en la que se deben tener especialmente en cuenta las necesidades de los países en desarrollo, debe tener por objeto la consecución de, entre otros, los siguientes objetivos, habida cuenta de la necesidad de asistencia técnica y de asignación racional y eficiente de recursos financieros y técnicos: a) Promover el desarrollo de la ciencia y la tecnología espaciales y de sus aplicaciones; b) Fomentar el desarrollo de una capacidad espacial pertinente y suficiente en los Estados interesados; c) Facilitar el intercambio de conocimientos y tecnología entre los Estados, sobre una base mutuamente aceptable. 6. Los organismos nacionales e internacionales, las instituciones de investigación, las organizaciones de ayuda para el desarrollo, los países desarrollados y los países en desarrollo deben considerar la utilización adecuada de las aplicaciones de la tecnología espacial y las posibilidades que ofrece la cooperación internacional para el logro de sus objetivos de desarrollo. 7. Se debe fortalecer la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos en su función, entre otras, de foro para el intercambio de información sobre las actividades nacionales e internacionales en la esfera de la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre. 8. Se debe alentar a todos los Estados a que contribuyan al programa de las Naciones Unidas de aplicaciones de la tecnología espacial y a otras iniciativas en la esfera de la cooperación internacional de conformidad con su capacidad espacial y su participación en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre.12 United States Treaties and Other International Agreements. 13 Treaties and Other International Acts Series. 14 Naciones Unidas -Recueil des Traités. -34 -III. Situación de los acuerdos internacionales relativos a las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre Tratados de las Naciones Unidas 1. 1967 TEU -Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes (Tratado del Espacio Ultraterrestre) Aprobación por la Asamblea General de 19 de diciembre de 1966 las Naciones Unidas: (resolución 2222 (XXI) de la Asamblea General, anexo) Apertura a la firma: 27 de enero de 1967, Londres, Moscú, Washington, D.C. Entrada en vigor: 10 de octubre de 1967 Depositarios: Estados Unidos de América, Federación de Rusia, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte (Fuentes: 18 UST12 2410; TIAS13 6347; 610 RTNU14 205) 2. 1968 ASDA -Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre (Acuerdo sobre salvamento) Aprobación por la Asamblea General de 19 de diciembre de 1967 las Naciones Unidas: (resolución 2345 (XXII) de la Asamblea General, anexo) Apertura a la firma: 22 de abril de 1968 Londres, Moscú, Washington, D.C. Entrada en vigor: 3 de diciembre de 1968 Depositarios: Estados Unidos de América, Federación de Rusia, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte (Fuentes: 19 UST 7570; TIAS 6599; 672 RTNU 119)15 International Legal Materials. -35 -3. 1972 -Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por los daños causados por objetos espaciales (Convenio sobre responsabilidad) Aprobación por la Asamblea General de 29 de noviembre de 1971 las Naciones Unidas: (resolución 2777 (XXVI) de la Asamblea General, anexo) Apertura a la firma: 29 de marzo de 1972 Londres, Moscú, Washington, D.C. Entrada en vigor: 1º de septiembre de 1972 Depositarios: Estados Unidos de América, Federación de Rusia, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte (Fuentes: 24 UST 2389; TIAS 7762; 961 RTNU 187) 4. 1975 REG -Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre (Convenio sobre registro) Aprobación por la Asamblea General de 12 de noviembre de 1974 las Naciones Unidas: (resolución 3225 (XXIX) de la Asamblea General, anexo) Apertura a la firma: 14 de enero de 1975, Nueva York Entrada en vigor: 15 de septiembre de 1976 Depositario: Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas (Fuentes: 28 UST 695; TIAS 8480; 1023 RTNU 15) 5. 1979 LUNA -Acuerdo que rige las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes (Acuerdo sobre la Luna) Aprobación por la Asamblea General de 5 de diciembre de 1979 las Naciones Unidas: (resolución 34/68 de la Asamblea General, anexo) Apertura a la firma: 18 de diciembre de 1979, Nueva York Entrada en vigor: 11 de julio de 1984 Depositario: Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas (Fuentes: 18 ILM15 1434; 1363 RTNU 3)-36 -Otros acuerdos Generales 6. 1963 TPE -Tratado por el que se prohíben los ensayos con armas nucleares en la atmósfera, el espacio ultraterrestre y debajo del agua Apertura a la firma: 5 de agosto de 1963, Moscú Entrada en vigor: 10 de octubre de 1963 Depositarios: Estados Unidos de América, Federación de Rusia, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte (Fuentes: 14 UST 1313; TIAS 5433; 480 RTNO 43) 7. 1974 BRUS -Convenio internacional sobre la distribución de señales portadoras de programas y transmitidas mediante satélite (Convenio de Bruselas) Apertura a la firma: 21 de mayo de 1974, Bruselas Entrada en vigor: 25 de agosto de 1979 Depositario: Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas (Fuente: 1144 RTNO 3) Instituciones 8. 1971 INTL -Acuerdo relativo a la Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite (INTELSAT), con anexos, y Acuerdo Operativo relativo a la Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones por Satélite, con anexo Apertura a la firma: 20 de agosto de 1971, Washington, D.C. Entrada en vigor: 12 de febrero de 1973 Depositario: Estados Unidos de América (Fuentes: 23 UST 3813 y 4091; TIAS 7532) 9. 1971 INTR -Acuerdo sobre la creación del Sistema Internacional y de la Organización de Telecomunicaciones Cósmicas “INTERSPUTNIK” Apertura a la firma: 15 de noviembre de 1971, Moscú Entrada en vigor: 12 de julio de 1972 Depositario: Federación de Rusia (Fuente: 862 RTNU 3) 10. 1975 ESA -Convenio de Creación de una Agencia Espacial Europea (ESA) con anexos Apertura a la firma: 30 de mayo de 1975, París Entrada en vigor: 30 de octubre de 1980 Depositario: Francia (Fuente: 14 ILM 864)-37 -11. 1976 ARBS -Acuerdo de la Organización Árabe de Comunicaciones Mediante Satélite (ARABSAT) Apertura a la firma: 14 de abril de 1976, El Cairo (14 de Rabi´ II de 1396 de la Hégira) Entrada en vigor: 16 de julio de 1976 Depositario: Liga de los Estados Árabes (Fuente: Space Law Related Documents, US Senate, 101 st. Congress, 2nd Session, 395 (1990)) 12. 1976 INTC -Acuerdo Multilateral de Cooperación entre Gobiernos para la Exploración y Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos (INTERCOSMOS) Apertura a la firma: 13 de julio de 1976, Moscú Entrada en vigor: 25 de marzo de 1977 Depositario: Federación de Rusia (Fuente: 16 ILM 1) 13. 