Model_Law_against_TIP_en_Model_Law_against_TIP_fr_EF
Correct misalignment Change languages order
Model_Law_against_TIP_en.pdf (english) Model_Law_against_TIP_fr.pdf (french)
Model Law against Trafficking in Persons UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME Model Law against Trafficking in Persons UNITED NATIONS Vienna, 2009Note Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations document. UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION Sales No. E.09.V.11 ISBN 978-92-1-133674-0iii Contents Page Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter I. General provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Article 1. [Title]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Article 2. Commencement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Article 3. General principles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Article 4. Scope of application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Chapter II. Definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Article 5. Definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Chapter III. Jurisdiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Article 6. Application of this Law within the territory. . . . . . . . . . 25 Article 7. Application of this Law outside the territory. . . . . . . . . 26 Chapter IV. Criminal provisions: basic criminal offences as a foundation for trafficking offences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking. . . . . 31 Article 8. Trafficking in persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Article 9. Aggravating circumstances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Article 10. Non‑liability [non‑punishment] [non‑prosecution] of victims of trafficking in persons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Article 11. Use of forced labour and services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Chapter VI. Criminal provisions: ancillary offences and offences related to trafficking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Article 12. Accomplice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Article 13. Organizing and directing to commit an offence. . . . . . 46 Article 14. Attempt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46iv Page Article 15. Unlawful handling of travel or identity documents. . . 47 Article 16. Unlawful disclosure of the identity of victims and/or witnesses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Article 17. Duty of, and offence by, commercial carriers . . . . . . . 49 Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Article 18. Identification of victims of trafficking in persons . . . . 53 Article 19. Information to victims. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Article 20. Provision of basic benefits and services to victims of trafficking in persons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Article 21. General protection of victims and witnesses . . . . . . . . 58 Article 22. Child victims and witnesses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Article 23. Protection of victims and witnesses in court. . . . . . . . 62 Article 24. Participation in the criminal justice process. . . . . . . . . 64 Article 25. Protection of data and privacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Article 26. Relocation of victims and/or witnesses. . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Article 27. Right to initiate civil action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Article 28. Court-ordered compensation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Article 29. Compensation for victims of trafficking in persons... 69 Chapter VIII. Immigration and return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Article 30. Recovery and reflection period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Article 31. Temporary or permanent residence permit. . . . . . . . . . 75 Article 32. Return of victims of trafficking in persons to [name of State]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Article 33. Repatriation of victims of trafficking in persons to another State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Article 34. Verification of legitimacy and validity of documents upon request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Chapter IX. Prevention, training and cooperation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Article 35. Establishment of a national anti-trafficking coordinating body [inter-agency anti-trafficking task force]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Article 36. Establishment of the office of a national rapporteur [national monitoring and reporting mechanism]. . . . . . 87 Article 37. Cooperation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Chapter X. Regulatory power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Article 38. Rules and regulations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 911 Introduction1 The UNODC Model Law against Trafficking in Persons was developed by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in response to the request of the General Assembly to the Secretary-General to promote and assist the efforts of Member States to become party to and implement the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime2 and the Protocols thereto. It was developed in particular to assist States in implementing the provisions contained in the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing that Convention.3 The Model Law will both facilitate and help systematize provision of legislative assistance by UNODC as well as facilitate review and amendment of existing legislation and adoption of new legislation by States themselves. It is designed to be adaptable to the needs of each State, whatever its legal tradition and social, economic, cultural and geographical conditions. The Model Law contains all the provisions that States are required or recommended to introduce into their domestic legislation by the Protocol. The distinction between mandatory and optional provisions is indicated in the commentary to the law. This distinction is not made with regard to the general provisions and the definitions, as they are an integral part of the Model Law, but are not mandated by the Protocol per se. Recommended provisions may also stem from other international instruments. Whenever appropriate or necessary, several options for language are suggested in order to reflect the differences between legal cultures. The commentary also indicates the source of the provision and, in some cases, supplies alternatives to the suggested text or examples of national legislation from various countries (in unofficial translation where necessary). Due regard is also given to the interpretative notes for the travaux préparatoires of the Protocol4 and the legislative guides for the 1The introduction is intended as an explanatory note on the genesis, nature and scope of the Model Law on Trafficking in Persons; it is not part of the text of the Model Law. 2United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 2225, No. 39574. 3Ibid., vol. 2237, No. 39574. 4A/55/383/Add.1.2 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocols thereto. It should be emphasized that matters related to international cooperation in criminal matters, as well as crimes of participation in an organized criminal group, corruption, obstruction or justice and money-laundering, which often accompany human trafficking activities, are contained in the “parent” Convention. It is therefore essential that the Trafficking in Persons Protocol provisions be read and applied together with the provisions of the Convention and that domestic legislation be developed to implement not only the Protocol but also the Convention. In addition, it is of particular importance that any legislation on trafficking in persons be in line with a State’s constitutional principles, the basic concepts of its legal system, its existing legal structure and enforcement arrangements, and that definitions used in such legislation on trafficking in persons be consistent with similar definitions used in other laws. The Model Law is not meant to be incorporated as a whole without a careful review of the whole legislative context of a given State. In that respect, the Model Law cannot stand alone and domestic legislation implementing the Convention is essential for it to be effective. The work on the UNODC Model Law against Trafficking in Persons has been carried out by the Organized Crime and Criminal Justice Section of the Division for Treaty Affairs in cooperation with the Anti-Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling Unit of the Division for Operations and the Statistics and Surveys Section of the Division for Policy Analysis and Public Affairs. Two consultant drafters, Marjan Wijers and Roelof Haveman, assisted UNODC. A group of experts5 in the field of human trafficking, from a variety of legal and geographical backgrounds met to discuss and review the draft of the Model Law. 5Experts were from Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, France, Georgia, Israel, Lebanon, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Slovakia, Thailand, Uganda and the United States of America, as well as representatives of the International Labour Organization and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. 3 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Preamble The Government of [name of State], Concerned with the problem of trafficking in persons in [name of State], Considering that trafficking in persons constitutes a serious offence and a violation of human rights, Considering also that, in line with the international and/or regional conventions to which [name of State] is a party, measures must be taken to prevent trafficking in persons, to punish the traffickers and to assist and protect the victims of such trafficking, including by protecting their human rights, Considering further the international obligations accepted by [name of State] when it ratified/acceded to [the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its supplementary Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children,] [the ILO Convention concerning Forced or Compulsory Labour,] [the ILO Convention concerning the Abolition of Forced Labour,] [the Convention on the Rights of the Child,] [the ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour,] [the Slavery Convention,] [the Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery,] [the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women,] [the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Their Families], Considering that all actions and initiatives against trafficking in persons must be non‑discriminatory and take gender equality into account, as well as a child-sensitive approach, Recognizing that, in order to deter traffickers and bring them to justice, it is necessary to appropriately criminalize trafficking in persons and related offences, prescribe appropriate punishment, give priority to the investigation and prosecution of trafficking offences and assist and protect the victims of such offences,4 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Recognizing also that advocacy, awareness-raising, education, research, training, counselling and other measures are necessary to help families, local communities and governmental and civil society institutions to fulfil their responsibilities in preventing trafficking in persons, in protecting and assisting the victims of such trafficking and in law enforcement, Recognizing further that children who are victims or witnesses are particularly vulnerable and need special protection, assistance and support appropriate to their age, gender, level of maturity and special needs in order to prevent further hardship and trauma that may result from their participation in the criminal justice process, Believing that effective measures against trafficking in persons require national coordination and cooperation between government agencies as well as between government agencies and civil society, including non‑governmental organizations, Believing also that trafficking in persons is a national as well as a transnational crime, where criminals work across boundaries, and that therefore the response to human trafficking also has to rise above jurisdictional limitations, and that States must cooperate bilaterally and multilaterally to effectively suppress this crime, Be it enacted by the [National Assembly/Parliament/other] of [name of State] during its [number] session on [date]: Commentary Optional provision The preamble, if any, will vary according to the legal culture and the local context.5 Chapter I. General provisions Article 1. [Title] The present Law may be cited as the [Law against Trafficking in Persons] of [name of State] [year of adoption]. Commentary Article 1 is redundant when there is a separate law promulgating the present law on trafficking in persons. In such a case the title of the law will be mentioned in the promulgation law. Examples of titles are: Combating Trafficking in Persons Act; Countering Trafficking in Persons Act; Act to Prevent and Suppress Trafficking in Persons and to Protect and Assist Victims of Trafficking. Article 2. Commencement The present Law shall come into force on the [date]. Article 3. General principles 1. The purposes of this Law are: (a) To prevent and combat trafficking in persons in [name of State]; (b) To protect and assist the victims of such trafficking, while maintaining full respect for their human rights [protecting their human rights]; (c) To ensure just and effective punishment of traffickers [effective investigation and prosecution of traffickers]; and (d) To promote and facilitate national and international cooperation in order to meet these objectives.6 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Source: Protocol, article 2. Paragraph 1 slightly modifies article 2 of the Protocol, by adding subparagraph (c). 2. The measures set forth in this Law [in particular the identification of victims and the measures to protect and promote the rights of victims] shall be interpreted and applied in a way that is not discriminatory on any ground, such as race, colour, religion, belief, age, family status, culture, language, ethnicity, national or social origin, citizenship, gender, sexual orientation, political or other opinion, disability, property, birth, immigration status, the fact that the person has been trafficked or has participated in the sex industry, or other status. Commentary Source: Protocol, article 14. According to article 14, paragraph 1, of the Protocol, nothing in the Protocol “shall affect the rights, obligations and responsibilities of States and individuals under international law, including humanitarian and international human rights law”. The same article (paragraph 2) also provides that the measures set forth in the Protocol “shall be interpreted and applied in a way that is not discriminatory to persons on the ground that they are victims of trafficking in persons. The interpretation and application of those measures shall be consistent with internationally recognized principles of non‑discrimination” as, for example, contained in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (article 2, paragraph 1). At a minimum, the wording of article 14 should be included if a similar provision is not already included in the law as a general principle. An example is: “The measures set forth in this law shall be interpreted and applied in a way that is not discriminatory to persons on the ground that they are victims of trafficking and shall be consistent with the principle of nondiscrimination.” 3. Child victims shall be treated fairly and equally, regardless of their or their parents’ or the legal guardian’s race, colour, religion, belief, age, family status, culture, language, ethnicity, national or social origin, citizenship, gender, sexual orientation, political or other opinion, disability, property, birth, immigration status, the fact that the person has been trafficked or has participated in the sex industry, or other status.Chapter I. General provisions 7 Commentary Source: Protocol, article 14. As the Protocol itself addresses the special needs of children (Protocol, article 6, paragraph 4), and should be consistent with existing human rights law (Protocol, article 14, paragraph 2), such as the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the provisions of the Model Law contain child-specific wording, where appropriate. Paragraph 3 is based on article 14 of the Protocol, and the internationally recognized principle of non‑discrimination, as, for example, contained in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (Economic and Social Council resolution 2005/20, annex). Article 4. Scope of application This Law shall apply to all forms of trafficking in persons, whether national or transnational and whether or not connected with organized crime. Commentary The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, should be interpreted together with the Convention (Protocol, article 1). Article 4 of the Protocol limits its applicability to the prevention, investigation and prosecution of offences that are transnational in nature and involve an organized criminal group, except as otherwise stated. These requirements are not part of the definition of the offence (see the Protocol, article 3 and article 5, paragraph 1) and national laws should establish trafficking in persons as a criminal offence, independently of the transnational nature or the involvement of an organized criminal group (see the Convention, article 34). The Model Law does not distinguish between provisions that require these elements and provisions that do not, in order to ensure equal treatment by national authorities of all cases of trafficking in persons within their territory.9 Chapter II. Definitions Article 5. Definitions Commentary Some jurisdictions prefer to include a chapter on definitions in the law, either at the beginning or at the end of the law. In other jurisdictions the criminal code or law contains a general chapter with definitions, in which case some or all of the below-mentioned definitions can be included. In some cases, States may find it advisable to leave the interpretation to the courts. The definitions here should be read in conjunction with the definitions of crime in chapter IV, Criminal provisions: basic criminal offences as a foundation for trafficking offences. Where possible, definitions are derived from the Protocol, the Convention or other existing international instruments. In some cases examples are given from existing national laws from various countries. In general it is advisable for the definitions used in this law to be in line with already existing definitions provided in domestic law. This chapter only contains definitions of terms that are specific to trafficking in persons. General terms are not included, as they should already be incorporated in the national law (with all national variations possible). These terms include “accomplice”, “aiding and abetting”, “attempt”, “conspiracy”, “falsified identity document”, “legal person” and “structured group”. 1. For the purposes of this Law the following definitions shall apply: (a) “Abuse of a position of vulnerability” shall refer to any situation in which the person involved believes he or she has no real and acceptable alternative but to submit; or “Abuse of a position of vulnerability” shall mean taking advantage of the vulnerable position a person is placed in as a result of [provide a relevant list]: [(i) Having entered the country illegally or without proper documentation;] or [(ii) Pregnancy or any physical or mental disease or disability of the person, including addiction to the use of any substance;] or10 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons [(iii) Reduced capacity to form judgements by virtue of being a child, illness, infirmity or a physical or mental disability;] or [(iv) Promises or giving sums of money or other advantages to those having authority over a person;] or [(v) Being in a precarious situation from the standpoint of social survival;] or [(vi) Other relevant factors.] Commentary Source: Interpretative notes for the official records (travaux préparatoires) of the negotiation of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocols thereto (A/55/383/Add.1), para. 63 (hereinafter “interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1)”). Many other definitions of abuse of a position of vulnerability are possible, including elements such as abuse of the economic situation of the victim or of dependency on any substance, as well as definitions focusing on the objective situation or on the situation as perceived by the victim. It is recommended to include a definition of this crime element in the law, as in practice it appears to pose many problems. In order to better protect the victims, Governments may consider adopting a definition focusing on the offender and his intention to take advantage of the situation of the victim. These may also be easier to prove, as it will not require an inquiry into the state of mind of the victim but only that the offender was aware of the vulnerability of the victim and had the intention to take advantage of it. Examples: “Abuse of a position of vulnerability means such abuse that the person believes he or she has no reasonable alternative but to submit to the labour or services demanded of the person, and includes but is not limited to taking advantage of the vulnerabilities resulting from the person having entered the country illegally or without proper documentation, pregnancy or any physical or mental disease or disability of the person, including addiction to the use of any substance, or reduced capacity to form judgments by virtue of being a child.” (Source: United States State Department Model Law to Combat Trafficking in Persons, 2003) “Taking advantage of the particularly vulnerable position in which the alien is placed as a result of illegal or insecure administrative status, pregnancy, illness, infirmity or a physical or mental disability.” (Source: Belgium, Law containing Provisions to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings and Child Pornography, 13 April 1995, article 77 bis (1) 2)Chapter II. Definitions 11 “Profiting from a situation of physical or psychological inferiority or from a situation of necessity, or through promises or giving sums of money or other advantages to those having authority over a person.” (Source: Italy, Criminal Code, article 601) “State of vulnerability—special state in which a person is found such that he/she is inclined to be abused or exploited, especially due to: “a) his/her precarious situation from the standpoint of social survival; “b) situation conditioned upon age, pregnancy, illness, infirmity, physical or mental deficiency; “c) his/her precarious situation due to illegal entry or stay in a country of transit or destination.” (Source: Republic of Moldova, Law on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Human Beings No. 241-XVI, 20 October 2005, article 2, paragraph 10) (b) “Accompanying dependants” shall mean any family member [and/or] close relative, whom the trafficked person [is bound by law to support] [is legally obligated to provide support], and was present with the victim of trafficking in persons at the time of the offence, as well as any child born during or after the time of the offence; (c) “Child” shall mean any person below the age of eighteen; Commentary Source: Protocol, article 3 (d); Convention on the Rights of the Child, article 1; ILO Convention No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labour, article 2. (d) “Commercial carrier” shall mean a legal or a natural person who engages in the transportation of goods or people for commercial gain; (e) “Coercion” shall mean use of force or threat thereof, and some forms of non‑violent or psychological use of force or threat thereof, including but not limited to: (i) Threats of harm or physical restraint of any person; (ii) Any scheme, plan or pattern intended to cause a person to believe that failure to perform an act would result in serious harm to or physical restraint against any person; (iii) Abuse or any threat linked to the legal status of a person; (iv) Psychological pressure;12 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Source: United States State Department Model Law to Combat Trafficking in Persons, 2003. This is one example of how to define “coercion”. Many variations are possible, focusing on the objective situation or on the situation as perceived by the coerced person. Another example of a criminal law definition is: “Force or coercion includes obtaining or maintaining through acts of threat the labour, service or other activities of a person by physical, legal, psychological or mental coercion, or abuse of authority.” (Source: Nigeria, Harmonised Trafficking in Persons (Prohibition) Law Enforcement and Administration Acts 2005, article 64) (f) “Deception” shall mean any conduct that is intended to deceive a person; or “Deception” shall mean any deception by words or by conduct [as to fact or as to law], [as to]: (i) The nature of work or services to be provided; (ii) The conditions of work; (iii) The extent to which the person will be free to leave his or her place of residence; or [(iv) Other circumstances involving exploitation of the person.] Commentary Deception or fraud can refer to the nature of the work or services that the trafficked person will engage in (for example the person is promised a job as a domestic worker but forced to work as a prostitute), as well as to the conditions under which the person will be forced to perform this work or services (for instance the person is promised the possibility of a legal work and residence permit, proper payment and regular working conditions, but ends up not being paid, is forced to work extremely long hours, is deprived of his or her travel or identity documents, has no freedom of movement and/or is threatened with reprisals if he or she tries to escape), or both. Under the United Kingdom Theft Act 1968, s15(4), the statutory definition provides that “deception” means “any deception (whether deliberate or reckless) by words or by conduct as to fact or as to law, including a deception as to the present intentions of the person using the deception or any other person.”Chapter II. Definitions 13 An alternative approach is to define deception in the context of trafficking in persons. The law in Australia defines a specific offence of “deceptive recruiting for sexual services” as: “(1) A person who, with the intention of inducing another person to enter into an engagement to provide sexual services, deceives that other person about: “(a) the fact that the engagement will involve the provision of sexual services; or “(aa) the nature of sexual services to be provided (for example, whether those services will require the person to have unprotected sex); or “(b) the extent to which the person will be free to leave the place or area where the person provides sexual services; or “(c) the extent to which the person will be free to cease providing sexual services; or “(d) the extent to which the person will be free to leave his or her place of residence; or “(da) if there is or will be a debt owed or claimed to be owed by the person in connection with the engagement—the quantum, or the existence, of the debt owed or claimed to be owed; or “(e) the fact that the engagement will involve exploitation, debt bondage or the confiscation of the person’s travel or identity documents; is guilty of an offence.” (Source: Australia, Criminal Code Act 1995, chapter 8/270, section 270.7) (g) “Debt bondage” shall mean the status or condition arising from a pledge by a debtor of his or her personal services or those of a person under his or her control as security for a debt, if the value of those services as reasonably assessed is not applied towards the liquidation of the debt or if the length of those services is not limited and defined; Commentary Source: Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery, article 1. “Debt bondage” refers to the system by which a person is kept in bondage by making it impossible for him or her to pay off his or her real, imposed or imagined debts. An example of a criminal law definition of “debt bondage” is: “Debt bondage means the status or condition that arises from a pledge by a person:14 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons “(a) of his or her personal services; or “(b) of the personal services of another person under his or her control; as security for a debt owed, or claimed to be owed, (including any debt incurred, or claimed to be incurred, after the pledge is given), by that person if: “(a) the debt owed or claimed to be owed is manifestly excessive; or “(b) the reasonable value of those services is not applied toward the liquidation of the debt or purported debt; or “(c) the length and nature of those services are not respectively limited and defined.” (Source: Australia, Criminal Code Act 1995, section 271.8) (h) “Exploitation of prostitution of others” shall mean the unlawful obtaining of financial or other material benefit from the prostitution of another person; Commentary Source: Trafficking in Human Beings and Peace Support Operations: Trainers Guide, United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute, 2006, p. 153. This is one example of a definition, but many other definitions are possible. Exploitation of prostitution of others and sexual exploitation. The terms “exploitation of prostitution of others” and “sexual exploitation” have been intentionally left undefined in the Protocol in order to allow all States, independent of their domestic policies on prostitution, to ratify the Protocol. The Protocol addresses the exploitation of prostitution only in the context of trafficking (interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1), para. 64). There is no obligation under the Protocol to criminalize prostitution. Different legal systems—whether or not they legalize, regulate, tolerate or criminalize (the exploitation of the prostitution of others) non‑coerced adult prostitution—comply with the Protocol. The term “unlawful” was added to indicate that this has to be unlawful in accordance with the national laws on prostitution. If using these terms in the law, it is advisable to define them. (i) “Forced labour or services” shall mean all work or service that is exacted from any person under the threat of any penalty and for which the person concerned has not offered him-or herself voluntarily; Commentary Source: ILO Convention No. 29 concerning Forced or Compulsory Labour of 1930, articles 2, paragraph 1, and 25. Chapter II. Definitions 15 Forced labour, slavery, practices similar to slavery and servitude. Article 14 of the Protocol takes note of the existence of other international instruments in interpreting the Protocol. The concepts of forced labour, slavery, practices similar to slavery and servitude are elaborated upon in a number of international conventions and should, where applicable to States concerned, guide the interpretation and application of the Protocol. Forced labour and services. The notion of exploitation of labour in the definition allows for a link to be established between the Protocol and ILO Convention concerning Forced Labour and makes clear that trafficking in persons for the purpose of exploitation is encompassed by the definition of forced or compulsory labour of the Convention. Article 2, paragraph 1, of the Convention defines “forced labour or services” as: “All work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily.” While the Protocol draws a distinction between exploitation for forced labour or services and sexual exploitation, this should not lead to the conclusion that coercive sexual exploitation does not amount to forced labour or services, particularly in the context of trafficking. Coercive sexual exploitation and forced prostitution fall within the scope of the definition of forced labour or compulsory labour (ILO, Eradication of Forced Labour, International Labour Conference, 2007, p. 42). Since the coming into force of Convention No. 29, the ILO Committee of Experts has treated trafficking for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation as one of the forms of forced labour. Work or service. A forced labour situation is determined by the nature of the relationship between a person and an “employer”, and not by the type of activity performed, the legality or illegality of the activity under national law, or its recognition as an “economic activity” (ILO, Global Report 2005, p. 6). Forced labour thus includes forced factory work as well as forced prostitution or other forced sexual services (also when prostitution is illegal under national law) or forced begging. Voluntarily. Legislatures and law enforcement have to take into account that the seemingly “voluntary offer” of a worker/victim may have been manipulated or was not based on an informed decision. Also, the initial recruitment can be voluntary and the coercive mechanisms to keep a person in an exploitative situation may come into play later. Where (migrant) workers were induced by deceit, false promises, the retention of travel or identity documents or use of force to remain at the disposal of the employer, the ILO supervisory bodies noted a violation of the Convention. This means that also in cases where an employment relationship was originally the result of a freely concluded agreement, the worker’s right to free choice of employment remains inalienable, that is, a restriction on leaving a job, even when the worker freely agreed to enter into it, can be considered forced labour (ILO Guidelines on Human Trafficking and Forced Labour Exploitation, 2005; ILO, Eradication of Forced Labour, International Labour Conference, 2007, pp. 20-21). One way to deal with the difficulty the use of the term may cause is to include in the definition the use of means such as force or threat. This has 16 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons been the approach taken by several national legislators (see below). The Model Law includes an optional definition that refers back to the “means” element. Any penalty. The threat of a penalty can take multiple forms ranging from (the threat of) physical violence or restraint, (threats of) violence to the victim or his or her relatives, threats to denounce the victim to the police or immigration authorities when his or her employment or residence status is illegal, threats of denunciation to village elders or family members in the case of girls or women forced into prostitution, (threat of) confiscation of travel or identity papers, economic penalties linked to debts, the non‑payment of wages, or the loss of wages accompanied by threats of dismissal if workers refuse to work overtime beyond the scope of their contract or national law. (ILO, Global Report 2005, pp. 5-6; ILO, Eradication of Forced Labour, International Labour Conference, 2007, p. 20). In its report “Human trafficking and forced labour exploitation – guidance for legislation and law enforcement”, ILO identifies five major elements that can point to a forced labour situation: (Threat of) physical or sexual violence; this may also include emotional torture like blackmail, condemnation, using abusive language and so on; Restriction of movement and/or confinement to the workplace or to a limited area; Debt bondage/bonded labour; withholding of wages or refusal of payment; Retention of passport and identity papers so that the worker cannot leave or prove his or her identity and status; Threat of denunciation to the authorities. Examples of criminal law definitions of forced labour are: “Anyone who unlawfully forces a person to work, by using force or other means of pressure or by threat of one of these, or by consent elicited by means of fraud, whether or not for consideration, shall be liable to ... imprisonment.” (Source: Israel, Criminal Code) “(1) Forced labour or services means labour or services that are performed or provided by another person and are obtained or maintained through an actor: “(a) causing or threatening to cause serious harm to any person; “(b) physically restraining or threatening to physically restrain any person; “(c) abusing or threatening to abuse the law or legal process; “(d) knowingly destroying, concealing, removing, confiscating, or possessing any actual or purported passport or other immigration Chapter II. Definitions 17 document, or any other actual or purported government identification document, of another person; “(e) using blackmail; “(f) causing or threatening to cause financial harm to any person or using financial control over any person; or “(g) using any scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause any person to believe that, if the person did not perform such labour or services, that person or another person would suffer serious harm or physical restraint. “(2) ‘Labour’ means work of economic or financial value. “(3) ‘Services’ means an ongoing relationship between a person and the actor in which the person performs activities under the supervision of or for the benefit of the actor or a third party. Commercial sexual activity and sexually explicit performances shall be considered ‘services’ under this Act. “(4) ‘Maintain’ means, in relation to labour or services, to secure continued performance thereof, regardless of any initial agreement on the part of the trafficked person to perform such labour or service.” (Source: State Model Law on Protection for Victims of Human Trafficking, Global Rights 2005, drafted for the states of the United States of America) “Forced labour means the condition of a person who provides labour or services (other than sexual services) and who, because of the use of force or threats: “(a) is not free to cease providing labour or services; or “(b) is not free to leave the place or area where the person provides labour or services.” (Source: Australia, Criminal Code Act 1995, S73.2(3)) (j) “Forced or servile marriages” shall mean any institution or practice in which: (i) A woman [person] or child without the right to refuse is promised or given in marriage on payment of a consideration in money or in kind to her [his] parents, guardian, family or any other person or group; or (ii) The husband of a woman, his family or his clan has the right to transfer her to another person for value received or otherwise; or (iii) A woman on the death of her husband is liable to be inherited by another person;18 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Source: Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, article 1. The definition derived from the above-mentioned Convention refers solely to the practice of forced or servile marriages in relation to women. Legislators may consider updating this definition to include practices in which both women/girls and men/boys can be the subject of forced or servile marriages. This may cover trafficking for marriage and certain forms of “mail order bride” practices. (k) “Organized criminal group” shall mean a structured group of three or more persons, existing for a period of time and acting in concert with the aim of committing one or more offences established under chapters V and VI of this Law, in order to obtain, directly or indirectly, a financial or other material benefit; Commentary Source: Convention, article 2 (a). (l) “Practices similar to slavery” shall include debt bondage, serfdom, servile forms of marriage and the exploitation of children and adolescents; Commentary The Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery does not contain a definition, but specifically prohibits debt bondage, serfdom, servile forms of marriage and the exploitation of children and adolescents. Another definition could be: “Practices similar to slavery shall mean the economic exploitation of another person on the basis of an actual relationship of dependency or coercion, in combination with a serious and far-reaching deprivation of fundamental civil rights, and shall include debt bondage, serfdom, forced or servile marriages and the exploitation of children and adolescents.” (m) “Prostitution” shall have the same definition as defined in [refer to the relevant national legislation]; Commentary See the commentary on article 5, paragraph 1 (h).Chapter II. Definitions 19 (n) “Public official” shall mean: (i) Any person holding a legislative, executive, administrative or judicial office, whether appointed or elected, whether permanent or temporary, whether paid or unpaid, irrespective of that person’s seniority; (ii) Any other person who performs a public function, including for a public agency or public enterprise, or provides a public service; Commentary Source: United Nations Convention against Corruption, article 2. If the national legislation includes a broader definition of “public official”, such a definition can be used for the purpose of this law. (o) “Revictimization” shall mean a situation in which the same person suffers from more than one criminal incident over a specific period of time;Commentary Source: UNODC Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. (p) “Secondary victimization” shall mean victimization that occurs not as a direct result of the criminal act but through the response of institutions and individuals to the victim; Commentary Source: UNODC Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. (q) “Serfdom” shall mean the condition or status of a tenant who is by law, custom or agreement bound to live and labour on land belonging to another person and to render some determinate service to such other person, whether for reward or not, and is not free to change his or her status; Commentary Source: Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, article 1.20 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons (r) “Servitude” shall mean the labour conditions and/or the obligation to work or to render services from which the person in question cannot escape and which he or she cannot change; Commentary Servitude is prohibited by, among other instruments, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966). Neither of these international instruments contains an explicit definition of servitude. The definition given is based on an interpretation of the Universal Declaration and the Covenant listed. In its 2005 judgement in the case of Siliadin v. France the European Court of Human Rights defined servitude as: “An obligation to provide one’s services that is imposed by the use of coercion, and is to be linked to the concept of slavery.” (ECHR, 26 July 2005, No. 73316/01) An example of a criminal law definition of servitude is: “Servitude means a condition of dependency in which the labor or services of a person are provided or obtained by threats of serious harm to that person or another person, or through any scheme, plan or pattern intended to cause the person to believe that, if the person did not perform such labor or services, that person or another person would suffer serious harm.” (Source: US State Department Model Law to Combat Trafficking in Persons) (s) “Sexual exploitation” shall mean the obtaining of financial or other benefits through the involvement of another person in prostitution, sexual servitude or other kinds of sexual services, including pornographic acts or the production of pornographic materials; Commentary See the commentary on article 5, paragraph 1 (h). (t) “Slavery” shall mean the status or condition of a person over whom any or all the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised; or “Slavery” shall mean the status or condition of a person over whom control is exercised to the extent that the person is treated like property;Chapter II. Definitions 21 Commentary Source: Slavery Convention of 1926 as amended by the 1953 Protocol, article 1, paragraph 1. The definition in the Slavery Convention may cause some difficulties today, as there could be no rights of ownership for one person over another. In order to solve this difficulty, an alternative definition is included here, which instead requires that the person is “treated like property”. Another definition of slavery, which focuses on the core of the crime—that is, the objectification of human beings—is “reducing a person to a status or condition in which any or all of the powers attaching to the right of property are exercised”. Examples of contemporary criminal law definitions of slavery are: “Slavery is the condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised, including where such a condition results from a debt or a contract made by the person.” (Australia, Criminal Code, section 270.1, as amended in 1999) “There is no settled exhaustive list of all the rights of ownership. However, some of the more ‘standard’ rights are ... the right to possess, the right to manage (i.e. the right to decide how and by whom a thing owned shall be used), the right to the income and capital derived from the thing owned, the right to security (i.e. to retain the thing whilst ever the owner is solvent) and the right to transmit your interest to successors. Therefore if, for example, a person is forced to work for another without receiving any reward for her or his labour, it is likely that the court would find that the person is a slave.” (Explanatory notes to the Australian legislation) “Placing a person in conditions of contemporary slavery shall mean the deprivation of identification documents, restriction of freedom of movement, restriction of communication with his/her family, including correspondence and telephone conversation, cultural isolation as well as forced labour in a situation where human honour and dignity are violated and/or without remuneration or with inadequate remuneration.” (Source: Georgia, Criminal Code, article 143) “Whoever exerts on any other person powers and rights corresponding to ownership; places or holds any other person in conditions of continuing enslavement, sexually exploiting such person, imposing coerced labour or forcing said person into begging, or exploiting him/her in any other way shall be punished .... “Placement or maintenance in a position of slavery occurs when use is made of violence, threat, deceit, or abuse of power; or when anyone 22 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons takes advantage of a situation of physical or mental inferiority and poverty; or when money is promised, payments are made or other kinds of benefits are promised to those who are responsible for the person in question.” (Source: Italy, Penal Code, article 600) “‘Slavery’ means a situation under which powers generally exercised towards property are exercised over a person; in this matter, substantive control over the life of a person or denial of his liberty shall be deemed use of powers as stated.” (Source: Israel, Penal Code, article 375A(c)) “ ‘Slave’ means a person who is held in bondage whose life, liberty, freedom and property are under absolute control of someone.” (Source: Nigeria, Trafficking In Persons (Prohibition) Law, Enforcement And Administration Act, 2003, article 50) “(1) Slavery—the partial or full possession of rights of other person treated like property—shall be punished by imprisonment of from 5 to 10 years. “(2) If the subject of the deeds described above is a child or it has been done with a view to trafficking it shall be punished by imprisonment of from 7 to 10 years. “(3) Slave trade, i.e. forcing into slavery or treatment like a slave, slave keeping with a view to sale or exchange, disposal of a slave, any deed related to the slave trading or trafficking, as well as sexual slavery or divestment of sexual freedom through slavery, shall be punished by imprisonment of from 5 to 10 years.” (Source: Azerbaijan, Criminal Code, article 106) (u) “Support person” shall mean a specially trained person designated to assist the child throughout the justice process to prevent risks of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization; Commentary Source: UNODC Model Law on Justice in Matters Involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. (v) “Victim of trafficking”, for the purposes of articles 19-22, 25, 26 and 30-34 of this Law, shall mean any natural person who has been subject to trafficking in persons, or whom [the competent authorities, including the Chapter II. Definitions 23 designated non‑governmental organizations where applicable] reasonably believe is a victim of trafficking in persons, regardless of whether the perpetrator is identified, apprehended, prosecuted or convicted. For all other articles, a victim of trafficking shall be any person or persons identified in accordance with article 18, paragraph 1, of this Law. Commentary A two-pronged definition of “victim of trafficking” will be used throughout this law. The first definition/determination of status included here is a relatively low threshold and entitles one to basic services and assistance. The higher threshold status determination will be made in accordance with government-established guidelines. This two-pronged definition attempts to strike a balance between fulfilling victims’ basic and immediate needs upon fleeing a situation of exploitation and a Government’s need to regulate the dispensation of services and benefits. A more extensive definition of “victim” is found in the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power: “1. ‘Victims’ means persons who, individually or collectively, have suffered harm, including physical or mental injury, emotional suffering, economic loss or substantial impairment of their fundamental rights, through acts or omissions that are in violation of criminal laws operative within Member States, including those laws proscribing criminal abuse of power. “2. A person may be considered a victim, under this Declaration, regardless of whether the perpetrator is identified, apprehended, prosecuted or convicted and regardless of the familial relationship between the perpetrator and the victim. The term ‘victim‘ also includes, where appropriate, the immediate family or dependants of the direct victim and persons who have suffered harm in intervening to assist victims in distress or to prevent victimization.” Another option is the definition in the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings: “any natural person who is subject to trafficking in human beings as defined in this article” (article 4 (e)). In order to make the process simple, we recommend that the definition be linked to the mechanism for identification of victims in each national system. In some countries, this is done by non‑governmental organizations (for example, in India). 