1976 OMI -Convenio Constitutivo de la Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Móviles por Satélite (INMARSAT), con anexo y Acuerdo de Explotación de la Organización Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Móviles por Satélite (INMARSAT), con anexo Apertura a la firma: 3 de septiembre de 1976, Londres Entrada en vigor: 16 de julio de 1979 Depositario: Secretario General de la Organización Marítima Internacional (Fuente: 31 UST 1; TIAS 9605) 14. 1982 EUTL -Convenio Constitutivo de la Organización Europea de Satélites de Telecomunicaciones (EUTELSAT) Apertura a la firma: 15 de julio de 1982, París Entrada en vigor: 1º de septiembre de 1985 Depositario: Francia (Fuentes: UK Misc. Nº 4, Cmnd. 9154 (1984)) 15. 1983 EUMT -Convenio Constitutivo de una Organización Europea de Explotación de Satélites Meteorológicos (EUMETSAT) Apertura a la firma: 14 de mayo de 1983, Ginebra Entrada en vigor: 19 de junio de 1986 Depositario: Suiza (Fuente: Alemania, “Bundesgesetzblatt”, Jahrgang 1987, Tell 11 (1987), pág. 256. Este Convenio ha sido publicado en los boletines oficiales de los Estados que lo han ratificado)-38 -16. 1992 UIT -Constitución y Convenio de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Apertura a la firma: 22 de diciembre de 1992, Ginebra Entrada en vigor: 1º de julio de 1994 Depositario: Secretario General de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (Fuente: Secretaría de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones, Place des Nations, CH-1211 Ginebra 20, Suiza)-39 -Situación de los acuerdos internacionales relativos a las actividades en el espacio ultraterrestre (al 1º de febrero de 1999)a Tratados de las Naciones Unidas País, zona u organización TEU ASDA RESP REG LUNA (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Afganistán R Albania Alemania R R R R Andorra Angola Antigua y Barbuda R R R R Arabia Saudita R R Argelia R F Argentina R R R R Armenia Australia R R R R R Austria R R R R R Azerbaiyán Bahamas R R Bahrein Bangladesh R Barbados R R R Belarús R R R R Bélgica R R R R Belice Benin R R Bhután Bolivia F F Bosnia y Herzegovina R R Botswana F R R Brasil R R R Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria R R R R Burkina Faso R Burundi F F F Cabo Verde Camboya F Camerún F R Canadá R R R R-40 -Otros acuerdos (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TPE BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R F R R R RR F R R R R R R R b-41 -País, zona u organización TEU ASDA RESP REG LUNA (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Chad Chile R R R R R China R R R R Chipre R R R R Colombia F F F Comoras Congo F Costa Rica F F Côte d'Ivoire Croacia Cuba R R R R Dinamarca R R R R Djibouti Dominica Ecuador R R R Egipto R R F El Salvador R R F Emiratos Árabes Unidos Eritrea Eslovaquia R R R R Eslovenia R R España R R R Estados Unidos de América R R R R Estonia Etiopía F Federación de Rusia R R R R Fiji R R R Filipinas F F F R Finlandia R R R Francia R R R R F Gabón R R Gambia F R F Georgia R Ghana F F F Granada Grecia R R R Guatemala F F Guinea Guinea Bissau R R Guinea Ecuatorial R-42 -(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 TPE BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT (16) 1992 UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R c R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R RR R-43 -País, zona u organización (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 TEU ASDA RESP REG LUNA Guyana F R Haití F F F Honduras F F Hungría R R R R India R R R R F Indonesia F R R Irán (República Islámica del) F R R F Iraq R R R Irlanda R R R Islandia R R F Islas Marshall Islas Salomón Israel R R R Italia R R R Jamahiriya Árabe Libia R Jamaica R F Japón R R R R Jordania F F F Kazajstán R R R Kenya R R Kirguistán Kiribati Kuwait R R R la ex República Yugoslava de Macedonia Lesotho F F Letonia Líbano R R F Liberia Liechtenstein R Lituania Luxemburgo F F R Madagascar R R Malasia F F Malawi Maldivas R Malí R R Malta F R Marruecos R R R R Mauricio R R-44 -(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TPE BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R-45 -País, zona u organización TEU ASDA RESP REG LUNA (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Mauritania México R R R R R Micronesia, Estados Federados de Mónaco F Mongolia R R R R Mozambique Myanmar R F Namibia Nauru Nepal R R F Nicaragua F F F F Níger R R R R Nigeria R R Noruega R R R R Nueva Zelandia R R R Omán F Países Bajos R R R R R Pakistán R R R R R Panamá F R Papua Nueva Guinea R R R Paraguay Perú R R F R F Polonia R R R R Portugal R R Qatar R Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte R R R R República Árabe Siria R R R República Centroafricana F F República Checa R R R R República de Corea R R R R República Democrática del Congo F F F República Democrática Popular Lao R R R República de Moldova República Dominicana R F R República Popular Democrática de Corea República Unida de Tanzanía F-46 -(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TPE BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R-47 -País, zona u organización TEU ASDA RESP REG LUNA (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Rumania R R R F Rwanda F F F Samoa Occidental San Marino R R Santa Lucía Santa Sede F Santo Tomé y Príncipe San Vicente y las Granadinas Senegal F R Seychelles R R R R Sierra Leona R F F Singapur R R R F Somalia F F Sri Lanka R R Sudáfrica R R F Sudán Suecia R R R R Suiza R R R R Suriname Swazilandia R Tailandia R R Tayikistán Togo R R Tonga R R Trinidad y Tabago F R Túnez R R R Turkmenistán Turquía R F Tuvalu Ucrania R R R R Uganda R Uruguay R R R R R Uzbekistán Vanuatu Venezuela R F R Viet Nam R F Yemen R F Yugoslavia F R R R-48 -(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TPE BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R RRR R F R R R RRR R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R RR R R R F R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R-49 -País, zona u organización TEU ASDA RESP REG LUNA (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 1967 1968 1972 1975 1979 Zambia R R R Zimbabwe Palestina Agencia Espacial Europea D D D Organización Europea de Explotación de Satélites D Organización Europea de Satélites de Telecomunicaciones D a R = Ratificación, aceptación, aprobación, adhesión o sucesión. F = Firma únicamente. D = Declaración de aceptación de derechos y obligaciones. Cuando en la columna correspondiente a un país, zona u organización no figure ninguna indicación, ese país, zona u organización no ha firmado el acuerdo correspondiente, no es parte en él o se ha retirado de él. b El Canadá tiene un acuerdo de cooperación con la Agencia Espacial Europea, pero no es miembro de ella. c El procedimiento de adhesión de Estonia está en curso.-50 -(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) 1963 1974 1971 1971 1975 1976 1976 1976 1982 1983 1992 TPE BRUS INTL INTR ESA ARBS INTC OMI EUTL EUMT UIT R R R R R R-51 -Acuerdos internacionales conexos 1. 1959 ANT -Tratado Antártico Apertura a la firma: 1º de diciembre de 1959, Washington, D.C. Entrada en vigor: 23 de junio de 1961 Depositario: Estados Unidos de América (Fuentes: 402 UNTS 71; 12 UST 794; TIAS 4780) 2. 1977 PROMOD -Convención sobre la prohibición de utilizar técnicas de modificación ambiental con fines militares u otros fines hostiles Aprobación por la Asamblea General de 10 de diciembre de 1976, las Naciones Unidas (resolución 31/72 de la Asamblea General, anexo) Apertura a la firma: 18 de mayo de 1977, Ginebra Entrada en vigor: 5 de octubre de 1978 Depositario: Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas (Fuentes: 1108 UNTS; 31 UST 333; 16 ILM 88) 3. 1982 CDM -Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Derecho del Mar Apertura a la firma: 10 de diciembre de 1982, Montego Bay Entrada en vigor: 16 de noviembre de 1994 Depositario: Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas (Fuentes: Doc. de las Naciones Unidas A/CONF.62/122 (1982); 21 ILM 1261) 4. 1982 UIT -Convenio Internacional de Telecomunicaciones Apertura a la firma: 6 de noviembre de 1982, Nairobi Entrada en vigor: 1º de enero de 1984 Depositario: Secretario General de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones-52 -5. 1986 PNAN -Convención sobre la Pronta Notificación de Accidentes Nucleares Apertura a la firma: 26 de septiembre de 1986, Viena Entrada en vigor: 27 de octubre de 1986 Depositario: Director General del Organismo Internacional de Energía Atómica (Fuente: 251 ILM 1370) 6. 1986 ACAN -Convención sobre Asistencia en Caso de Accidente Nuclear o Emergencia Radiológica Apertura a la firma: 26 de septiembre de 1986, Viena Entrada en vigor: 26 de febrero de 1987 Depositario: Director General del Organismo Internacional de Energía Atómica (Fuente: 25 ILM 1377) 7. 1992 UIT-CAMR -Actas Finales de la Conferencia Administrativa Mundial de Radiocomunicaciones encargada de la asignación de frecuencias en ciertas partes del espectro (CAMR-92) Apertura a la firma: 3 de marzo de 1992, Málaga-Torremolinos Entrada en vigor: 12 de octubre de 1993 Depositario: Secretario General de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones-53 -IV. Comentario: Recopilación de extractos de declaraciones formuladas con ocasión de la aprobación de los tratados de las Naciones Unidas Tratado sobre los principios que deben regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre, incluso la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes Vigésimo primer período de sesiones de la Asamblea General (A/PV.1499): Sr. Goldberg (Estados Unidos de América): “En todo el alcance de la expresión, es éste un tratado de las Naciones Unidas del cual todos los países Miembros pueden enorgullecerse con justicia. Ha sido negociado bajo los auspicios de la Organización y constituye el fruto de sus labores. El tratado ayuda a fortalecer los objetivos de la Carta pues reduce enormemente el peligro de conflictos internacionales y fomenta las perspectivas de la cooperación internacional, para beneficio de todos, en el más nuevo de los campos de la actividad humana. Este tratado constituye un importante paso hacia la paz.” Sr. Fedorenko (Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas) (interpretación del ruso): “Al evaluar el tratado, deseamos subrayar que consideramos su elaboración y su aprobación por la Asamblea General como una victoria de las fuerzas amantes de la paz en la lucha contra los partidarios de que el espacio ultraterrestre se utilice con fines de provocación y agresión.” Sr. Vinci (Italia): “Por primera vez en la historia de la humanidad, los países, y en primer término las dos Potencias mundiales de la actualidad, no están tratando de obtener nuevas conquistas territoriales ni la expansión de sus derechos de soberanía. Al contrario, se encaminan solamente a conquistas científicas y tecnológicas en los nuevos continentes del espacio ultraterrestre, que pasan a ser no las provincias de las distintas Potencias, sino la provincia de toda la humanidad. Por primera vez, tras nuestras primeras exploraciones espaciales, se dejan de lado conceptos nacionales, religiosos e ideológicos y en su lugar se afirman solemnemente ideas de paz y de unidad de todos los hombres, cualesquiera sean su religión, credo o color.” Sr. Seydoux (Francia) (interpretación del francés): “... nos contamos entre los que subrayaron, como hizo nuestro colega, el Sr. Manfred Lachs, que ese Tratado en cierta forma sólo constituye el primer capítulo del derecho del espacio, donde aún queda mucho por hacer.” 1491a sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/SR.1491): El Sr. Lachs (Polonia), hablando como Presidente de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, dice que con la aprobación del tratado el derecho internacional adquirirá una nueva dimensión. Esto resulta de la extensión de las actividades de los Estados al nuevo terreno del espacio ultraterrestre, ya que no puede haber un vacío jurídico en ninguna esfera de actividad.-54 -142a sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/SR.1492): El Sr. Goldberg (Estados Unidos de América) señala que los Estados Unidos consideran el tratado como un importante paso hacia la paz, puesto que disminuirá considerablemente el peligro de conflictos internacionales y permitirá augurar el advenimiento de la cooperación internacional por el bien común en una de las esferas más nuevas y menos conocidas de la actividad humana. ... El espíritu de conciliación de que han dado pruebas las Potencias espaciales y las demás Potencias ha dado lugar a un tratado que establece un justo equilibrio entre los intereses y obligaciones de todos los participantes, incluidos los países que no han emprendido todavía ninguna actividad espacial. El Sr. Waldheim (Austria) dice que los progresos científicos y técnicos realizados en el espacio ultraterrestre deben ir acompañado de acuerdos jurídicos y políticos. A este respecto, el tratado es un jalón de la mayor importancia en la ruta hacia la instauración del imperio del derecho en el espacio ultraterrestre, y ofrece una base importante para hacer nuevos progresos en ese campo. El Sr. Fuentealba (Chile) declara que el principal mérito del tratado espacial reside en que al formular las normas que regirán las actividades de los Estados en este ámbito, soluciona, al mismo tiempo, problemas potenciales cuya gravedad se aprecia plenamente. El Sr. de Carvalho Silos (Brasil) sostiene que el tratado marca una etapa decisiva en la obra de las Naciones Unidas. ... El tratado propuesto es quizá el acontecimiento político de mayor importancia desde la firma del Tratado de prohibición parcial de los ensayos. 