2. Terms not defined in this article shall be interpreted consistently with their use elsewhere in national law. 25 Chapter III. Jurisdiction Commentary Jurisdiction may already have been provided for in other laws. If not, articles 6 and 7 should be incorporated into the anti-trafficking law. Article 6. Application of this Law within the territory Commentary Mandatory provision This Law shall apply to any offence established under chapters IV and V of this Law when: (a) The offence is committed within the territory of [name of State]; (b) The offence is committed on board a vessel or aircraft that is registered under the laws of [name of State] at the time the offence was committed; Commentary Source: Convention, article 15, paragraph 1 (a) and (b). Territorial jurisdiction and jurisdiction on board a vessel or aircraft that is registered in the State (the so-called flag State principle) exists in all States. In common law countries this may even be the only basis for jurisdiction. The criterion is the place where the criminal act has been committed (i.e. the locus delicti is in the territory of the State). According to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 1982, jurisdiction may be extended to permanent installations on the continental shelf as part of the territory (optional). (c) The offence is committed by a [name of State] national whose extradition is refused on the grounds of nationality.26 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Source: Convention, articles 15, paragraph 3, and 16, paragraph 10. Article 7. Application of this Law outside the territory Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Convention, articles 15, paragraph 3, and 16, paragraph 10. 1. This Law shall apply to any offence established under chapters V and VI of this Law committed outside the territory of [name of State] when: (a) The offence is committed by a [name of State] national; (b) The offence is committed by a stateless person who has his or her habitual residence in [name of State] at the time of the commission of the offence; or (c) The offence is committed against a victim who is a [name of State] national; Commentary Note that establishment of jurisdiction over a national is compulsory in the framework of the principle aut dedere aut judicare. Article 15, paragraph 3, of the Convention provides the jurisdictional basis for prosecution of a national for crimes he or she committed abroad, in cases where the State does not extradite him or her on the ground of nationality. According to the Convention, in such cases of refusal of extradition, submission of the case without undue delay to the competent authorities for the purpose of prosecution is mandatory. Extension of jurisdiction over acts committed by a citizen of a State in the territory of another State (active personality principle) is mostly done with regard to specific crimes of particular gravity. In some jurisdictions the active personality principle is restricted to those acts which are not only a crime according to the law of the State whose national commits the act, but also according to the law of the State on whose territory the act is committed. 2. This Law shall also apply to acts with a view to the commission of an offence under this Law within [name of State]. Chapter III. Jurisdiction 27 Commentary Paragraph 2 is a further extension of jurisdiction in line with the previous one. It extends jurisdiction to cases in which the acts have not led to a completed crime, but where an attempt has been made in the territory of another State to commit a crime in the territory of the jurisdictional State.29 Chapter IV. Criminal provisions: basic criminal offences as a foundation for trafficking offences Commentary It is essential while establishing trafficking offences to ensure that national legislation adequately criminalizes participation in an organized criminal group (Convention, article 5); laundering of the proceeds of crime (article 6); corruption (article 8); and obstruction of justice (article 23). In addition, measures to establish the liability of legal persons must be adopted (article 10). UNODC is currently developing best practices and model provisions for the implementation of these articles. 31 Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking Commentary This chapter contains the criminal offences related to trafficking in persons. Article 8. Trafficking in persons Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, articles 3 and 5; interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1); Convention, articles 2 (b) and 34. 1. Any person who: (a) Recruits, transports, transfers, harbours or receives another person; (b) By means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability, or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person; (c) For the purpose of exploitation of that person; shall be guilty of an offence of trafficking in persons and upon conviction shall be subject to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... [a fine of the ... category]. Commentary This definition closely follows the definition of trafficking in persons in article 3 (a) of the Protocol: “Trafficking in persons shall mean the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a person by means of the threat or use of force or other means of coercion, or by abduction, fraud, deception, abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability, or by the giving or receiving of 32 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs.” Means. The inclusion of fraud, deception and the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability recognizes that trafficking can occur without the use of any overt (physical) force. Example: “(Trafficking in human beings). – Whoever carries out trafficking in persons who are in the conditions referred to in article 600, that is, with a view to perpetrating the crimes referred to in the first paragraph of said article; or whoever leads any of the aforesaid persons through deceit or obliges such person by making use of violence, threats, or abuse of power; by taking advantage of a situation of physical or mental inferiority, and poverty; or by promising money or making payments or granting other kinds of benefits to those who are responsible for the person in question, to enter the national territory, stay, leave it or migrate to said territory, shall be punished with imprisonment from eight to twenty years.” (Source: Italy, Penal Code, article 601) In some national legislations, trafficking is defined without reference to the use of means (coercion, fraud, deception, etc.), taking into account that some forms of exploitation are coercive by nature. In such cases, the definition includes reference to the acts (recruitment, transportation, transfer harbouring and receipt) and the purpose of exploitation. This facilitates the prosecution of crimes of trafficking and has proved efficient in that context. Forms of exploitation. See the definitions above under article 5 (g)-(j), (l), (m) and (q)-(t). Some national examples are: “377A. Trafficking in Persons “Anyone who carries on a transaction in a person for one of the following purposes or in so acting places the person in danger of one of the following, shall be liable to sixteen years imprisonment: “1. removing an organ from the person’s body; “2. giving birth to a child and taking the child away; “3. subjecting the person to slavery; “4. subjecting the person to forced labor; “5. instigating the person to commit an act of prostitution; “6. instigating the person to take part in an obscene publication or obscene display; Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking 33 “7. committing a sexual offense against the person.” (Source: Israel, Penal Code, article 377A) “Trafficking in persons “1. Actions intended to sell or purchase or undertake other types of activities regarding turning over or obtaining a dependent person (trafficking in persons), shall be subject to arrest—up to six months; or to restriction of freedom—up to three years; or to imprisonment—up to six years. “2. The same actions committed: knowingly against a juvenile; against two or more persons; with the goal of sexploitation or other type of exploitation; with the goal of using the victim’s organs or tissue for purposes of transplantation; by a group of people based on foregoing planning, or by an organized group; by public official at the hand of power abuse shall be penalized by imprisonment for a term of from five to ten years with seizure of property or without. “3. Aforementioned actions that carelessly caused the death or heavy bodily injury of a victim shall be subject to imprisonment for a term of from 8 to 15 years with seizure of property or without.” (Source: Belarus, article 181 of the Criminal Code, as amended by Law No. 227-3 on Changes to the Criminal Code and Criminal Procedure Code, 22 July 2003) “1) Persons who select, transport, hide, or receive individuals or groups of persons for the purpose of using them for acts of debauchery, compulsory labour, removing their organs, or keeping them in forceful subordination, irrespective of their consent, shall be punished with imprisonment of one to eight years and a fine not exceeding eight thousand levs.” (Source: Bulgaria, Criminal Code, article 159a) Consent. The inclusion of means of coercion in the definition excludes consent of the victim. This is reaffirmed in article 3 (b) of the Protocol, which reads: “The consent of a victim of trafficking in persons to the intended exploitation set forth in subparagraph (a) shall be irrelevant where any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) have been used.” This means that, once the elements of the crime of trafficking, including the use of one of the identified means (coercion, deception, etc.), are proven, 34 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons any defence or allegation that the victim “consented” is irrelevant. It also means, for example, that a person’s awareness of being employed in the sex industry or in prostitution does not exclude such person from becoming a victim of trafficking. While being aware of the nature of the work, the person may have been misled as to the conditions of work, which have turned out to be exploitative or coercive. This provision restates existing international legal norms. It is logically and legally impossible to “consent” when one of the means listed in the definition is used. Genuine consent is only possible and legally recognized when all the relevant facts are known and a person exercises free will. However, if there is any doubt about the issue of consent in national domestic law, a separate paragraph should be included in the law. For example: “The consent of the trafficked person to the (intended) exploitation set forth in article 8, paragraph 2, shall be irrelevant if one of the means listed in article 8, paragraph 1 (b), is used.” or “In a prosecution for trafficking in persons under article 8, the alleged consent of a person to the intended exploitation is irrelevant once any of the means or circumstances set forth in article 8, paragraph 2, is established.” The above does not remove the right to a defence. According to paragraph 68 of the interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1), the irrelevance of consent if one of the means is used should not be interpreted as imposing any restriction on the right of the accused to a full defence and to the presumption of innocence. It should also not be interpreted as imposing on the defendant the burden of proof. As in any criminal case, the burden of proof is always on the prosecution, in accordance with domestic law, except where the national law provides for specific exceptions to this rule. Furthermore, article 11, paragraph 6, of the Convention reserves applicable legal defences and other related principles of domestic law to the domestic law of the State party. Criminalization of trafficking offences within national boundaries and offences that are transnational in nature. The Convention (article 34, paragraph 2) requires the criminalization under the domestic law of each State party of the offences established in accordance with the Convention, independently of the transnational nature or the involvement of an organized criminal group. This is in line with article 1, paragraph 3, of the Protocol, which states that offences established under the Protocol shall be regarded as offences established in accordance with the Convention (see also the commentary on article 4). Sanctions. Sanctions should fulfil at least the threshold set for trafficking in persons to constitute a serious crime as defined in the Convention, that is, punishable by a maximum deprivation of liberty of at least four years or a more serious penalty (article 2 (b) of the Convention). Regarding fines, comparative law and practice suggest avoiding setting monetary amounts in the legislative Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking 35 text, as during periods of rapid inflation the fines might quickly become insufficient and lose their deterrent effect. Fines may be referred to in the form of “units” or “categories” and listed in monetary terms in regulations under the principal statute. This drafting method makes it possible for them to be easily and rapidly updated. 2. Exploitation shall include: (a) The exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation; (b) Forced or coerced labour or services [including bonded labour and debt bondage]; (c) Slavery or practices similar to slavery; (d) Servitude [including sexual servitude]; (e) The removal of organs; (f) [Other forms of exploitation defined in national law]. Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, articles 3 and 5; interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1). The definition of exploitation covers the forms of exploitation that, according to the Protocol, shall be included “at a minimum”. The list is therefore not exhaustive. The principle of legality, however, requires crimes to be clearly defined. Additional forms of exploitation will have to be spelled out in the law. Other forms of exploitation. States may consider including also other forms of exploitation in their criminal law. In that case these should be well defined. Other forms of exploitation that, for example, may be included are: “(a) Forced or servile marriage; “(b) Forced or coerced begging; “(c) The use in illicit or criminal activities [including the trafficking or production of drugs]; “(d) The use in armed conflict; “(e) Ritual or customary servitude [any form of forced labour related to customary ritual] [exploitative and abusive religious or cultural practices that dehumanize, degrade or cause physical or psychological harm]; “(f) The use of women as surrogate mothers; “(g) Forced pregnancy; “(h) Illicit conduct of biomedical research on a person.”36 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons The list of forms of exploitation can be adapted taking into account the national experience with specific forms of exploitation and existing legislation. Exploitation. The term “exploitation” is not defined in the Protocol. However, it is generally associated with particularly harsh and abusive conditions of work, or “conditions of work inconsistent with human dignity”. The Belgian Penal Code, for example, specifies exploitation in its definition of trafficking in persons as: “the intent to put somebody to work or permitting the person to be put into work where conditions are contrary to human dignity.” (Source: Belgium, Act to Amend Several Provisions with a View to Combating More Effectively Trafficking of Human Beings and the Practices of Abusive Landlords, August 2005, article 433 quinquies) The French Penal Code specifies as one of the purposes of trafficking “the imposition of living or working conditions inconsistent with human dignity” (Penal Code, as amended in 2003, section 225-4-1). The Penal Code of Germany defines trafficking for labour exploitation by referring to “working conditions that show a crass disparity to the working conditions of other employees performing the same or comparable tasks” (Penal Code, section 231). 3. If the other person mentioned in paragraph 1 (a) is a child, exploitation shall also include: (a) The use [procuring or offering of a child] for illicit or criminal activities [including the trafficking or production of drugs and begging]; (b) The use in armed conflict; (c) Work that, by its nature or by the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health or safety of children, as determined by [quote the name of the national (labour) legislation or authority, e.g. the Ministry of Labour]; (d) The employment or use in work, where the said child has not reached the applicable minimum working age for the said employment or work; (e) [Other forms of exploitation]. Commentary Optional provision All forms of exploitation listed in article 8, paragraph 2, apply to children. Additionally, States may consider including forms of exploitation specific to children, taking into account their national experiences. Article 8, paragraph Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking 37 3, lists a number of forms of exploitation specific to children, which may be included in domestic criminal law. The list is based on the internationally accepted meaning of child labour and extends the forms of exploitation listed in the Protocol to those covered by the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, the Convention concerning Minimum Age for Admission to Employment (ILO Convention No. 138) and the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (2002). Article 3 of the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention defines as “worst forms of child labour”: “(a) All forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as the sale and trafficking of children, debt bondage and serfdom and forced or compulsory labour, including forced or compulsory recruitment of children for use in armed conflict; “(b) The use, procuring or offering of a child for prostitution, for the production of pornography or for pornographic performances; “(c) The use, procuring or offering of a child for illicit activities, in particular for the production and trafficking of drugs as defined in the relevant international treaties; “(d) Work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children.” Subparagraph (a) above refers explicitly to “forced or compulsory labour, including forced or compulsory recruitment of children for use in armed conflict”. Thus, the issue of child soldiers is a special subcategory of forced labour, while article 2, paragraph 2 (a), of ILO Convention No. 29 concerning Forced or Compulsory Labour excludes from the definition of forced labour legal conscription by virtue of military service laws of adults 18 years or above. Paragraph 3 (b). If such hazardous work is not determined by national labour legislation, at least some specific types of occupation or sector may be explicitly enumerated for the purpose of defining trafficking in children, taking into account the prevailing problems in the country, for instance, in mining, cotton plantations, carpet making and so on. Alternatively such enumeration could be left to the regulations or a decision by a minister, given the need to be adaptable to the changes in practice. Paragraph 3 (c). If no minimum age is set or no special protective provisions for children at work are in place, at least a threshold age may be set for the purpose of defining trafficking in children here, taking into consideration the age for ending compulsory schooling, for instance. 4. The recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child for the purpose of exploitation shall be considered trafficking in persons even if this does not involve any of the means set forth in paragraph 1 (b).38 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 3 (c); interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1). This provision follows the Protocol, which states that any recruitment and so on of a child for the purpose of exploitation shall be considered trafficking in persons, even if it does not involve any of the means listed in article 3 (a) of the Protocol. According to the interpretative notes (para. 66), illegal adoption will also fall within the scope of the Protocol, where it amounts to a practice as described above. Concerning the removal of organs (article 8, paragraph 2 (e) above), it should be noted that, as specified in the interpretative notes (para. 65), the removal of organs from children with the consent of a parent or guardian for legitimate medical or therapeutic reasons should not be considered exploitation. Child. According to article 3 (d) of the Protocol, “child” shall mean any person below the age of 18. A higher age limit may be prescribed; however, a lower age limit is not allowed as this gives less protection to children than the Protocol requires. Consent. The issue of consent is not relevant in relation to the trafficking of children as the use of one of the means listed in the Protocol is not required in the case of persons below the age of 18. If there is any doubt concerning the issue of consent, a specific paragraph should be included stating that: “The consent of the victim or the parent or a person having legal or de facto control of a child victim of trafficking to the intended exploitation set forth in article 8, paragraph 2, shall be irrelevant.” Exploitation of children and adolescents is defined as: “Any institution or practice whereby a child or young person under the age of 18 years is delivered by either or both of his natural parents or by his guardian to another person, whether for reward or not, with a view to the exploitation of the child or young person or of his labour.” (Source: Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, articles 1 and 7 (b)) Article 9. Aggravating circumstances Commentary Optional provision This provision may be included if it is in conformity with domestic law. The use of aggravating circumstances is optional. Article 9 can be added to the law, if Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking 39 and in as far as this is in line with existing aggravating circumstances with regard to other crimes. All aggravating circumstances are linked to the offender who knowingly committed the crime of trafficking in persons. It is possible to differentiate between sanctions taking into account the nature and number of aggravating circumstances. For example: “If two or more of the above circumstances are present, the offences under article 8 shall be punished by imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... [a fine of the ... category].” If any of the following circumstances are present, the offences under article 8 shall be punishable by imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... [a fine of the ... category]: (a) Where the offence involves serious injury or death of the victim or another person, including death as a result of suicide; (b) Where the offence involves a victim who is particularly vulnerable, including a pregnant woman; (c) Where the offence exposed the victim to a life-threatening illness, including HIV/AIDS; (d) Where the victim is physically or mentally handicapped; (e) Where the victim is a child; (f) Where the offence involves more than one victim; (g) Where the crime was committed as part of the activity of an organized criminal group; Commentary See the definition in article 2 (a) of the Transnational Organized Crime Convention. (h) Where drugs, medications or weapons were used in the commission of the crime; (i) Where a child has been adopted for the purpose of trafficking; (j) Where the offender has been previously convicted for the same or similar offences; (k) Where the offender is a [public official] [civil servant]; (l) Where the offender is a spouse or the conjugal partner of the victim;40 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons (m) Where the offender is in a position of responsibility or trust in relation to the victim; Commentary Examples are a parent or a person having legal or de facto control over the victim, such as a social worker who is responsible for the minor in the course of his or her functions or responsibilities. This aggravating circumstance clearly does not intend to punish a parent who in good faith sends his or her child(ren) abroad or to family members or another person (for example, to ensure that they get a better education), for what in the end turns into a case of trafficking. To be punishable it must be proved under article 9 that the parent knew that the purpose was the exploitation of the child. Only then can the fact that it concerns a parent act as an aggravating circumstance. (n) Where the offender is in a position of authority concerning the child victim. Article 10. Non‑liability [non‑punishment] [non‑prosecution] of victims of trafficking in persons Commentary Optional provision The Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Human Trafficking of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (E/2002/68/Add.1) offer considerations on non‑punishment of trafficked persons. Recommended principle 7, concerning protection and assistance, states: “Trafficked persons shall not be detained, charged or prosecuted for the illegality of their entry into or residence in countries of transit and destination, or for their involvement in unlawful activities to the extent that such involvement is a direct consequence of their situation as trafficked persons.” Further, recommended guideline 8 recommends that States consider “ensuring that children who are victims of trafficking are not subjected to criminal procedures or sanctions for offences related to their situation as trafficked persons”. The Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings states: “Each Party shall, in accordance with the basic principles of its legal system, provide for the possibility of not imposing penalties on victims for their Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking 41 involvement in unlawful activities, to the extent that they have been compelled to do so.” (Source: Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, Council of Europe Treaty Series, No. 197, article 26) The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings recommends “ensuring that victims of trafficking are not subjected to criminal proceedings solely as a direct result of them having been trafficked”. (Source: OSCE Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings, decision 557/Rev.1, 7 July 2005) In paragraph 13 of its resolution 55/67, the General Assembly invited Governments to consider preventing, within the legal framework and in accordance with national policies, victims of trafficking, in particular women and girls, from being prosecuted for their illegal entry or residence, taking into account that they are victims of exploitation. The suggested provision ensures that victims of trafficking in persons are not prosecuted or otherwise held responsible for offences, be it criminal or other, committed by them as part of the crime of trafficking, such as, in appropriate cases, working in or violating regulations on prostitution, illegally crossing borders, the use of fraudulent documents and so on. Two different criteria are used here: causation (the offence is directly connected/related to the trafficking) and duress (the person was compelled to commit the offences). The proposed provision is without prejudice to general defences such as duress in cases in which the victim was compelled to commit a crime. The proposed provision is possible in legal systems with or without prosecutorial discretion (i.e. whether or not the public prosecutor has the discretionary power to prosecute or not). In legal systems that have prosecutorial discretion, a similar provision could be included in guidelines for prosecutors. For example: “A victim of trafficking should not be detained, imprisoned or held liable for criminal prosecution or administrative sanctions for offences committed by him or her as a direct result of the crime of trafficking in persons, including: “(a) The person’s illegal entry into, exit out of or stay in [State]; “(b) The person’s procurement or possession of any fraudulent travel or identity documents that he or she obtained, or with which he or she was supplied, for the purpose of entering or leaving the country in connection with the act of trafficking in persons; “(c) The person’s involvement in unlawful activities to the extent that he or she was compelled to do so.”42 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons A good practice is not to detain the victims in any case, regardless of their willingness to cooperate with authorities. This may be adopted in regulations on treatment of victims, for example: “Victims of trafficking in persons shall not be held in a detention centre, jail or prison at any time prior to, during or after all civil, criminal or other legal or administrative proceedings.” (See below, article 25, paragraph 4, on victim assistance) Some national examples include: United Nations Interim Administration in Kosovo regulation No. 2001/4 on the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons in Kosovo, which states that “a person is not criminally responsible for prostitution or illegal entry, presence or work in Kosovo if that person provides evidence that supports a reasonable belief that he or she was the victim of trafficking”. The United States Trafficking Victims Protection Act acknowledges that victims of trafficking should not be “penalized solely for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being trafficked, such as using false documents, entering the country without documentation, or working without documentation”. (Source: Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, 18 U.S.C. § 7101(17), (19)). 1. A victim of trafficking in persons shall not be held criminally or administratively liable [punished] [inappropriately incarcerated, fined or otherwise penalized] for offences [unlawful acts] committed by them, to the extent that such involvement is a direct consequence of their situation as trafficked persons. 2. A victim of trafficking in persons shall not be held criminally or administratively liable for immigration offences established under national law. 3. The provisions of this article shall be without prejudice to general defences available at law to the victim. 4. The provisions of this article shall not apply where the crime is of a particularly serious nature as defined under national law. Article 11. Use of forced labour and services Anyone who makes use of the services or labour of a person or profits in any form from the services or labour of a person with the prior knowledge that such labour or services are performed or rendered under one or more of the conditions described in article 8, paragraph 1, shall be guilty of an Chapter V. Criminal provisions: provisions specific to trafficking 43 offence and, upon conviction, shall be liable to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... Commentary Optional provision Article 9, paragraph 5, of the Protocol requires Governments to take measures to discourage the demand for exploitation. Discouraging the demand for exploitation may include measures such as carrying out awareness-raising campaigns and increasing transparency of enterprises’ supply chains. In addition, the use of the services of a victim of trafficking and/or forced labour or services may be penalized in order to deter “users” of services of trafficked victims. The mens rea required here is “knowingly” to ensure that once a person learns that he or she will be using the services of a victim of trafficking, and nevertheless decides to go ahead and benefit from the exploitation of another person, he or she will be punished. Potential clients of victims should be encouraged to report suspicious cases to the police, without facing threat of prosecution. Alternative suggestions for drafting such a provision are: “Anyone who knowingly makes use of or profits from labour or services performed or rendered under conditions of exploitation as defined in article 8, paragraph 2, [labour or services performed or rendered by a victim of trafficking in persons] shall be guilty of an offence and, upon conviction, shall be liable to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... [a fine of the ... category].” or “Anyone who makes use of labour or services that are the object of exploitation as defined in article 8, paragraph 2, with the knowledge that the person is a victim of trafficking shall be guilty of an offence and, upon conviction, shall be liable to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... [a fine of the ... category].” The Protocol does not require that the exploitation be made a criminal offence in and of itself (to criminalize forced labour, servitude and slavery-like practices), therefore these were included in this Model Law only in the context of their being a purpose of the trafficking offence. However, many human rights conventions do require criminalization of these acts. Governments may therefore wish to ensure that “exploitation” is always punishable under domestic law even if the other elements of trafficking were not committed. In this context it should be noted that not all forced labour results from trafficking in persons: according to ILO, about 20 per cent of all forced labour results from trafficking. Legislation against any exploitation of human beings under forced and/or slavery-like conditions as a specific offence will therefore 44 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons be needed no matter how people arrive in these conditions, that is, independently of the presence of the other elements (acts and means) in the definition of trafficking. This would be in line with the major human rights treaties, which clearly prohibit the use of forced labour, slavery, servitude and the like. Example of such a definition: “Anyone who subjects another person to forced labor or services [provides or obtains the labor or services of that person]: “(1) by causing or threatening to cause serious harm to a person, or “(2) by physically restraining or threatening to physically restrain a person or another person related to that person, or “(3) by abusing or threatening to abuse the law or legal process, or “(4) by knowingly destroying, concealing, removing, confiscating, or possessing any travel or identity document of that person, or “(5) by using blackmail, or “(6) by causing or threatening to cause financial harm to that person or by using his or her financial control over that person or to any other person related to that person, or “(7) by means of any scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause a person to believe that, if the person did not perform such labor or services, that person or another person related to that person would suffer serious harm or physical restraint; “shall be guilty of an offence and upon conviction, shall be liable to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... [a fine of the ... category].” (Source: State Model Law on Protection for Victims of Human Trafficking, Global Rights, 2005)45 Chapter VI. Criminal provisions: ancillary offences and offences related to trafficking Commentary This chapter contains general provisions not specific to trafficking that only need to be included if not already covered by general provisions in the national criminal code or law that are applicable to all crimes. In some cases, alternatives are given in the explanatory section. Article 12. Accomplice Any person who participates as an accomplice in the crime of trafficking is subject to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... . Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 5, paragraph 2 (b). This provision need only be included if it is not already included in the national criminal code or law. In some jurisdictions the penalty for an accomplice is less than for the basic crime, while in others it is the same. The mens rea of the accomplice is an essential element of the crime. It requires intention to assist in the commission of a crime. Examples of alternative formulations are: “A person who participates as an accomplice in any of the offences under this Law is considered to have committed the offence and is punishable as if the offence had been committed by that person.” or “A person who aids, abets, counsels, procures or otherwise participates in an offence under this Law is considered to have committed the offence and is punishable as if the offence had been committed by that person.” In some jurisdictions “accomplice” is further defined. This depends entirely upon national criminal practice. An example of a further differentiation that allows for repentance is: 46 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons “A person does not commit an offence under paragraph 1 if, before the offence was committed, he or she: “(a) Terminated his or her involvement; and “(b) Took reasonable steps to prevent the commission of the offence.” Article 13. Organizing and directing to commit an offence Any person who organizes or directs [another person] [other persons] to commit the crime of trafficking is subject to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... . Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 5, paragraph 2 (c). This provision need only be included if it is not already included in the national criminal code or law. Article 14. Attempt Any attempt to commit the crime of trafficking in persons is subject to imprisonment for ... and/or a fine of/up to ... . Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 5, paragraph 2 (a). This provision need only be included if it is not already included in the national criminal code or law. In some jurisdictions the penalty for an attempt is less than for the basic crime; in others it is the same. According to the interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1, para. 70), references to attempting to commit the offences established under domestic law in accordance with article 5, paragraph 2, of the Protocol are understood in some countries to include both acts perpetrated in preparation for a criminal offence and those carried out in an unsuccessful attempt to commit the offence, where those acts are also punishable under domestic law.Chapter VI. Criminal provisions: ancillary offences and offences related to trafficking 47 Examples of alternative formulations are: “A person who attempts to commit any of the offences under this Law shall be punished as if the offence attempted had been committed. An attempted offence is punishable by the same penalty as is prescribed for the commission of the offence.” or “A person who attempts to commit an offence under this Law commits an offence and is punishable as if the offence attempted had been committed, provided that the person’s conduct is more than merely preparatory to the commission of the offence. An attempted offence is punishable by the same penalty as is prescribed for the commission of the offence.” In some jurisdictions “attempt” is further defined. This depends entirely upon national criminal practice. Examples of additional provisions are: “2. A person is not guilty of attempting to commit an offence under paragraph 1 if the facts are such that the commission of the offence is impossible. “3. A person does not commit an offence under paragraph 1 if, before the offence was committed, he or she: “(a) Terminated his or her involvement; “(b) Took reasonable steps to prevent the commission of the offence; and “(c) Has no mens rea, that is, the intention/knowledge that the act he or she is committing is part of an offence, or has no intention to commit the act that constitutes an offence.” Article 15. Unlawful handling of travel or identity documents Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 12. Article 12 (b) of the Protocol obliges States parties to take measures to ensure that travel and identity documents are of such quality that they cannot easily be misused and cannot readily be falsified or unlawfully altered, replicated or issued, and to prevent their unlawful creation, issuance and use. According to paragraph 82 of the interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1), the words “falsified or unlawfully altered, replicated or issued” should be interpreted as including not only the creation of false documents, but also the alteration of legitimate documents and the filling in of stolen blank documents. The intention is to cover 48 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons both documents that have been forged and genuine documents that have been validly issued but are being used by a person other than the lawful holder. One way to meet this obligation is to include a provision in criminal law, but there are other ways also. The proposed article is an example of criminalizing the practices at hand, should a similar provision not already be included in the national criminal code or law or the immigration laws. 1. Any person who without lawful authority makes, produces or alters any identity or travel document, whether actual or purported, in the course or furtherance of an offence under this Law, shall be guilty of an offence and, upon conviction, shall be liable to imprisonment ... [and/or] a fine of ... . 2. Any person who obtains, procures, destroys, conceals, removes, confiscates, withholds, alters, replicates, possesses or facilitates the fraudulent use of another person’s travel or identity document, with the intent to commit or to facilitate the commission of an offence under this Law, shall be guilty of an offence and, upon conviction, shall be liable to imprisonment of ... [and/or] a fine of ... . Commentary Paragraph 2 is particularly relevant for trafficking as the withholding of documents is a prevalent method of control used by traffickers. It is advisable, in any case, to include paragraph 2 or a similar provision in the criminal law, if not already included. Article 16. Unlawful disclosure of the identity of victims and/or witnesses Any person who discloses without lawful authority to another person any information acquired in the course of his or her official duties that enables or leads to the identification of a victim and/or witness of trafficking in persons shall be guilty of an offence and, upon conviction, shall be liable to punishment of ... . Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 1; Convention, article 24.Chapter VI. Criminal provisions: ancillary offences and offences related to trafficking 49 Article 17. Duty of, and offence by, commercial carriers Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 11. Article 11 of the Protocol obliges States parties to adopt legislative or other measures to prevent commercial carriers from being used in the commission of trafficking offences, including, where appropriate, establishing the obligation of commercial carriers to ascertain that all passengers are in possession of proper travel documents, as well as to take the necessary measures to provide for sanctions in case of violation of this obligation. According to paragraph 79 of the interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1), legislative or other measures should take into account that victims of trafficking in persons may enter a State legally only to face subsequent exploitation, whereas in cases of smuggling of migrants, illegal means of entry are more generally used, which may make it more difficult for common carriers to apply preventive measures in trafficking cases than in smuggling cases. According to paragraph 80 of the interpretative notes, measures and sanctions should take into account other international obligations of the State party concerned. It should also be noted that article 11 of the Protocol requires States parties to impose an obligation on commercial carriers only to ascertain whether or not passengers have the necessary documents in their possession and not to make any judgement or assessment of the validity or authenticity of the documents. Moreover, the above obligation does not unduly limit the discretion of States parties not to hold carriers liable for transporting undocumented refugees. There are several ways to fulfil the obligation under article 11; the inclusion of a provision in criminal law is just one way. The proposed article is an example of criminalizing the practices at hand, should a similar provision not already be included in the national criminal code or law or the immigration laws. However, in many countries it may be more appropriate to impose such a duty with a corresponding penalty in civil regulatory law. An example of such a regulation is: “1. Any [commercial carrier] [person who engages in the international transportation of goods or people for commercial gain] must verify that every passenger possesses the identity and/or travel documents required to enter the destination country and any transit countries. “2. A commercial carrier is liable for the costs associated with the person’s accommodation in and removal from [State].” Another example is: “Responsibilities of International Transportation Companies 50 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons “(a) International transportation companies must verify that every passenger possesses the necessary travel documents, including passports and visas, to enter the destination country and any transit countries. “(b) The requirement in (a) applies both to staff selling or issuing tickets, boarding passes or similar travel documents and to staff collecting or checking tickets prior to or subsequent to boarding. “(c) Companies which fail to comply with the requirements of this section will be fined [insert appropriate amount]. Repeated failure to comply may be sanctioned by revocation of licenses to operate in accordance with [applicable law][insert reference to law governing revocation of licenses].” (Source: United States State Department, Legal Building Blocks to Combat Trafficking in Persons, §400, released by the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, February 2004.) The law of Romania includes a specific provision: “(1) International transportation companies have the obligation to verify, on issuing the travel document, whether their passengers possess the required identification for entry in their transit or destination country. “(2) The obligation stipulated in paragraph 1 is also shared by the driver of the international road transportation vehicle on admitting passengers on board, as well as in the case of staff responsible for verifying travel documents.” (Source: Romania, Law on the Prevention and Combat of Trafficking in Human Beings, article 47.) 1. Any commercial carrier who fails to verify that every passenger possesses the identity and/or travel documents required to enter the destination country and any transit countries commits an offence and is liable to a fine of/up to ... . 2. Any commercial carrier who fails to report to the competent authorities that a person has attempted to or has travelled on that carrier without the identity and/or travel documents required to enter the destination country or any transit countries, with knowledge or in reckless disregard of the fact that the person was a victim of trafficking in persons, commits an offence and [in addition to any other penalty provided in any other law or enactment] is liable to [a fine not exceeding ...]. 3. A commercial carrier is not guilty of an offence under subparagraph 2 if: (a) There were reasonable grounds to believe that the documents that the transported person had were the travel documents required for lawful entry into [name of State];Chapter VI. Criminal provisions: ancillary offences and offences related to trafficking 51 (b) The transported person possessed the lawful travel documents when he or she boarded, or last boarded, the means of transport to travel to [name of State]; or (c) The entry into [name of State] occurred only because of circumstances beyond the control of the [commercial carrier] [person who engages in the transportation of goods or people for commercial gain].53 Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation Commentary Article 6, paragraph 3, of the Protocol obliges States parties to consider implementing measures to provide for the physical, psychological and social recovery of victims of trafficking in persons, including, in appropriate cases, in cooperation with non‑governmental organizations. While this is a general requirement, the Protocol does not specify the forms this must take, leaving the matter to the discretion of States parties. Article 18. Identification of victims of trafficking in persons Commentary Optional provision The timely and proper identification of victims is of paramount importance to ensure that victims receive the assistance they are entitled to, as well as for the effective prosecution of the crime. A person should be considered and treated as a victim of trafficking in persons, irrespective of whether or not there is already a strong suspicion against an alleged trafficker or an official granting/recognition of the status of victim. It is advisable to develop guidelines for law enforcement agencies to assist them in the identification of victims and their referral to appropriate assistance agencies. Such guidelines should include a list of indicators that could be reviewed and updated as needed at regular intervals. Part of these guidelines may concern a recovery or reflection period for all victims of trafficking, in which they can begin to recover, consider their options and take an informed decision on whether or not they want to cooperate with the authorities and/or act as witnesses. This provision is also applicable to countries of origin, which should endeavour to identify victims among returning nationals. An optional provision, which may be included in the guidelines: “4. Within [four] days of a state or local official having identified the presence of a victim of trafficking in persons within the State [having determined that there are reasonable grounds to believe that a person is a victim of 54 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons trafficking in persons], the [competent authority] shall review and evaluate the case of the victim, including any attendant crime report, and issue a letter of certification of eligibility or other relevant document entitling the victim to have access to the rights, benefits and services set forth in chapters VII and VIII of this Law.” 1. The national coordinating body established in accordance with article 35 shall establish national guidelines/procedures for identification of victims of trafficking. 2. The national coordinating body shall develop and disseminate to professionals who are likely to encounter victims of trafficking information and materials concerning trafficking in persons, including, but not limited to, a procedural manual on the identification and referral of victims of trafficking in persons. 3. With a view to the proper identification of victims of trafficking in persons, the [competent authorities] shall collaborate with relevant state and non‑state victim assistance organizations. Article 19. Information to victims Commentary Source: Protocol, articles 6 and 7; Convention, article 25, paragraph 2. Article 6, paragraph 2 (a), of the Protocol requires States parties to ensure the provision of information to victims on relevant court and administrative proceedings. States parties may consider providing other types of information that are valuable to the victims. The types of information to be provided to victims could be included in regulations and guidelines. One option could be: “2. From their first contact with the justice process and throughout that process the [competent authority] shall inform the victim about: “(a) The degree and nature of the available benefits and services, the possibilities of assistance by non‑governmental organizations and other victim agencies, and the way such assistance can be obtained; “(b) The different stages and the role and position of the victim in court and administrative proceedings; “(c) The possibilities of access to [free and/or low-cost] legal services; “(d) The availability of protection for victims and witnesses [and their families] faced with threats or intimidation;Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 55 “(e) The right to privacy and confidentiality; “(f) The right to be kept informed about the status and progress of the criminal proceedings; “(g) The legal remedies available, including restitution and compensation in civil and criminal proceedings; “(h) The possibilities of temporary and/or permanent residence status, including the possibilities to apply for asylum or residence on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.” 1. Victims shall be provided information on the nature of protection, assistance and support to which they are entitled and the possibilities of assistance and support by non‑governmental organizations and other victim agencies, as well as information on any legal proceedings related to them. 2. Information shall be provided in a language that the victim understands. If the victim cannot read, he or she shall be briefed by the competent authority.Article 20. Provision of basic benefits and services to victims of trafficking in persons Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraphs 2-4; Convention, article 25, paragraph 1. Many countries already have laws, policies, regulations and guidelines in place to ensure victims of (serious) crimes the listed rights, benefits and services. If this is the case, it should be ensured that these rights, benefits and services also apply to victims of trafficking in persons. If this is not the case, it is advisable to extend the listed rights to all victims of (serious) crimes, including victims of trafficking in persons, in order to avoid creating a hierarchy of victims of certain crimes. Some of these rights will need to be included in the law, while others may be more suitably implemented through regulations, policies or guidelines, for example, guidelines for the investigation and prosecution of trafficking in persons and the treatment of victims. Adequate victim assistance and protection serve the interest both of the victim and of prosecution of the offenders. From a law enforcement perspective, poor victim assistance and protection may discourage victims from seeking assistance from law enforcement officials for fear of mistreatment, deportation or potential risks to their personal safety.56 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Article 25, paragraph 1, of the Convention obliges States parties to take appropriate measures to provide assistance and protection to victims, in particular in cases of threat of retaliation or intimidation, which in the case of victims of trafficking will often be the case. Article 6, paragraph 3, of the Protocol obliges States parties to consider implementing measures to provide for the physical, psychological and social recovery of victims of trafficking, in cooperation with non‑governmental organizations and other elements of civil society, in particular the provision of appropriate housing, counselling and information, medical, psychological and material assistance and employment, education and training opportunities. According to the interpretative notes (A/55/383/Add.1, para. 71), the type of assistance set forth in article 6, paragraph 3, of the Protocol is applicable to both the receiving State and the State of origin of the victims of trafficking in persons, but only as regards victims who are in their respective territory. Article 6, paragraph 3, of the Protocol is applicable to the receiving State until the victim of trafficking in persons has returned to his or her State of origin and to the State of origin thereafter. 1. Competent authorities and victim service providers shall provide the basic benefits and services described below to victims of trafficking in persons in [name of State], without regard to the immigration status of such victims or the ability or willingness of the victim to participate in the investigation or prosecution of his or her alleged trafficker. Commentary Referral to assistance agencies should take place at the earliest moment possible and preferably before the victim makes an official statement. It is advisable that the police and other bodies involved in the identification process establish procedures for adequate assistance to and referral of victims. Article 6, paragraph 3, of the Protocol specifically mentions cooperation with non‑governmental organizations and other elements of civil society. 2. Assistance shall include: (a) Safe and appropriate accommodation; (b) Health care and necessary medical treatment, including, where appropriate, free optional confidential testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases; (c) Counselling and psychological assistance, on a confidential basis and with full respect for the privacy of the person concerned, in a language that he or she understands;Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 57 Commentary Article 6, paragraph 3 (b), of the Protocol obliges States parties to consider implementing measures to provide for the physical, psychological and social recovery of victims of trafficking in persons, including the provision of counselling and information, in particular as regards their legal rights, in a language that the victim understands. (d) Information regarding [free or low-cost] legal assistance to represent his or her interests in any criminal investigation, including the obtaining of compensation, [to pursue civil actions against his or her traffickers] and [, where applicable, to assist with applications for regular immigration status]; and Commentary Article 6, paragraph 2 (a), of the Protocol obliges States parties to ensure that their domestic legal and administrative system contains measures that provide to victims of trafficking in persons, in appropriate cases, information on relevant court and administrative proceedings. Throughout criminal and other relevant judicial and administrative proceedings, the [competent authority] shall inform the victim about: (a) The timing and progress of the criminal proceedings and other relevant judicial and administrative proceedings, including claims for restitution and compensation in criminal proceedings; (b) The disposition of the case, including any decision to stop the investigation or the prosecution, to dismiss the case or to release the suspect(s). Article 6, paragraph 2 (b), of the Protocol obliges States parties to ensure that their domestic legal or administrative system contains measures that provide to victims of trafficking in persons assistance to enable their views and concerns to be presented and considered at appropriate stages of criminal proceedings against offenders, in a manner not prejudicial to the rights of the defence. Together they strongly underline the importance of legal assistance to victims of trafficking, provided for by the State. If a system of free legal aid exists, this should also apply to victims of trafficking. If free legal aid is not possible, the victim should have the possibility to be assisted by a support person of his or her choice, for example from a non‑governmental organization or a legal aid institution that provides victim assistance. In addition, workers’ organizations may play an important role in assisting (alleged) victims to bring complaints. (e) Translation and interpretation services, where applicable. 3. In appropriate cases and to the extent possible, assistance shall be provided to the accompanying dependants of the victim.58 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Assistance to dependants of the victim may be deemed appropriate, for example, when the victim has children. 4. Victims of trafficking in persons shall not be held in any detention facility as a result of their status as victims or their immigration status. Commentary According to article 6, paragraph 3 (a) of the Protocol, holding victims of trafficking in prisons or other detention centres can by no means be considered to be appropriate housing. 5. All assistance services shall be provided on a consensual and informed basis and while taking due account of the special needs of children and other persons in a vulnerable position. 6. The assistance services set forth in paragraph 2 shall also be available for victims who are repatriated from another State to [name of State]. Commentary It is important to ensure that all victims have access to assistance in order to enable them to recover and to make an informed decision about their options, including the decision to assist in criminal proceedings and/or to pursue legal proceedings for compensation claims. Those victims who do not want or do not dare to act as witnesses—or are not required as witnesses because they do not possess any relevant information or because the perpetrators cannot be identified or taken into custody—require adequate assistance and protection on an equal footing with victims who are willing and able to testify. Some forms of long-term assistance may be dependent on whether the victim remains in the country and assists the authorities in the investigation and prosecution of the traffickers. Article 21. General protection of victims and witnesses Commentary The Model Law addresses witness protection issues only to the extent that they are unique to trafficking in persons. For general provisions on witness protection, see UNODC, Good Practices for the Protection of Witnesses in Criminal Proceedings involving Organized Crime (available at www.unodc.org/documents/organized-crime/Witness-protection-manual-Feb08.pdf).Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 59 Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 1; Convention, article 24. Article 6, paragraph 1, of the Protocol obliges States parties, in appropriate cases and to the extent possible under its domestic law, to protect the privacy and identity of victims of trafficking in persons, including, inter alia, by making legal proceedings relating to such trafficking confidential. Article 24, paragraph 1, of the Convention pertains specifically to the protection of witnesses, stating that each State party shall take appropriate measures within its means to provide effective protection from potential retaliation or intimidation for witnesses in criminal proceedings who give testimony and, as appropriate, for their relatives and other persons close to them. This may include establishing procedures for the physical protection of such persons, such as relocating them and permitting, where appropriate, non‑disclosure or limitations on the disclosure of information concerning the identity and whereabouts of such persons (article 24, paragraph 2 (a)). According to article 24, paragraph 4, of the Convention, this article also applies to victims insofar as they are witnesses. The proposed article specifically applies to pretrial criminal investigations. The various provisions are examples of how to provide for the protection of the privacy and identity of the victim and/or witness during such investigations. The applicability of the various provisions will depend on the national legal system. 1. The [competent authority] shall take all appropriate measures to ensure that a victim or witness of trafficking in persons, and his or her family, is provided adequate protection if his or her safety is at risk, including measures to protect him or her from intimidation and retaliation by traffickers and their associates. 2. Victims and witnesses of trafficking in persons shall have access to any existing witness protection measures or programmes. Article 22. Child victims and witnesses Commentary Optional provision A statement of principle such as the following could be inserted: “All actions undertaken in relation to child victims and witnesses shall be based on the principles set out in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, in particular the principle that the best interests of the child must be a primary consideration in all actions involving the child and the principle that the child’s view must be considered and taken into account in all matters affecting him or her.”60 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons This provision addresses the special status of child victims, on the basis of article 6 of the Protocol, as well as the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime also provide guidance on this matter. In addition to any other guarantees provided for in this Law: (a) Child victims, especially infants, shall be given special care and attention; (b) When the age of the victim is uncertain and there are reasons to believe that the victim is a child, he or she shall be presumed to be a child and shall be treated as such, pending verification of his or her age; (c) Assistance to child victims shall be provided by specially trained professionals and in accordance with their special needs, especially with regard to accommodation, education and care; Commentary Mandatory provision According to article 6, paragraph 4, of the Protocol, States parties shall take into account the age, gender and special needs of victims of trafficking, in particular the special needs of children. (d) If the victim is an unaccompanied minor the [competent authority] shall: (i) Appoint a legal guardian to represent the interests of the child; (ii) Take all necessary steps to establish his or her identity and nationality; (iii) Make every effort to locate his or her family when this is in the best interest of the child; Commentary Optional provision This in line with the obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child. See also General Comment No. 6 of the Committee on the Rights of the Child. (e) Information may be provided to child victims through their legal guardian or, in case the legal guardian is the alleged offender, a support person;Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 61 Commentary Optional provision This is in line with the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. (f) Child victims shall be provided with information in a language that they use and understand and in a manner that is understandable to them; Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraphs 3 (b) and 4; Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. Article 6, paragraph 4, of the Protocol obliges States parties to take into account the age, gender and special needs of victims of trafficking, in particular the special needs of children. (g) In the case of child victims or witnesses, interviews, examinations and other forms of investigation shall be conducted by specially trained professionals in a suitable environment and in a language that the child uses and understands and in the presence of his or her parents, legal guardian or a support person; Commentary Optional provision Source: Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. A support person may be a specialist, a representative of a non‑governmental organization specialized in working with children or an appropriate family member. (h) In the case of child victims and witnesses, court proceedings shall always be conducted in camera away from the presence of media and public. Child victims and witnesses shall always give evidence [testify] in court out of sight of the accused.62 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Article 23. Protection of victims and witnesses in court Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 1; Convention, article 24, paragraphs 1 and 2 (a); Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. The proposed article applies specifically to in-court proceedings. The various provisions are examples of how to provide for the protection of the privacy and identity of the victim during court proceedings. The applicability of the various provisions will depend on the national legal system. Some of these provisions are dependent on the criminal system or jurisprudence of the State concerned and may not be possible in jurisdictions that require the right of the accused to defend him-or herself by having all proceedings carried out/recorded in his or her presence so that he or she has the benefit of cross-examination and clarification. * “In camera” is a legal term of art meaning “in private” and refers to a closed hearing, where the public and press are not allowed. 1. A judge may order on application, or where the judge determines it is necessary in the interest of justice, and without prejudice to the rights of the accused, that: (a) Court proceedings be conducted in camera,* away from the presence of media and public; (b) Records of the court proceedings be sealed; (c) Evidence of a victim or a witness be heard through a video link [or the use of other communications technology] [behind a screen] or similar adequate means out of view of the accused; and/or Commentary Article 24, paragraphs 1 and 2 (b), of the Convention determines that measures to protect a victim or witness from retaliation or intimidation may include rules to permit witness testimony to be given in a manner that ensures the safety of the witness, such as permitting testimony to be given through the use of communications technology such as video links or other adequate means. The victim or witness may testify in court without public disclosure of his or her name, address or other identifying information. (d) The victim or witness use a pseudonym. [, and/or] Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 63 [(e) The statement of a victim or a witness made during the pretrial phase in front of a judge be admitted as evidence.] Commentary This is optional for legal systems that allow the submission of non‑oral evidence or allow for exceptions (e.g. when the witness is dead or incapable of giving testimony). 2. The judge shall restrict questions asked to the victim or witness, in particular, but not limited to, questions related to the personal history, previous sexual behaviour, the alleged character or the current or previous occupation of the victim. Commentary An additional provision may be included here to allow for in camera proceedings in order to assess the relevancy of such questions, if the judge deems appropriate. An alternative option is the inclusion of a provision in the criminal law with regard to the inadmissibility of certain evidence in trafficking cases, for example: “The following evidence is not admissible in any criminal proceedings: “(a) Evidence offered to prove that the alleged victim engaged in other sexual behaviour; “(b) Evidence offered to prove any alleged trafficking victim’s sexual predisposition.” (Source: State Model Law on Protection for Victims of Human Trafficking, Global Rights, 2005) or “In a prosecution for trafficking in persons under article 8, evidence of a victim’s past sexual behaviour is irrelevant and inadmissible for the purpose of proving that the victim engaged in other sexual behaviour, or to prove the victim’s sexual predisposition.” (Source: United States State Department Model Law to Combat Trafficking in Persons, 2003) The competent authorities should also take all measures possible to avoid a direct confrontation of the victim with the accused inside or outside the courtroom.64 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Article 24. Participation in the criminal justice process The [Ministry of Justice] [prosecutor] and/or [court] and/or [other competent authority] shall provide the victim with the opportunity to present his or her views, needs, interests and concerns for consideration at appropriate stages of any judicial or administrative proceedings relating to the offence, either directly or through his or her representative, without prejudice to the rights of the defence. Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 2 (b); Convention, article 25, paragraph 3. Article 25, paragraph 3, of the Convention obliges States parties, subject to their domestic law, to enable views and concerns of victims to be presented and considered at appropriate stages of criminal proceedings against offenders in a manner not prejudicial to the rights of the defence. Article 6, paragraph 2 (b), of the Protocol obliges States parties to ensure that their domestic legal or administrative system contains measures that provide victims of trafficking in persons assistance to enable their views and concerns to be presented and considered at appropriate stages of criminal proceedings against offenders, in a manner not prejudicial to the rights of the defence. Judicial and administrative proceedings may include, where applicable, proceedings before labour courts. Participation of victims in criminal proceedings can take different forms. In some civil law countries, victims may enjoy the status of participants (and they should be informed of this possibility under article 24). In common law countries, they may be allowed to participate at certain stages (for example, to present their views on plea bargains) or give a victim impact statement. Article 25. Protection of data and privacy Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 1; Convention, article 24, paragraph 2 (a). Procedures that regulate the exchange of personalized and/or operationally sensitive information are particularly important in the case of victims of trafficking, as the misuse of information may directly endanger the life and safety of the victim and his or her relatives or lead to stigmatization or social exclusion. Moreover, it should be taken into account that trafficking in persons is a crime Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 65 that is apt to lead to corruption and is often committed by organized criminal groups and networks. Increased cooperation and data exchange also lead to greater risk of misuse of information. One way to protect data is the practice of so-called “restricted notes”, meaning that data of victims of trafficking are marked with a number, the identity of which is only known to selected officials. Furthermore, individuals who have access to such data should be bound by a duty of confidentiality. 1. All personal data regarding victims of trafficking shall be processed, stored and used in conformity with the conditions provided for by the [national legislation regarding the protection of personal data] and shall be used exclusively for the purposes for which they were originally compiled. 2. In accordance with [relevant national legislation], a protocol shall be established for the exchange of information between agencies concerned in victim identification and assistance and criminal investigation with full respect for the protection of the privacy and safety of victims. 3. All information exchanged between a victim and a professional [counsellor] providing medical, psychological, legal or other assistance services shall be confidential and shall not be exchanged with third persons without the consent of the victim. Commentary Optional provision In order to gain access to help and support, victims of trafficking must have a protected space in which they can talk about their experiences. It is therefore crucial for regulations to be in place to ensure the confidentiality of the client-counsellor relationship and protect counsellors from any obligation to pass on information to third parties against the will and without the consent of the trafficked person. If regulations protecting the confidentiality of clientcounsellor relationships are already in place, it should be ensured that counsellors of trafficking victims fall within the scope of those regulations. Counsellors should include persons employed by non‑governmental organizations providing assistance services to victims of trafficking. 4. Interviews [questioning] of the victim and/or witness during criminal [judicial and administrative] proceedings shall take place with due respect for his or her privacy, and away from the presence of the public and media. 5. The results of any medical examination of a victim of trafficking in persons shall be treated confidentially and shall be used for the purpose of the criminal investigation and prosecution only.66 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons 6. The name, address or other identifying information (including pictures) of a victim of trafficking in persons shall not be publicly disclosed or published [by the media]. 7. A violation of paragraphs 3, 5 or 6 shall be punishable by a fine of [...]. Article 26. Relocation of victims and/or witnesses The [competent authority] may, when necessary to safeguard the physical safety of a victim or witness, at the request of the victim or witness or in consultation with him or her, take all necessary measures to relocate him or her and to limit the disclosure of his or her name, address and other identifying personal information to the extent possible. Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 1; Convention, article 24. Article 24, paragraph 2 (a), of the Convention provides that measures to protect a victim or witness from retaliation or intimidation may include relocating victims or witnesses and permitting non‑disclosure or limitations on the disclosure of information on the identity. Article 24, paragraph 3, states that States parties shall consider entering into agreements with other States for the relocation of victims and witnesses. Article 27. Right to initiate civil action Commentary This provision needs only be included if it is not already included in the national criminal code or law. If it is already included in the criminal code or law, it needs to be ensured that it also applies to victims of trafficking in persons. See also the commentary on articles 28 and 29. 1. A victim of trafficking in persons shall have the right to initiate civil proceedings to claim material and non‑material damages suffered by him or her as a result of acts specified as criminal offences by this Law.Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 67 2. The right to pursue a civil claim for material or non‑material damages shall not be affected by the existence of criminal proceedings in connection with the same acts from which the civil claim derives. 3. The immigration status or the return of the victim to his or her home country or other absence of the victim from the jurisdiction shall not prevent the court from ordering payment of compensation under this article. Article 28. Court-ordered compensation Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 6, paragraph 6. Article 6, paragraph 6, of the Protocol obliges States parties to ensure that their domestic legal system contains measures that offer victims the possibility of obtaining compensation for damages suffered. Article 25, paragraph 2, of the Convention states that States parties shall establish appropriate procedures to provide access to compensation and restitution for victims. The proposed articles 28 and 29 are an example of such a provision. This provision need only be included if it is not already included as a general rule in the domestic criminal code or law. If it is already included in the criminal code or law, it needs to be ensured that it also applies to victims of trafficking in persons. Apart from the criminal procedure, in some countries and in appropriate cases, the victim may benefit from bringing the case to a labour court. Workers’ organizations may play an important role here and in assisting victims to obtain restitution and/or compensation. Any civil/labour proceedings should follow criminal proceedings, since if they are started before them they will invariably be adjourned until the criminal case has concluded. The Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (General Assembly resolution 40/34, annex) states, with regard to restitution and compensation: “Restitution “8. Offenders or third parties responsible for their behaviour should, where appropriate, make fair restitution to victims, their families or dependants. Such restitution should include the return of property or payment for the harm or loss suffered, reimbursement of expenses incurred as a result of the victimization, the provision of services and the restoration of rights. “9. Governments should review their practices, regulations and laws to consider restitution as an available sentencing option in criminal cases, in addition to other criminal sanctions.68 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons “10. In cases of substantial harm to the environment, restitution, if ordered, should include, as far as possible, restoration of the environment, reconstruction of the infrastructure, replacement of community facilities and reimbursement of the expenses of relocation, whenever such harm results in the dislocation of a community. “11. Where public officials or other agents acting in an official or quasiofficial capacity have violated national criminal laws, the victims should receive restitution from the State whose officials or agents were responsible for the harm inflicted. In cases where the Government under whose authority the victimizing act or omission occurred is no longer in existence, the State or Government successor in title should provide restitution to the victims. “Compensation “12. When compensation is not fully available from the offender or other sources, States should endeavour to provide financial compensation to: “(a) Victims who have sustained significant bodily injury or impairment of physical or mental health as a result of serious crimes; “(b) The family, in particular dependants of persons who have died or become physically or mentally incapacitated as a result of such victimization. “13. The establishment, strengthening and expansion of national funds for compensation to victims should be encouraged. Where appropriate, other funds may also be established for this purpose, including in those cases where the State of which the victim is a national is not in a position to compensate the victim for the harm.” 1. Where an offender is convicted of an offence under the present Law, the court may order the offender to pay compensation to the victim, in addition to, or in place of, any other punishment ordered by the court. 2. When imposing an order for compensation, the court shall take the offender’s means and ability to pay compensation into account and shall give priority to a compensation order over a fine. 3. The aim of an order for compensation shall be to make reparation to the victim for the injury, loss or damage caused by the offender. An order for compensation may include payment for or towards: (a) Costs of medical, physical, psychological or psychiatric treatment required by the victim; (b) Costs of physical and occupational therapy or rehabilitation required by the victim;Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 69 (c) Costs of necessary transportation, temporary childcare, temporary housing or the movement of the victim to a place of temporary safe residence; (d) Lost income and due wages according to national law and regulations regarding wages; (e) Legal fees and other costs or expenses incurred, including costs incurred related to the participation of the victim in the criminal investigation and prosecution process; (f) Payment for non‑material damages, resulting from moral, physical or psychological injury, emotional distress, pain and suffering suffered by the victim as a result of the crime committed against him or her; and (g) Any other costs or losses incurred by the victim as a direct result of being trafficked and reasonably assessed by the court. 4. An order for compensation under this article may be enforced by the State with all means available under domestic law. 5. The immigration status or the return of the victim to his or her home country or other absence of the victim from the jurisdiction shall not prevent the court from ordering payment of compensation under this article. 6. Where the offender is a public official whose actions constituting an offence under this Law were carried out under actual or apparent State authority, the court may order the State to pay compensation to the victim [in accordance with national legislation]. An order for State compensation under this article may include payment for or towards all or any of the items under paragraph 3 (a) to (g) above. Article 29. Compensation for victims of trafficking in persons Commentary Mandatory provision One way to ensure compensation to the victim for damages caused, independently of a criminal case and whether or not the offender can be identified, sentenced and punished, is the establishment of a victim fund, to which victims can apply for compensation for the damages suffered by them. Paragraphs 12 and 13 of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power state: “12. When compensation is not fully available from the offender or other sources, States should endeavour to provide financial compensation to:70 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons “(a) Victims who have sustained significant bodily injury or impairment of physical or mental health as a result of serious crimes; “(b) The family, in particular dependants of persons who have died or become physically or mentally incapacitated as a result of such victimization. “13. The establishment, strengthening and expansion of national funds for compensation to victims should be encouraged. Where appropriate, other funds may also be established for this purpose, including in those cases where the State of which the victim is a national is not in a position to compensate the victim for the harm.” A victim fund can be established specifically for victims of trafficking or (as is the case in a number of countries) for victims of serious crimes in general (see, for example, article 11 of the Victim Support Act (1991, last amended in 2005) of Switzerland). The latter option is preferable as it will be easier to administer a single fund than several different funds for different types of crime. Its objectives can be limited to assistance to and compensation of victims or to wider costs related to the prevention and combating of trafficking in persons. The administration of the fund should be established in accordance with existing structures, for example, in regulations or secondary legislation. Regulations may include detailed provisions for the management of the fund, for example: “The moneys and assets of the Fund shall be applied as follows [options to be chosen by the State]: “(a) For compensation for material and non‑material damages suffered by victims of trafficking in persons; “(b) For any matter connected to the protection of, assistance to and reintegration and prevention of revictimization and/or compensation for damages to victims of trafficking in persons; “(c) Towards the basic material support of victims of trafficking in persons; “(d) For the education and vocational training of victims of trafficking in persons; “(e) For the establishment of shelters and other assistance services for victims of trafficking in persons; “(f) For training and capacity-building of persons connected with the protection of, assistance to and reintegration of victims of trafficking in persons; “(g) For any act relating to the victims’ participation in criminal proceedings against the offenders (such as travel costs, residential costs if the victim has to stay in a place other than his or her normal residence, incidental costs thereto and so on).Chapter VII. Victim and witness protection, assistance and compensation 71 “The Fund shall be administered by a board of trustees appointed by the [Minister]. “The Board of Trustees shall organize its own procedures by regulations, including for the consideration and approval of applications for assistance from victims of trafficking in persons, which shall be approved by governmental decree.” One example for including such a fund in the criminal code or law is: “Special Fund. “(a) The decision of the court on forfeiture according to section 377D shall serve as a basis for the Administrator General to seize the forfeited property; property that has been forfeited, or the consideration thereof, shall be transferred to the Administrator General and deposited by him in a special fund that shall be administered in accordance with the regulations that shall be promulgated according to subsection (d) (in this section—the Fund). “(b) A fine imposed by the court for an offence shall be deposited in the Fund. “(c) Where a victim of an offence presents, to an entity determined by the Minister of Justice for this purpose, a judgment for compensation and shows that he has no reasonable possibility to realize all or part of the judgment, according to any law, the victim of the offence shall be paid from the Fund the compensation set forth in the judgment that has not been paid, all or part thereof; for the purposes of this section, ‘judgment’ means a judgment that may no longer be appealed. “(d) The Minister of Justice, with the approval of the Constitution, Law and Justice Committee of the Knesset, shall promulgate in regulations the methods of administering the Fund, the use to be made of the Fund’s assets, and the manner of their distribution for these purposes: “(1) rehabilitation, treatment, and protection of victims of an offence; for this purpose, there shall be allocated annually an amount not less than one half of the Fund’s assets in one year; “(2) payment of compensation awarded in a judgment to a victim of an offence, in accordance with the provisions of subsection (c); “(3) prevention of the commission of an offence; “(4) carrying out the functions of law enforcement authorities in enforcing the provisions of this Law in respect to an offence.” (Source: Israel, Penal Code, section 377E) In Romania, compensation to victims of certain offences (not including trafficking, but including rape and assault) is regulated by the Law on Certain Measures to Ensure the Protection of Victims of Crime, chapter V, Financial compensation from the State for the victims of certain offences.72 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons 1. Without prejudice to the power of the court to order an offender to pay compensation to a victim of trafficking in persons under article 28 of this Law, the [competent authority] shall make arrangements for the payment of compensation to, or in respect of, persons who have been identified as victims of trafficking in accordance with the procedures established under article 18 of this Law. Such arrangements shall specify, inter alia: (a) The circumstances under which compensation may be paid; (b) The basis on which compensation is to be calculated and the amount of compensation payable taking into account any compensation received or sums recovered under article 28 of this Law; (c) The fund from which payments shall be made; (d) The application procedure for payment of compensation; and (e) A procedure for review and appeal of decisions with respect to claims for compensation. 