1493a sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/SR.1493): El Sr. Gowland (Argentina) dice que el tratado echará las bases del ordenamiento jurídico de la fascinante aventura del hombre en el espacio. El tratado dispone la exploración y utilización del espacio sin discriminación y en condiciones de igualdad, fomentando con ello la amistad y la comprensión en la medida deseada por la Carta de las Naciones Unidas. El Sr. Tilakaratna (Ceilán) dice que el tratado es un gran paso hacia la implantación de las normas que han de regir las actividades de los Estados en la exploración pacífica del espacio. El Sr. Matsui (Japón) señala que el tratado reviste importancia histórica, no sólo porque asegura que el espacio ultraterrestre, la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes se usarán únicamente con fines pacíficos, sino también porque prevé la cooperación de todos los Estados, grandes y pequeños, en la investigación espacial. ... Espera que todos los Estados se adhieran al tratado para que se consiga el grado más amplio posible de cooperación internacional, y que el espíritu de progreso y comprensión que ha inspirado la preparación del tratado conduzca a la solución de otros problemas que afligen a la humanidad. El Sr. Burns (Canadá) dice que el tratado es el resultado de serios esfuerzos realizados tanto dentro como fuera de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos. Representa un significativo intento de establecer un régimen jurídico del espacio ultraterrestre. ... El tratado en conjunto constituirá una base firme para acuerdos subsiguientes más detallados. El grado de acuerdo alcanzado sobre los principios que han de regir las actividades de los Estados en el espacio ultraterrestre es sumamente alentador y es motivo de esperanza para cuantos se esfuerzan por lograr la adopción de medidas de desarme eficaces.-55 -El Sr. Schuurmans (Bélgica) dice que cabe regocijarse de la redacción de un instrumento que instaura la cooperación activa de todas las comunidades internacionales bajo la égida de las Naciones Unidas. Bélgica está firmemente convencida de que al apoyar el tratado con un voto unánime, las Naciones Unidas contribuirán poderosamente a estimular a los Estados a buscar también en otros campos, además del espacio, soluciones pacíficas para los demás problemas graves que siguen separándolos. El Sr. Odhiambo (Kenya) observa que la exploración espacial, como la ciencia nuclear, es una espada de dos filos que puede resultar a la vez peligrosa y útil para la humanidad. Por lo tanto, se congratula de que la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos haya logrado llegar a un acuerdo respecto de un tratado destinado a asegurar que el espacio ultraterrestre, la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes se utilizarán únicamente con fines pacíficos y que los beneficios de la exploración espacial se pondrán al alcance de todos. El Sr. Tarabanov (Bulgaria) declara que el tratado, como instrumento jurídico destinado a estimular la cooperación internacional en la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, es un acontecimiento histórico. No es, sin embargo, un fin en sí mismo, sino un comienzo prometedor. ... El tratado no sólo afirma los principios de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y del derecho internacional, sino que también establece el concepto de paz como norma jurídica en cuanto a las actividades espaciales. El Sr. Rossides (Chipre) afirma que el tratado es un audaz e importante paso adelante. El progreso científico en el espacio ultraterrestre está ahora equilibrado por el progreso jurídico, de manera que el derecho internacional y la Carta de las Naciones Unidas se aplican plenamente a las actividades espaciales. El Sr. López (Filipinas) manifiesta que el tratado representa la culminación de los esfuerzos de las Naciones Unidas para lograr un acuerdo sobre los principios jurídicos obligatorios aplicables a una esfera donde la tecnología científica ha adelantado con pasos tan rápidos y sorprendentes.-56 -Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre Vigésimo segundo período de sesiones de la Asamblea General (A/PV.1640): Sr. Waldheim (Austria), hablando en su calidad de Presidente de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos: “Confiamos en que el proyecto de resolución recibirá la aprobación unánime de la Asamblea General, abriendo así el camino para una pronta entrada en vigor del acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de cosmonautas. Estamos convencidos de que esto no sólo representaría un importante adelanto en la elaboración del derecho del espacio ultraterrestre, sino también un ejemplo de la colaboración y unión de todas las naciones en la gran aventura del hombre en la exploración del espacio ultraterrestre.” Sr. Wyzner (Polonia): “Indudablemente, mis colegas apreciarán el significado en términos humanitarios del Acuerdo en favor de esos hombres valientes e intrépidos que, según el artículo V del Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre, son enviados de la humanidad en el espacio ultraterrestre: están arriesgando sus vidas, como los trágicos accidentes ocurridos recientemente lo han demostrado, en empresas que benefician los intereses de todos. El Acuerdo también constituye otra medida importante en el desarrollo gradual del derecho del espacio ultraterrestre. ... No se puede permitir que el espacio ultraterrestre, con su terrible potencial bélico, se convierta en una esfera de competencia a menos que se trate de una competencia pacífica. El Acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas también constituye otra medida colectiva en la búsqueda de la paz, dado que, junto con otros, elimina las posibles fuentes de controversia y fricción entre los Estados.” Sr. Vinci (Italia): “Consideramos que el acuerdo que tenemos a la vista es importante tanto por su valor intrínseco como por formar parte de una empresa más amplia, o sea, la disciplina jurídica de las actividades del espacio ultraterrestre, actividades que cada día repercuten más en nuestra vida en la Tierra y que continuarán repercutiendo con mayor intensidad en un futuro cercano. La tarea de las Naciones Unidas en esta esfera es muy clara: proteger y fomentar no sólo los intereses de un determinado grupo de países, sino más bien los intereses generales de todos los países, ya sea que participen o no en actividades espaciales a título individual o como miembros de organizaciones multilaterales. La formulación del derecho del espacio ultraterrestre creará un marco que facilitará el desempeño de las actividades espaciales con fines pacíficos y hará que dichas actividades no constituyan causa de controversias y tiranteces, sino, por el contrario, fuente de beneficios para todos y para la cooperación internacional.” Sr. Goldberg (Estados Unidos de América): “Es un Tratado sólido y bien fundado que resistirá las pruebas del tiempo y de la experiencia. A juicio de los Estados Unidos, el acto de apoyo de la Asamblea a este Tratado es un hecho histórico. El texto del Tratado representa el acuerdo por el que se pone en práctica la célebre frase del Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre de que los astronautas son los “enviados de la humanidad”. Mi delegación opina que la aprobación del Tratado por la Asamblea General constituye uno de sus logros más importantes. Los Estados Unidos consideran que el acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de astronautas que hemos aprobado representa un justo equilibrio de intereses de todos los Miembros de las Naciones Unidas, tanto de las Potencias espaciales y cuasiespaciales como de las que colaboran en la empresa y de todos los que se interesan en el espacio ultraterrestre, lo que, por cierto, equivale a la totalidad de los Miembros de nuestra Organización. Este acuerdo es testimonio de que las Naciones Unidas pueden coadyuvar verdaderamente a que el imperio de la ley se haga extensivo a nuevas zonas y al ordenamiento positivo y pacífico de los esfuerzos humanos en el campo de la ciencia y en la construcción de un mundo mejor. Es también, y no en menor grado, un homenaje a quienes se aventuran en el nuevo mundo del espacio ultraterrestre. Nosotros nos esforzamos para que esa empresa redunde, como esperamos, en beneficio de todos.” Sr. C.O.E. Cole (Sierra Leona): “La delegación de Sierra Leona votó a favor del proyecto de resolución que acabamos de aprobar. Los muy loables principios humanitarios y jurídicos que encierra, así como el hecho de que mi Gobierno es signatario del Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre, impulsaron a mi delegación a adoptar esa actitud. Éste es el homenaje mínimo que podemos rendir a todos aquellos que con tanta valentía se aventuran en el espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, y a todos los que trabajan tan diligentemente con ese fin.” Sr. Fedorenko (Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas) (interpretación del ruso): “Habiéndose aprobado el proyecto de acuerdo sobre el salvamento y la devolución de cosmonautas y la restitución de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, que ha presentado la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, la delegación soviética está convencida de que la celebración de ese acuerdo revestirá significación, dado el rápido progreso de la navegación espacial, el desarrollo de la exploración científica del cosmos y el futuro uso de los aparatos espaciales para la satisfacción de necesidades prácticas, para los pronósticos meteorológicos, para la navegación, etc. No hay duda de que el acuerdo sobre el salvamento de cosmonautas tendrá gran significación práctica para la seguridad en el rápido salvamento de cosmonautas en caso de accidente, situación de peligro o aterrizaje forzoso, si se considera que, gracias al progreso científico y técnico, cada año se efectuarán vuelos más complicados y largos en aparatos tripulados por cosmonautas. ... Está perfectamente fundado calificar al Acuerdo sobre el salvamento de cosmonautas de humanitario acto de derecho internacional de los Estados Miembros de las Naciones Unidas con respecto a los valerosos exploradores del piélago cósmico, que, según los propios términos del Acuerdo, son “enviados de la humanidad en el espacio ultraterrestre”.-57 -Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales Vigésimo sexto período de sesiones de la Asamblea General (A/PV.1998): Sr. Migliuolo (Italia) en su calidad de Relator de la Primera Comisión: “El proyecto de convenio constituye el resultado de largos y persistentes esfuerzos realizados por un distinguido grupo de juristas internacionales y diplomáticos, quienes durante años han tratado de avanzar hacia la expansión del corpus juris en relación con los aspectos internacionales de la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos. Sr. Shepard (Estados Unidos de América): “El proyecto de convenio sobre la responsabilidad es un tratado importante que se basa en percepciones realistas de interés y beneficio mutuos. Creemos que ocupará su lugar al lado del Tratado sobre el espacio ultraterrestre de 1967 y el Acuerdo sobre los astronautas de 1968, tan altamente elogiados. El proyecto de convenio sobre la responsabilidad debería permitir que razonablemente fuera posible el pronto pago de una indemnización equitativa en caso de daños causados por el lanzamiento, el vuelo o el retorno de vehículos espaciales construidos por el hombre.” 1826a sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1826): Sr. Van Ussel (Bélgica) (interpretación del francés): “Los miembros de la Primera Comisión no ignoran que las negociaciones han sido arduas y que se ha necesitado a menudo mucha imaginación, concesiones e incluso sacrificios para poder redactar los artículos del convenio. Si hemos llegado a un acuerdo, después de tantos años de reuniones, de consultas y de intercambios de puntos de vista, es porque todos los miembros de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos, bajo la dirección tan esclarecida como eficaz de su Presidente, Sr. Wyzner, estaban animados por un espíritu constructivo y por la voluntad de conseguir un texto conforme a los principios sagrados del derecho internacional. El Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales ... es, ante todo, el resultado de una transacción que, como ya lo señalé en mi intervención en la 1823a sesión, es el fruto feliz de la unión del derecho y la diplomacia. Sr. Williams (Jamaica): “Mi delegación expresa su agradecimiento a la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos por el trabajo que ha puesto durante años en este proyecto de convenio y por, finalmente, presentarlo como documento para nuestra aprobación. Nos damos cuenta de las casi insuperables dificultades que ello entraña. Como crece el número de objetos que se lanzan al espacio ultraterrestre, tenía cierta urgencia el ponerse de acuerdo sobre algunas reglas de conducta para el caso de que un objeto espacial