2. The [competent authority] shall ensure that victims of trafficking are able to apply for payment of compensation under this article even where the offender is not identified, caught or convicted. 3. [For use where a specific fund must be established] For the purpose of making compensation payments to victims of trafficking in accordance with this article, the [competent authority] shall establish a fund for victims and designate administrators of the fund. Administrators of the fund shall accept payments to the fund from: (a) Moneys allocated to the fund in accordance with [relevant fiscal law]; (b) Moneys confiscated and proceeds from the sale of goods or assets confiscated under the provisions of national law; (c) Voluntary payments, grants or gifts to the fund; (d) Income, interest or benefits deriving from investments of the fund; and (e) Any other source designated by the administrators of the fund. 4. [For use where an appropriate victim compensation fund already exists] The [competent authority] shall ensure that the administrators responsible for [the fund] have authority to make payments to victims of trafficking in accordance with this article. 5. The immigration status or the return of the victim to his or her home country or other absence of the victim from the jurisdiction shall not prevent the court from ordering payment of compensation under this article.73 Chapter VIII. Immigration and return Commentary The provisions on immigration and repatriation of victims of trafficking in persons derive from articles 7 and 8 of the Protocol. The manner in which these articles may be implemented much depends upon the specific migration laws and regulations of the particular State. In some cases they may be included in the law, while in others it may be more appropriate to implement them through guidelines and regulations. Article 30. Recovery and reflection period Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, articles 6 and 7. Article 7 of the Protocol obliges States parties to consider adopting legislative or other appropriate measures that permit victims of trafficking in persons to remain in their territory, temporarily or permanently, in appropriate cases, and with appropriate consideration being given to humanitarian and compassionate factors. Article 7 should be read in conjunction with article 6. It is important that States strike a balance between their need to properly identify victims of trafficking in persons and the burden that lengthy bureaucratic procedures of identification and adjudication of status will place on a victim of trafficking in persons. Although optional, it is important that States recognize that trafficked persons who face immediate deportation or arrest will not be encouraged to come forward, report the crime or cooperate with the competent authorities. Granting a recovery and reflection period, including corresponding rights, and regardless of whether or not there is prior agreement to give evidence as a witness, assists States in the protection of the human rights of trafficked persons. The protection of basic rights also serves to raise the victim’s confidence in the State and its ability to protect his or her interests. A victim with confidence in the State is more likely to make an informed decision and to cooperate with the authorities in the prosecution of traffickers. If a victim is put under pressure to press charges immediately, the risk increases that he or she will withdraw the statement at a later stage. A recovery and reflection period is in the interest of both the victim and the authorities to enable proper identification and to start or proceed with investigations.74 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons 1. A victim of trafficking in persons shall, where applicable, not be removed from the territory of [name of State] until the identification process established in accordance with article 18, paragraph 1, has been completed by the [competent authority]. 2. The [competent authority] shall, within [...] days of having reasonable grounds to believe, based on the national guidelines/procedures established pursuant to article 18, paragraph 1, of this Law, that a person is a victim of trafficking in persons, submit a written request to the [competent immigration authority] that the victim be granted a recovery and reflection period of not less than ninety days in order to make an informed decision on whether to cooperate with the competent authorities. 3. Any [natural] person who believes he or she is a victim of trafficking in persons shall have the right to submit a written request to the [competent immigration authority] to be granted a recovery and reflection period of not less than 90 days in order to make an informed decision on whether to cooperate with the competent authorities. 4. The [competent immigration authority] shall grant a recovery and reflection period where it has established that there are reasonable grounds to believe a person is a victim of trafficking in persons within [...] days of the submission of a written request. 5. The decision of the [competent immigration authority] regarding the granting of a recovery and reflection period shall be appealable by the [competent authority] or any natural person who believes he or she has been a victim of trafficking in persons. 6. Until the [competent immigration authority] decides whether to grant a recovery and reflection period, a victim of trafficking in persons shall not be deported from [name of State] (and shall be entitled to the rights, benefits, services and protection measures set forth in chapter VII). Where deportation proceedings have been initiated, they shall be stayed, or where an order of deportation has been made, it shall be suspended. 7. Paragraph 1 shall not prevent or prejudice the competent authorities from carrying out any relevant investigative activities.Chapter VIII. Immigration and return 75 Article 31. Temporary or permanent residence permit Commentary Optional provision Source: Protocol, article 7. Option 1 1. If the competent authorities [name the authority] have identified a person as a victim of trafficking, he or she shall be issued a temporary residence permit for at least a period of six months, irrespective of whether he or she cooperates with the [competent authority], with the possibility of renewal. Commentary Relevant legal proceedings include not only criminal but also civil proceedings, for instance in order to claim damages. It is in the interest of both the victim and the prosecution to allow the victim at least a temporary residence permit during criminal proceedings. Without the presence of the victim it will be impossible or very difficult to prosecute the suspects successfully. Moreover, the victim should be enabled to initiate a civil procedure for damages or to bring his or her case before any other relevant court, for example, a labour court. Option 2 Commentary Trafficked persons who do not wish or do not dare to make a declaration as witnesses—or are not required as witnesses because they possess no relevant information or because the perpetrators cannot be taken into custody in the destination country—require equally adequate protection measures as trafficked persons who are willing and able to testify. Though witnesses who are not themselves victims are not mentioned in article 7 of the Protocol, it is advisable, in order to ensure the effective prosecution of trafficking cases, to extend the possibility of a temporary residence permit to witnesses who are willing and able to testify against the suspect. 1. If the victim cooperates with the competent authorities, and upon the request of the victim, the [competent immigration authority] shall issue a [renewable] temporary residence permit to the victim [and accompanying dependants] for the duration of any relevant legal proceedings [for a period of at least six months].76 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons 2. On the basis of the temporary or permanent residence permit the victim [and accompanying dependants] shall be entitled to the assistance, benefits, services and protection measures set forth in chapter VII. 3. If the victim is a child, the [competent immigration authority] shall issue the child victim a temporary or permanent residence permit, including the corresponding rights, if this is in the best interest of the child. 4. The victim [and his or her accompanying dependants] may apply for refugee status or permanent [long-term] residence status on humanitarian [and compassionate] grounds. Commentary The immigration authority or immigration judge considering the application of a victim of trafficking in persons for permanent or long-term residence status on humanitarian and compassionate grounds in the light of the principle of non‑refoulement and the prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment should keep the following in mind: (a) The risk of retaliation against the victim or his or her family; (b) The risk of prosecution in the country of origin for trafficking-related offences; (c) The prospects for social inclusion and an independent, sustainable and humane life in the country of origin; (d) The availability of adequate, confidential and non‑stigmatizing support services in the country of origin; (e) The presence of children. Article 7, paragraph 2, of the Protocol expressly states that in implementing the provision on temporary or permanent residence status, States parties shall give appropriate consideration to humanitarian and compassionate factors. “Permanent residence” should be interpreted to mean long-term residence, but not necessarily indefinite residence. Moreover, the paragraph should be understood as being without prejudice to any domestic legislation regarding either the granting of the right of residence or the duration of residence (interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1), para. 72). 5. The non‑fulfilment of standard requirements (for the application for temporary/permanent residence status) as a consequence of the person being a victim of trafficking, such as a lack of a valid passport or other identity documents, shall not be a reason to refuse him or her temporary or permanent residence status.Chapter VIII. Immigration and return 77 Commentary Requirements that in normal situations are necessary in order to obtain residence status, such as valid identity documents and language proficiency, but that are not fulfilled because the person has been trafficked, hence outside his or her power, shall not be considered a reason to refuse residence status, as would be the case under normal circumstances. It is good practice for countries of origin and countries of destination to enter into bilateral or regional agreements/arrangements that provide for the reintegration of repatriated victims of trafficking in persons and minimize the risk of such victims being re-trafficked. Article 32. Return of victims of trafficking in persons to [name of State] 1. The [competent authority] shall facilitate and accept the return of a victim of trafficking in persons, who is a national of [name of State] or had the right of permanent residence in [name of State] at the time he or she was trafficked, without undue or unreasonable delay and with due regard for his or her rights and safety [privacy, dignity and health]. Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 8, paragraphs 1 and 2; interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1). Article 8, paragraph 1, of the Protocol obliges States parties to facilitate and accept the return of a national “with due regard for the safety of that person”. This imposes a positive obligation upon Governments to ensure that there is no danger of retaliation or other harm the trafficked person could face upon returning home, such as arrest for leaving the country or working in prostitution abroad, when these are actions criminalized in the country of origin. “Without undue or unreasonable delay” does not mean that Governments can immediately deport all trafficked persons. Governments should arrange for the return of the trafficked person only after they have had an opportunity to assess that all of their legal rights to justice and their safety upon return are assured. 2. If the victim is without proper documentation the [competent authority] shall issue, at the request of the victim or the competent authorities of the State to which the person was trafficked, such travel documents or other authorization as may be necessary to enable the person to travel to and re-enter the territory of [name of State].78 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Commentary Optional provision 3. In case of the return of a victim of trafficking in persons to [name of State], no record shall be made in the identity papers of that person relating to the reason for his or her return and/or to the person having been a victim of trafficking in persons, nor shall personal data to that effect be stored in any database that may affect his or her right to leave the country or enter another country or that may have any other negative consequences. Commentary Optional provision Article 33. Repatriation of victims of trafficking in persons to another State 1. When a victim of trafficking who is not a national of [name of State] requests to return to his or her country of origin or the country in which he or she had the right of permanent residence at the time he or she was trafficked, the [competent authorities] shall facilitate such return, including arranging for the necessary travel documents, without undue delay and with due regard for his or her rights and safety [privacy, dignity and health]. Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, article 8, paragraph 2; interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1); General Comment No. 6 of the Committee on the Rights of the Child. Article 8, paragraph 2, of the Protocol states that if a State party returns a victim to the State of which that person is a national, this shall be with due regard for the safety of that person and for the status of any legal proceedings related to the fact that the person is a victim of trafficking. Return shall preferably be voluntary. 2. When, upon the decision of [competent authority] a victim of trafficking in persons who is not a national of [name of State], is returned [deported] to the State of which he or she is a national or in which he or she had the right of permanent residence at the time he or she was trafficked, the [competent authority] shall ensure that such return shall be with due regard for Chapter VIII. Immigration and return 79 his or her safety and for the status of any legal proceedings related to the fact that the person is a victim of trafficking. Commentary Mandatory provision The interpretative notes (para. 73) state that the words “and shall preferably be voluntary” must be understood not to place any obligation on the State party returning the victim, thus making it clear that returns can also be involuntary. However, this and the previous provisions also clearly limit involuntary returns to those which are safe and are carried out with due regard for legal proceedings. 3. Any decision to return a victim of trafficking in persons to his or her country shall be considered in the light of the principle of non‑refoulement and of the prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment. Commentary Mandatory provision Moreover, the international principle of non‑refoulement and the prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment under international human rights law must be taken into account. 4. When a victim of trafficking raises a substantial allegation that he or she or his or her family may face danger to life, health or personal liberty if he or she is returned to his or her country of origin, the competent authority [name authority] shall conduct a risk and security assessment before returning the victim. Commentary Optional provision A risk assessment should take into consideration factors such as the risk of reprisals by the trafficking network against the victim and his or her family, the capacity and willingness of the authorities in the country of origin to protect the victim and his or her family from possible intimidation or violence, the social position of the victim on return, the risk of the victim being arrested, detained or prosecuted by the authorities in his or her home country for trafficking related offences (such as the use of false documents and prostitution), the availability of assistance and opportunities for long-term employment. Non‑governmental organizations and other service agencies working with victims of trafficking 80 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons should have the right to submit information on these aspects, which should be taken into account in any decision about the return or deportation of victims by the competent authorities. 5. In case of the return of a victim [or witness] of trafficking in persons to his or her country of origin, no record shall be made in the identity papers of that person relating to the reason for his or her return and/or to the person having been a victim of trafficking in persons, nor shall personal data to that effect be stored in any database that may affect his or her right to leave his or her country or enter another country or that may have any other negative consequences. 6. Child victims or witnesses shall not be returned to their country of origin if there is an indication, following a risk and security assessment, that their return would not be in their best interest. Commentary Optional provision Children who are at risk of being re-trafficked should not be returned to their country of origin unless it is in their best interest and appropriate measures for their protection have been taken. States may consider complementary forms of protection for trafficked children when return is not in their best interest (see General Comment No. 6 of the Committee on the Rights of the Child). 7. The [competent authority] shall to the extent possible, and, where appropriate, in cooperation with non‑governmental organizations, make available to the victim contact information of organizations that can assist him or her in the country to which he or she is returned or repatriated, such as law enforcement offices, non‑governmental organizations, legal professions able to provide counselling and social welfare agencies. Article 34. Verification of legitimacy and validity of documents upon request Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, articles 8 and 13. Chapter VIII. Immigration and return 81 1. At the request of the appropriate authority or representative of another State, the competent authorities and the diplomatic and consular authorities abroad of [name of State] shall verify without undue or unreasonable delay: (a) Whether a person who is a victim of trafficking is a national of or had the right of permanent residence in [name of State] at the time of entry into the territory of the requesting State [the act of trafficking]; Commentary Source: Protocol, article 8, paragraph 3. According to paragraph 74 of the interpretative notes ... (A/55/383/Add.1), this provision implies that a return should not be undertaken before the nationality or right of permanent residence of the person whose return is sought has been duly verified. (b) The legitimacy and validity of travel or identity documents issued or purported to have been issued in the name of [name of State] and suspected of being used for trafficking in persons. Commentary Source: Protocol, article 13. 2. If the victim is without proper documentation, the competent authority [name authority] shall issue such legal travel and/or identity documents as may be necessary to enable the repatriation of the victim. Commentary Source: Protocol, article 8, paragraph 4. Article 8, paragraphs 5 and 6, of the Protocol clearly state that article 8 shall be without prejudice to any right afforded to victims of trafficking in persons by any domestic law of the receiving State party, and without prejudice to any applicable bilateral or multilateral agreement or arrangement that governs, in whole or in part, the return of victims of trafficking in persons. The interpretative notes further specify that agreements or arrangements in this paragraph include both agreements that deal specifically with the subject-matter of the Protocol and more general agreements that include provisions dealing with illegal migration, as well as that this paragraph should be understood as being without prejudice to any other obligations under customary international law regarding the return of migrants.82 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons 3. The [competent authority] is designated to coordinate responses to inquiries described in paragraph 1 and to establish procedures for responding to such inquiries in a regular and timely fashion.83 Chapter IX. Prevention, training and cooperation Commentary The manner in which these articles may be implemented much depends upon the legal system and framework of the particular State. In some cases they may be included in the law, while in others it may be more appropriate to implement them through guidelines and regulations. Obligation to take preventive measures Source: Protocol, article 9. Article 9, paragraph 1, of the Protocol obliges States parties to establish comprehensive policies, programmes and measures to prevent and combat trafficking in persons and to protect victims from revictimization. Article 9, paragraph 2, obliges States parties to endeavour to undertake research, information and media campaigns and social and economic initiatives to prevent and combat trafficking in persons. According to article 9, paragraphs 4 and 5, States parties shall take or strengthen measures, including through bilateral or multilateral cooperation, to alleviate the factors that make persons vulnerable to trafficking and to discourage the demand that fosters all forms of exploitation that lead to trafficking, thus requiring Governments to take positive steps to address the underlying causes of trafficking. According to article 9, paragraph 3, measures established on the basis of article 9 should include cooperation with non‑governmental and other relevant organizations and other elements of civil society. Examples of measures to address the demand side are measures to broaden awareness, attention and research into all forms of exploitation and forced labour, and the factors that underpin its demand; to raise public awareness on products and services that are produced by exploitative and forced labour; to regulate, register and license private recruitment agencies; to sensitize employers not to engage victims of trafficking or forced labour in their supply chain, whether through subcontracting or directly in their production; to enforce labour standards through labour inspections and other relevant means; to support the organization of workers; to increase the protection of the rights of migrant workers; and/or to criminalize the use of services of victims of trafficking or forced labour (see chapter IV). Various ministries, including those responsible for labour, and workers’ and employers’ organizations may play an important supportive role in addressing the demand side.84 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons Article 35. Establishment of a national anti-trafficking coordinating body [inter-agency anti-trafficking task force] Commentary Optional provision This provision is optional, though in line with the intention of the Protocol to develop comprehensive and coordinated policies on trafficking in persons and to promote cooperation between the relevant governmental agencies and between governmental and non‑governmental agencies. A national coordinating body can enhance this. Setting up a sustainable multidisciplinary anti-trafficking structure will enhance an adequate response to trafficking and enable the development of best practices. 1. The [competent authority] shall establish a national anti-trafficking coordinating body [inter-agency anti-trafficking task force] to be comprised of officials from [name State officials responsible for justice, health and welfare, labour, social affairs, legal services and immigration affairs], officials from other relevant State agencies and representatives of local governmental and non‑governmental service providers. 2. The National Anti-Trafficking Coordinating Body [Inter-agency Anti-Trafficking Task Force] shall carry out the following activities: (a) Coordinate the implementation of this Law, including developing protocols and guidelines; (b) Develop [within [one year] of the enactment of this Law] a national plan of action, consisting of a comprehensive set of measures for the prevention of trafficking, identification of, assistance to and protection of victims, including victims who are repatriated from another State to [name of State], the prosecution of traffickers and the training of relevant State and non‑State agencies, as well as coordinate and monitor its implementation; Commentary States should design policies or programmes on prevention in order: (a) To prevent victims from being revictimized; (b) To carry out information and awareness-raising campaigns, in cooperation with the media, non‑governmental organizations, labour market organizations, migrants’ organizations and other elements of civil society, aimed in particular at sectors and groups that are vulnerable to trafficking in persons; (c) To develop educational programmes, in particular for young people, to address gender discrimination and to promote gender equality and respect for the dignity and integrity of every human being;Chapter IX. Prevention, training and cooperation 85 (d) To include trafficking in persons in human rights curricula in schools and universities; (e) To reduce the factors that further, maintain and facilitate the exploitation of persons, including measures to discourage the demand [for cheap, exploitative and unprotected labour or services] [that fosters all forms of exploitation that lead to trafficking], through research on best practices, methods and strategies, enforcement of labour standards, raising awareness of the responsibility and role of media and civil society, and information campaigns; (f) To address the underlying causes of trafficking, such as poverty, underdevelopment, unemployment, lack of equal opportunities and discrimination in all its forms, and to improve the social and economic conditions of groups at risk; (g) To reduce the vulnerability of children to trafficking by creating a protective environment; and (h) To ensure effective action against traffickers as well as places of exploitation, because such action will be a deterrent to offenders and thus help in preventing trafficking. (c) Develop, coordinate and monitor the implementation of a national referral mechanism to ensure the proper identification of, referral of, assistance to and protection of victims of trafficking in persons, including child victims, and to ensure that they receive adequate assistance while protecting their human rights; Commentary Components of a national referral mechanism are: (a) Guidelines and protocols for the identification and assistance of victims of trafficking in persons, including specific guidelines and mechanisms for the treatment of children to ensure that they receive adequate assistance in accordance with their needs and rights; (b) A system to refer (possible) victims of trafficking in persons to specialized agencies offering protection and assistance; (c) The establishment of mechanisms to harmonize the assistance of (possible) victims of trafficking in persons with investigative and criminal prosecution efforts. Paragraph 2 (e). Both police and labour inspectors play important roles in law enforcement. Labour inspectors have the power to monitor workplaces and take measures to ensure that conditions of work meet the legal requirements, whereas the police have the ability to identify victims and possible perpetrators and actively investigate cases of trafficking. Other important actors are employers’ and workers’ organizations, as well as non‑governmental organizations engaged in the protection of human rights, assistance to victims and the prevention of trafficking.86 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons (d) Establish procedures to collect data and to promote research on the scale and nature of both domestic and transnational trafficking in persons and its forced labour and slavery-like outcomes, the factors that further and maintain trafficking in persons and best practices for the prevention of trafficking, for assistance to and protection of victims and the prosecution of traffickers; (e) Facilitate inter-agency and multidisciplinary cooperation between the various government agencies and between governmental and non‑governmental agencies, including labour inspectors and other labour market actors; (f) Facilitate cooperation among countries of origin, transit and destination; (g) Act as a focal point for national institutions and other State and non‑State actors, as well as international bodies and other actors, engaged in the prevention of trafficking in persons, the prosecution of traffickers and assistance to victims; and (h) Ensure that anti-trafficking measures comply with existing human rights norms and do not undermine or adversely affect the human rights of the groups affected. [; and] Commentary Measures should comply with human rights norms and standards (article 14 of the Protocol). [(i) Monitor the victim fund.] 3. Director of the Coordinating Body [Task Force]. The [competent authority] is authorized to appoint a Governmental Coordinator [Director] of the Coordinating Body [Task Force]. The Coordinator [Director] shall have as his or her primary responsibility to assist the Coordinating Body [Task Force] in carrying out its activities and may have additional responsibilities as determined by the [competent authority]. The Coordinator [Director] shall consult with non‑governmental, intergovernmental, international or any other relevant organizations, victims of trafficking in persons and other affected groups. 4. Annual report. The Coordinating Body [Task Force] shall issue an annual report on the progress of its activities, the number of victims assisted, including data on their age, sex and nationality and the services and/or Chapter IX. Prevention, training and cooperation 87 benefits they received under this Law, the number of trafficking cases investigated and prosecuted, and the number of traffickers convicted. 5. All data collection under this chapter shall respect the confidentiality of personal data of victims and the protection of their privacy. Article 36. Establishment of the office of a national rapporteur [national monitoring and reporting mechanism] Commentary Optional provision States are advised to establish a central place where information from different sources and actors is systematically gathered and analysed. This could be a national rapporteur or a comparable mechanism. The main task of such a mechanism would be the collection of data on trafficking in the widest possible sense, including monitoring the effects of the implementation of a national action plan. The national rapporteur should have an independent status and a clear mandate and adequate competence to use access to, and actively collect, data from all involved agencies, including law enforcement agencies, and to actively seek information from non‑governmental organizations. The mandate to collect information must be clearly distinguished from executive, operational or policy coordinating tasks, which should be fulfilled by other bodies. It should further have the competence to report directly to the Government and/or parliament and to make recommendations on the development of national policies and action plans without it being itself a policymaking agency. 1. This Law hereby creates a National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons, which will be supported by an office. 2. The National Rapporteur [National Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism] shall be an independent body and shall report annually directly to Parliament. 3. The National Rapporteur [National Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism] shall be appointed by Parliament [other competent body] each time for a period of five years. 4. The main tasks of the National Rapporteur [National Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism] shall be to collect data on trafficking in persons, to monitor the effects of the implementation of the national action plan and other measures, policies and programmes concerned with trafficking in persons, to identify best practices and to formulate recommendations to improve responses to trafficking in persons. 88 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons 5. To this end the National Rapporteur [National Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism] shall be authorized to have access to all available national data sources and to actively seek information from all State agencies and non‑governmental organizations involved. Article 37. Cooperation Commentary Mandatory provision Source: Protocol, articles 6, 9, paragraph 3, and 10. 1. Law enforcement, immigration, labour and other relevant agencies shall, as appropriate, cooperate with one another to prevent and prosecute trafficking crimes and to protect the victims of trafficking in persons, without prejudice to the victims’ right to privacy, by exchanging and sharing information and participating in training programmes, in order, among other things: (a) To identify victims and traffickers; (b) To identify (the type of) travel documents used to cross the border for the purpose of trafficking in persons; (c) To identify the means and methods used by criminal groups for the purpose of trafficking in persons; (d) To identify best practices on all aspects of preventing and combating trafficking in persons; (e) To provide assistance and protection to victims, witnesses and victim-witnesses. Commentary Article 10, paragraph 1, of the Protocol obliges law enforcement, immigration and other relevant authorities to cooperate by exchanging information. 2. In the development and implementation of policies, programmes and measures to prevent and combat trafficking in persons and to assist and protect its victims, State agencies shall cooperate, as appropriate, with non‑governmental organizations, other civil society institutions and international organizations.Chapter IX. Prevention, training and cooperation 89 Commentary Various articles of the Protocol oblige States parties to cooperate, where appropriate, with non‑governmental organizations, other civil society institutions and international organizations. States should design training programmes in a child-and gender-sensitive manner and involve all relevant State and non‑State agencies, including law enforcement, immigration, labour and other relevant officials, judicial officers, legal services, health-care and social workers, local service providers and other relevant professionals and civil society partners in order: (a) To educate them on the phenomenon of trafficking in persons, relevant legislation and the rights and needs of victims of trafficking; (b) To enable them to properly identify victims of trafficking in persons; (c) To enable them to effectively assist and protect victims and advise them on their rights, with due regard to the specific needs of child victims and other particularly vulnerable groups; (d) To encourage multidisciplinary and multi-agency cooperation. Source: Protocol, article 10, paragraph 2. Article 10, paragraph 2, of the Protocol obliges States parties to provide or strengthen training for law enforcement, immigration and other relevant officials, including labour officials, in the prevention of trafficking and to encourage cooperation with non‑governmental organizations, thus recognizing the need for State agencies to work together with non‑governmental organizations. With regard to child victims and witnesses it is important to put in place adequate training, selection and procedures to protect and meet the special needs of child victims and witnesses, as the nature of victimization affects children differently, such as sexual assault of children, especially girls. (Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime)91 Chapter X. Regulatory power Commentary The section on regulations and the authoritative text will vary according to the legal culture and the local context, if included in the law at all. Article 38. Rules and regulations Commentary Optional provision 1. Promulgating authority(ies) 1. The authority to promulgate regulations under this Law is vested in [name of authority(ies)] in close consultation with the National Anti‑Trafficking Coordinating Body of [name of State]. 2. Issuing rules and regulations 2. Not later than one hundred eighty days after the date of the enactment of this Law, the promulgating authority shall issue rules and regulations for the effective implementation of this Law in order: (a) To prevent trafficking in persons; (b) To raise awareness on trafficking in persons; (c) To identify, protect, assist and reintegrate victims of trafficking in persons, to provide them access to counselling, educational and vocational opportunities and other relevant services, to protect their rights and to prevent them from being revictimized or re-trafficked; (d) To collect data on the scale and nature of trafficking in persons, its root causes and other relevant elements; (e) To establish training programmes for the police, immigration, labour and other relevant officials, judicial officers, social workers and other relevant professionals and civil society partners;92 Model Law against Trafficking in Persons (f) To address the factors that make persons vulnerable to trafficking and exploitation, such as poverty, underdevelopment, discrimination and lack of equal opportunities; (g) To establish border control measures; (h) To establish cooperation between State agencies, non‑governmental organizations and other elements of civil society, international organizations and other relevant organizations for the prevention of trafficking in persons, the prosecution of traffickers and assistance to and protection of victims.Vienna International Centre, PO Box 500, 1400 Vienna, Austria Tel.: (+43-1) 26060-0, Fax: (+43-1) 26060-5866, www.unodc.org *0985117* United Nations publication Printed in Austria Sales No. E.09.V.11 USD 17 ISBN 978-92-1-133674-0 V.09-85117—September 2009—2,200Loi type contre la traite des personnes OFFICE DES NATIONS UNIES CONTRE LA DROGUE ET LE CRIME Loi type contre la traite des personnes NATIONS UNIES Vienne, 2010Note Les cotes des documents de l’Organisation des Nations Unies se composent de lettres majuscules et de chiffres. La simple mention d’une cote dans un texte signifie qu’il s’agit d’un document de l’Organisation.iii Table des matières Pages Loi type contre la traite des personnes Chapitre premier. Dispositions Article premier. Article 2. Entrée en Article 3. Principes Article 4. Champ d’application Chapitre II. Article 5. Chapitre III. Compétence Article 6. Application de la présente loi sur le Article 7. Application de la présente loi hors du territoire Chapitre IV. Dispositions pénales: infractions pénales de base comme fondement des infractions de Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la Article 8. Traite des Article 9. Circonstances Article 10. Non-responsabilité [non-sanction] [non-poursuite] des victimes de la Article 11. Recours au travail et aux services forcés Chapitre VI. Dispositions pénales: infractions accessoires et infractions liées à la Article 12. Article 13. Organisation et instructions en vue de la commission d’une Article 14. Article 15. Pratiques illicites eu égard aux documents de voyage ou iv Pages Article 16. Divulgation illicite de l’identité de victimes et/ou de Article 17. Obligations des transporteurs commerciaux et infractions commises par Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins Article 18. Identification des victimes de la traite des Article 19. Information aux victimes Article 20. Prestations et services de base aux victimes de la traite des Article 21. Protection générale des victimes et des Article 22. Enfants victimes et Article 23. Protection des victimes et des témoins au Article 24. Participation à la procédure pénale Article 25. Protection des données et de la vie Article 26. Fourniture d’un nouveau domicile aux victimes et/ou aux Article 27. Droit d’engager une action Article 28. Réparation ordonnée par le Article 29. Réparation pour les victimes de la traite des Chapitre VIII. Immigration et Article 30. Délai de rétablissement et de Article 31. Titre de séjour temporaire ou Article 32. Retour des victimes de la traite des personnes dans [l’État] Article 33. Rapatriement des victimes de la traite des personnes vers un État Article 34. Vérification, sur demande, de la légitimité et de la validité des Chapitre IX. Prévention, formation et Article 35. Création d’un organisme national de coordination de la lutte contre la traite [d’une équipe spéciale interinstitutions chargée de combattre la traite]. . . . . . . . 88 Article 36. Institution d’un bureau du Rapporteur national [mécanisme national de suivi et de communication Article 37. Chapitre X. Pouvoir Article 38. Règles et 1 Introduction1 La Loi type contre la traite des personnes a été élaborée par l’Office des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC) pour répondre à la demande de l’Assemblée générale, qui a prié le Secrétaire général d’encourager et de faciliter les efforts accomplis par les États Membres pour devenir parties à la Convention des Nations Unies contre la criminalité transnationale organisée2 et aux Protocoles s’y rapportant et pour les appliquer. Elle a plus particulièrement pour objet d’aider les États à mettre en pratique les dispositions du Protocole visant à prévenir, réprimer et punir la traite des personnes, en particulier des femmes et des enfants, additionnel à la Convention3. La Loi type facilitera et contribuera à systématiser la fourniture d’une assistance législative par l’UNODC et aidera les États eux-mêmes à examiner et modifier les législations existantes ou à en adopter de nouvelles. Elle se veut adaptable aux besoins de chaque État, indépendamment de sa tradition juridique et de sa situation sociale, économique, culturelle et géographique. La Loi type contient toutes les dispositions que les États sont tenus ou qu’il leur est recommandé d’introduire dans leur législation nationale en vertu du Protocole. Le commentaire distingue entre les dispositions impératives et les dispositions facultatives, distinction qui n’a pas lieu d’être pour les dispositions générales et les définitions, qui, si elles font partie intégrante de la Loi type, ne sont pas prescrites par le Protocole en tant que tel. Les dispositions recommandées peuvent en outre s’inspirer d’autres instruments internationaux. Chaque fois que cela est approprié ou nécessaire, plusieurs variantes sont proposées pour tenir compte de la diversité des cultures juridiques. Le commentaire précise aussi la source de la disposition et, dans certains cas, fournit des variantes au texte proposé ou des exemples tirés de la législation de divers pays (dans une traduction non officielle si nécessaire). Il est en outre dûment tenu compte des notes interprétatives pour les travaux 1La présente introduction décrit la genèse, la nature et la teneur de la Loi type contre la traite des personnes; elle ne fait pas partie du texte de la Loi type. 2Nations Unies, Recueil des Traités, vol. 2225, n° 39574. 3Ibid., vol. 2237, n° 39574.2 Loi type contre la traite des personnes préparatoires du Protocole4 et des guides législatifs pour l’application de la Convention des Nations Unies contre la criminalité transnationale organisée et des Protocoles s’y rapportant. Il convient de souligner que les questions concernant la coopération internationale en matière pénale, ainsi que les infractions de participation à un groupe criminel organisé, de corruption, d’entrave au bon fonctionnement de la justice et de blanchiment d’argent, qui vont souvent de pair avec la traite des personnes, sont abordées dans la Convention. Il est par conséquent essentiel de lire et de mettre en pratique les dispositions du Protocole relatif à la traite des personnes conjointement avec les dispositions de la Convention et d’élaborer une législation interne pour appliquer ces deux instruments. Il est en outre particulièrement important que toute législation nationale contre la traite des personnes soit conforme aux principes constitutionnels de l’État qui l’adopte, aux concepts fondamentaux de son système juridique, à sa structure juridique et à ses dispositifs d’application de la loi, et que les définitions qui y sont utilisées soient compatibles avec les définitions correspondantes d’autres lois. La Loi type n’est pas censée être incorporée comme un tout sans un examen minutieux de l’ensemble du cadre législatif de l’État. Elle ne saurait donc être transposée en droit interne indépendamment d’une législation d’application de la Convention, essentielle pour assurer son efficacité. La Loi type contre la traite des personnes a été élaborée par la Section de la criminalité organisée et de la justice pénale de la Division des traités, en coopération avec le Groupe de la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains et le trafic illicite de migrants de la Division des opérations et la Section des statistiques et des enquêtes de la Division de l’analyse des politiques et des relations publiques. Deux rédacteurs consultants, Marjan Wijers et Roelof Haveman, ont apporté leur concours à l’UNODC. Un groupe de spécialistes5 de la traite des êtres humains, issus de divers contextes juridiques et géographiques, s’est réuni pour examiner le projet de Loi type. 4A/55/383/Add.1. 