ocasionara daños al regresar a la Tierra. La Comisión ha tratado de solucionar estos problemas pendientes mediante la transacción.” Sr. Seaton (República Unida de Tanzanía): “Felicitamos a la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos por ponerse de acuerdo sobre el proyecto de convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales. Creemos que éste merece el cuidadoso examen de todos los Estados.” Sr. Farhang (Afganistán): “La delegación de Afganistán recibe con agrado los esfuerzos hechos por la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos y por su Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos. También alabamos el espíritu de transacción demostrado por las principales Potencias espaciales que hicieron posible la preparación del proyecto de convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales.” Sr. Issraelyan (Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas) (interpretación del ruso): “En particular, nos complace destacar la aprobación del proyecto de resolución A/C.1/L.570/Rev.1, en que se acoge favorablemente el proyecto de convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales; ha sido aprobado así el mismo texto que después de largo tiempo consiguió preparar la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos. Expresamos la esperanza, como se dice ya en la resolución aprobada, de que eventualmente el convenio logre la adhesión más amplia posible.”-58 -Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre 1988ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1988): Sr. Jankowitsch (Austria), en su calidad de Presidente de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos: “La Comisión... ha realizado una vez más una contribución a este importante nuevo conjunto de leyes al aprobar un convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre que se presentará a la Asamblea General en el actual período de sesiones para su examen y aprobación. No satisface y, por supuesto, no puede satisfacer completamente a todos pero, además de ser el fruto de varios años de trabajo arduo y esmerado, representa también, en mi opinión, el nivel óptimo de arreglo al que se podía llegar en el estado actual de la tecnología. Es por ello que el proyecto de convenio recibió la aprobación unánime de los miembros de la Comisión... El proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre es por lo tanto un instrumento indispensable para garantizar que las reclamaciones de víctimas inocentes basadas en el Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales puedan atenderse pronta y eficazmente. Complementa el conjunto de normas que componen el Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales en el sentido de que facilitará los procedimientos para identificar objetos espaciales en caso de duda. A este respecto, el proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre es, a nuestro modo de ver, una valiosa contribución para complementar el conjunto de normas internacionales existentes en esta esfera; por consiguiente, representa un importante paso adelante en el progresivo desarrollo y codificación del derecho internacional del espacio”. Sr. Wyzner (Polonia), en su calidad de Presidente de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos: “El proyecto de convenio es un instrumento formulado cuidadosamente tras una larga reflexión. Es el fruto de negociaciones amplias y detalladas entre delegaciones que tenían puntos de vista diferentes y representaban distintas escuelas de pensamiento, pero que a pesar de ello trataron de lograr un acuerdo tan amplio como fuese posible”. 1990ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1990): Sr. Kuche (Estados Unidos de América): “Durante la negociación de este convenio fue posible solucionar muchas cuestiones difíciles, y estimamos que el acuerdo al que se ha llegado es razonable, tiene en cuenta intereses diversos, y constituirá una aportación útil al conjunto de normas de derecho internacional que se está gestando en relación con la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos”. Sr. Frazao (Brasil) (interpretación del francés): “La aprobación por la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos de un proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre es, por supuesto, un logro notable, y por ello deseamos felicitar calurosamente a la Subcomisión y, en especial, a su incansable Presidente, el Embajador Wyzner. Gracias al espíritu de entendimiento y a la voluntad de conciliación que predominó durante el último período de sesiones de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos, en el presente período de sesiones la Asamblea podrá proceder a la aprobación del texto final de un convenio a todas luces necesario”. 1991ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1991): Sr. Datcu (Rumania) (interpretación del francés): “Este convenio, que complementa las disposiciones del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales, es un importante paso adelante hacia el establecimiento de un marco jurídico general para la cooperación entre los Estados en las actividades espaciales”. Sr. Rydbeck (Suecia): “Observamos con gran satisfacción que la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos nos presenta este año resultados concretos en forma de un proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre. La preparación del texto que tenemos ante nosotros ha requerido muchos años de esfuerzos en el seno de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos. Marca un nuevo hito en los logros alcanzados por las Naciones Unidas en la esfera del espacio ultraterrestre. ... A nuestro modo de ver, el Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre complementa eficazmente las disposiciones del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales. La aprobación del Convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre tal vez contribuya también a un aumento del número de ratificaciones del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales y de los demás instrumentos aprobados por la Naciones Unidas en la esfera del espacio ultraterrestre”. Sr. Todorov (Bulgaria) (interpretación del ruso): “El hecho de que en la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos se haya llegado a un acuerdo para la formulación de un texto realista y equilibrado ha confirmado una vez más la reputación de la Subcomisión como órgano que está realizando una importante contribución al desarrollo y la codificación del derecho internacional del espacio”. 1992ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1992): Sr. Charvet (Francia) (interpretación del francés): “Deseo subrayar que los resultados alcanzados con respecto al registro de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre constituyen un ejemplo para las otras cuestiones que tiene ante sí la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos. De hecho, estos resultados demuestran lo que puede lograrse cuando existe entre los Estados el deseo de llegar a una solución en un espíritu de cooperación”. Sr. Brankovic (Yugoslavia): “Este [proyecto de convenio] constituye sin duda un logro muy importante en la esfera de la legislación relativa al espacio ultraterrestre. La aprobación y aplicación de este convenio contribuirá indudablemente a alcanzar uno de los objetivos fundamentales, la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos, y representará un paso muy importante en esa dirección”.-59 -1994ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1994): Sr. Yokota (Japón): “La finalización del proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre es otro acontecimiento memorable en la historia de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos. ... Espero sinceramente que la Comisión apruebe por unanimidad el proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre, que en mi opinión constituye otro hito en el progresivo desarrollo del derecho relativo al espacio ultraterrestre. ... Mi delegación estima que la comunidad internacional puede derivar una importante lección del análisis cuidadoso de las largas y difíciles negociaciones que han permitido terminar este año el proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre”. 1995ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1995): Sr. Isa (Pakistán): “Este proyecto de convenio es un complemento necesario del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales y constituye una valiosa aportación al derecho espacial. La responsabilidad por daños causados por objetos espaciales sólo puede atribuirse correctamente si existe un sistema para determinar el origen de esos objetos”. Sr. Al-Masri (República Árabe Siria) (interpretación del árabe): “Los alentadores resultados alcanzados por la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos -principalmente el proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre-nos permiten esperar que los obstáculos que siguen impidiendo la realización de una serie de logros en esta esfera -en particular la elaboración de normas internacionales relativas a la Luna, las transmisiones directas de televisión por satélites artificiales y la teleobservación-se eliminarán gracias a nuestra buena voluntad y a nuestra fe sincera en los principios de la cooperación internacional y las relaciones amistosas entre los pueblos”. Sr. Yango (Filipinas): “Este proyecto de convenio es una nueva y excelente contribución de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos al desarrollo del derecho internacional con miras a la utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos. A nuestro modo de ver, el proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre es un complemento necesario de acuerdos anteriores. ... En este proyecto de convenio se establece un sistema obligatorio de registro de los objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre no sólo a nivel nacional sino también a nivel internacional. Estos registros son una fuente de datos vitales y necesarios en los continuos esfuerzos desplegados por la humanidad para la exploración y utilización del espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos”. 1996ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1996): Sr. Plaja (Italia): “No ha sido fácil llegar a un acuerdo sobre el texto [del Convenio] y, como es habitual en estas negociaciones internacionales, es el resultado de varias transacciones que reflejan el espíritu de adaptación de muchos miembros que sacrificaron sus posiciones originales para alcanzar un consenso general. El proyecto de convenio sobre el registro de objetos lanzados al espacio ultraterrestre representa otro pequeño paso no sólo hacia la finalización del nuevo conjunto de leyes espaciales en las que hemos estado trabajando, sino también hacia una nueva ‘Magna Carta’ de leyes y reglamentos mundiales que se utilizarán y respetarán en el futuro para la determinación de las relaciones internacionales entre los pueblos.” 1997ª sesión de la Primera Comisión (A/C.1/PV.1997): Sr. Azzout (Argelia) (interpretación del francés): “El resultado obtenido es por cierto de fundamental importancia, ya que este documento jurídico es una contribución, en términos prácticos y precisos, a la nueva legislación que se está elaborando gradualmente, y constituye un complemento armonioso del Convenio sobre la responsabilidad internacional por daños causados por objetos espaciales”.-60 -Acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes 15ª sesión de la Comisión Política Especial (A/SPC/34/SR.15) El Sr. Ahmed (India) dice que la aprobación del tratado por la Asamblea General garantizará la explotación de los recursos naturales de la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes en forma ordenada y racional mediante la creación de un régimen internacional que asegure que dichos recursos, como patrimonio común de la humanidad, se exploten en beneficio de toda la humanidad. El Sr. Enterlein (República Democrática Alemana) afirma que el proyecto de acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna, aprobado por consenso en el 22º período de sesiones de la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos, contiene valiosas disposiciones concretas relativas al uso del espacio ultraterrestre. Es de particular importancia que, de conformidad con el artículo III del proyecto de acuerdo, todos los Estados partes utilicen la Luna exclusivamente con fines pacíficos. También es esencial para la paz y la distensión que el proyecto de acuerdo confirme la desmilitarización de la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes y prohíba la puesta en órbita en torno de ellos de objetos que transporten armas nucleares u otras armas de destrucción en masa. Con la aprobación de ese acuerdo, otra parte importante del espacio ultraterrestre y de las actividades que en él se realizan quedará sujeta a disposiciones concretas, detalladas y de carácter obligatorio en virtud del derecho internacional. El hecho de que se haya podido elaborar el proyecto de acuerdo por consenso constituye una prueba patente del valor de principio del consenso en la elaboración de disposiciones jurídicas relativas al espacio ultraterrestre. 