5Le groupe était composé de spécialistes du Canada, de la Côte d’Ivoire, de l’Égypte, des États-Unis d’Amérique, de la France, de la Géorgie, d’Israël, du Liban, du Nigéria, de l’Ouganda, des Pays-Bas, de la Slovaquie et de la Thaïlande, ainsi que de représentants de l’Organisation internationale du Travail et de l’Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe.3 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Préambule Le Gouvernement de [l’État], Préoccupé par le problème de la traite des personnes [dans] [nom de l’État], Considérant que la traite des personnes constitue une infraction grave et une violation des droits de l’homme, Considérant également que, conformément aux conventions internationales et/ou régionales auxquelles [l’État] est partie, des mesures doivent être prises pour prévenir la traite des personnes, punir les trafiquants et aider et protéger les victimes de cette traite, notamment en faisant respecter leurs droits fondamentaux, Considérant en outre les obligations internationales que [l’État] a souscrites par sa ratification de/son adhésion à [la Convention des Nations Unies contre la criminalité transnationale organisée et son Protocole additionnel visant à prévenir, réprimer et punir la traite des personnes, en particulier des femmes et des enfants,] [la Convention de l’OIT concernant le travail forcé ou obligatoire,] [la Convention de l’OIT concernant l’abolition du travail forcé,] [la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant,] [la Convention de l’OIT concernant l’interdiction des pires formes de travail des enfants et l’action immédiate en vue de leur élimination,] [la Convention relative à l’esclavage,] [la Convention supplémentaire relative à l’abolition de l’esclavage, de la traite des esclaves et des institutions et pratiques analogues à l’esclavage,] [la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes,] [la Convention internationale sur la protection des droits de tous les travailleurs migrants et des membres de leur famille], Considérant que toute action ou initiative dans le domaine de la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains doit être non discriminatoire et prendre en considération l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes, ainsi qu’une approche respectueuse des enfants,4 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Conscient que, pour décourager les auteurs de la traite et les traduire en justice, il est nécessaire d’incriminer comme il convient la traite des personnes et les infractions connexes, de prévoir des sanctions appropriées, de faire une priorité des enquêtes et des poursuites relatives aux infractions de traite et d’aider et de protéger les victimes de telles infractions, Conscient également que la mobilisation, la sensibilisation, l’éducation, la recherche, la formation, le conseil et d’autres mesures sont nécessaires pour aider les familles, les communautés locales, les organismes publics et les institutions de la société civile à s’acquitter de leurs responsabilités en matière de prévention de la traite des personnes, de protection des victimes de la traite et d’aide à ces dernières, ainsi qu’en matière de détection et de répression, Conscient en outre que les enfants victimes ou témoins sont particulièrement vulnérables et ont besoin d’une protection, d’une assistance et d’un soutien particuliers adaptés à leur âge, à leur sexe, à leur degré de maturité et à leurs besoins spécifiques afin de leur éviter des épreuves et traumatismes supplémentaires du fait de leur participation au processus de justice pénale, Convaincu que pour être efficaces les mesures contre la traite des personnes exigent une coordination au niveau national et une coopération entre organismes publics, ainsi qu’entre organismes publics et société civile, y compris les organisations non gouvernementales, Convaincu également que la traite des personnes est une infraction de nature nationale et transnationale dont les auteurs opèrent à l’échelle transfrontière et que, par conséquent, la lutte contre la traite doit aussi s’élever au-dessus des limites juridictionnelles et les États doivent coopérer sur les plans bilatéral et multilatéral pour réprimer efficacement cette infraction, [L’Assemblée nationale/Le Parlement/autre] de [l’État] adopte à sa [numéro] session, le [date], la loi ci-après: Commentaire Disposition facultative Le préambule, s’il y en a un, variera selon la culture juridique et le contexte local.5 Chapitre premier. Dispositions générales Article premier. [Titre] La présente loi pourra être citée sous le titre de “[loi contre la traite des personnes] de [l’État] de [année de l’adoption]”. Commentaire L’article premier est redondant s’il existe un texte distinct portant promulgation de la loi sur la traite des personnes, auquel cas le titre de la loi sera mentionné dans ledit texte. Exemples de titres: Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes; Loi visant à combattre la traite des personnes; Loi visant à prévenir et réprimer la traite des personnes et à protéger et aider les personnes qui en sont victimes. Article 2. Entrée en vigueur La présente loi entre en vigueur le [date]. Article 3. Principes généraux 1. La présente loi a pour objet: a) De prévenir et de combattre la traite des personnes dans [l’État]; b) De protéger et d’aider les victimes d’une telle traite en respectant pleinement leurs droits fondamentaux [en défendant leurs droits fondamentaux]; c) D’assurer un châtiment juste et efficace des trafiquants [des enquêtes et des poursuites efficaces à l’encontre des trafiquants]; et6 Loi type contre la traite des personnes d) De promouvoir et de faciliter la coopération nationale et internationale en vue d’atteindre ces objectifs. Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 2. Le paragraphe 1 se différencie légèrement de l’article 2 du Protocole, par l’ajout de l’alinéa c. 2. Les mesures énoncées dans la présente loi [en particulier les mesures sur l’identification des victimes et les mesures visant à protéger et promouvoir les droits des victimes] sont interprétées et appliquées à tous sans distinction aucune, que celle-ci soit fondée sur la race, la couleur, la religion, les croyances, l’âge, la situation familiale, la culture, la langue, l’appartenance ethnique, l’origine nationale ou sociale, la nationalité, le sexe, l’orientation sexuelle, l’opinion politique ou toute autre opinion, la capacité physique, la fortune, la naissance, le statut au regard de la législation sur l’immigration, le passé de victime de la traite ou de travailleur de l’industrie du sexe, ou toute autre situation. Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 14. Aux termes du paragraphe 1 de l’article 14 du Protocole, aucune disposition du Protocole “n’a d’incidences sur les droits, obligations et responsabilités des États et des particuliers en vertu du droit international, y compris du droit international humanitaire et du droit international relatif aux droits de l’homme”. Le même article (par. 2) prévoit en outre que les mesures énoncées dans le Protocole “sont interprétées et appliquées d’une façon telle que les personnes ne font pas l’objet d’une discrimination au motif qu’elles sont victimes d’une traite. L’interprétation et l’application de ces mesures sont conformes aux principes de non-discrimination internationalement reconnus” comme ceux qui figurent dans le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques (article 2, par. 1). Au minimum, le libellé de l’article 14 devrait être inclus dans la loi si celle-ci ne comporte pas déjà de disposition analogue posant un principe général, par exemple: “Les mesures énoncées dans la présente loi sont interprétées et appliquées d’une façon telle que les personnes ne font pas l’objet d’une discrimination au motif qu’elles sont victimes d’une traite. Elles sont conformes au principe de non-discrimination.” 3. Les enfants victimes sont traités de manière juste et équitable, indépendamment de la race, de la couleur, de la religion, des croyances, de l’âge, Chapitre premier. Dispositions générales 7 de la situation familiale, de la culture, de la langue, de l’appartenance ethnique, de l’origine nationale ou sociale, de la nationalité, du sexe, de l’orientation sexuelle, de l’opinion politique ou de toute autre opinion, de la capacité physique, de la fortune, de la naissance, du statut au regard de la législation sur l’immigration, du passé de victime de la traite ou de travailleur de l’industrie du sexe, ou de toute autre situation qui sont les leurs ou ceux de leurs parents ou représentants légaux. Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 14. Étant donné que le Protocole lui-même aborde les besoins spécifiques des enfants (Protocole, article 6, par. 4) et qu’il doit être appliqué de manière conforme aux normes existantes en matière de droits de l’homme (Protocole, article 14, par. 2), telles que la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, les dispositions de la Loi type sont, lorsqu’il y a lieu, libellées de manière à s’appliquer plus spécifiquement aux enfants. Le paragraphe 3 est fondé sur l’article 14 du Protocole et sur le principe de non-discrimination internationalement reconnu, qui figure par exemple dans le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques, dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et dans les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels (résolution 2005/20 du Conseil économique et social, annexe). Article 4. Champ d’application La présente loi s’applique à toutes les formes de traite des personnes, qu’elles soient de nature nationale ou transnationale et qu’elles soient ou non liées à la criminalité organisée. Commentaire Le Protocole visant à prévenir, réprimer et punir la traite des personnes, en particulier des femmes et des enfants, additionnel à la Convention des Nations Unies contre la criminalité transnationale organisée, est interprété conjointement avec la Convention (Protocole, article 1). L’article 4 du Protocole limite son applicabilité à la prévention, aux enquêtes et aux poursuites concernant les infractions de nature transnationale impliquant un groupe criminel organisé, sauf disposition contraire. Ces prescriptions ne font pas partie intégrante de la définition de l’infraction (voir Protocole, article 3 et article 5, par. 1) et les lois nationales devraient conférer le caractère d’infraction pénale à la traite des personnes indépendamment de sa nature transnationale ou de l’implication d’un groupe criminel organisé (voir Convention, article 34). La Loi type n’établit pas de distinction 8 Loi type contre la traite des personnes entre les dispositions qui exigent ces éléments et celles qui ne les exigent pas, afin d’assurer l’égalité de traitement, par les autorités nationales, de toutes les affaires de traite des personnes sur leur territoire.9 Chapitre II. Définitions Article 5. Définitions Commentaire Certains pays préfèrent inclure un chapitre sur les définitions, soit au début de la loi, soit à la fin. Dans d’autres pays, le Code pénal (ou la loi pénale) contient un chapitre général avec des définitions, dont éventuellement certaines de celles ou toutes celles figurant ci-après. Parfois, les États estiment souhaitable de laisser l’interprétation aux tribunaux. Les définitions ci-après devraient être lues conjointement avec les définitions des infractions qui figurent dans le chapitre IV (Dispositions pénales: infractions pénales de base comme fondement des infractions de traite). Les définitions sont chaque fois que possible tirées du Protocole, de la Convention ou d’autres instruments internationaux existants. Des exemples tirés de lois de différents pays peuvent aussi être donnés. En général, il est souhaitable que les définitions utilisées dans la loi correspondent à celles qui existent déjà dans la législation interne. Le présent chapitre contient uniquement des définitions de termes spécifiques à la traite des personnes. Les termes généraux n’y figurent pas car ils devraient déjà être incorporés dans le droit interne (avec toutes les variations nationales possibles). C’est le cas notamment des termes “complice”, “complicité”, “tentative”, “entente délictueuse”, “document d’identité falsifié”, “personne morale” et “groupe structuré”. 1. Aux fins de la présente loi, les définitions suivantes s’appliquent: a) L’expression “abus d’une situation de vulnérabilité” s’entend de l’abus de toute situation dans laquelle la personne concernée estime qu’elle n’a pas d’autre choix réel ni acceptable que de se soumettre; ou L’expression “abus d’une situation de vulnérabilité” s’entend du fait de tirer parti de la situation de vulnérabilité dans laquelle se trouve une personne pour les raisons suivantes [fournir une liste pertinente]: [i) Entrée dans le pays de manière illégale ou sans les documents requis;] ou10 Loi type contre la traite des personnes [ii) État de grossesse ou toute maladie ou déficience physique ou mentale, y compris la dépendance à une substance;] ou [iii) Capacité réduite à former des jugements, étant enfant ou souffrant d’une maladie, d’une infirmité ou d’une déficience physique ou mentale;] ou [iv) Promesses ou dons de sommes d’argent ou d’autres avantages à des personnes ayant autorité sur la personne en question;] ou [v) Situation précaire sur le plan de la survie sociale;] ou [vi) Autres facteurs pertinents.] Commentaire Source: Notes interprétatives pour les documents officiels (travaux préparatoires) des négociations sur la Convention des Nations Unies contre la criminalité transnationale organisée (A/55/383/Add.1), paragraphe 63 (ci‑après dénommées “notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1)”). De nombreuses autres définitions de l’abus d’une situation de vulnérabilité sont possibles, qui peuvent mentionner des éléments comme l’abus de la situation économique de la victime ou la dépendance à une substance, ou qui peuvent être axées sur la situation objective ou sur la situation telle qu’elle est perçue par la victime. Il est recommandé d’inclure dans la loi une définition de cet élément de l’infraction étant donné qu’il soulève de nombreux problèmes dans la pratique. Pour mieux protéger les victimes, les gouvernements pourraient envisager d’adopter une définition axée sur l’auteur de l’infraction et son intention de tirer parti de la situation de la victime. Ces éléments pourraient être en outre plus faciles à prouver, car il n’y aurait pas besoin de connaître l’état psychologique de la victime mais seulement de savoir si l’auteur de l’infraction avait connaissance de la vulnérabilité de la victime et avait l’intention d’en tirer parti. Exemples: “L’expression “abus d’une situation de vulnérabilité” s’entend de l’abus de toute situation dans laquelle une personne estime qu’elle n’a pas d’autre choix raisonnable que de se soumettre au travail ou aux services demandés et inclut, sans s’y limiter, le fait de tirer parti des vulnérabilités de la personne tenant à son entrée illégale ou sans les documents requis dans le pays, à son état de grossesse ou à toute maladie ou déficience physique ou mentale dont elle peut souffrir, y compris la dépendance à une substance, ou à sa capacité réduite à former des jugements, étant enfant.” (Source: États-Unis d’Amérique, Département d’État, Loi type pour lutter contre la traite des personnes, 2003.) [Abus] de la situation particulièrement vulnérable dans laquelle se trouve l’étranger en raison de sa situation administrative illégale ou précaire, d’un état de grossesse, d’une maladie, d’une infirmité ou d’une déficience physique ou mentale.” Chapitre II. Définitions 11 (Source: Belgique, Loi contenant des dispositions en vue de la répression de la traite des êtres humains et de la pornographie enfantine, 13 avril 1995, article 77 bis 1) 2.) “[...] en profitant d’une situation d’infériorité physique ou psychologique ou d’une situation de nécessité, ou au moyen de promesses ou de sommes d’argent ou d’autres avantages aux personnes ayant autorité sur la personne considérée.” (Source: Italie, Code pénal, article 601.) “État de vulnérabilité — état particulier dans lequel une personne se trouve et qui la rend susceptible d’être l’objet d’un abus ou d’être exploitée, en particulier en raison de: a) La situation précaire dans laquelle elle se trouve sur le plan de la survie sociale; b) Son âge, un état de grossesse, une maladie, une infirmité, une déficience physique ou mentale; c) La situation précaire dans laquelle elle se trouve du fait de son entrée ou séjour illégal dans un pays de transit ou de destination.” (Source: République de Moldova, loi n° 241-XVI visant à prévenir et à combattre la traite des personnes, 20 octobre 2005, article 2, paragraphe 10.) b) L’expression “personnes à charge accompagnant la victime” s’entend de tout membre de la famille [et/ou] proche parent dont la personne victime de la traite [est tenue par la loi d’assurer la subsistance] [est légalement tenue d’assurer la subsistance] et qui était aux côtés de la victime au moment de la commission de l’infraction, ainsi que de tout enfant né pendant ou après la commission de l’infraction; c) Le terme “enfant” s’entend de toute personne âgée de moins de 18 ans; Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 3, alinéa d; Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, article premier; Convention n° 182 de l’OIT concernant l’interdiction des pires formes de travail des enfants et l’action immédiate en vue de leur élimination, article 2. d) L’expression “transporteur commercial” s’entend d’une personne morale ou physique qui assure le transport de biens ou de passagers à des fins lucratives; e) Le terme “contrainte” s’entend du recours ou de la menace de recours à la force, et de certaines formes psychologiques ou non violentes de recours ou de menace de recours à la force, y compris, mais pas uniquement:12 Loi type contre la traite des personnes i) Les menaces de préjudice ou de contrainte physique contre une personne; ii) Tout stratagème, plan ou manoeuvre visant à convaincre une personne que, si elle n’accomplit pas un acte donné, il en découlera un préjudice grave ou une contrainte physique; iii) Toute pratique abusive ou toute menace en rapport avec le statut juridique d’une personne; iv) Les pressions psychologiques; Commentaire Source: États-Unis d’Amérique, Département d’État, Loi type pour lutter contre la traite des personnes, 2003. C’est là une manière de définir la “contrainte”. Beaucoup de variantes sont possibles, qui peuvent être axées sur la situation objective ou sur la situation telle qu’elle est perçue par la personne subissant la contrainte. Autre exemple de définition en droit pénal: “Les termes “force ou contrainte” englobent le fait d’obtenir ou de perpétuer par des actes de menace la fourniture, par une personne, d’un travail, de services ou d’autres activités, par la contrainte physique, légale, psychologique ou mentale, ou l’abus d’autorité.” (Source: Nigéria, Loi de 2005 portant exécution et administration de la législation sur la traite des personnes (interdiction), article 64.) f) Le terme “tromperie” s’entend de tout comportement visant à tromper une personne; ou Le terme “tromperie” s’entend de toute tromperie, par des paroles ou par un comportement, [sur les faits ou sur le droit] [sur]: i) La nature du travail ou des services à fournir; ii) Les conditions de travail; iii) La mesure dans laquelle la personne sera libre de quitter son lieu de résidence; ou [iv) D’autres circonstances en rapport avec l’exploitation de la personne.] Commentaire La fraude ou la tromperie peuvent porter sur la nature du travail ou des services que la victime de la traite fournira (par exemple, une personne se voit Chapitre II. Définitions 13 promettre un travail d’employé de maison mais est forcée de se prostituer), sur les conditions dans lesquelles la victime sera forcée de fournir ce travail ou ces services (par exemple, une personne se voit promettre un travail régulier et un titre de séjour, un salaire approprié et des conditions de travail normales mais ne reçoit par la suite aucun salaire, est forcée de travailler de longues journées, est privée de ses documents de voyage ou d’identité, n’a aucune liberté de mouvement et/ou est menacée de représailles si elle tente de s’échapper), ou sur les deux. Au Royaume-Uni, en vertu de la section 15-4 de la loi de 1968 sur le vol, le terme “tromperie” s’entend de “toute tromperie (qu’elle soit délibérée ou qu’elle tienne à des actes dont les possibles conséquences sont sciemment ignorées), par des paroles ou un comportement, sur les faits ou sur le droit, notamment la tromperie sur les intentions du moment de la personne qui y recourt ou de toute autre personne”. Une autre approche consiste à définir la tromperie dans le contexte de la traite des personnes. La législation australienne définit une infraction spécifique de “recrutement trompeur pour services sexuels”, comme suit: “1) Une personne qui, dans l’intention d’amener une autre personne à s’engager à fournir des services sexuels, la trompe sur: a) Le fait que le recrutement impliquera la fourniture de services sexuels; ou aa) La nature des services sexuels à fournir (par exemple, si ces services impliqueront qu’elle ait des rapports sexuels non protégés); ou b) La mesure dans laquelle elle sera libre de quitter le lieu ou le secteur où elle fournit des services sexuels; ou c) La mesure dans laquelle elle sera libre de cesser de fournir des services sexuels; ou d) La mesure dans laquelle elle sera libre de quitter son lieu de résidence; ou da) La question de savoir si une dette sera due ou considérée comme due par elle en rapport avec l’engagement qu’elle aura pris — le montant, ou l’existence, d’une dette due ou considérée comme due; ou e) Le fait que l’engagement pris impliquera l’exploitation, la servitude pour dettes ou la confiscation des documents de voyage ou d’identité; est coupable d’infraction.” (Source: Australie, loi de 1995 portant modification du Code pénal, chapitre 8/270, section 270.7.) g) L’expression “servitude pour dettes” s’entend de l’état ou la condition résultant du fait qu’un débiteur s’est engagé à fournir en garantie d’une dette ses services personnels ou ceux de quelqu’un sur lequel il a autorité, si la valeur équitable de ces services n’est pas affectée à la liquidation de 14 Loi type contre la traite des personnes la dette ou si la durée de ces services n’est pas limitée ni leur caractère défini; Commentaire Source: Convention supplémentaire relative à l’abolition de l’esclavage, de la traite des esclaves et des institutions et pratiques analogues à l’esclavage, article premier. L’expression “servitude pour dettes” désigne le système par lequel une personne est tenue en servitude en étant placée dans une situation où il lui est impossible de rembourser ses dettes réelles, imposées ou imaginaires. Exemple de définition de “servitude pour dette” en droit pénal: “L’expression “servitude pour dettes” s’entend de l’état ou la condition résultant du fait qu’un débiteur s’est engagé à fournir: a) Ses services personnels; ou b) Ceux de quelqu’un sur lequel il a autorité; en garantie d’une dette due, ou considérée comme due (y compris toute dette contractée, ou considérée comme contractée, après l’engagement pris), par une personne si: a) La dette ou prétendue dette est manifestement excessive; ou b) La valeur équitable de ces services n’est pas affectée à la liquidation de la dette ou de la prétendue dette; ou c) La durée de ces services n’est pas limitée ni leur caractère défini.” (Source: Australie, loi de 1995 portant modification du Code pénal, sect. 271.8.) h) L’expression “exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui” s’entend du fait de tirer illégalement un avantage financier ou un autre avantage matériel de la prostitution d’autrui; Commentaire Source: Institut interrégional de recherche des Nations Unies sur la criminalité et la justice, Guide à l’intention des formateurs sur la traite des êtres humains et les opérations de maintien de la paix (Trafficking in Human Beings and Peace Support Operations: Trainers Guide), 2006, p. 153. C’est là un exemple de définition, mais beaucoup d’autres définitions sont possibles. Exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui et exploitation sexuelle. Les termes “exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui” et “exploitation sexuelle” n’ont pas été Chapitre II. Définitions 15 définis dans le Protocole, afin que les États puissent le ratifier quelles que soient leurs politiques internes en matière de prostitution. Le Protocole n’envisage l’exploitation de la prostitution que dans le contexte de la traite (notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1), par. 64). Il ne comporte aucune obligation d’incriminer la prostitution. Ainsi, différents systèmes juridiques — en vertu desquels (l’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui) la prostitution adulte non contrainte peut être légale, réglementée, tolérée ou incriminée — sont conformes au Protocole. Le terme “illégalement” a été ajouté pour indiquer que l’acte doit être illégal au regard des lois nationales sur la prostitution. Si ces termes sont utilisés dans la loi, il est souhaitable de les définir. i) L’expression “travail ou services forcés” s’entend de tout travail ou service exigé d’une personne sous la menace d’une peine quelconque et pour lequel ladite personne ne s’est pas offerte de plein gré; Commentaire Source: Convention n° 29 de l’OIT concernant le travail forcé ou obligatoire de 1930, article 2, paragraphe 1, et article 25. Travail forcé, esclavage, pratiques analogues à l’esclavage et servitude. L’article 14 du Protocole mentionne l’existence d’autres instruments internationaux en rapport avec l’interprétation du Protocole. Les notions de travail forcé, d’esclavage, de pratiques analogues à l’esclavage et de servitude sont précisées dans un certain nombre de conventions internationales et devraient, s’il y a lieu dans les États concernés, guider l’interprétation et l’application du Protocole. Travail et services forcés. La notion d’exploitation du travail comprise dans la définition permet d’établir le lien entre le Protocole et la Convention de l’OIT concernant le travail forcé et de mettre en évidence que la traite des personnes aux fins d’exploitation entre dans la définition du travail forcé ou obligatoire figurant dans la Convention. Le paragraphe 1 de l’article 2 de ladite convention définit l’expression “travail forcé ou obligatoire” comme suit: “Tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu sous la menace d’une peine quelconque et pour lequel ledit individu ne s’est pas offert de plein gré.” Que le Protocole établisse une distinction entre l’exploitation du travail ou des services forcés et l’exploitation sexuelle ne signifie pas que l’exploitation sexuelle sous la contrainte ne relève pas du travail ou des services forcés, en particulier dans le contexte de la traite. L’exploitation sexuelle sous la contrainte et la prostitution forcée entrent dans le champ de la définition du travail forcé ou obligatoire (OIT, Éradiquer le travail forcé, Conférence internationale du travail, 2007, p. 43). Depuis l’entrée en vigueur de la Convention n° 29, la Commission d’experts de l’OIT a considéré la traite en vue de l’exploitation sexuelle à des fins commerciales comme une forme de travail forcé. Travail ou service. Le travail forcé se définit par la nature de la relation entre un individu et un “employeur”, et non pas par le type d’activité exercée, la légalité ou l’illégalité de l’activité en question dans la législation nationale, ou 16 Loi type contre la traite des personnes sa désignation officielle comme “activité économique” (OIT, Rapport global 2005, p. 6). Le travail forcé englobe donc le travail forcé en usine ainsi que la prostitution forcée et les autres services sexuels forcés (y compris lorsque la prostitution est illégale en vertu de la législation nationale) ou la mendicité forcée. De plein gré. Le législateur et les services de détection et de répression doivent tenir compte du fait que ce qui peut apparaître comme une “offre de plein gré” de la part d’un travailleur/d’une victime peut être le résultat d’une manipulation ou ne pas reposer sur une décision éclairée. En outre, il se peut que la personne, au départ, se fasse recruter de son plein gré et que les mécanismes coercitifs destinés à la maintenir dans une situation d’exploitation soient mis en place ultérieurement. Lorsque des travailleurs (migrants) sont victimes de tromperie, de fausses promesses, lorsque leurs papiers d’identité sont retenus ou lorsqu’ils sont forcés de rester à la disposition d’un employeur, les organes de contrôle de l’OIT considèrent qu’il y a violation de la Convention. Cela signifie que, même dans les cas où l’emploi est à l’origine le résultat d’un accord conclu librement, les travailleurs ne sauraient aliéner leur droit au libre choix de leur travail et que, par conséquent, toute restriction à la liberté de quitter son emploi, même lorsque le travailleur l’a librement accepté, peut être considérée comme du travail forcé (Directives de l’OIT relatives à la traite des êtres humains et au travail forcé, 2005; OIT, Éradiquer le travail forcé, Conférence internationale du travail, 2007, p. 20 et 21). Une façon de remédier au problème que pourrait susciter l’utilisation de ces termes est d’insérer une définition sur le recours à des moyens comme la force ou la menace, approche adoptée par plusieurs législateurs nationaux (voir plus bas). La Loi type prévoit une définition facultative faisant référence aux “moyens” employés. Peine quelconque. La menace d’une peine peut revêtir les formes les plus diverses: (menace de) violence ou contrainte physique, (menace de) violence envers la victime ou sa famille, menace de dénonciation à la police ou aux services d’immigration lorsque la victime est dans une situation illégale en matière d’emploi ou de résidence, menace de dénonciation aux notables de leur village ou aux membres de leur famille dans le cas de jeunes filles ou de femmes contraintes de se prostituer, (menace de) confiscation des documents de voyage ou d’identité, prélèvement d’une partie du salaire pour le remboursement des dettes, non-paiement du salaire, ou perte de salaire accompagnée d’une menace de licenciement si le travailleur refuse de travailler davantage que prévu par les dispositions de son contrat ou de la législation nationale (OIT, Rapport global 2005, p. 5 et 6; OIT, Éradiquer le travail forcé, Conférence internationale du travail, 2007, p. 20). Dans ses directives relatives à la traite des êtres humains et au travail forcé, l’OIT énumère cinq grands éléments permettant d’identifier le travail forcé: (Menace de) violence physique ou sexuelle; il s’agit notamment de la torture émotionnelle telle que le chantage, la réprobation, les insultes, etc.; Restriction de mouvement et/ou détention sur le lieu de travail ou dans un secteur limité; Servitude pour dettes/travail sous contrainte pour dette; retenue ou non‑paiement du salaire; Retenue du passeport et des documents d’identité pour que le travailleur ne puisse pas partir ou prouver son identité et son statut; Menace de dénonciation aux autorités. Chapitre II. Définitions 17 Exemples de définitions du travail forcé en droit pénal: “Quiconque contraint de manière illégale une personne à travailler, en recourant à la force ou à d’autres moyens de pression, ou en menaçant d’utiliser l’un ou l’autre de ceux-ci, ou en obtenant un consentement au moyen de la fraude, moyennant ou non finance, est passible [...] d’emprisonnement.” (Source: Israël, Code pénal.) “1) L’expression “travail ou services forcés” s’entend du travail ou des services dont la fourniture est obtenue d’une personne ou perpétuée par l’intermédiaire d’un agent qui: a) Cause ou menace de causer un préjudice grave à la personne; b) Recourt ou menace de recourir à la contrainte physique contre la personne; c) Viol ou menace de violer la loi ou la procédure judiciaire; d) Détruit, dissimule, soustrait, confisque ou détient sciemment tout passeport ou autre document d’immigration réel ou supposé, ou tout autre document d’identification officiel réel ou supposé, de la personne; e) Recourt au chantage; f) Cause ou menace de causer un préjudice financier à la personne ou exerce un contrôle sur sa situation financière; ou g) Utilise un stratagème, un plan ou une manoeuvre visant à convaincre la personne que, si elle ne fournit pas le travail ou les services en question, elle ou une autre personne subira un préjudice grave ou une contrainte physique. 2) Le terme “travail” s’entend d’une activité ayant une valeur économique ou financière. 3) Le terme “services” s’entend d’une relation continue entre une personne et un agent dans le cadre de laquelle la personne exerce des activités sous le contrôle ou pour le bénéfice de l’agent ou d’un tiers. Les activités sexuelles à des fins commerciales et les spectacles à caractère sexuellement explicite sont considérés comme des “services” en vertu de la présente loi. 4) Le terme “perpétuer” s’entend du fait de s’assurer la fourniture continue d’un travail ou de services, indépendamment de tout accord initial par lequel la victime de la traite aurait accepté de fournir ce travail ou service.” (Source: Global Rights, Loi type sur la protection des victimes de la traite des êtres humains rédigée à l’intention des États fédérés des États-Unis d’Amérique, 2005.)18 Loi type contre la traite des personnes “L’expression “travail forcé” s’entend de la condition d’une personne qui fournit un travail ou des services (autres que des services sexuels) et qui, du fait de l’usage de la force ou de la menace: a) n’est pas libre de cesser de fournir le travail ou les services en question; ou b) n’est pas libre de quitter le lieu ou le secteur où elle fournit le travail ou les services en question.” [Source: Australie, loi de 1995 portant modification du Code pénal, section S73.2(3).] j) L’expression “mariage forcé ou servile” s’entend de toute institution ou pratique en vertu de laquelle: i) Une femme [personne] ou un enfant est, sans avoir le droit de refuser, promis ou donné en mariage moyennant une contrepartie en espèces ou en nature versée à ses parents, à son tuteur, à sa famille ou à toute autre personne ou tout autre groupe de personnes; ou ii) Le mari d’une femme, la famille ou le clan de celui-ci ont le droit de la céder à un tiers, à titre onéreux ou autrement; ou iii) La femme peut, à la mort de son mari, être transmise par succession à une autre personne; Commentaire Source: Convention supplémentaire relative à l’abolition de l’esclavage, article premier. La définition tirée de la convention susmentionnée fait référence uniquement à la pratique des mariages forcés ou serviles de femmes. Les législateurs pourraient envisager de l’actualiser pour qu’elle vise les pratiques en vertu desquelles tant les femmes/filles que les hommes/garçons peuvent faire l’objet de mariages forcés ou serviles. La définition pourrait englober la traite à des fins de mariage et certaines formes de “mariages par correspondance”. k) L’expression “groupe criminel organisé” s’entend d’un groupe structuré de trois personnes ou plus existant depuis un certain temps et agissant de concert dans le but de commettre une ou plusieurs infractions créées aux chapitres V et VI de la présente loi, pour en tirer directement ou indirectement un avantage financier ou un autre avantage matériel; Commentaire Source: Convention, article 2, alinéa a.Chapitre II. Définitions 19 l) L’expression “pratiques analogues à l’esclavage” englobe la servitude pour dettes, le servage, les mariages serviles et l’exploitation des enfants et des adolescents; Commentaire La Convention supplémentaire relative à l’abolition de l’esclavage ne contient pas de définition, mais elle interdit expressément la servitude pour dettes, le servage, les mariages serviles et l’exploitation des enfants et des adolescents. Autre définition possible: “L’expression “pratiques analogues à l’esclavage” s’entend de l’exploitation économique d’une personne fondée sur une relation de dépendance ou de contrainte effective, associée à une privation grave et radicale des droits civils fondamentaux, et englobe la servitude pour dettes, le servage, les mariages forcés ou serviles et l’exploitation des enfants et des adolescents.” m) Le terme “prostitution” s’entend conformément à la définition qui en est donnée dans [la législation nationale pertinente]; Commentaire Voir le commentaire sur le paragraphe 1, alinéa h, de l’article 5. n) L’expression “agent public” s’entend de: i) Toute personne qui détient un mandat législatif, exécutif, administratif ou judiciaire, qu’elle ait été nommée ou élue, à titre permanent ou temporaire, qu’elle soit rémunérée ou non rémunérée, et quel que soit son niveau hiérarchique; ii) Toute autre personne qui exerce une fonction publique, y compris pour un organisme public ou une entreprise publique, ou qui fournit un service public; Commentaire Source: Convention des Nations Unies contre la corruption, article 2. Si la législation nationale comprend une définition plus large de l’expression “agent public”, celle-ci peut être utilisée aux fins de la loi. o) L’expression “nouvelle victimisation” s’entend de la situation dans laquelle une même personne est victime de plus d’une infraction pénale au cours d’une période donnée;20 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Commentaire Source: Loi type de l’UNODC sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. p) L’expression “victimisation secondaire” s’entend d’une victimisation qui ne résulte pas directement d’un acte criminel mais de la réaction d’institutions et de particuliers envers la victime; Commentaire Source: Loi type de l’UNODC sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. q) Le terme “servage” s’entend de la condition de toute personne tenue par la loi, la coutume ou un accord de vivre et de travailler sur une terre appartenant à une autre personne et de fournir à cette autre personne, contre rémunération ou gratuitement, certains services déterminés, sans pouvoir changer sa condition; Commentaire Source: Convention supplémentaire relative à l’abolition de l’esclavage, article premier. r) Le terme “servitude” s’entend des conditions de travail et/ou de l’obligation de travailler ou de prêter des services auxquelles une personne ne peut échapper et qu’elle ne peut changer; Commentaire La servitude est interdite par, entre autres instruments, la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme (1948) et le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques (1966). Aucun de ces instruments internationaux ne comporte de définition explicite du terme “servitude”. La définition proposée ici se fonde sur une interprétation de la Déclaration universelle et du Pacte susmentionnés. Dans son jugement de l’affaire Siliadin c. France (2005), la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme définit la servitude comme suit: “Obligation de prêter ses services sous l’empire de la contrainte, à mettre en lien avec la notion “d’esclavage”.” (CEDH, 26 juillet 2005, n° 73316/01) Exemple de définition de la servitude en droit pénal:Chapitre II. Définitions 21 On entend par “servitude” une condition de dépendance dans laquelle le travail ou les services d’une personne sont fournis ou obtenus au moyen de menaces de préjudice grave envers cette personne ou une autre personne, ou au moyen d’un stratagème, d’un plan ou d’une manoeuvre visant à convaincre la personne que, si elle ne fournit pas le travail ou les services en question, elle ou une autre personne subira un préjudice grave.” (Source: États-Unis d’Amérique, Département d’État, Loi type pour lutter contre la traite des personnes.) s) L’expression “exploitation sexuelle” s’entend de l’obtention d’avantages financiers ou autres au moyen de la réduction d’une personne à la prostitution, à la servitude sexuelle ou à d’autres types de services sexuels, notamment la pornographie ou la production de matériel pornographique; Commentaire Voir le commentaire sur le paragraphe 1, alinéa h, de l’article 5. t) Le terme “esclavage” s’entend de l’état ou de la condition d’une personne sur laquelle s’exercent les attributs du droit de propriété ou certains d’entre eux; ou Le terme “esclavage” s’entend de l’état ou de la condition d’une personne sur laquelle s’exerce un pouvoir tel qu’elle est traitée comme un bien; Commentaire Source: Convention relative à l’esclavage de 1926 telle qu’amendée par le Protocole de 1953, article premier, paragraphe 1. La définition figurant dans la Convention relative à l’esclavage peut poser des difficultés aujourd’hui, étant donné qu’il ne peut y avoir de droit de propriété d’une personne sur une autre. Pour remédier à ce problème, elle est suivie ici d’une autre définition, selon laquelle la personne est “traitée comme un bien”. Une autre définition de l’esclavage, axée sur l’élément essentiel de ce crime — à savoir la réduction d’êtres humains à la condition d’objets —, est la suivante: “réduire une personne à un état ou à une condition dans lesquels s’exercent les attributs du droit de propriété ou certains d’entre eux”. Exemples de définitions contemporaines de l’esclavage en droit pénal: “Le terme “esclavage” désigne la condition d’une personne sur laquelle s’exercent les attributs du droit de propriété ou certains d’entre eux, y 22 Loi type contre la traite des personnes compris lorsque cette condition résulte d’une dette ou d’un contrat signé par la personne.” (Australie, Code pénal, section 270.1, telle que modifiée en 1999) “Il n’y a pas de liste exhaustive fixe de tous les attributs du droit de propriété. On citera cependant certains des plus “ordinaires”: le droit de possession, le droit de gestion (c’est-à-dire le droit de décider comment et par qui un bien possédé est utilisé), le droit au revenu et au capital tiré du bien possédé, le droit à la sécurité (c’est-à-dire le droit de conserver le bien tant que le propriétaire est solvable) et le droit de transmettre les intérêts à ses successeurs. Ainsi, dans le cas d’une personne contrainte à travailler pour une autre sans être rétribuée pour son travail, le tribunal conclura probablement que cette personne est esclave.” (Notes explicatives afférentes à la législation australienne) “On parle de mise en situation d’esclavage contemporain lorsqu’il y a dépossession des documents d’identité, restriction de la liberté de mouvement, restriction de la communication avec la famille, y compris la correspondance et les conversations téléphoniques, isolement culturel, ainsi que travail forcé dans une situation où l’honneur et la dignité humaines sont violés et/ou sans rémunération ou avec une rémunération inadéquate.” (Source: Géorgie, Code pénal, article 143.) “Toute personne qui exerce sur une autre personne des pouvoirs et droits correspondant aux attributs du droit de propriété; qui place ou maintient une autre personne dans une situation d’esclavage continue, la soumet à l’exploitation sexuelle, au travail forcé, à la mendicité forcée ou à toute autre forme d’exploitation est punie... Il y a réduction ou maintien en état d’esclavage lorsqu’il y a recours à la violence, à la menace, à la tromperie ou à l’abus de pouvoir; ou lorsque quiconque profite d’une situation d’infériorité physique ou psychologique et d’une situation de nécessité; ou promet ou octroie des sommes d’argent ou d’autres types d’avantages aux personnes ayant autorité sur la personne en question.” (Source: Italie, Code pénal, article 600.) “Le terme “esclavage” s’entend d’une situation dans laquelle les pouvoirs généralement exercés sur un bien sont exercés sur une personne; à cet égard, le fait d’avoir sous son contrôle effectif la vie d’une personne ou de lui refuser sa liberté est considéré comme constituant les “pouvoirs” visés dans le présent article.” (Source: Israël, Code pénal, article 375A c) “Le terme “esclave” s’entend d’une personne maintenue en état de servitude et dont la vie, la liberté et les biens sont sous le contrôle absolu de quelqu’un.”Chapitre II. Définitions 23 (Source: Nigéria, Loi portant exécution et administration de la législation sur la traite des personnes (interdiction), 2003, article 50.) “1) L’esclavage — possession partielle ou intégrale de droits sur une personne traitée comme un bien — est puni d’une peine d’emprisonnement de cinq à dix ans. 2) Les actes décrits ci-dessus, lorsqu’ils visent un enfant ou sont commis aux fins de la traite, sont punis d’une peine d’emprisonnement de sept à dix ans. 3) La traite d’esclaves, c’est-à-dire le fait de réduire une personne en esclavage ou de la traiter comme un esclave, de posséder un esclave à des fins de vente ou d’échange, de céder un esclave, d’accomplir tout acte lié au commerce ou à la traite d’esclaves, ainsi que l’esclavage sexuel ou la privation de la liberté sexuelle par l’esclavage, est punie d’une peine d’emprisonnement de cinq à dix ans.” (Source: Azerbaïdjan, Code pénal, article 106.) u) L’expression “personne de soutien” s’entend d’une personne spécialement formée pour aider un enfant tout au long de la procédure judiciaire afin de prévenir le risque de contrainte, de nouvelle victimisation et de victimisation secondaire; Commentaire Source: Loi type de l’UNODC sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. v) Aux fins des articles 19 à 22, 25, 26 et 30 à 34 de la présente loi, l’expression “victime de la traite” s’entend de toute personne physique qui a fait l’objet de la traite des personnes ou dont [les autorités compétentes et, le cas échéant, les organisations non gouvernementales désignées] ont des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’elle est victime de la traite des personnes, que l’auteur soit ou non identifié, arrêté, poursuivi ou déclaré coupable. Aux fins de tous les autres articles, une victime de la traite est toute personne identifiée conformément au paragraphe 1 de l’article 18 de la présente loi. Commentaire L’expression “victime de la traite” sera définie à deux niveaux dans le cadre de la Loi type. Au premier niveau, la définition/détermination du statut de victime repose sur des critères relativement élémentaires et donne droit à des services et une assistance de base. Au deuxième niveau, où s’appliquent des critères plus élaborés, le statut de victime est déterminé conformément aux lignes directrices établies par les pouvoirs publics. Cette définition à deux 24 Loi type contre la traite des personnes niveaux vise à ménager un équilibre entre la satisfaction des besoins essentiels et immédiats des victimes qui fuient une situation d’exploitation et la nécessité du gouvernement de réglementer l’octroi de services et de prestations. On trouvera une définition plus large du terme “victime” dans la Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir: “1. On entend par “victimes” des personnes qui, individuellement ou collectivement, ont subi un préjudice, notamment une atteinte à leur intégrité physique ou mentale, une souffrance morale, une perte matérielle ou une atteinte grave à leurs droits fondamentaux, en raison d’actes ou d’omissions qui enfreignent les lois pénales en vigueur dans un État Membre, y compris celles qui proscrivent les abus criminels de pouvoir. 2. Une personne peut être considérée comme une “victime”, dans le cadre de la présente Déclaration, que l’auteur soit ou non identifié, arrêté, poursuivi ou déclaré coupable, et quels que soient ses liens de parenté avec la victime. Le terme “victime” inclut aussi, le cas échéant, la famille proche ou les personnes à la charge de la victime directe et les personnes qui ont subi un préjudice en intervenant pour venir en aide aux victimes en détresse ou pour empêcher la victimisation.” Une autre variante est la définition qui figure dans la Convention du Conseil de l’Europe sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains: “toute personne physique qui est soumise à la traite des êtres humains telle que définie au présent article” (article 4 e). Pour simplifier le processus, il est recommandé de lier la définition au mécanisme d’identification des victimes dans chaque système national. Dans certains pays (par exemple en Inde), ce sont les organisations non gouvernementales qui se chargent de l’identification. 2. Les termes qui ne sont pas définis dans le présent article sont interprétés comme il est d’usage dans la loi nationale.25 Chapitre III. Compétence Commentaire La question de la compétence peut être déjà traitée par d’autres lois. Si tel n’est pas le cas, les articles 6 et 7 devraient être incorporés dans la loi contre la traite des personnes. Article 6. Application de la présente loi sur le territoire Commentaire Disposition obligatoire La présente loi s’applique à toute infraction créée conformément à ses chapitres IV et V lorsque: a) L’infraction est commise sur le territoire de [l’État]; b) L’infraction est commise à bord d’un navire ou d’un aéronef immatriculé conformément au droit de [l’État] au moment où ladite infraction est commise; Commentaire Source: Convention, article 15, paragraphe 1, alinéas a et b. La compétence territoriale et la compétence à bord d’un navire ou d’un aéronef immatriculé dans l’État (principe de l’État du pavillon) existent dans tous les États. Dans les pays de common law, cela peut même être le seul chef de compétence. Le critère est le lieu où l’acte criminel a été commis (c’est-à-dire que le lieu du délit doit être situé sur le territoire de l’État). Selon la Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer de 1982, la compétence peut être étendue aux installations permanentes situées sur le plateau continental, en tant que partie du territoire (facultatif). c) L’infraction est commise par un ressortissant de [l’État] dont l’extradition est refusée pour des motifs de nationalité.26 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Commentaire Source: Convention, article 15, paragraphe 3, et article 16, paragraphe 10. Article 7. Application de la présente loi hors du territoire Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Convention, article 15, paragraphe 3, et article 16, paragraphe 10. 1. La présente loi s’applique à toute infraction créée conformément à ses chapitres V et VI et commise hors du territoire de [l’État], lorsque: a) L’infraction est commise par un ressortissant de [l’État]; b) L’infraction est commise par une personne apatride résidant habituellement dans [l’État] au moment où ladite infraction est commise; ou c) L’infraction est commise à l’encontre d’un ressortissant de [l’État]. Commentaire Il convient de noter que, conformément au principe aut dedere, aut judicare, l’État doit établir sa compétence à l’égard de ses ressortissants. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 15 de la Convention constitue la base de compétence en vertu de laquelle l’État peut engager des poursuites à l’encontre d’un ressortissant ayant commis des infractions à l’étranger, lorsqu’il ne l’extrade pas au motif de sa nationalité. Selon la Convention, en cas de refus d’extradition, l’État est tenu de soumettre l’affaire sans retard excessif aux autorités compétentes aux fins de poursuites. L’extension de la compétence d’un État à des actes commis par l’un de ses ressortissants sur le territoire d’un autre État (principe de la personnalité active) est généralement liée à des crimes précis particulièrement graves. Dans certains pays, l’application de ce principe est limitée aux actes qui constituent une infraction en vertu non seulement du droit de l’État dont l’auteur est ressortissant, mais aussi du droit de l’État sur le territoire duquel l’acte a été commis. 2. La présente loi s’applique aussi aux actes perpétrés en vue de la commission, sur le territoire de [l’État], d’un acte constituant une infraction en vertu de la présente loi.Chapitre III. Compétence 27 Commentaire Le paragraphe 2 constitue une nouvelle extension de la compétence, dans l’esprit de la précédente. Il étend la compétence aux cas où les actes n’ont pas entraîné une infraction consommée, mais où une tentative a été effectuée sur le territoire d’un autre État en vue de commettre une infraction sur le territoire de l’État compétent.29 Chapitre IV. Dispositions pénales: infractions pénales de base comme fondement des infractions de traite Commentaire Lors de la création des infractions de traite, il est essentiel de veiller à ce que la législation nationale incrimine de manière adéquate la participation à un groupe criminel organisé (article 5 de la Convention); le blanchiment du produit du crime (article 6); la corruption (article 8); et l’entrave au bon fonctionnement de la justice (article 23). En outre, des mesures visant à établir la responsabilité des personnes morales doivent être adoptées (article 10). L’UNODC élabore actuellement des pratiques optimales et des dispositions types pour faciliter l’application de ces articles.31 Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite Commentaire Le présent chapitre porte sur les infractions pénales liées à la traite des personnes. Article 8. Traite des personnes Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, articles 3 et 5; notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1); Convention, article 2, alinéa b, et article 34. 1. Toute personne qui: a) Recrute, transporte, transfère, héberge ou accueille une autre personne; b) Par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre; c) Aux fins d’exploitation de cette personne; se rend coupable d’une infraction de traite des personnes et est passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... [amende de la catégorie ...]. Commentaire Cette définition suit de près celle de la traite des personnes qui figure à l’article 3, alinéa a, du Protocole: “L’expression “traite des personnes” désigne le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil de personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou 32 Loi type contre la traite des personnes l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre aux fins d’exploitation. L’exploitation comprend, au minimum, l’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui ou d’autres formes d’exploitation sexuelle, le travail ou les services forcés, l’esclavage ou les pratiques analogues à l’esclavage, la servitude ou le prélèvement d’organes.” Moyens: En incluant la fraude, la tromperie et l’abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, on reconnaît qu’il peut y avoir traite en l’absence de recours à la force en tant que telle (physique). Exemple: “(Traite des personnes). — Quiconque se livre à la traite d’une personne se trouvant dans les conditions visées à l’article 600, en vue de commettre une infraction visée au premier paragraphe dudit article, l’incite par la tromperie ou la contraint en recourant à la violence, à des menaces, à l’abus de pouvoir ou en profitant d’une situation d’infériorité physique ou psychologique ou d’une situation de nécessité, ou en promettant ou octroyant des sommes d’argent ou d’autres types d’avantages à une personne ayant autorité sur elle, à entrer ou à séjourner sur le territoire national, à le quitter ou à s’y déplacer, est passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de huit à vingt ans.” (Source: Italie, Code pénal, article 601.) Dans certaines législations nationales, la définition de la traite ne fait pas référence aux moyens (contrainte, fraude, tromperie, etc.), car on estime que certaines formes d’exploitation sont coercitives par nature. Dans ces cas, la définition fait référence aux actes (recrutement, transport, transfert, hébergement ou accueil) et à la finalité de l’exploitation, ce qui facilite les poursuites relatives aux infractions de traite et s’est révélé efficace dans ce contexte. Formes d’exploitation. Voir les définitions ci-dessus aux alinéas g à j, l, m et q à t de l’article 5. Exemples de dispositions dans la législation nationale: “377A. Traite des personnes Quiconque se livre à une transaction portant sur une personne à l’une des fins ci-après énumérées, ou qui, ce faisant, expose la personne au risque de subir l’une des situations ci-après, est passible de seize années d’emprisonnement: 1. Prélèvement d’un organe sur la personne; 2. Naissance et soustraction d’un enfant; 3. Réduction de la personne en esclavage; 4. Assujettissement de la personne au travail forcé; 5. Instigation à la commission, par la personne, d’un acte de prostitution; 6. Instigation à la participation de la personne à une publication ou une représentation obscène; Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 33 7. Commission d’une infraction sexuelle sur la personne.” (Source: Israël, Code pénal, article 377 A.) “Traite des personnes 1. La vente, l’achat ou toute autre transaction ayant pour objet une personne, ainsi que le transfert ou l’obtention d’une personne en situa-tion de dépendance (traite des personnes) sont passibles d’une peine privative de liberté de six mois au plus; d’une peine restrictive de liberté de trois ans au plus; ou d’une peine d’emprisonnement de six ans au plus. 2. Les mêmes actes commis: Sciemment à l’encontre d’un mineur; À l’encontre de deux personnes ou plus; Aux fins de l’exploitation sexuelle ou d’une autre forme d’exploitation; Dans le but de prélever des organes ou des tissus à des fins de transplantation; Par un groupe de personnes qui se sont concertées, ou par un groupe organisé; Par un agent public abusant de son pouvoir; sont passibles d’une peine d’emprisonnement de cinq à dix ans, accompagnée ou non d’une saisie des biens. 3. Les actes susmentionnés qui ont entraîné la mort ou des blessures graves par négligence sont passibles d’une peine d’emprisonnement de huit à quinze ans, accompagnée ou non d’une saisie des biens.” (Source: Bélarus, article 181 du Code pénal tel que modifié par la loi n° 227-3 portant modification du Code pénal et du Code de procédure pénale du 22 juillet 2003.) “1. Les personnes qui sélectionnent, transportent, cachent ou reçoivent des individus ou des groupes de personnes dans le but de les utiliser à des fins de prostitution, travail forcé ou prélèvement d’organes, ou de les maintenir dans un état de subordination forcée, qu’elles aient ou non donné leur consentement, sont punies d’une peine d’emprisonnement de un à huit ans et d’une amende de 8 000 leva au plus.” (Source: Bulgarie, article 159 a du Code pénal.) Consentement. En incluant les moyens de contrainte dans la définition, on exclut de prendre en compte le consentement de la victime. C’est le principe affirmé à l’alinéa b de l’article 3 du Protocole, qui se lit comme suit: “Le consentement d’une victime de la traite des personnes à l’exploitation envisagée, telle qu’énoncée à l’alinéa a, est indifférent lorsque l’un quelconque des moyens énoncés à l’alinéa a a été utilisé.”34 Loi type contre la traite des personnes En d’autres termes, une fois que les éléments de l’infraction de traite, y compris le recours à l’un des moyens énoncés (contrainte, tromperie, etc.), ont été prouvés, les allégations ou moyens de défense selon lesquels la victime était “consentante” ne sont pas pris en considération. Cela signifie également, par exemple, que le fait qu’une personne travaille en connaissance de cause dans l’industrie du sexe ou la prostitution n’empêche pas qu’elle puisse être victime de la traite. En effet, sans ignorer la nature de l’activité, cette personne peut avoir été induite en erreur quant aux conditions de travail, qui se révèlent être de nature coercitive ou relever de l’exploitation. Cette disposition réaffirme des normes juridiques internationales existantes. Il est logiquement et juridiquement impossible de “donner son consentement” lorsque l’un des moyens énoncés dans la définition est utilisé. Un consentement authentique n’est possible et reconnu sur le plan juridique que si tous les faits pertinents sont connus et que la personne exerce son libre arbitre. Toutefois, si la question du consentement n’est pas clairement réglée dans la législation interne, il convient d’intégrer un paragraphe distinct dans la loi, qui pourrait se lire comme suit: “Le consentement d’une victime de la traite à l’exploitation (envisagée) visée au paragraphe 2 de l’article 8 est indifférent lorsque l’un quelconque des moyens énoncés à l’alinéa b du paragraphe 1 de l’article 8 est utilisé.” ou “En cas de poursuites pour traite des personnes au sens de l’article 8, le prétendu consentement d’une personne à l’exploitation envisagée est indifférent dès lors que l’un quelconque des moyens ou des circonstances énoncés au paragraphe 2 de l’article 8 est établi.” Les dispositions susmentionnées n’éliminent pas le droit à la défense. Selon le paragraphe 68 des notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1), le caractère indifférent du consentement en cas de recours à l’un quelconque des moyens énoncés ne doit pas être interprété comme imposant une restriction au droit d’une personne inculpée d’être pleinement défendue et de bénéficier de la présomption d’innocence. Il ne doit pas non plus être interprété comme imposant au défendeur la charge de la preuve. Comme dans toute affaire pénale, la charge de la preuve incombe au ministère public, conformément au droit interne, sauf disposition contraire dudit droit. En outre, le paragraphe 6 de l’article 11 de la Convention préserve les moyens juridiques de défense applicables ainsi que d’autres principes juridiques connexes du droit interne des États parties. Incrimination des infractions de traite commises sur le territoire national et des infractions de nature transnationale. La Convention (paragraphe 2 de l’article 34) prévoit que les infractions établies conformément à ses dispositions sont établies dans le droit interne de chaque État partie, indépendamment de leur nature transnationale ou de l’implication d’un groupe criminel organisé. Cette disposition est conforme au paragraphe 3 de l’article premier du Protocole, qui prévoit que les infractions établies conformément au Protocole sont Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 35 considérées comme des infractions établies conformément à la Convention (voir également le commentaire relatif à l’article 4). Sanctions. Les sanctions doivent au moins correspondre au minimum défini pour que la traite des personnes constitue une infraction grave au sens de la Convention, c’est-à-dire une infraction passible d’une peine privative de liberté dont le maximum ne doit pas être inférieur à quatre ans ou d’une peine plus lourde (alinéa b de l’article 2 de la Convention). Pour ce qui est des amendes, l’examen du droit comparé et de la pratique montre qu’il est préférable d’éviter de fixer des montants dans la loi, car en période d’inflation rapide ces amendes peuvent rapidement devenir insuffisantes et perdre leur effet dissuasif. Les amendes peuvent être désignées en termes d’unités ou de catégories dans la loi et être exprimées en termes monétaires dans des règlements complétant la loi principale. Ainsi, les montants peuvent facilement et rapidement être mis à jour. 2. L’exploitation comprend: a) L’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui et d’autres formes d’exploitation sexuelle; b) Le travail ou les services forcés ou contraints [y compris le travail en servitude et la servitude pour dettes]; c) L’esclavage ou les pratiques analogues à l’esclavage; d) La servitude [y compris la servitude sexuelle]; e) Le prélèvement d’organes; f) [D’autres formes d’exploitation définies en droit interne]. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, articles 3 et 5; notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1). La définition de l’exploitation couvre les formes d’exploitation qui, selon le Protocole, doivent “au minimum” être visées. La liste n’est par conséquent pas exhaustive. Toutefois, le principe de la légalité exigeant que les infractions soient clairement définies, les autres formes d’exploitation devront être énoncées dans la loi. Autres formes d’exploitation. Les États peuvent envisager d’inclure également d’autres formes d’exploitation dans leur droit pénal. Dans ce cas, celles-ci doivent être clairement définies. Elles peuvent être par exemple les suivantes: a) Le mariage forcé ou servile; b) La mendicité forcée ou contrainte; c) L’utilisation à des fins d’activités illicites ou criminelles [y compris le trafic ou la production de drogues];36 Loi type contre la traite des personnes d) L’utilisation dans des conflits armés; e) La servitude rituelle ou coutumière [toute forme de travail forcé liée à un rituel coutumier] [les pratiques religieuses ou culturelles de nature abusive ou relevant de l’exploitation qui déshumanisent, rabaissent ou causent un préjudice physique ou psychologique]; f) L’utilisation de femmes en tant que mères de substitution; g) La grossesse forcée; h) La conduite illicite de recherches biomédicales sur autrui.” La liste peut être adaptée en fonction des différentes formes d’exploitation constatées dans le pays et de la législation en vigueur. Exploitation. Le terme “exploitation” n’est pas défini dans le Protocole. Toutefois, il est généralement associé à des conditions de travail particulièrement dures et abusives, ou à des “conditions de travail contraires à la dignité humaine”. Ainsi, le Code pénal belge définit comme suit l’exploitation dans sa définition de la traite des êtres humains: “mettre au travail ou [...] permettre la mise au travail de cette personne dans des conditions contraires à la dignité humaine.” (Source: Belgique, loi modifiant diverses dispositions en vue de renforcer la lutte contre la traite et le trafic des êtres humains et contre les pratiques des marchands de sommeil, août 2005, article 433 quinquies.) Le Code pénal français fait référence, dans la définition de la traite, à des “conditions de travail ou d’hébergement contraires à [la] dignité [humaine]” (Code pénal tel que modifié en 2003, article 225-4-1). Le Code pénal allemand définit la traite à des fins de travail forcé en faisant référence à des “conditions de travail qui présentent des différences flagrantes avec celles d’autres personnes exécutant un travail identique ou comparable” (Code pénal, article 231). 3. Si l’autre personne visée à l’alinéa a du paragraphe 1 est un enfant, l’exploitation englobe également: a) L’utilisation [le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant] aux fins d’activités illicites ou criminelles [y compris le trafic ou la production de drogues et la mendicité]; b) L’utilisation dans des conflits armés; c) Un travail qui, par sa nature ou les conditions dans lesquelles il s’exerce, est susceptible de nuire à la santé ou à la sécurité des enfants, selon la définition donnée par [la législation ou l’autorité nationale pertinente (en matière de travail), par exemple le Ministère du travail];Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 37 d) Le fait d’employer ou de faire travailler un enfant qui n’a pas atteint l’âge minimum pour l’emploi ou le travail en question; e) [D’autres formes d’exploitation]. Commentaire Disposition facultative Toutes les formes d’exploitation énoncées au paragraphe 2 de l’article 8 s’appliquent aux enfants. Par ailleurs, les États peuvent envisager d’inclure d’autres formes d’exploitation, qui s’appliquent spécifiquement aux enfants, compte tenu de ce qui a été observé sur le plan national. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 8 énumère un certain nombre de ces formes d’exploitation, qui peuvent être incluses dans le droit pénal interne. Cette liste, qui s’appuie sur la définition internationalement acceptée du travail des enfants, inclut, outre les formes d’exploitation énumérées dans le Protocole, celles couvertes par la Convention sur les pires formes de travail des enfants, la Convention concernant l’âge minimum d’admission à l’emploi (Convention n° 138 de l’OIT) et le Protocole facultatif à la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, concernant la vente d’enfants, la prostitution des enfants et la pornographie mettant en scène des enfants (2002). L’article 3 de la Convention sur les pires formes de travail des enfants définit l’expression “les pires formes de travail des enfants” comme suit: “a) Toutes les formes d’esclavage ou pratiques analogues, telles que la vente et la traite des enfants, la servitude pour dettes et le servage ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire, y compris le recrutement forcé ou obligatoire des enfants en vue de leur utilisation dans des conflits armés; b) L’utilisation, le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant à des fins de prostitution, de production de matériel pornographique ou de spectacles pornographiques; c) L’utilisation, le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant aux fins d’activités illicites, notamment pour la production et le trafic de stupéfiants, tels que les définissent les conventions internationales pertinentes; d) Les travaux qui, par leur nature ou les conditions dans lesquelles ils s’exercent, sont susceptibles de nuire à la santé, à la sécurité ou à la moralité de l’enfant.” L’alinéa a ci-dessus mentionne expressément “le travail forcé ou obligatoire, y compris le recrutement forcé ou obligatoire des enfants en vue de leur utilisation dans des conflits armés”. Ainsi, la question des enfants soldats constitue une sous-catégorie distincte de travail forcé, alors que l’alinéa a du paragraphe 2 de l’article 2 de la Convention n° 29 de l’OIT exclut de la définition du travail forcé tout travail ou service exigé en vertu des lois sur le service militaire obligatoire effectué par un adulte de 18 ans révolus. Paragraphe 3, alinéa c. Si la législation nationale du travail ne traite pas de ces formes de travail dangereuses, on pourra au moins énumérer expressé38 Loi type contre la traite des personnes ment certains types de travail ou de secteur dans la définition de la traite des enfants, compte tenu de la situation qui prévaut dans le pays, par exemple l’exploitation minière, les plantations de coton, la fabrication de tapis, etc. Autrement, on peut faire figurer une telle énumération dans la réglementation ou dans une décision ministérielle, pour répondre à l’impératif d’adaptabilité. Paragraphe 3, alinéa d. Si aucun âge minimum n’a été défini ou s’il n’existe aucune disposition particulière pour protéger les enfants qui travaillent, on pourra au moins fixer un âge minimum dans la définition de la traite des enfants, en tenant compte, par exemple, de l’âge de la fin de la scolarité obligatoire. 4. Le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’un enfant aux fins d’exploitation sont considérés comme une “traite des personnes” même s’ils ne font appel à aucun des moyens énoncés à l’alinéa b du paragraphe 1. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 3, alinéa c; notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1). La présente disposition est alignée sur le Protocole, qui prévoit que tout recrutement ou autre d’un enfant aux fins d’exploitation est considéré comme une “traite des personnes”, même s’il ne fait appel à aucun des moyens énoncés à l’alinéa a de l’article 3 du Protocole. Selon les notes interprétatives (par. 66), une adoption illégale entrera également dans le champ d’application du Protocole car elle y est assimilée aux pratiques décrites plus haut. S’agissant du prélèvement d’organes (alinéa e du paragraphe 2 de l’article 8 ci-dessus), on notera que, comme il est précisé dans les notes interprétatives (par. 65), le prélèvement d’organes sur des enfants pour des raisons médicales ou thérapeutiques légitimes avec le consentement d’un parent ou du représentant légal ne devrait pas être considéré comme une forme d’exploitation. Enfant. Selon l’alinéa d de l’article 3 du Protocole, le terme “enfant” désigne toute personne âgée de moins de 18 ans. Il est possible d’envisager une limite d’âge supérieure, mais pas inférieure, car cela reviendrait à offrir aux enfants une protection moindre que ne l’exige le Protocole. Consentement. La question du consentement ne se pose pas avec les enfants car, dans le cas de personnes âgées de moins de 18 ans, le recours à l’un quelconque des moyens énoncés dans le Protocole n’est pas nécessaire pour qu’il y ait traite. Si la question du consentement n’est pas clairement réglée, il convient d’intégrer dans la loi un paragraphe distinct qui pourrait se lire comme suit: “Le consentement de la victime, celui du parent d’un enfant victime de la traite ou celui de la personne ayant une autorité de droit ou de fait sur cet enfant à l’exploitation envisagée, telle qu’énoncée au paragraphe 2 de l’article 8, est indifférent.”Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 39 L’expression “exploitation d’enfants et d’adolescents” désigne: “Toute institution ou pratique en vertu de laquelle un enfant ou un adolescent de moins de dix-huit ans est remis, soit par ses parents ou par l’un d’eux, soit par son tuteur, à un tiers, contre paiement ou non, en vue de l’exploitation de la personne, ou du travail dudit enfant ou adolescent.” (Source: Convention supplémentaire relative à l’abolition de l’esclavage, article 1 et article 7, alinéa b.) Article 9. Circonstances aggravantes Commentaire Disposition facultative Cette disposition peut être incluse si elle est conforme au droit interne. La définition de circonstances aggravantes est facultative. L’article 9 peut être ajouté à la loi dans la mesure où les circonstances aggravantes qui y sont définies concordent avec celles prévues en relation avec d’autres infractions. Toutes les circonstances aggravantes sont liées à l’auteur de l’infraction qui a sciemment commis l’infraction de traite. Il est possible de moduler les sanctions en fonction de la nature et du nombre de circonstances aggravantes, avec une disposition de ce type: “Si elles sont accompagnées d’une ou de plusieurs des circonstances susmentionnées, les infractions visées à l’article 8 sont passibles d’une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... [amende de la catégorie ...].” Si elles sont accompagnées de l’une quelconque des circonstances suivantes, les infractions visées à l’article 8 sont passibles d’une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... [amende de la catégorie ...]: a) Lorsque l’infraction entraîne la blessure grave ou la mort de la victime ou d’un tiers, y compris la mort par suicide; b) Lorsque l’infraction est commise à l’encontre d’une victime particulièrement vulnérable, notamment une femme enceinte; c) Lorsque l’infraction expose la victime à une maladie mortelle, notamment l’infection à VIH/sida;40 Loi type contre la traite des personnes d) Lorsque la victime souffre d’une déficience physique ou mentale; e) Lorsque la victime est un enfant; f) Lorsque l’infraction est commise à l’encontre de plusieurs victimes; g) Lorsque l’infraction est commise dans le cadre des activités d’un groupe criminel organisé; Commentaire Voir la définition à l’alinéa a de l’article 2 de la Convention contre la criminalité transnationale organisée. h) Lorsque des drogues, des médicaments ou des armes sont utilisés pour la commission de l’infraction; i) Lorsqu’un enfant a été adopté à des fins de traite; j) Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction a précédemment été condamné pour une infraction identique ou analogue; k) Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est un [agent public] [fonctionnaire]; l) Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est le conjoint ou le concubin de la victime; m) Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est en position de responsabilité ou de confiance par rapport à la victime; Commentaire Cet alinéa vise par exemple un parent de la victime ou une personne ayant une autorité de droit ou de fait sur la victime, telle qu’un travailleur social responsable d’un mineur dans l’exercice de ses fonctions ou de ses responsabilités. De toute évidence, cette disposition n’a pas pour but de punir un parent qui envoie de bonne foi son ou ses enfants à l’étranger ou chez des membres de la famille ou une autre personne (par exemple pour leur offrir une meilleure éducation), lorsqu’il apparaît en fin de compte qu’ils sont victimes de la traite. Pour que la sanction s’applique, il faut prouver conformément à l’article 9 que le parent savait que l’objectif était l’exploitation de l’enfant. Dans ce cas seulement, le fait qu’un parent soit impliqué constitue une circonstance aggravante. n) Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est en position d’autorité par rapport à l’enfant victime.Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 41 Article 10. Non-responsabilité [non-sanction] [non-poursuite] des victimes de la traite Commentaire Disposition facultative Les “Principes et directives concernant les droits de l’homme et la traite des êtres humains: recommandations” du Haut Commissaire des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme (E/2002/68/Add.1) abordent la question de la nonsanction des victimes de la traite. Ainsi, le principe 7, concernant la protection et l’assistance, se lit comme suit: “Les victimes de la traite ne doivent pas être détenues, inculpées ou poursuivies au motif qu’elles sont entrées ou résident de manière illégale dans les pays de transit ou de destination, ni pour avoir pris part à des activités illicites lorsqu’elles y sont réduites par leur condition de victimes de la traite.” En outre, la directive 8 recommande que les États envisagent de “faire en sorte que les enfants exploités ne fassent pas l’objet de poursuites pénales ou de sanctions pour des infractions découlant de leur expérience de victimes de la traite des personnes.” La Convention du Conseil de l’Europe sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains comprend la disposition suivante: “Chaque Partie prévoit, conformément aux principes fondamentaux de son système juridique, la possibilité de ne pas imposer de sanctions aux victimes pour avoir pris part à des activités illicites lorsqu’elles y ont été contraintes.” (Source: Convention du Conseil de l’Europe sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains, Série des Traités du Conseil de l’Europe, n° 197, article 26.) Le plan d’action de l’Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe (OSCE) pour lutter contre la traite des êtres humains recommande de “faire en sorte que les victimes de la traite ne fassent pas l’objet de poursuites pénales du simple fait d’avoir été soumises à la traite.” (Source: Plan d’action de l’OSCE pour lutter contre la traite des êtres humains, décision 557/Rev.1 du 7 juillet 2005.) Au paragraphe 13 de sa résolution 55/67, l’Assemblée générale invitait les gouvernements à envisager, sans sortir du cadre de leur législation et sans préjudice de leur politique en la matière, d’empêcher les poursuites contre les victimes de la traite, en particulier les femmes et les filles, pour entrée ou résidence illégale dans le pays, compte tenu du fait qu’elles étaient victimes d’exploitation.42 Loi type contre la traite des personnes La disposition proposée vise à garantir que les victimes de la traite ne sont pas poursuivies ou tenues autrement responsables pour des infractions, pénales ou autres, qu’elles ont commises dans le cadre de la traite comme, le cas échéant, le fait d’avoir travaillé dans la prostitution ou d’avoir violé la réglementation en la matière, d’avoir illégalement franchi des frontières, d’avoir utilisé des documents frauduleux, etc. Deux critères différents sont utilisés ici: la causalité (l’infraction est directement liée à la traite) et la contrainte (la personne était contrainte de commettre ces infractions). La disposition proposée est sans préjudice des moyens de défense généraux comme l’invocation de la contrainte lorsque la victime a été contrainte de commettre un crime. La disposition proposée peut être adoptée dans les systèmes juridiques qui admettent ou non la règle de l’opportunité des poursuites (c’est-à-dire que le ministère public soit libre ou non de poursuivre ou de ne pas poursuivre). Dans les systèmes juridiques qui l’admettent, une disposition similaire pourrait être incluse dans les lignes directrices destinées aux agents du ministère public; elle pourrait se lire comme suit: “Une victime de la traite ne devrait pas être détenue, incarcérée ou tenue responsable dans le cadre de poursuites pénales ou de sanctions administratives pour des infractions résultant directement de l’infraction de traite des personnes, notamment: a) Le fait d’entrer dans [l’État], d’en sortir ou d’y séjourner illégalement; b) Le fait de se procurer ou d’être en possession d’un document de voyage ou d’identité frauduleux qu’elle a obtenu, ou qui lui a été fourni, dans le but d’entrer dans le pays ou d’en sortir, en relation avec la traite; c) Le fait de participer à des activités illicites lorsqu’elle y a été contrainte.” Il est de bonne pratique de ne détenir les victimes en aucun cas, indépendamment de leur volonté de coopérer avec les autorités, et une disposition en ce sens peut être adoptée dans la réglementation relative au traitement des victimes, avec une formulation de ce type: “Les victimes de la traite des personnes ne doivent à aucun moment être détenues dans un centre de détention, une maison d’arrêt ou une maison centrale, que ce soit avant, pendant ou après des procédures civiles ou pénales ou d’autres procédures judiciaires ou administratives.” (Voir ci-après le paragraphe 4 de l’article 25 sur l’assistance aux victimes.) Exemples de dispositions dans la législation nationale: Le règlement n° 2001/4 de la Mission d’administration intérimaire des Nations Unies au Kosovo sur l’interdiction de la traite des personnes au Kosovo Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 43 prévoit que “La prostitution, ou l’entrée, la présence ou le travail illicites au Kosovo n’entraîne pas de responsabilité pénale si la personne apporte des preuves laissant raisonnablement croire qu’elle a été victime de la traite.” La loi des États-Unis d’Amérique sur la protection des victimes de la traite prévoit que celles-ci ne devraient pas être “sanctionnées au seul motif qu’elles ont commis des actes illicites qui étaient la conséquence directe de leur condition de victime de la traite, comme l’utilisation de faux documents, ou l’entrée ou le travail dans le pays sans documents. [Source: États-Unis d’Amérique, Loi sur la protection des victimes de la traite de 2000, 18 U.S.C. § 7101(17), (19)]. 1. Une victime de la traite des personnes n’est pas tenue responsable sur les plans pénal ou administratif [punie] [incarcérée, condamnée à une amende ou autrement sanctionnée de manière inappropriée] pour avoir commis des infractions [actes illicites] lorsqu’elle y a été réduite par sa condition de victime de la traite. 2. Une victime de la traite des personnes n’est pas tenue responsable sur les plans pénal ou administratif d’infractions à la législation nationale sur l’immigration. 3. Les dispositions du présent article sont sans préjudice des moyens de défense généraux que la victime peut invoquer en vertu de la loi. 4. Les dispositions du présent article ne s’appliquent pas lorsque le crime est de nature particulièrement grave, selon la définition qu’en donne le droit interne.Article 11. Recours au travail et aux services forcés Toute personne qui recourt aux services ou au travail d’une autre personne ou profite de quelque manière que ce soit des services ou du travail d’une autre personne en sachant que ce travail ou ces services sont fournis dans une ou plusieurs des conditions visées au paragraphe 1 de l’article 8 se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... Commentaire Disposition facultative Au paragraphe 5 de l’article 9 du Protocole, les gouvernements sont priés d’adopter des mesures pour décourager la demande qui favorise l’exploitation.44 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Diverses mesures peuvent être envisagées pour décourager la demande qui favorise l’exploitation, notamment le lancement de campagnes de sensibilisation et le renforcement de la transparence dans les chaînes d’approvisionnement des entreprises. En outre, il est possible de sanctionner le recours aux services d’une victime de la traite et/ou au travail ou aux services forcés pour dissuader d’y recourir. Dans ce cas, l’élément moral est le fait, pour une personne, de savoir que les services auxquels elle va avoir recours sont ceux d’une victime de la traite; si elle décide néanmoins d’y avoir recours et de tirer profit de l’exploitation d’autrui, elle sera punie. Les clients potentiels de victimes devraient être encouragés à signaler les cas suspects à la police sans que cela ne les expose à des poursuites. Autres variantes pour une disposition de ce type: “Toute personne qui recourt sciemment à un travail ou à des services fournis dans des conditions d’exploitation visées au paragraphe 2 de l’article 8 [à un travail ou à des services fournis par une victime de la traite des personnes], ou qui en tire profit, se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... [amende de la catégorie ...].” ou “Toute personne qui recourt à un travail ou à des services fournis par une personne exploitée au sens du paragraphe 2 de l’article 8, en sachant que cette personne est victime de la traite, se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... [amende de la catégorie ...].” Le Protocole n’exige pas de conférer le caractère d’infraction pénale à l’exploitation en tant que telle (pour incriminer le travail forcé, la servitude et les pratiques analogues à l’esclavage). Les actes correspondants sont donc mentionnés dans la Loi type uniquement au motif qu’ils sont l’objectif de l’infraction de traite. Toutefois, de nombreuses conventions relatives aux droits de l’homme exigent l’incrimination de ces actes, et les gouvernements voudront peut-être veiller à ce que l’exploitation soit toujours punissable en droit interne, même en l’absence des autres éléments de la traite. Dans ce contexte, il convient de noter que le travail forcé n’est pas toujours la conséquence de la traite des personnes: selon l’OIT, 20 % environ du travail forcé est lié à la traite. C’est pourquoi une législation incriminant toute forme d’exploitation d’êtres humains exercée dans des conditions de contrainte ou s’apparentant à de l’esclavage est nécessaire, quelle que soit la manière dont les personnes se trouvent soumises à ces conditions, c’est-à-dire indépendamment des autres éléments (actes et moyens) énoncés dans la définition de la traite. Une telle législation serait conforme aux grands traités relatifs aux droits de l’homme, qui interdisent formellement le recours au travail forcé, à l’esclavage et à la servitude, entre autres.Chapitre V. Dispositions pénales: dispositions spécifiques à la traite 45 Exemple de définition: “Toute personne qui soumet une autre personne à un travail ou à des services forcés [fournit à autrui ou obtient le travail ou les services de cette personne]: 1) En causant ou en menaçant de causer un préjudice grave à cette personne; ou 2) En recourant ou en menaçant de recourir à la contrainte physique contre cette personne ou l’un de ses proches; ou 3) En violant ou en menaçant de violer la loi ou la procédure judiciaire; ou 4) En détruisant, en dissimulant, en soustrayant, en confisquant ou en détenant sciemment tout document de voyage ou d’identité de cette personne; ou 5) En recourant au chantage; ou 6) En causant ou en menaçant de causer un préjudice financier à cette personne ou en exerçant un contrôle sur la situation financière de cette personne ou de l’un de ses proches; ou 7) En utilisant un stratagème, un plan ou une manoeuvre visant à convaincre la personne que si elle ne fournit pas le travail ou les services en question, elle ou l’un de ses proches subira un préjudice grave ou une contrainte physique; se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine d’emprisonnement de ... ans et/ou une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... [amende de la catégorie ...]. (Source: Loi type pour les États fédérés sur la protection des victimes de la traite des êtres humains, Global Rights, 2005.)47 Chapitre VI. Dispositions pénales: infractions accessoires et infractions liées à la traite Commentaire Le présent chapitre comprend des dispositions générales qui ne sont pas spécifiques à la traite et qui ne doivent être incluses que si le code ou le droit pénal national ne comportent pas déjà de telles dispositions visant toutes les infractions. Des variantes sont parfois proposées dans la partie explicative. Article 12. Complicité Toute personne qui participe en tant que complice à l’infraction de traite est passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de ... et/ou d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... . Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 5, paragraphe 2, alinéa b. Cette disposition ne doit être incluse que si elle n’est pas déjà prévue dans le code ou le droit pénal national. Dans certains systèmes juridiques, la peine encourue pour complicité est inférieure à celle encourue pour l’infraction de base, tandis que dans d’autres elle est équivalente. L’intention coupable du complice est un élément essentiel de l’infraction. Il doit y avoir intention d’aider à perpétrer une infraction. Exemples de variantes possibles: “Une personne qui participe en tant que complice à l’une quelconque des infractions visées par la présente loi est considérée comme ayant commis cette infraction et est passible de la même sanction que si elle l’avait commise.” ou “Une personne qui apporte aide, encouragements, conseils, sert d’intermédiaire pour qu’une infraction visée par la présente loi soit commise ou y 48 Loi type contre la traite des personnes participe d’une autre manière est considérée comme ayant commis cette infraction et est passible de la même sanction que si elle l’avait commise.” Dans certains pays, le terme “complice” est défini plus précisément. Cela dépend entièrement de la pratique du pays en matière pénale. Dans la variante ci-après, une différentiation plus poussée permet le repentir: “Une personne ne commet pas d’infraction au sens du paragraphe 1 si, avant que l’infraction ne soit commise, elle: a) Met fin à sa participation; et b) Prend des mesures raisonnables pour empêcher la commission de l’infraction.” Article 13. Organisation et instructions en vue de la commission d’une infraction Toute personne qui organise la commission d’une infraction de traite ou donne des instructions [à une autre personne] [à d’autres personnes] pour que cette infraction soit commise est passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de ... et/ou d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... . Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 5, paragraphe 2, alinéa c. Cette disposition ne doit être incluse que si elle n’est pas déjà prévue dans le code ou le droit pénal national. Article 14. Tentative Toute tentative de commission de l’infraction de traite des personnes est passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de ... et/ou d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 5, paragraphe 2, alinéa a.Chapitre VI. Dispositions pénales: infractions accessoires et infractions liées à la traite 49 Cette disposition ne doit être incluse que si elle n’est pas déjà prévue dans le code ou le droit pénal national. Dans certains pays, la peine encourue pour une tentative est inférieure à celle encourue pour l’infraction de base; dans d’autres, elle est équivalente. Selon les notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1, par. 70), les références aux tentatives faites pour commettre les infractions établies par le droit interne conformément au paragraphe 2 de l’article 5 du Protocole sont comprises dans certains pays comme englobant tant les actes perpétrés dans la préparation d’une infraction pénale que ceux qui s’inscrivent dans le cadre d’une tentative infructueuse de commission de l’infraction, dans les cas où ces actes sont également passibles de sanctions dans le droit interne. Exemples de variantes possibles: “Une personne qui tente de commettre l’une quelconque des infractions visées par la présente loi est punie comme si l’infraction avait été commise. Une tentative est passible de la même peine que celle prévue pour la commission de l’infraction.” ou “Une personne qui tente de commettre l’une des infractions visées par la présente loi commet une infraction et est passible de la même sanction que si l’infraction avait été commise, dès lors que cette personne fait plus que simplement préparer la commission de l’infraction. Une tentative est passible de la même peine que celle prévue pour la commission de l’infraction.” Dans certains pays, le terme “tentative” est défini plus précisément. Cela dépend entièrement de la pratique du pays en matière pénale. Exemples de dispositions complémentaires: “2. Une personne ne se rend pas coupable de tentative de commission d’infraction au sens du paragraphe 1 si les faits sont tels que la commission de l’infraction est impossible. 3. Une personne ne commet pas d’infraction au sens du paragraphe 1 si, avant que l’infraction ne soit commise: a) Elle met fin à sa participation; b) Elle prend des mesures raisonnables pour empêcher la commission de l’infraction; et c) Elle n’a pas d’intention coupable, à savoir qu’elle n’a pas l’intention de commettre/n’a pas la connaissance du fait qu’elle commet un acte qui est un élément d’infraction, ou n’a pas l’intention de commettre l’acte qui constitue une infraction.”50 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Article 15. Pratiques illicites eu égard aux documents de voyage ou d’identité Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 12. L’alinéa b de l’article 12 du Protocole oblige les États parties à prendre des mesures pour faire en sorte que les documents de voyage et d’identité soient d’une qualité telle qu’on ne puisse facilement en faire un usage impropre et les falsifier ou les modifier, les reproduire ou les délivrer illicitement, et pour empêcher qu’ils ne soient créés, délivrés et utilisés illicitement. Selon le paragraphe 82 des notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add. 1), les mots “les falsifier ou les modifier, les reproduire ou les délivrer illicitement” devraient être interprétés comme englobant non seulement la création de faux documents, mais également la modification de documents licites et le fait de remplir des documents vierges volés. L’intention est d’inclure à la fois les documents contrefaits et les documents authentiques valablement délivrés, mais utilisés par une personne autre que leur titulaire légitime. L’un des moyens de satisfaire à cette obligation est d’inclure une disposition dans le droit pénal, mais il existe également d’autres moyens. L’article proposé ici vise à incriminer les pratiques considérées au cas où il n’y aurait pas encore de disposition semblable dans le code ou le droit pénal national ou dans les lois sur l’immigration. 1. Toute personne qui, sans y être habilitée, fabrique, produit ou modifie tout document d’identité ou de voyage, réel ou supposé, pendant la commission d’une infraction visée par la présente loi ou à cette fin, se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine d’emprisonnement de ... [et/ou] une amende de ... . 