16ª sesión de la Comisión Política Especial (A/SPC/34/SR.16): El Sr. Barton (Canadá) señala con satisfacción que la Comisión ha terminado finalmente de redactar un proyecto de tratado concerniente a la Luna, cuyo texto reitera el principio enunciado en el Tratado de 1967, a saber, que la Luna y los otros cuerpos celestes serán utilizados con fines exclusivamente pacíficos; prohíbe expresamente todo recurso a la amenaza o al empleo de la fuerza e implica que las ventajas obtenidas de la explotación de los recursos celestes serán compartidas equitativamente entre todas las partes. El Sr. Fujita (Japón) dice que el proyecto de acuerdo contiene diversos principios capitales que, por su fuerza obligatoria, deberían contribuir eficazmente a fomentar una mayor colaboración entre los Estados con el objeto de explorar y utilizar el espacio ultraterrestre con fines pacíficos. La Sra. Nowotny (Austria) manifiesta que en su período de sesiones anterior, la Comisión sobre la Utilización del Espacio Ultraterrestre con Fines Pacíficos pudo finalizar, basándose en los trabajos de la Subcomisión de Asuntos Jurídicos, la elaboración del proyecto de acuerdo que debe regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, lo que constituye una etapa en extremo importante de la codificación del derecho internacional relativo al espacio ultraterrestre. Gracias a dicho acuerdo, la utilización de los recursos naturales de los cuerpos celestes y del espacio ultraterrestre, que permitiría aliviar las fuertes presiones a que está sometida la humanidad debido a los limitados recursos de la Tierra, podrán canalizarse en un medio espacial esencialmente pacífico, de una manera ordenada y conforme al derecho internacional, a base de una cooperación y comprensión mutuas, y según las modalidades oportunas convenidas de antemano. Sólo en estas condiciones podrá beneficiarse toda la humanidad. 17ª sesión de la Comisión Política Especial (A/SPC/34/SR.17): La Sra. Oliveros (Argentina) señala que, en lo que respecta al proyecto de tratado sobre la Luna, las diferencias de opinión que habían aparecido desde el principio y que a veces parecían irreconciliables, han sido superadas, demostrando nuevamente que la negociación entre los Estados es el método más eficaz de salvar tales obstáculos. A ese respecto, el proyecto de tratado refleja un buen equilibrio entre los diferentes intereses, y la delegación de la Argentina estima que tanto los países desarrollados como los países en desarrollo pueden sentirse satisfechos con su contenido. El proyecto de tratado también renueva la credibilidad de la Comisión sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre y pone de manifiesto que se trata de uno de los órganos más eficaces de las Naciones Unidas, puesto que en su relativamente corta existencia ha elaborado cinco instrumentos internacionales de gran importancia. El tratado también constituye un excelente ejemplo de cómo puede llevarse adelante la tarea del desarrollo progresivo y del derecho internacional y su codificación en virtud del inciso a) del Artículo 13 de la Carta. El Sr. Roslyakov (Unión de Repúblicas Socialistas Soviéticas) afirma que el proyecto de acuerdo es un documento minucioso y equilibrado que satisface las necesidades de todos los países, independientemente de su nivel de desarrollo económico y grado de participación en las actividades del espacio ultraterrestre. El Sr. Cotton (Nueva Zelandia) dice que el proyecto de tratado, que establece las pautas que han de guiar la conducta de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes, representará un progreso de importancia en la cooperación internacional. 18ª sesión de la Comisión Política Especial (A/SPC/34/SR.18): El Sr. Albornoz (Ecuador) señala que el que se haya terminado el proyecto de acuerdo que ha de regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes representa un hecho concreto de progreso. Es alentador que este instrumento no sólo estipule que la exploración y la utilización de la Luna son de la incumbencia de toda la humanidad sino que tales actividades se deben efectuar en provecho y en interés de todos los países, cualquiera que sea su grado de desarrollo. Los Estados partes en ese acuerdo deberán utilizar la Luna exclusivamente con fines pacíficos y no pondrán en órbita alrededor de la Luna objetos portadores de armas nucleares.-61 -El Sr. Kalina (Checoslovaquia) dice que la delegación de Checoslovaquia se felicita por la conclusión de los trabajos sobre el acuerdo que ha de regir las actividades de los Estados en la Luna y otros cuerpos celestes. La conclusión de esa labor demuestra que, con la voluntad política necesaria, incluso las cuestiones más difíciles y delicadas pueden resolverse. El acuerdo sobre la Luna contiene el concepto de patrimonio común de la humanidad. En él se reconoce la necesidad de contar con la cooperación internacional en gran escala de todos los países en el espacio ultraterrestre, cualquiera que sea su nivel de desarrollo. 19ª sesión de la Comisión Política Especial (A/SPC/34/SR.19): El Sr. Petree (Estados Unidos de América) dice que el proyecto de tratado sobre la Luna se basa en gran medida en el Tratado sobre el Espacio Ultraterrestre de 1967, y de ningún modo limita las estipulaciones de este último. Representa asimismo, por derecho propio, un avance significativo en la codificación del derecho internacional que versa sobre el espacio ultraterrestre, y contiene obligaciones de aplicación inmediata y a largo plazo. El Sr. Kolbasin (República Socialista Soviética de Bielorrusia) declara que el proyecto de tratado sobre la Luna, además de ser una contribución de importancia al derecho internacional, será un elemento importante en el desarrollo de la confianza mutua entre los Estados y contribuirá a fortalecer la paz mundial. El Sr. Gómez Robledo (México) manifiesta que, en opinión de la delegación de México, el proyecto de tratado ha logrado un difícil equilibrio entre el idealismo y el realismo al establecer reglas por las que se han de guiar las actividades de la humanidad sobre la Luna. El Sr. Suryokusumo (Indonesia) dice que Indonesia acoge con satisfacción el proyecto de acuerdo relativo a la Luna, que es sin duda un hito en el desarrollo del derecho del espacio y una prueba de los progresos que pueden realizarse en la solución de las cuestiones si se reconocen los intereses comunes y se manifiesta un espíritu de avenencia. El Sr. Diez (Chile) afirma que la conclusión del acuerdo constituye un logro para los países desarrollados y los países en desarrollo por cuanto consagra, sobre la base de la igualdad, la cooperación efectiva de los Estados en la exploración y eventual utilización de la Luna en beneficio de toda la humanidad.Oficina de Asuntos del Espacio Ultraterrestre Centro Internacional de Viena A.P. 500, A-1400 Viena, Austria Teléfono: +(43)(1) 26060-4950 Fax: +(43)(1) 26060-5830