2. Toute personne qui obtient, procure, détruit, dissimule, fait disparaître, confisque, retient, modifie, reproduit ou détient un document de voyage ou d’identité d’une autre personne ou en facilite l’usage frauduleux, avec l’intention de commettre une infraction visée par la présente loi ou d’en faciliter la commission, se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine d’emprisonnement de ... [et/ou] une amende de ... . Commentaire Le paragraphe 2 est particulièrement pertinent en cas de traite car la rétention de documents est une méthode couramment utilisée par les auteurs de la traite pour garder les victimes sous leur contrôle. Il est de toute façon souhaitable d’inclure ce paragraphe ou une disposition semblable dans le droit pénal, si ce n’est pas déjà fait.Chapitre VI. Dispositions pénales: infractions accessoires et infractions liées à la traite 51 Article 16. Divulgation illicite de l’identité de victimes et/ou de témoins Toute personne qui divulgue à une autre personne, sans y être habilitée, une information qu’elle a obtenue dans le cadre de ses fonctions officielles et qui permet d’identifier une victime et/ou un témoin de la traite des personnes ou conduit à son identification se rend coupable d’infraction et encourt, en cas de condamnation, une peine de ... . Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 1; Convention, article 24. Article 17. Obligations des transporteurs commerciaux et infractions commises par eux Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 11. L’article 11 du Protocole oblige les États parties à adopter des mesures législatives ou autres pour prévenir l’utilisation des transporteurs commerciaux pour la commission d’infractions de traite, y compris en prévoyant, lorsqu’il y a lieu, l’obligation pour les transporteurs commerciaux de vérifier que tous les passagers sont en possession des documents de voyage requis, et à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour assortir de sanctions cette obligation. Selon le paragraphe 79 des notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1), les mesures législatives ou autres devraient tenir compte du fait que les victimes de la traite des personnes peuvent entrer légalement dans un État, pour ensuite se trouver confrontées à l’exploitation, tandis que dans le trafic de migrants les moyens d’entrée sont plus généralement illégaux, ce qui fait que les transporteurs publics peuvent plus difficilement appliquer des mesures préventives dans les cas de traite que dans les cas de trafic. Selon le paragraphe 80 des notes interprétatives, les mesures et sanctions devraient tenir compte des autres obligations internationales de l’État partie concerné. Il conviendrait de noter également qu’en vertu de l’article 11 du Protocole les États parties sont tenus d’imposer aux transporteurs commerciaux uniquement l’obligation de vérifier si les passagers sont en possession ou non des documents nécessaires, et non de juger ou d’évaluer la validité ou l’authenticité desdits documents. Par ailleurs, l’obligation susmentionnée ne limite pas indûment la liberté qu’ont les États parties de ne pas tenir les transporteurs responsables en cas de transport de réfugiés sans papiers.52 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Il y a plusieurs moyens de satisfaire à l’obligation énoncée dans l’article 11; inclure une disposition dans le droit pénal n’est que l’un d’entre eux. L’article proposé ici vise à incriminer les pratiques considérées au cas où il n’y aurait pas déjà de disposition semblable dans le code ou le droit pénal national ou dans les lois sur l’immigration. Toutefois, dans de nombreux pays, il peut être plus judicieux d’inscrire cette obligation avec une peine correspondante dans les dispositions réglementaires du droit civil. Exemple de formulation d’une telle règle: “1. [Tout transporteur commercial] [Toute personne qui se livre au transport international de marchandises ou de passagers dans un but lucratif] doit vérifier que chaque passager est en possession des documents d’identité et/ou de voyage requis pour l’entrée dans le pays de destination et dans tout pays de transit. 2. Un transporteur commercial est responsable des frais associés à l’hébergement de la personne dans [l’État] et à son expulsion.” Autre variante: “Responsabilités des compagnies de transport international a) Les compagnies de transport international doivent vérifier que chaque passager est en possession des documents de voyage requis, dont le passeport et le visa, pour l’entrée dans le pays de destination et dans tout pays de transit. b) L’obligation faite aux compagnies de transport à l’alinéa a s’applique à la fois au personnel qui vend ou émet des billets, des cartes d’embarquement ou des documents de voyage similaires et au personnel qui collecte ou vérifie les billets avant ou après l’embarquement. c) Les compagnies qui ne se conforment pas aux exigences de la présente section se verront imposer une amende de [montant]. Le fait de ne pas respecter ces exigences à plusieurs reprises peut être sanctionné par une résiliation de la licence d’exploitation conformément à [la loi applicable] [insérer une référence à la loi qui régit la résiliation des licences].” (Source: États-Unis d’Amérique, Département d’État, “Legal Building Blocks to Combat Trafficking in Persons”, § 400, publié par l’Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, février 2004.) Le droit roumain comprend une disposition spécifique: “1) Les compagnies de transport international ont l’obligation de vérifier, lorsqu’elles émettent les documents de voyage, que leurs passagers sont en possession des documents d’identité requis pour l’entrée dans le pays de transit ou de destination.Chapitre VI. Dispositions pénales: infractions accessoires et infractions liées à la traite 53 2) L’obligation énoncée au paragraphe 1 concerne également le conducteur du véhicule de transport routier international qui admet des passagers à son bord, ainsi que le personnel chargé de vérifier les documents de voyage.” (Source: Roumanie, loi visant à prévenir et à combattre la traite des êtres humains, article 47.) 1. Tout transporteur commercial qui omet de vérifier que chaque passager est en possession des documents d’identité et/ou de voyage requis pour l’entrée dans le pays de destination et dans tout pays de transit commet une infraction et est passible d’une amende de/pouvant aller jusqu’à ... . 2. Tout transporteur commercial qui omet de signaler aux autorités compétentes qu’une personne a tenté de voyager ou a voyagé grâce à ses services sans les documents d’identité et/ou de voyage requis pour l’entrée dans le pays de destination ou dans tout pays de transit, alors qu’il a connaissance du fait que cette personne était une victime de la traite ou qu’il fait preuve de négligence fautive à cet égard, commet une infraction et [outre toute autre peine prévue dans une autre loi ou disposition] est passible [d’une amende de ... au plus]. 3. Un transporteur commercial ne se rend pas coupable d’infraction au sens du paragraphe 2 si: a) Il existait des motifs raisonnables de penser que les documents que le passager avait en sa possession étaient les documents requis pour entrer légalement dans [l’État]; b) Le passager était en possession de documents de voyage réguliers lorsqu’il est monté à bord ou la dernière fois qu’il est monté à bord du moyen de transport à destination de [l’État]; ou c) L’entrée dans [l’État] n’a eu lieu qu’en raison de circonstances indépendantes de la volonté [du transporteur commercial] [de la personne qui se livre au transport de marchandises ou de passagers dans un but lucratif].55 Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins Commentaire Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à envisager de mettre en oeuvre des mesures en vue d’assurer le rétablissement physique, psychologique et social des victimes de la traite des personnes, y compris, s’il y a lieu, en coopération avec les organisations non gouvernementales. Cette disposition étant générale, elle ne précise pas la forme que ces mesures doivent prendre, laissant cette question à l’appréciation des États parties. Article 18. Identification des victimes de la traite des personnes Commentaire Disposition facultative La bonne et rapide identification des victimes est cruciale pour que celles-ci reçoivent l’assistance à laquelle elles ont droit et que les infractions donnent effectivement lieu à des poursuites. Une personne devrait être considérée et traitée comme une victime de la traite avant même qu’il y ait une forte suspicion quant à l’auteur présumé de l’infraction ou que le statut de victime lui soit officiellement octroyé/reconnu. Il est recommandé d’élaborer des principes directeurs à l’intention des services de détection et de répression pour les aider à identifier les victimes et à aiguiller ces dernières vers les organismes d’assistance appropriés. Ces principes devraient comprendre une liste d’indicateurs susceptible d’être réexaminée et mise à jour à intervalles réguliers, selon que de besoin. Ils pourraient notamment porter sur une période de rétablissement ou de réflexion qui serait accordée à toutes les victimes de la traite et pendant laquelle cellesci pourraient commencer à se rétablir, réfléchir aux possibilités qui s’offrent à elles et décider en connaissance de cause si elles veulent ou non coopérer avec les autorités et/ou témoigner. Cette disposition s’applique également aux pays d’origine, qui devraient s’efforcer d’identifier les victimes parmi leurs ressortissants qui rentrent sur le territoire.56 Loi type contre la traite des personnes La disposition facultative ci-après pourrait être incluse dans les principes directeurs: “4. Lorsqu’un agent de l’État ou un agent local a établi la présence d’une victime de la traite des personnes sur le territoire de l’État [a établi qu’il y a des motifs raisonnables de penser qu’une personne est victime de la traite des personnes], [l’autorité compétente], dans les [quatre] jours qui suivent, examine et évalue le cas de cette victime, y compris tout rapport d’infraction la concernant, et délivre une lettre attestant que les conditions requises sont remplies ou tout autre document pertinent pour que la victime ait accès aux droits, aux prestations et aux services énoncés aux chapitres VII et VIII de la présente loi.” 1. L’organisme national de coordination créé conformément à l’article 35 définit les principes directeurs/procédures à suivre au niveau national pour identifier les victimes de la traite. 2. L’organisme national de coordination élabore et diffuse auprès des professionnels qui sont susceptibles d’être en contact avec des victimes de la traite des informations et documents concernant la traite des personnes dont, mais pas uniquement, un manuel de procédure sur l’identification et l’orientation des victimes de la traite des personnes. 3. En vue de la bonne identification des victimes de la traite des personnes, [les autorités compétentes] collaborent avec les organismes étatiques et non étatiques d’assistance aux victimes compétents. Article 19. Information aux victimes Commentaire Source: Protocole, articles 6 et 7; Convention, article 25, paragraphe 2. En vertu de l’alinéa a du paragraphe 2 de l’article 6 du Protocole, les États parties sont tenus de s’assurer que des informations sur les procédures judiciaires et administratives applicables sont fournies aux victimes. Les États parties peuvent envisager de communiquer aux victimes d’autres types d’informations utiles. Les types d’informations à fournir aux victimes pourraient être précisés dans les règlements et principes directeurs. Exemple de formulation possible: “2. Dès le premier contact avec le processus de justice et tout au long de celui-ci, [l’autorité compétente] fournit aux victimes des informations sur ce qui suit:Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 57 a) Le degré et la nature des prestations et services disponibles, les possibilités d’assistance offertes par des organisations non gouvernementales et d’autres organismes d’aide aux victimes, et la façon dont cette assistance peut être obtenue; b) Les différentes étapes des procédures judiciaires et administratives et le rôle et la position de la victime; c) Les possibilités d’accès à des services juridiques [gratuits et/ou peu coûteux]; d) La possibilité pour les victimes et les témoins [et leur famille] d’obtenir une protection en cas de menaces ou d’actes d’intimidation; e) Le droit à la vie privée et à la confidentialité; f) Le droit d’être tenu au courant de l’état d’avancement et des progrès de la procédure pénale; g) Les recours juridiques disponibles, y compris le recours en réparation dans le cadre de procédures civiles et pénales; h) Les possibilités de bénéficier d’un statut de résident temporaire et/ou permanent, y compris de présenter une demande d’asile ou de résidence pour des raisons humanitaires.” 1. Les victimes reçoivent des informations sur la nature de la protection, de l’assistance et de l’appui auxquels elles ont droit et les possibilités d’assistance et d’appui offertes par des organisations non gouvernementales et d’autres organismes d’aide aux victimes, ainsi que des informations sur les procédures judiciaires les concernant. 2. Les informations sont communiquées dans une langue que la victime comprend. Si la victime ne sait pas lire, elle est informée oralement par l’autorité compétente. Article 20. Prestations et services de base aux victimes de la traite des personnes Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphes 2 à 4; Convention, article 25, paragraphe 1. De nombreux pays disposent déjà de lois, politiques, règlements et principes directeurs qui assurent aux victimes d’infractions (graves) les droits, prestations et services mentionnés ci-après. Si tel est le cas, il convient de veiller à ce que ces droits, prestations et services s’appliquent également aux victimes de la traite des personnes. Si tel n’est pas le cas, il est souhaitable d’étendre 58 Loi type contre la traite des personnes les droits en question à toutes les victimes d’infractions (graves), y compris celles de la traite des personnes, afin d’éviter de créer une hiérarchie entre les victimes de différentes infractions. Certains de ces droits devront être inscrits dans la loi, tandis que d’autres se prêtent peut-être mieux à des règlements, politiques ou principes directeurs, comme des principes directeurs sur les enquêtes et les poursuites relatives à la traite des personnes et sur le traitement des victimes. L’octroi d’une assistance et d’une protection appropriées aux victimes est dans l’intérêt à la fois de la victime et des poursuites engagées contre les auteurs d’infractions. Du point de vue des services de détection et de répression, la fourniture d’une assistance et d’une protection insuffisantes aux victimes peut dissuader ces dernières de demander de l’aide auprès des agents de ces services par crainte de mauvais traitements, d’une expulsion ou de risques potentiels pour leur sécurité. Le paragraphe 1 de l’article 25 de la Convention oblige les États parties à prendre des mesures appropriées pour prêter assistance et accorder protection aux victimes, en particulier dans les cas de menace de représailles ou d’intimidation, cas fréquents s’agissant des victimes de la traite. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à envisager de mettre en oeuvre des mesures en vue d’assurer le rétablissement physique, psychologique et social des victimes de la traite, en coopération avec les organisations non gouvernementales et d’autres éléments de la société civile et, en particulier, de leur fournir un logement convenable, des conseils et des informations, une assistance médicale, psychologique et matérielle, et des possibilités d’emploi, d’éducation et de formation. Selon les notes interprétatives (A/55/383/Add.1, par. 71), le type d’assistance dont il est question dans le paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole s’applique tant à l’État d’accueil qu’à l’État d’origine des victimes de la traite des personnes, mais uniquement à l’égard des victimes se trouvant sur leurs territoires respectifs. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole s’applique à l’État d’accueil jusqu’à ce que la victime de la traite des personnes ait été rapatriée dans son État d’origine, puis à l’État d’origine à compter de la date de son retour. 1. Les autorités compétentes et les prestataires de services aux victimes fournissent les prestations et les services de base décrits ci-dessous aux victimes de la traite des personnes dans [l’État], indépendamment du statut de ces victimes au regard de la législation sur l’immigration ou de la capacité ou de la volonté de la victime de participer à l’enquête ou aux poursuites visant l’auteur présumé de la traite. Commentaire L’orientation des victimes vers les organismes d’assistance devrait se faire dès que possible et, de préférence, avant que la victime ne fasse de déposition officielle. Il est souhaitable que la police et les autres services participant au Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 59 processus d’identification mettent en place des procédures qui permettent aux victimes de bénéficier d’une assistance et d’une orientation adéquates. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole mentionne expressément la coopération avec les organisations non gouvernementales et d’autres éléments de la société civile. 2. L’assistance doit comprendre: a) Un logement sûr et convenable; b) Des soins de santé et les traitements médicaux nécessaires, dont éventuellement un dépistage gratuit, facultatif et confidentiel du VIH et d’autres maladies sexuellement transmissibles; c) Des conseils et une aide psychologique fournis à titre confidentiel, dans le respect total de la vie privée de la personne concernée et dans une langue qu’elle comprend; Commentaire L’alinéa b du paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à envisager de mettre en oeuvre des mesures en vue d’assurer le rétablissement physique, psychologique et social des victimes de la traite des personnes, y compris des conseils et des informations, concernant notamment les droits que la loi leur reconnaît, dans une langue que la victime comprend. d) Des informations concernant l’assistance juridique [gratuite ou peu coûteuse] qui est à la disposition de la victime pour représenter ses intérêts dans le cadre de toute enquête pénale, notamment en vue d’obtenir réparation, [pour engager une action civile contre les auteurs de la traite] et [, s’il y a lieu, pour l’aider à faire une demande de régularisation de son statut au regard de la législation sur l’immigration]; et Commentaire L’alinéa a du paragraphe 2 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à s’assurer que leur système juridique ou administratif prévoit des mesures permettant de fournir aux victimes de la traite des personnes, lorsqu’il y a lieu, des informations sur les procédures judiciaires et administratives applicables. Tout au long de la procédure pénale et de toute autre procédure judiciaire et administrative pertinente, [l’autorité compétente] fournit à la victime des informations sur ce qui suit: a) Le calendrier et le déroulement de la procédure pénale et de toute autre procédure judiciaire et administrative applicable, y compris les demandes en réparation dans le cadre de la procédure pénale;60 Loi type contre la traite des personnes b) L’issue de l’affaire, y compris toute décision d’interrompre l’enquête ou les poursuites, de classer l’affaire ou de relâcher le(s) suspect(s). L’alinéa b du paragraphe 2 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à s’assurer que leur système juridique ou administratif prévoit des mesures permettant de fournir aux victimes de la traite des personnes une assistance pour faire en sorte que leurs avis et préoccupations soient présentés et pris en compte aux stades appropriés de la procédure pénale engagée contre les auteurs d’infractions, d’une manière qui ne porte pas préjudice aux droits de la défense. Ces dispositions soulignent avec insistance l’importance de l’assistance juridique fournie par l’État aux victimes de la traite. S’il existe un système d’assistance juridique gratuite, il devrait aussi s’appliquer aux victimes de la traite. Si la victime ne peut pas bénéficier d’une telle assistance, elle devrait pouvoir se faire assister par une personne de son choix, appartenant par exemple à une organisation non gouvernementale ou à une institution chargée de l’assistance juridique aux victimes. En outre, les organisations de travailleurs peuvent jouer un rôle important en aidant les victimes (présumées) à porter plainte. e) Des services de traduction et d’interprétation, le cas échéant. 3. Dans les cas appropriés et dans la mesure du possible, une assistance est fournie aux personnes à charge accompagnant la victime. Commentaire Une assistance aux personnes à charge peut être jugée nécessaire, notamment lorsque la victime a des enfants. 4. Les victimes de la traite des personnes ne doivent pas être placées dans quelque centre de détention que ce soit du fait de leur statut de victime ou de leur statut au regard de la législation sur l’immigration. Commentaire Le fait de placer des victimes de la traite en prison ou dans d’autres centres de détention ne peut en aucun cas être considéré comme correspondant à leur fournir un logement convenable au sens de l’alinéa a du paragraphe 3 de l’article 6 du Protocole. 5. Tous les services d’assistance sont fournis sur une base consensuelle et informée, prenant dûment en compte les besoins spécifiques des enfants et d’autres personnes en situation vulnérable. 6. Les services d’assistance énumérés au paragraphe 2 doivent aussi être offerts aux victimes qui sont rapatriées dans [l’État] depuis un autre État.Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 61 Commentaire Il importe de veiller à ce que toutes les victimes aient accès à une assistance qui leur permette de se rétablir et de prendre une décision en connaissance de cause quant aux possibilités qui s’offrent à elles, y compris pour ce qui est de participer à la procédure pénale et/ou d’engager une action en réparation. Les victimes qui ne souhaitent pas ou n’osent pas faire de déposition en tant que témoins — ou qui ne sont pas appelées à témoigner en cette qualité parce qu’elles ne possèdent pas d’informations utiles ou parce que les auteurs de la traite ne peuvent pas être identifiés ou placés en détention — ont besoin d’une assistance et d’une protection au même titre que les victimes qui souhaitent et peuvent témoigner. Certaines formes d’assistance à long terme ne peuvent être apportées que lorsque la victime reste dans le pays et coopère avec les autorités dans le cadre de l’enquête et des poursuites visant les auteurs de la traite. Article 21. Protection générale des victimes et des témoins Commentaire La présente Loi type n’aborde les questions de protection des témoins que dans la mesure où elles sont propres à la traite des personnes. Pour des dispositions générales sur la protection des témoins, voir les Bonnes pratiques de protection des témoins dans les procédures pénales afférentes à la criminalité organisée de l’UNODC (disponibles en anglais à l’adresse suivante: www.unodc.org/documents/organized-crime/Witness-protectionmanual-Feb08.pdf). Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 1; Convention, article 24. Le paragraphe 1 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties, lorsqu’il y a lieu et dans la mesure où leur droit interne le permet, à protéger la vie privée et l’identité des victimes de la traite des personnes, notamment en rendant les procédures judiciaires relatives à cette traite non publiques. Le paragraphe 1 de l’article 24 de la Convention porte plus particulièrement sur la protection des témoins et dispose que chaque État partie prend, dans la limite de ses moyens, des mesures appropriées pour assurer une protection efficace contre des actes éventuels de représailles ou d’intimidation aux témoins qui, dans le cadre de procédures pénales, font un témoignage et, le cas échéant, à leurs parents et à d’autres personnes qui leur sont proches. Ces mesures peuvent consister notamment à établir, pour la protection physique de ces personnes, des procédures visant notamment à leur fournir un nouveau domicile et à permettre, le cas échéant, que les renseignements concernant leur identité et le lieu où elles se trouvent ne soient pas divulgués ou que leur divulgation soit limitée (alinéa a du paragraphe 2 de l’article 24). Le paragraphe 4 de l’article 24 de la Convention pose que les dispositions de cet article s’appliquent également aux victimes lorsqu’elles sont témoins. L’article proposé s’applique plus particulièrement aux enquêtes pénales précédant le procès. Ses diverses dispositions visent à protéger la vie privée et 62 Loi type contre la traite des personnes l’identité de la victime et/ou du témoin pendant l’enquête. L’applicabilité de ces dispositions dépendra du système juridique de chaque pays. 1. [L’autorité compétente] prend toutes les mesures appropriées pour que les victimes ou témoins de la traite des personnes, ainsi que leur famille, reçoivent une protection suffisante au cas où leur sécurité serait menacée, y compris des mesures de protection contre des actes de représailles ou d’intimidation commis par les auteurs de la traite et leurs associés. 2. Les victimes et les témoins de la traite des personnes ont accès à toutes les mesures ou tous les programmes de protection des témoins existants. Article 22. Enfants victimes et témoins Commentaire Disposition facultative Exemple de déclaration de principe pouvant être insérée dans la loi: “Toutes les mesures prises en rapport avec des enfants victimes et témoins doivent s’appuyer sur les principes énoncés dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, notamment le principe selon lequel l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant doit être la considération qui l’emporte dans toutes les mesures prises en faveur des enfants et celui qui veut que l’opinion de l’enfant soit examinée et prise en compte pour toutes les questions le concernant.” Cette disposition porte sur le statut particulier des enfants victimes, conformément à l’article 6 du Protocole et à la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant. Les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels donnent également des orientations à ce sujet. Outre les autres garanties prévues par la présente loi: a) Les enfants victimes, notamment les nourrissons, reçoivent des soins et une attention particuliers; b) En cas d’incertitude sur l’âge de la victime et lorsqu’il existe des raisons de croire qu’elle est un enfant, elle est présumée être un enfant et est traitée comme tel dans l’attente de la vérification de son âge; c) L’assistance aux enfants victimes est fournie par des professionnels spécialement formés et compte tenu des besoins spécifiques des enfants, notamment en ce qui concerne le logement, l’éducation et les soins;Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 63 Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Aux termes du paragraphe 4 de l’article 6 du Protocole, les États parties tiennent compte de l’âge, du sexe et des besoins spécifiques des victimes de la traite, en particulier des besoins spécifiques des enfants. d) Si la victime est un mineur non accompagné, [l’autorité compétente]: i) Désigne un tuteur chargé de représenter les intérêts de l’enfant; ii) Prend toutes les mesures nécessaires pour déterminer son identité et sa nationalité; iii) Met tout en oeuvre pour retrouver sa famille, lorsque cela est dans l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant; Commentaire Disposition facultative Cette disposition est conforme aux obligations découlant de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant. Voir également l’observation générale n° 6 du Comité des droits de l’enfant. e) Des informations peuvent être communiquées aux enfants victimes par l’intermédiaire de leur tuteur ou, si le tuteur est l’auteur présumé de l’infraction, par une personne de soutien; Commentaire Disposition facultative Cette disposition est conforme à la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et aux Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. f) Les informations sont communiquées aux enfants victimes dans une langue qu’ils pratiquent et qu’ils comprennent et d’une manière facile à comprendre pour eux; Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 3, alinéa b, et paragraphe 4; Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels.64 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Le paragraphe 4 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à tenir compte de l’âge, du sexe et des besoins spécifiques des victimes de la traite, en particulier des besoins spécifiques des enfants. g) Dans le cas d’enfants victimes ou témoins, les entretiens, auditions et autres moyens d’enquête sont menés par des professionnels spécialement formés, dans un environnement adapté, dans une langue que l’enfant pratique et comprend et en présence de ses parents, de son tuteur ou d’une personne de soutien; Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Une personne de soutien peut être un spécialiste, un représentant d’une organisation non gouvernementale spécialisé dans le travail avec les enfants ou un membre approprié de la famille. h) Dans le cas d’enfants victimes et témoins, l’audience se déroule toujours à huis clos, sans médias ni public. Les enfants victimes et témoins déposent [témoignent] toujours en l’absence de l’accusé. Article 23. Protection des victimes et des témoins au tribunal Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 1; Convention, article 24, paragraphe 1 et paragraphe 2, alinéa a; Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. L’article proposé s’applique plus particulièrement aux audiences. Ses diverses dispositions visent à protéger la vie privée et l’identité de la victime et/ou du témoin pendant l’audience. L’applicabilité de ces dispositions sera fonction du système juridique de chaque pays. Certaines de ces dispositions dépendent du système pénal ou de la jurisprudence de l’État concerné et ne sont pas applicables dans des systèmes juridiques où l’accusé a le droit, pour se défendre, d’être présent pendant le déroulement/l’établissement du procès-verbal de toutes les audiences de manière à pouvoir bénéficier d’un contre-interrogatoire et donner des éclaircissements. Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 65 * “À huis clos” est un terme juridique qui signifie “en privé” et qualifie une audience fermée, où le public et la presse ne sont pas admis. 1. Un juge peut ordonner sur demande, ou lorsqu’il estime que cela est nécessaire dans l’intérêt de la justice, et sans préjudice des droits de l’accusé, que: a) L’audience se déroule à huis clos*, sans médias ni public; b) Les procès-verbaux d’audience soient scellés; c) La déposition d’une victime ou d’un témoin soit entendue par liaison vidéo [ou à l’aide d’autres techniques de communication] [derrière un écran] ou par des moyens adéquats similaires en l’absence de l’accusé; et/ou Commentaire Le paragraphe 1 et l’alinéa b du paragraphe 2 de l’article 24 de la Convention disposent que les mesures visant à protéger une victime ou un témoin contre des actes de représailles ou d’intimidation peuvent consister notamment à prévoir des règles qui permettent aux témoins de déposer d’une manière qui garantisse leur sécurité, notamment à les autoriser à déposer en recourant à des techniques de communication telles que les liaisons vidéo ou à d’autres moyens adéquats. La victime ou le témoin peuvent déposer sans que leur nom, leur adresse ni aucune autre information permettant de les identifier ne soient divulgués. d) La victime ou le témoin utilise un pseudonyme. [, et/ou] [e) La déposition qu’une victime ou un témoin a faite devant un juge au cours de la phase précédant le procès soit admise comme élément de preuve.] Commentaire Cet alinéa est facultatif pour les systèmes juridiques qui autorisent les dépositions autres qu’orales ou prévoient des exceptions (par exemple, lorsque le témoin est décédé ou incapable de témoigner). 2. Le juge restreint les questions posées à la victime ou au témoin, notamment, mais pas uniquement, celles qui concernent son histoire personnelle, son comportement sexuel passé, son caractère supposé ou son activité professionnelle actuelle ou passée. Commentaire Il est possible d’ajouter ici une disposition supplémentaire qui prévoie une audience à huis clos pour évaluer la pertinence de ces questions, si le juge considère que c’est utile. 66 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Il est également possible d’inclure dans le droit pénal une disposition concernant le caractère non admissible de certains éléments de preuve dans les affaires de traite des personnes; elle pourrait être formulée comme suit: “Les éléments de preuve ci-après ne sont pas admissibles dans le cadre des procédures pénales: a) Élément de preuve tendant à démontrer que la victime présumée s’est livrée à des pratiques sexuelles autres; b) Élément de preuve tendant à démontrer une éventuelle prédisposition sexuelle de la victime présumée de la traite.” (Source: Global Rights, Loi type sur la protection des victimes de la traite des êtres humains rédigée à l’intention des États fédérés, 2005.) ou “En cas de poursuites relatives à la traite des personnes au sens de l’article 8, le comportement sexuel passé d’une victime est indifférent et ne peut être invoqué pour prouver que la victime s’est livrée à des pratiques sexuelles autres ou pour prouver sa prédisposition sexuelle.” (Source: États-Unis d’Amérique, Département d’État, Loi type pour lutter contre la traite des personnes, 2003.) Les autorités compétentes devraient en outre prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour éviter une confrontation directe de la victime avec l’accusé à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur de la salle d’audience. Article 24. Participation à la procédure pénale [Le Ministère de la justice] [le ministère public] et/ou [le tribunal] et/ou [une autre autorité compétente] donne à la victime la possibilité de présenter, soit directement, soit par l’intermédiaire de son représentant, ses avis, besoins, intérêts et préoccupations afin qu’ils soient pris en compte aux stades appropriés de toute procédure judiciaire ou administrative relative à l’infraction, sans préjudice des droits de la défense. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 2, alinéa b; Convention, article 25, paragraphe 3. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 25 de la Convention oblige les États parties, sous réserve de leur droit interne, à faire en sorte que les avis et préoccupations des victimes soient présentés et pris en compte aux stades appropriés de la procédure pénale engagée contre les auteurs d’infractions, d’une manière qui ne porte Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 67 pas préjudice aux droits de la défense. L’alinéa b du paragraphe 2 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à s’assurer que leur système juridique ou administratif prévoit des mesures permettant de fournir aux victimes de la traite des personnes une assistance pour faire en sorte que leurs avis et préoccupations soient présentés et pris en compte aux stades appropriés de la procédure pénale engagée contre les auteurs d’infractions, d’une manière qui ne porte pas préjudice aux droits de la défense. Les procédures judiciaires et administratives peuvent inclure, le cas échéant, une procédure devant un tribunal du travail. La participation des victimes à la procédure pénale peut prendre différentes formes. Dans certains pays de droit romain, les victimes peuvent bénéficier du statut de participants (et devraient être informées de cette possibilité selon l’article 24). Dans les pays de common law, elles peuvent être autorisées à participer à certains stades de la procédure (par exemple pour donner leur avis sur le plaider-coupable) ou à faire une déclaration quant aux conséquences de l’infraction. Article 25. Protection des données et de la vie privée Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 1; Convention, article 24, paragraphe 2, alinéa a. Les procédures qui réglementent les échanges d’informations personnalisées et/ou sensibles du point de vue opérationnel sont particulièrement importantes dans le cas des victimes de la traite, étant donné qu’une utilisation malveillante de ces informations pourrait directement mettre en danger la vie et compromettre la sécurité de la victime et de ses proches ou conduire à une stigmatisation ou à une exclusion sociale. En outre, il faut tenir compte du fait que la traite des personnes est une infraction qui est susceptible d’engendrer la corruption et qui est souvent le fait de groupes et de réseaux criminels organisés. L’intensification de la coopération et des échanges de données augmente également le risque d’utilisation à mauvais escient des informations. L’un des moyens de protéger les données est de recourir à des “notes à accès restreint”, c’est-à-dire de marquer d’un numéro les données concernant les victimes de la traite, dont l’identité n’est connue que de certains agents. De plus, les personnes qui ont accès à ces données devraient être liées par un devoir de confidentialité. 1. Toutes les données personnelles qui concernent les victimes de la traite sont traitées, stockées et utilisées dans les conditions prévues par [la législation 68 Loi type contre la traite des personnes nationale en matière de protection des données personnelles] et sont utilisées exclusivement aux fins pour lesquelles elles ont été recueillies à l’origine. 2. Conformément à [la législation nationale pertinente], un protocole est établi pour l’échange d’informations entre les services compétents en ce qui concerne l’identification des victimes, l’assistance qui leur est offerte et l’enquête judiciaire, dans le respect total de la vie privée et de la sécurité des victimes. 3. Toutes les informations échangées entre une victime et un [conseiller] professionnel qui lui apporte une assistance médicale, psychologique, juridique ou autre sont confidentielles et ne peuvent pas être communiquées à des tiers sans le consentement de la victime. Commentaire Disposition facultative Pour obtenir une aide et un soutien, les victimes de la traite doivent pouvoir parler de leur expérience dans un espace protégé. Il est par conséquent crucial que des règles soient en place pour garantir la confidentialité de la relation client-conseiller et empêcher que les conseillers ne soient obligés de transmettre des informations à des tiers contre la volonté et sans le consentement de la victime de la traite. Si des règles garantissant la confidentialité de cette relation sont déjà en vigueur, il convient de s’assurer qu’elles s’appliquent aux conseillers des victimes de la traite. Ces derniers devraient comprendre les personnes employées par des organisations non gouvernementales qui fournissent des services d’assistance aux victimes de la traite. 4. L’audition [l’interrogatoire] de la victime et/ou du témoin au cours de la procédure pénale [judiciaire et administrative] se tient dans le respect de sa vie privée, en l’absence de tout public ou média. 5. Les résultats des éventuels examens médicaux subis par une victime de la traite des personnes sont considérés comme confidentiels et ne sont utilisés qu’aux fins de l’enquête et des poursuites pénales. 6. Le nom, l’adresse d’une victime de la traite des personnes ou toute autre information (y compris des photos) permettant de l’identifier ne sont ni rendus publics ni publiés [dans les médias]. 7. Toute violation des paragraphes 3, 5 ou 6 est passible d’une amende de [...]. Article 26. Fourniture d’un nouveau domicile aux victimes et/ou aux témoins [L’autorité compétente] peut, lorsque cela est nécessaire pour garantir la sécurité physique d’une victime ou d’un témoin, à la demande de la Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 69 victime ou du témoin ou en consultation avec elle ou lui, prendre toutes les mesures requises pour lui fournir un nouveau domicile et pour limiter, dans la mesure du possible, la divulgation de son nom, de son adresse et de toute autre information permettant de l’identifier. Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 1; Convention, article 24. L’alinéa a du paragraphe 2 de l’article 24 de la Convention dispose que les mesures visant à protéger une victime ou un témoin contre des actes de représailles ou d’intimidation peuvent consister notamment à leur fournir un nouveau domicile et à permettre que les renseignements concernant leur identité ne soient pas divulgués ou que leur divulgation soit limitée. Le paragraphe 3 de l’article 24 prévoit que les États parties envisagent de conclure des arrangements avec d’autres États en vue de fournir un nouveau domicile aux victimes et aux témoins. Article 27. Droit d’engager une action civile Commentaire Cette disposition ne doit être incluse que si elle n’est pas déjà prévue dans le code ou le droit pénal national. Si elle est déjà prévue, il convient de s’assurer qu’elle s’applique aussi aux victimes de la traite des personnes. Voir aussi les commentaires relatifs aux articles 28 et 29. 1. Une victime de la traite des personnes a le droit d’engager une action civile en réparation du préjudice matériel et moral qu’elle a subi par suite d’actes érigés en infractions pénales par la présente loi. 2. Le droit d’engager une action civile en réparation du préjudice matériel ou moral n’est pas remis en cause par l’existence de poursuites pénales visant les mêmes actes que ceux à l’origine de la procédure civile. 3. Le statut de la victime au regard de la législation sur l’immigration ou son retour dans son pays d’origine ou toute autre raison pour laquelle elle se trouve hors de la juridiction n’empêche pas le tribunal d’ordonner le versement d’une réparation en application du présent article.70 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Article 28. Réparation ordonnée par le tribunal Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 6, paragraphe 6. Le paragraphe 6 de l’article 6 du Protocole oblige les États parties à s’assurer que leur système juridique prévoit des mesures qui offrent aux victimes la possibilité d’obtenir réparation du préjudice subi. Le paragraphe 2 de l’article 25 de la Convention dispose que les États parties établissent des procédures appropriées pour permettre aux victimes d’obtenir réparation. Les articles 28 et 29 proposés ci-après sont des exemples de dispositions visant à remplir cette obligation. Cette disposition ne doit être incluse que si elle ne fait pas déjà partie des dispositions générales du code ou du droit pénal national. Si elle en fait déjà partie, il convient de s’assurer qu’elle s’applique aussi aux victimes de la traite des personnes. Outre la procédure pénale, la victime peut avoir intérêt, dans certains pays et dans les cas qui s’y prêtent, à porter l’affaire devant un tribunal du travail. Les organisations de travailleurs peuvent alors jouer un rôle important en aidant les victimes à obtenir réparation. Les procédures civiles/devant un tribunal du travail doivent faire suite à la procédure pénale car, si elles sont engagées avant, elles seront invariablement ajournées dans l’attente de la conclusion de l’affaire au pénal. La Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir (résolution 40/34 de l’Assemblée générale, annexe) prévoit ce qui suit en matière de réparation: “Obligation de restitution et de réparation 8. Les auteurs d’actes criminels ou les tiers responsables de leur comportement doivent, en tant que de besoin, réparer équitablement le préjudice causé aux victimes, à leur famille ou aux personnes à leur charge. Cette réparation doit inclure la restitution des biens, une indemnité pour le préjudice ou les pertes subis, le remboursement des dépenses engagées en raison de la victimisation, la fourniture de services et le rétablissement des droits. 9. Les gouvernements doivent réexaminer leurs pratiques, règlements et lois pour faire de la restitution une sentence possible dans les affaires pénales, s’ajoutant aux autres sanctions pénales. 10. Dans tous les cas où des dommages graves sont causés à l’environnement, la restitution doit inclure autant que possible la remise en état de l’environnement, la restitution de l’infrastructure, le remplacement des équipements collectifs et le remboursement des dépenses de réinstallation lorsque ces dommages entraînent la dislocation d’une communauté. Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 71 11. Lorsque des fonctionnaires ou d’autres personnes agissant à titre officiel ou quasi officiel ont commis une infraction pénale, les victimes doivent recevoir restitution de l’État dont relèvent les fonctionnaires ou les agents responsables des préjudices subis. Dans les cas où le gouvernement sous l’autorité duquel s’est produit l’acte ou l’omission à l’origine de la victimisation n’existe plus, l’État ou le gouvernement successeur en titre doit assurer la restitution aux victimes. Indemnisation 12. Lorsqu’il n’est pas possible d’obtenir une indemnisation complète auprès du délinquant ou d’autres sources, les États doivent s’efforcer d’assurer une indemnisation financière: a) Aux victimes qui ont subi un préjudice corporel ou une atteinte importante à leur intégrité physique ou mentale par suite d’actes criminels graves; b) À la famille, en particulier aux personnes à la charge des personnes qui sont décédées ou qui ont été frappées d’incapacité physique ou mentale à la suite de cette victimisation. 13. Il faut encourager l’établissement, le renforcement et l’expansion de fonds nationaux d’indemnisation des victimes. Selon que de besoin, il conviendrait d’établir d’autres fonds et indemnisation notamment dans les cas où l’État dont la victime est ressortissante n’est pas en mesure de la dédommager.” 1. Lorsqu’une personne est reconnue coupable d’une infraction visée par la présente loi, le tribunal peut lui ordonner de verser une réparation à la victime, en plus ou à la place de toute autre sanction qu’il aura ordonnée. 2. Lorsqu’il prononce le versement d’une réparation, le tribunal prend en compte les moyens et la capacité de l’auteur de l’infraction de payer et il donne la priorité à la réparation sur l’amende. 3. Le but de la réparation ordonnée est d’indemniser la victime des dommages, pertes ou préjudices causés par l’auteur de l’infraction. La réparation peut couvrir entièrement ou en partie: a) Les frais liés aux traitements médicaux, physiques, psychologiques ou psychiatriques requis par la victime; b) Les frais liés aux soins de physiothérapie, d’ergothérapie ou de rééducation requis par la victime; c) Les frais liés au transport, à la prise en charge temporaire des enfants, au logement provisoire ou au déplacement de la victime vers un lieu de résidence temporaire sûr qui sont nécessaires;72 Loi type contre la traite des personnes d) La perte de revenus et les salaires dus conformément aux lois et règlements nationaux régissant les salaires; e) Les frais de justice et autres frais ou dépenses encourus, y compris les frais induits par la participation de la victime à l’enquête et aux poursuites pénales; f) La réparation du préjudice moral, physique ou psychologique, de la détresse émotionnelle, de la douleur et des souffrances subis par la victime par suite de l’infraction commise à son encontre; et g) Tous autres frais encourus ou pertes subies par la victime par suite directe de la traite et raisonnablement évalués par le tribunal. 4. L’État peut faire exécuter la décision de réparation prononcée en application du présent article par tous les moyens prévus en droit interne. 5. Le statut de la victime au regard de la législation sur l’immigration ou son retour dans son pays d’origine ou toute autre raison pour laquelle elle se trouve hors de la juridiction n’empêche pas le tribunal d’ordonner le versement d’une réparation en application du présent article. 6. Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est un agent public dont les actes constituant une infraction visée par la présente loi ont été commis sous l’autorité réelle ou apparente de l’État, le tribunal peut ordonner à l’État de verser une réparation à la victime [conformément à la législation nationale]. Le versement d’une réparation ordonné à l’État en application du présent article peut couvrir entièrement ou en partie certains ou tous les frais mentionnés aux alinéas a à g du paragraphe 3 ci‑dessus. Article 29. Réparation pour les victimes de la traite des personnes Commentaire Disposition obligatoire L’un des moyens de s’assurer que la victime reçoit réparation des préjudices subis, indépendamment de toute procédure pénale et que l’auteur de l’infraction puisse ou non être identifié, condamné et sanctionné, consiste à créer un fonds pour les victimes auprès duquel ces dernières peuvent faire une demande d’indemnisation. Les paragraphes 12 et 13 de la Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir disposent que:Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 73 “12. Lorsqu’il n’est pas possible d’obtenir une indemnisation complète auprès du délinquant ou d’autres sources, les États doivent s’efforcer d’assurer une indemnisation financière: a) Aux victimes qui ont subi un préjudice corporel ou une atteinte importante à leur intégrité physique ou mentale par suite d’actes criminels graves; b) À la famille, en particulier aux personnes à la charge des personnes qui sont décédées ou qui ont été frappées d’incapacité physique ou mentale à la suite de cette victimisation. 13. Il faut encourager l’établissement, le renforcement et l’expansion de fonds nationaux d’indemnisation des victimes. Selon que de besoin, il conviendrait d’établir d’autres fonds et indemnisation notamment dans les cas où l’État dont la victime est ressortissante n’est pas en mesure de la dédommager.” Un fonds pour les victimes peut être créé spécialement à l’intention des victimes de la traite ou, comme c’est le cas dans un certain nombre de pays, à l’intention des victimes d’infractions graves en général (voir, par exemple, l’article 11 de la loi fédérale suisse sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions de 1991, modifiée en dernier lieu en 2005). Cette dernière option est préférable dans la mesure où il est plus facile de gérer un seul fonds plutôt que plusieurs pour différents types d’infractions. Ses objectifs peuvent se limiter à la fourniture d’une assistance et d’une indemnisation aux victimes ou inclure le financement d’activités visant à prévenir et combattre la traite des personnes. La gestion du fonds devrait être régie selon les structures existantes, par exemple les règlements ou actes de droit dérivés. Les règlements peuvent inclure des dispositions précises sur la gestion du fonds. Par exemple: “Les ressources et les avoirs du Fonds sont affectés comme suit [options à choisir par l’État]: a) Indemnisation au titre du préjudice matériel et moral subi par les victimes de la traite des personnes; b) Toutes dépenses liées à la protection, à l’assistance, à la réinsertion, à la prévention d’une nouvelle victimisation et/ou à l’indemnisation au titre du préjudice subi par les victimes de la traite des personnes; c) Contribution au soutien matériel de base offert aux victimes de la traite des personnes; d) Formation générale et professionnelle des victimes de la traite des personnes; e) Mise en place de foyers et d’autres services d’assistance pour les victimes de la traite des personnes;74 Loi type contre la traite des personnes f) Formation et renforcement des capacités des personnes s’occupant de la protection et de la réinsertion des victimes de la traite des personnes, et de l’assistance à ces victimes; g) Toute dépense ayant trait à la participation des victimes à une procédure pénale contre les auteurs d’infractions (frais de voyage, frais d’hébergement si la victime doit séjourner dans un autre endroit que son lieu de résidence habituel, faux frais y relatifs, etc.). Le Fonds est géré par un conseil d’administration nommé par le [Ministre]. Le Conseil d’administration fixe ses propres procédures dans un règlement, où figurent notamment les conditions d’examen et d’approbation des demandes d’assistance présentées par les victimes de la traite des personnes et qui est approuvé par décret.” Exemple de disposition par laquelle le fonds peut être prévu dans le code ou le droit pénal: “Fonds spécial a) La décision du tribunal relative à la confiscation, telle que prévue par la section 377D, sert de base à l’Administrateur général pour procéder à la saisie des biens confisqués; les biens qui ont été confisqués, ou que l’on envisage de confisquer, sont transférés à l’Administrateur général et déposés par lui sur un fonds spécial qui est administré conformément au règlement promulgué selon les dispositions de l’alinéa d de la présente section (le Fonds); b) Toute amende imposée par le tribunal pour quelque infraction que ce soit est déposée sur le Fonds; c) Lorsqu’une victime d’infraction présente, à l’instance que le Ministre de la justice a déterminée à cette fin, un jugement d’indemnisation et montre qu’elle n’a aucune possibilité raisonnable de faire exécuter tout ou partie de ce jugement, en vertu d’aucune loi, elle reçoit du Fonds tout ou partie de l’indemnisation prévue dans ledit jugement et non encore versée; aux fins de la présente section, on entend par “jugement” une décision dont on ne peut plus faire appel; d) Le Ministre de la justice, avec l’approbation du Comité de la Constitution, des lois et de la justice de la Knesset, promulgue dans un règlement les méthodes d’administration du Fonds et les utilisations qui doivent être faites de ses avoirs, en indiquant leur répartition aux fins suivantes: 1) Réadaptation, traitement et protection des victimes d’infraction; est alloué à cette fin un montant annuel correspondant au moins à la moitié des avoirs du Fonds pour l’année; 2) Versement de l’indemnisation accordée par un jugement à une victime d’infraction, conformément aux dispositions de l’alinéa c; 3) Prévention de la commission d’infractions;Chapitre VII. Protection, assistance et réparation accordées aux victimes et aux témoins 75 4) Exercice des fonctions des services de détection et de répression visant à faire appliquer les dispositions de la présente loi en cas d’infraction.” (Source: Israël, Code pénal, section 377E.) En Roumanie, l’indemnisation des victimes de certaines infractions (n’incluant pas la traite mais le viol et les agressions) est régie par le chapitre V (Indemnisation financière par l’État des victimes de certaines infractions) de la loi sur les mesures visant à assurer la protection des victimes d’infractions. 1. Sans préjudice du pouvoir du tribunal d’ordonner à l’auteur d’une infraction de verser une réparation à une victime de la traite des personnes en vertu de l’article 28 de la présente loi, [l’autorité compétente] prend des dispositions pour le versement d’une réparation en rapport avec les personnes qui ont été identifiées comme des victimes de la traite ou en leur faveur, conformément à la procédure prévue à l’article 18 de la présente loi. Ces dispositions déterminent notamment: a) Les circonstances dans lesquelles une réparation peut être versée; b) La base sur laquelle la réparation doit être calculée et le montant de celle-ci, compte tenu de toute éventuelle réparation reçue ou somme touchée au titre de l’article 28 de la présente loi; c) Le fonds à partir duquel les versements sont effectués; d) La procédure à suivre pour demander le versement d’une réparation; et e) Les modalités de révision et d’appel des décisions concernant les demandes de réparation. 2. [L’autorité compétente] veille à ce que les victimes de la traite puissent demander réparation en vertu du présent article, même lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction n’a pas été identifié, arrêté ou condamné. 3. [Pour les cas où un fonds spécial doit être créé] Aux fins du versement d’une réparation aux victimes de la traite conformément au présent article, [l’autorité compétente] crée un fonds pour les victimes et nomme des administrateurs chargés de le gérer. Les administrateurs du fonds acceptent les versements au fonds provenant de: a) Sommes allouées au fonds conformément au [droit fiscal pertinent]; b) Sommes confisquées et produit de la vente de biens ou d’avoirs confisqués en application de la loi nationale pertinente; c) Contributions volontaires, subventions ou dons au fonds;76 Loi type contre la traite des personnes d) Revenus, intérêts ou bénéfices tirés de placements du fonds; et e) Toute autre source désignée par les administrateurs du fonds. 4. [Pour les cas où un fonds approprié pour les victimes existe déjà] [L’autorité compétente] veille à ce que les administrateurs du [fonds] soient habilités à verser une réparation aux victimes de la traite en vertu du présent article. 5. Le statut de la victime au regard de la législation sur l’immigration ou son retour dans son pays d’origine ou toute autre raison pour laquelle elle se trouve hors de la juridiction n’empêche pas le tribunal d’ordonner le versement d’une réparation en application du présent article.77 Chapitre VIII. Immigration et retour Commentaire Les dispositions sur l’immigration et le rapatriement des victimes de la traite des personnes découlent des articles 7 et 8 du Protocole. La manière dont elles seront appliquées dépendra en grande partie des lois et règlements particuliers de l’État en matière de migrations. Dans certains cas, elles seront incluses dans la loi, alors que dans d’autres il pourrait être plus opportun de les appliquer au moyen de lignes directrices et de règlements. Article 30. Délai de rétablissement et de réflexion Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, articles 6 et 7. En vertu de l’article 7 du Protocole, les États parties sont tenus d’envisager d’adopter des mesures législatives ou d’autres mesures appropriées qui permettent aux victimes de la traite des personnes de rester sur leur territoire, à titre temporaire ou permanent, lorsqu’il y a lieu, et de tenir dûment compte des facteurs humanitaires et personnels. L’article 7 devrait être lu conjointement avec l’article 6. Il est important que les États trouvent un compromis entre, d’une part, la nécessité d’identifier correctement les victimes de la traite des personnes et, d’autre part, la charge que représentent, pour les victimes, les procédures administratives fastidieuses d’identification et de reconnaissance de leur statut. Bien que cela soit facultatif, il est important que les États prennent conscience du fait que des victimes de la traite qui risquent l’expulsion ou l’arrestation immédiates ne sont pas incitées à se manifester, à dénoncer le crime ou à coopérer avec les autorités compétentes. L’octroi d’un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion, assorti des droits correspondants, que les victimes aient ou non préalablement accepté de témoigner, contribue à la protection des droits fondamentaux des victimes de la traite. Lorsque ses droits fondamentaux sont protégés, la victime a également davantage confiance en l’État et en la capacité de l’État de protéger ses intérêts. La victime de la 78 Loi type contre la traite des personnes traite qui a confiance en l’État est plus susceptible de prendre une décision en toute connaissance de cause et de coopérer avec les autorités dans le cadre des poursuites contre les trafiquants. Si des pressions sont exercées sur elle pour qu’elle porte plainte immédiatement, il y a de plus fortes chances qu’elle retire sa plainte par la suite. Un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion est dans l’intérêt tant de la victime que des autorités et facilite la bonne identification de la victime et le lancement ou la poursuite de l’enquête. 1. Une victime de la traite des personnes n’est, selon qu’il convient, pas éloignée du territoire de [l’État] tant que [l’autorité compétente] n’a pas achevé le processus d’identification établi conformément au paragraphe 1 de l’article 18. 2. Lorsqu’elle a des motifs raisonnables de croire, sur la base des principes directeurs/procédures à suivre au niveau national établies conformément au paragraphe 1 de l’article 18 de la présente loi, qu’une personne est victime de la traite, [l’autorité compétente] soumet [au service de l’immigration compétent], dans les [...] jours, une demande écrite tendant à ce qu’un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion d’au moins quatre-vingt-dix jours soit octroyé à la victime afin qu’elle puisse prendre une décision en toute connaissance de cause quant à sa coopération avec les autorités compétentes. 3. Toute personne [physique] qui s’estime victime de la traite a le droit de soumettre une demande écrite [au service de l’immigration compétent] pour obtenir un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion d’au moins quatrevingt-dix jours afin de pouvoir prendre une décision en toute connaissance de cause quant à sa coopération avec les autorités compétentes. 4. [Le service de l’immigration compétent], lorsqu’il a établi qu’il existait des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’une personne était victime de la traite, octroie un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion dans les [...] jours suivant la soumission d’une demande écrite. 5. La décision [du service de l’immigration compétent] concernant l’octroi d’un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion est susceptible d’appel par [l’autorité compétente] ou toute personne physique qui s’estime victime de la traite. 6. Tant que [le service de l’immigration compétent] n’a pas décidé d’octroyer ou non un délai de rétablissement et de réflexion, la victime de la traite des personnes ne peut être expulsée de [l’État] (et bénéficie de tous les droits, prestations, services et mesures de protection prévus au chapitre VII). Toutes éventuelles procédures d’expulsion en cours sont interrompues et tout éventuel ordre d’expulsion est suspendu. 7. Le paragraphe 1 n’empêche pas les autorités compétentes de mener toute enquête pertinente.Chapitre VIII. Immigration et retour 79 Article 31. Titre de séjour temporaire ou permanent Commentaire Disposition facultative Source: Protocole, article 7. Option 1 1. Si [l’autorité compétente] a déterminé qu’une personne était une victime de la traite, cette dernière se voit délivrer, qu’elle coopère ou non avec [l’autorité compétente], un titre de séjour temporaire pour une période de six mois au moins, avec possibilité de renouvellement. Commentaire Les procédures judiciaires pertinentes comprennent non seulement les procédures pénales mais aussi les procédures civiles, par exemple pour demande de réparation. Il est dans l’intérêt tant de la victime que du ministère public que la victime se voie délivrer au minimum un permis de séjour temporaire pour la durée de la procédure pénale. En l’absence de la victime, il serait en effet impossible ou très difficile de poursuivre efficacement les suspects. La victime devrait en outre avoir la possibilité d’engager une action au civil pour obtenir réparation ou de porter l’affaire devant tout autre tribunal compétent, par exemple un tribunal du travail. Option 2 Commentaire Les victimes de la traite qui ne souhaitent pas ou n’osent pas faire de déposition en tant que témoins — ou qui ne sont pas appelées à témoigner en cette qualité parce qu’elles ne possèdent pas d’informations utiles ou parce que les auteurs de la traite ne peuvent pas être placés en détention dans le pays de destination — ont besoin d’une protection adéquate au même titre que les victimes qui souhaitent et peuvent témoigner. Bien que les témoins qui ne sont pas eux-mêmes des victimes ne soient pas visés par l’article 7 du Protocole, il est souhaitable, pour garantir l’efficacité des poursuites concernant les affaires de traite, de donner également la possibilité d’obtenir un titre de séjour temporaire aux témoins qui souhaitent et peuvent témoigner contre le suspect. 1. Si la victime coopère avec les autorités compétentes, [le service de l’immigration compétent] lui délivre [ainsi qu’aux personnes à charge qui l’accompagnent], à sa demande, un permis de séjour temporaire [renouve80 Loi type contre la traite des personnes lable] pour la durée de toute procédure judiciaire pertinente [pour une période de six mois au moins]. 2. La victime [et les personnes à charge l’accompagnant] en possession d’un permis de séjour temporaire ou permanent a [ont] droit à l’assistance, aux prestations, aux services et aux mesures de protection prévus au chapitre VII. 3. Si la victime est un enfant, [le service de l’immigration compétent] lui délivre un permis de séjour temporaire ou permanent, assorti des droits correspondants, si cela est dans son intérêt supérieur. 4. La victime [, ainsi que toute personne à charge qui l’accompagne,] peut faire une demande de statut de réfugié ou de statut de résident permanent [à long terme] pour des raisons humanitaires [et personnelles]. Commentaire Le service de l’immigration ou le juge de l’immigration qui examine, à la lumière du principe de non-refoulement et de l’interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants, la demande de statut de résident à titre permanent ou à long terme présentée par une victime de la traite pour des raisons humanitaires et personnelles devrait tenir compte des éléments ci-après: a) Le risque de représailles contre la victime ou sa famille; b) Le risque de poursuites dans le pays d’origine pour des infractions liées à la traite; c) Les perspectives d’insertion sociale et de vie indépendante, stable et conforme à la dignité humaine dans le pays d’origine; d) L’existence, dans le pays d’origine, de services de soutien adéquats, confidentiels et non stigmatisants; e) La présence d’enfants. Le paragraphe 2 de l’article 7 du Protocole prévoit expressément que lorsqu’ils appliquent la disposition relative au statut de résident temporaire ou permanent, les États parties tiennent dûment compte des facteurs humanitaires et personnels. L’expression “résider à titre permanent” est comprise comme désignant le fait de résider à long terme mais pas nécessairement indéfiniment. De plus, le paragraphe est entendu sans préjudice de toute législation interne concernant l’octroi du droit de résidence ou la durée de cette résidence (notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1), par. 72).Chapitre VIII. Immigration et retour 81 5. Lorsque les exigences qui doivent normalement être remplies (pour demander le statut de résident temporaire ou permanent) ne le sont pas du fait que la personne est une victime de la traite et qu’elle n’a, par exemple, pas de passeport ou d’autres documents d’identité valides, cela n’est pas un motif pour lui refuser le statut de résident temporaire ou permanent. Commentaire Lorsque les conditions qui doivent normalement être remplies pour obtenir le statut de résident (documents d’identité valides et compétence linguistique, par exemple) ne le sont pas du fait que la personne a été victime de la traite et ne peut donc pas les remplir, cela ne peut justifier le refus de ce statut, comme ce serait le cas dans des circonstances ordinaires. Il est de bonne pratique pour les pays d’origine et les pays de destination de conclure des accords/arrangements bilatéraux ou régionaux qui prévoient la réinsertion des victimes rapatriées et réduisent le risque, pour ces dernières, d’être à nouveau victimes de la traite. Article 32. Retour des victimes de la traite des personnes dans [l’État] 1. [L’autorité compétente] facilite et accepte le retour d’une victime de la traite des personnes qui est ressortissante de [l’État] ou qui avait le droit d’y résider à titre permanent au moment où elle a été victime de la traite, sans retard injustifié ou déraisonnable et en tenant dûment compte de ses droits et de sa sécurité [du respect de sa vie privée, de sa dignité et de sa santé]. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 8, paragraphes 1 et 2; notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1). Aux termes du paragraphe 1 de l’article 8 du Protocole, les États parties facilitent et acceptent le retour d’un ressortissant, “en tenant dûment compte de la sécurité de cette personne”. Cela crée une obligation positive pour les gouvernements, qui doivent veiller à ce que la victime de la traite ne risque pas, à son retour, de représailles ou d’autres préjudices telle une arrestation au motif qu’elle a quitté le pays ou travaillé dans la prostitution à l’étranger, lorsque ces actes sont érigés en infractions pénales dans le pays d’origine. L’expression “sans retard injustifié ou déraisonnable” ne signifie pas que les gouvernements peuvent immédiatement expulser toutes les victimes de la traite. Les gouvernements ne devraient organiser le retour de la 82 Loi type contre la traite des personnes victime qu’après avoir pu vérifier que sa sécurité ainsi que tous les droits à la justice que la loi lui reconnaît seraient assurés à son retour. 2. Si la victime ne possède pas les documents voulus, [l’autorité compétente] délivre, à la demande de la victime ou des autorités compétentes de l’État vers lequel la personne a fait l’objet de la traite, les documents de voyage ou toute autre autorisation nécessaires pour permettre à la personne de se rendre et d’être réadmise sur le territoire de [l’État]. Commentaire Disposition facultative 3. En cas de retour d’une victime de la traite des personnes dans [l’État], aucune indication concernant le motif de son retour et/ou le fait qu’elle ait été victime de la traite ne peut être portée sur ses documents d’identité, et aucune donnée personnelle à cet effet ne peut être stockée dans quelque base de données que ce soit si cela risque d’être préjudiciable à son droit de quitter le pays ou d’entrer dans un pays tiers ou d’avoir toute autre conséquence négative. Commentaire Disposition facultative Article 33. Rapatriement des victimes de la traite des personnes vers un État tiers 1. Lorsqu’une victime de la traite qui n’est pas ressortissante de [l’État] demande à rentrer dans son pays d’origine ou dans le pays dans lequel elle avait le droit de résider à titre permanent au moment où elle a fait l’objet de la traite, les [autorités compétentes] facilitent ce retour, notamment l’obtention des documents de voyage nécessaires, sans retard injustifié et en tenant dûment compte de ses droits et de sa sécurité [du respect de sa vie privée, de sa dignité et de sa santé]. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 8, paragraphe 2; notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1); observation générale n° 6 du Comité des droits de l’enfant. Chapitre VIII. Immigration et retour 83 Aux termes du paragraphe 2 de l’article 8 du Protocole, lorsqu’un État partie renvoie une victime de la traite des personnes dans l’État dont cette personne est ressortissante, ce retour est assuré compte dûment tenu de la sécurité de la personne, ainsi que de l’état de toute procédure judiciaire liée au fait qu’elle est une victime de la traite, et il est de préférence volontaire. 2. Lorsque, sur décision de [l’autorité compétente], une victime de la traite des personnes qui n’est pas ressortissante de [l’État] est renvoyée [expulsée] vers l’État dont elle est ressortissante ou dans lequel elle avait le droit de résider à titre permanent au moment où elle a été victime de la traite, [l’autorité compétente] veille à ce que ce retour soit assuré compte dûment tenu de la sécurité de la personne ainsi que de l’état de toute procédure judiciaire liée au fait qu’elle est une victime de la traite. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Les notes interprétatives (par. 73) précisent que le membre de phrase “et il est de préférence volontaire” s’entend comme n’imposant aucune obligation à l’État partie qui renvoie les victimes, indiquant ainsi clairement que les retours peuvent aussi être involontaires. Toutefois, la présente disposition et celles qui précèdent limitent expressément les retours involontaires aux cas où ils sont sans danger et assurés compte dûment tenu de la procédure judiciaire. 3. Toute décision de renvoyer une victime de la traite des personnes dans son pays est examinée à la lumière du principe de non-refoulement et de l’interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants. Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Il convient en outre de tenir compte du principe international de non-refoulement et de l’interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants découlant du droit international relatif aux droits de l’homme. 4. Lorsqu’une victime de la traite avance des allégations sérieuses selon lesquelles sa vie, sa santé ou sa liberté personnelle, où celles de sa famille, pourraient être menacées si elle était renvoyée dans son pays d’origine, [l’autorité compétente] réalise une évaluation portant sur les risques et la sécurité avant de renvoyer la victime. Commentaire Disposition facultative84 Loi type contre la traite des personnes L’évaluation des risques devrait prendre en compte des facteurs tels que le risque de représailles par le réseau de trafiquants contre la victime et sa famille, la capacité et la volonté des autorités du pays d’origine de protéger la victime et sa famille contre d’éventuels actes d’intimidation ou de violence, la situation sociale de la victime à son retour, le risque pour la victime d’être arrêtée, détenue ou poursuivie par les autorités dans son pays d’origine pour des infractions liées à la traite (comme l’usage de documents falsifiés et la prostitution), l’assistance disponible et les perspectives d’emploi durable. Les organisations non gouvernementales et les autres organismes s’occupant des victimes de la traite devraient avoir le droit de communiquer, concernant ces différents points, des informations que les autorités compétentes devraient prendre en compte dans toute décision concernant le renvoi ou l’expulsion des victimes. 5. En cas de retour d’une victime [ou d’un témoin] de la traite des personnes dans son pays d’origine, aucune indication concernant le motif de son retour et/ou le fait qu’elle ait été victime de la traite ne peut être portée sur ses documents d’identité, et aucune donnée personnelle à cet effet ne peut être stockée dans quelque base de données que ce soit si cela risque d’être préjudiciable à son droit de quitter le pays ou d’entrer dans un autre pays ou d’avoir toute autre conséquence négative. 6. Les enfants victimes ou témoins ne sont pas renvoyés dans leur pays d’origine si, à la suite d’une évaluation portant sur les risques et la sécurité, il apparaît que le retour n’est pas dans leur intérêt supérieur. Commentaire Disposition facultative Les enfants qui risquent d’être à nouveau victimes de traite ne devraient pas être renvoyés dans leur pays d’origine, à moins que ce ne soit dans leur intérêt supérieur et que des mesures appropriées soient prises pour assurer leur protection. Les États pourraient envisager des formes complémentaires de protection en faveur des enfants victimes de traite si leur retour n’est pas dans leur intérêt supérieur (voir observation générale n° 6 du Comité des droits de l’enfant). 7. [L’autorité compétente] met à la disposition de la victime, dans la mesure du possible et, le cas échéant, en coopération avec les organisations non gouvernementales, des renseignements sur les instances susceptibles de l’aider dans le pays dans lequel elle est renvoyée ou rapatriée, telles que les services de détection et de répression, les organisations non gouvernementales, les professions juridiques à même de leur donner des conseils et les organismes sociaux.Chapitre VIII. Immigration et retour 85 Article 34. Vérification, sur demande, de la légitimité et de la validité des documents Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, articles 8 et 13. 1. À la demande de l’autorité compétente ou du représentant d’un État tiers, les autorités compétentes et les autorités diplomatiques et consulaires de [l’État] à l’étranger vérifient sans retard injustifié ou déraisonnable: a) Si une victime de la traite des personnes est son ressortissant ou avait le droit de résider à titre permanent dans [l’État] au moment de son entrée sur le territoire de l’État requérant [au moment où elle a fait l’objet de la traite]; Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 8, paragraphe 3. Aux termes du paragraphe 74 des notes interprétatives ... (A/55/383/Add.1), cette disposition implique qu’un retour ne peut intervenir avant que la nationalité ou le droit de résider à titre permanent de la personne dont le retour est demandé ait été dûment vérifié. b) La légitimité et la validité des documents de voyage ou d’identité délivrés ou censés avoir été délivrés au nom de [l’État] et dont on soupçonne qu’ils sont utilisés pour la traite des personnes. Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 13. 2. Si la victime ne possède pas les documents voulus, [l’autorité compétente] délivre les documents de voyage et/ou d’identité légaux nécessaires pour permettre son rapatriement. Commentaire Source: Protocole, article 8, paragraphe 4. Les paragraphes 5 et 6 de l’article 8 du Protocole indiquent expressément que l’article 8 s’entend sans préjudice de tout droit accordé aux victimes de 86 Loi type contre la traite des personnes la traite des personnes par toute loi de l’État partie d’accueil et sans préjudice de tout accord ou arrangement bilatéral ou multilatéral applicable régissant, en totalité ou en partie, le retour des victimes de la traite des personnes. Les notes interprétatives précisent en outre que les accords ou arrangements auxquels il est fait référence dans ce paragraphe englobent à la fois les accords qui traitent spécifiquement de la question et les accords plus généraux qui contiennent des dispositions relatives à l’immigration clandestine et que ce paragraphe doit être compris sans préjudice de toute autre obligation prévue en vertu du droit international coutumier concernant le retour des migrants. 3. [L’autorité compétente] est désignée pour coordonner les réponses aux demandes de renseignements décrites au paragraphe 1 et établir des procédures permettant d’y répondre de manière régulière et dans les délais.87 Chapitre IX. Prévention, formation et coopération Commentaire La manière dont ces articles seront appliqués dépendra en grande partie du système ou du cadre juridique de chaque État. Dans certains cas, ils sont inclus dans la loi, alors que dans d’autres, il pourrait être plus opportun de les appliquer au moyen de lignes directrices et de règlements. Obligation de prendre des mesures préventives Source: Protocole, article 9. Conformément au paragraphe 1 de l’article 9 du Protocole, les États parties établissent des politiques, programmes et autres mesures d’ensemble pour prévenir et combattre la traite des personnes et protéger les victimes contre une nouvelle victimisation. Conformément au paragraphe 2 du même article, ils s’efforcent de prendre des mesures telles que des recherches, des campagnes d’information et des campagnes dans les médias, ainsi que des initiatives sociales et économiques, afin de prévenir et de combattre la traite des personnes. Les paragraphes 4 et 5 de cet article disposent que les États parties prennent ou renforcent des mesures, notamment par le biais d’une coopération bilatérale ou multilatérale, pour remédier aux facteurs qui rendent les personnes vulnérables à la traite et pour décourager la demande qui favorise toutes les formes d’exploitation des personnes aboutissant à la traite, et obligent donc les gouvernements à adopter des mesures pour s’attaquer aux causes profondes de la traite. Conformément au paragraphe 3 de l’article 9, les mesures établies conformément à cet article incluent la coopération avec les organisations non gouvernementales, d’autres organisations compétentes et d’autres éléments de la société civile. Exemples de mesures visant à s’attaquer à la demande: faire mieux connaître toutes les formes d’exploitation et de travail forcé et les facteurs qui sous-tendent la demande, attirer l’attention sur la question et favoriser la recherche sur ce thème; mieux sensibiliser le public aux produits et services résultant de l’exploitation et du travail forcé; réglementer les agences de recrutement privées, les immatriculer et leur délivrer des autorisations d’exercer; sensibiliser les employeurs afin qu’ils ne fassent pas intervenir de victimes de la traite ou du travail forcé dans leur chaîne d’approvisionnement, que ce soit directement ou dans le cadre de la sous-traitance; faire respecter les normes du travail en prévoyant des inspections du travail et d’autres mesures pertinentes; soutenir les associations de travailleurs; mieux protéger les droits des travailleurs migrants; et/ou incriminer le recours aux services de victimes de la traite ou du travail forcé (voir chap. IV). Différents ministères, notamment ceux chargés du travail, ainsi que les associations de travailleurs et d’employeurs peuvent contribuer activement à s’attaquer à la demande.88 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Article 35. Création d’un organisme national de coordination de la lutte contre la traite [d’une équipe spéciale interinstitutions chargée de combattre la traite] Commentaire Disposition facultative Cette disposition est facultative mais conforme à l’objectif du Protocole d’élaborer des politiques globales coordonnées contre la traite des personnes et de promouvoir la coopération entre les différents organismes publics compétents et entre les organismes publics et les organisations non gouvernementales. Un organisme national de coordination pourrait y contribuer. La création d’une structure pluridisciplinaire durable chargée de lutter contre la traite permettra d’apporter une réponse adaptée à la traite et de définir les meilleures pratiques en la matière. 1. [L’autorité compétente] crée un organisme national de coordination de la lutte contre la traite [une équipe spéciale interinstitutions chargée de combattre la traite] comprenant des agents des [organismes publics chargés de la justice, de la santé et de la protection sociale, du travail, des affaires sociales, des services juridiques et de l’immigration], des agents des autres organismes publics concernés et des représentants des prestataires de services des secteurs public et privé locaux. 2. L’organisme national de coordination de la lutte contre la traite [l’équipe spéciale interinstitutions chargée de combattre la traite] remplit les fonctions suivantes: a) Coordonner l’application de la présente loi, notamment par l’élaboration de protocoles et de principes directeurs; b) Établir [dans un délai [d’un an] après la promulgation de la présente loi] un plan d’action national comprenant un ensemble complet de mesures visant à prévenir la traite, à identifier les victimes, y compris les victimes rapatriées d’un État tiers vers [l’État], à leur apporter assistance et protection, à poursuivre les trafiquants et à former les agents des organismes étatiques et non étatiques concernés, et assurer la coordination et le suivi de sa mise en oeuvre; Commentaire Les États devraient élaborer des politiques ou des programmes de prévention pour: a) Empêcher que les victimes ne subissent une nouvelle victimisation; b) Mener des campagnes d’information et de sensibilisation, en coopération avec les médias, les organisations non gouvernementales, les organisations d’employeurs et de travailleurs, les organisations s’occupant des Chapitre IX. Prévention, formation et coopération 89 migrants et d’autres éléments de la société civile, à l’intention en particulier des secteurs et des groupes vulnérables à la traite des personnes; c) Élaborer des programmes éducatifs, à l’intention en particulier des jeunes, pour lutter contre la discrimination fondée sur le sexe et promouvoir l’égalité entre les sexes et le respect de la dignité et de l’intégrité de tout être humain; d) Inscrire la traite des personnes dans le programme relatif aux droits de l’homme des écoles et des universités; e) Réduire les facteurs qui favorisent, entretiennent ou facilitent l’exploitation des personnes et adopter des mesures visant à décourager la demande [de services et de travail bon marché fournis par des personnes non protégées et exploitées] [qui favorise toutes les formes d’exploitation qui conduisent à la traite], en menant des recherches sur les meilleures pratiques, méthodes et stratégies, en faisant respecter les normes du travail, en faisant prendre conscience de la responsabilité et du rôle important des médias et de la société civile et en lançant des campagnes d’information; f) S’attaquer aux causes profondes de la traite, telles que la pauvreté, le sous-développement, le chômage, l’inégalité des chances et la discrimination sous toutes ses formes, et améliorer la situation socioéconomique des groupes à risque; g) Réduire la vulnérabilité des enfants à la traite en créant un environnement protecteur; et h) Lutter efficacement contre les trafiquants et les lieux d’exploitation, ce qui aura un effet dissuasif sur les auteurs d’infractions et contribuera à prévenir la traite. c) Établir un mécanisme national d’orientation, en assurer la coordination et en superviser la mise en oeuvre, pour identifier correctement les victimes de la traite, notamment les enfants victimes, les orienter et leur apporter assistance et protection, et pour veiller à ce qu’elles reçoivent une assistance adéquate tout en protégeant leurs droits fondamentaux; Commentaire Un mécanisme national d’orientation est composé des éléments suivants: a) Principes directeurs et protocoles pour identifier les victimes de la traite des personnes et leur prêter assistance, y compris principes directeurs et mécanismes visant spécifiquement les enfants afin qu’ils reçoivent une assistance adéquate tenant compte de leurs besoins et de leurs droits; b) Système d’orientation des (possibles) victimes de la traite des personnes vers des organismes spécialisés de protection et d’assistance; c) Établissement de mécanismes pour harmoniser l’assistance aux (possibles) victimes de la traite des personnes avec les enquêtes et les poursuites pénales. Paragraphe 2, alinéa e. Les inspecteurs du travail et la police jouent un rôle important dans la mise en oeuvre de la loi. Les inspecteurs du travail contrôlent les lieux de 90 Loi type contre la traite des personnes travail et prennent les mesures adéquates pour assurer que les conditions de travail garanties par la loi sont respectées. La police identifie les victimes ainsi que les responsables présumés de la traite et enquête activement sur les affaires de traite. Les organisations d’employeurs et de travailleurs, ainsi que les organisations non gouvernementales de protection des droits de l’homme, d’assistance aux victimes et de prévention de la traite jouent également un rôle important. d) Établir des procédures pour la collecte de données et la promotion de la recherche sur l’ampleur et la nature à la fois de la traite des personnes à l’échelle nationale et transnationale et du travail forcé et de l’esclavage qui en résultent, sur les facteurs qui favorisent et entretiennent la traite et sur les meilleure pratiques pour prévenir la traite, apporter assistance et protection aux victimes et poursuivre les trafiquants; e) Faciliter la coopération interinstitutions et pluridisciplinaire entre les différents organismes publics et entre les organismes publics et les organisations non gouvernementales, y compris les inspecteurs du travail et les autres acteurs du marché du travail; f) Faciliter la coopération entre les pays d’origine, de transit et de destination; g) Faire fonction d’organe de coordination pour les organismes nationaux et les autres acteurs étatiques et non étatiques, ainsi que les organismes et autres acteurs internationaux s’occupant de la prévention de la traite des personnes, de la poursuite des trafiquants et de l’assistance aux victimes; et h) Veiller à ce que les mesures de lutte contre la traite soient conformes aux normes relatives aux droits de l’homme existantes et ne nuisent pas ou ne portent pas atteinte aux droits fondamentaux des groupes concernés. [; et] Commentaire Les mesures devraient être conformes aux normes internationales relatives aux droits de l’homme (article 14 du Protocole). [i) Contrôler le fonds pour les victimes.] 3. Directeur de l’organisme de coordination [équipe spéciale]. [L’autorité compétente] peut désigner un Coordonnateur gouvernemental [Directeur] de l’organisme de coordination [équipe spéciale]. Le Coordonnateur [Directeur] a pour tâche principale d’aider l’organisme de coordination [équipe spéciale] à remplir ses fonctions, et il s’acquitte des autres tâches que [l’autorité compétente] peut lui confier. Le Coordonnateur [Directeur] consulte les organisations non gouvernementales, intergouvernementales et internationales Chapitre IX. Prévention, formation et coopération 91 ou toute autre organisation compétente, les victimes de la traite des personnes et les autres groupes concernés. 4. Rapport annuel. L’organisme de coordination [équipe spéciale] publie un rapport sur l’état d’avancement de ses activités, le nombre de victimes ayant bénéficié d’une assistance, avec indication de leur âge, sexe et nationalité et des services et/ou prestations qu’elles ont reçus en application de la présente loi, le nombre d’affaires de traite ayant fait l’objet d’enquêtes et de poursuites et le nombre de trafiquants condamnés. 5. Toutes les données recueillies en application du présent chapitre doivent respecter la confidentialité des données personnelles des victimes et leur vie privée. Article 36. Institution d’un bureau du Rapporteur national [mécanisme national de suivi et de communication d’informations] Commentaire Disposition facultative Il est conseillé aux États d’instituer un mécanisme central pour le recueil et l’analyse systématiques d’informations provenant de différentes sources et de différents acteurs, par exemple un bureau du Rapporteur national ou un autre mécanisme comparable. Ce mécanisme serait chargé essentiellement de collecter des données sur la traite au sens le plus large possible et d’évaluer les incidences de l’application d’un plan d’action national. Le Rapporteur national devrait avoir un statut indépendant, un mandat clairement défini et les compétences nécessaires pour accéder aux informations, collecter activement des données auprès de tous les organismes concernés, notamment les services de détection et de répression, et pour solliciter activement des informations des organisations non gouvernementales. Il convient de bien distinguer la fonction de collecte d’informations des autres fonctions décisionnelles, opérationnelles ou de coordination des politiques, qui devraient être confiées à des organismes différents. Le mécanisme considéré devrait en outre relever directement du gouvernement et/ou du Parlement et faire des recommandations sur l’élaboration de politiques et de plans d’action nationaux sans être lui-même un organe directeur. 1. Il est institué par la présente loi un Rapporteur national sur la traite des personnes, auquel sera adjoint un bureau. 2. Le Rapporteur national [Mécanisme national de suivi et de communication d’informations] est un organe indépendant qui relève directement du Parlement et qui lui fait rapport chaque année.92 Loi type contre la traite des personnes 3. Le Rapporteur national [Mécanisme national de suivi et de communication d’informations] est nommé par le Parlement [un autre organe compétent] pour un mandat de cinq ans. 4. Le Rapporteur national [Mécanisme national de suivi et de communication d’informations] a pour principales fonctions de réunir des données sur la traite des personnes, d’évaluer les incidences de l’application du plan d’action national et des autres mesures, politiques et programmes liés à la traite des personnes, de recenser les meilleures pratiques et de formuler des recommandations pour mieux lutter contre ce phénomène. 5. Pour ce faire, le Rapporteur national [Mécanisme national de suivi et de communication d’informations] est habilité à accéder à toutes les sources de données nationales disponibles et à solliciter activement des informations de tous les organismes publics et organisations non gouvernementales concernés. Article 37. Coopération Commentaire Disposition obligatoire Source: Protocole, article 6, article 9, paragraphe 3, et article 10. 1. Les services de détection, de répression, d’immigration, les organismes chargés du travail et les autres services compétents coopèrent entre eux, selon qu’il convient, afin de prévenir et réprimer les infractions de traite et de protéger les victimes de la traite des personnes, sans préjudice du droit des victimes à la vie privée, en échangeant et en partageant des informations et en participant à des programmes de formation, pour, entre autres: a) Identifier les victimes et les trafiquants; b) Identifier les (le type de) documents de voyage utilisés pour franchir la frontière aux fins de la traite des personnes; c) Identifier les moyens et les méthodes utilisés par les groupes criminels organisés aux fins de la traite des personnes; d) Recenser les meilleures pratiques concernant tous les aspects de la prévention de la traite des personnes et de la lutte contre ce phénomène; e) Apporter assistance et protection aux victimes, témoins et témoins victimes.Chapitre IX. Prévention, formation et coopération 93 Commentaire En vertu du paragraphe 1 de l’article 10 du Protocole, les services de détection, de répression, d’immigration et autres services compétents sont tenus de coopérer en échangeant des informations. 2. Pour l’élaboration et l’application des politiques, programmes et mesures visant à prévenir et combattre la traite des personnes et à apporter assistance et protection aux victimes, les organismes publics coopèrent, selon qu’il convient, avec les organisations non gouvernementales, les autres institutions de la société civile et les organisations internationales. Commentaire Divers articles du Protocole font obligation aux États parties de coopérer, selon qu’il convient, avec les organisations non gouvernementales, les autres institutions de la société civile et les organisations internationales. Les États devraient élaborer des programmes de formation tenant compte des problèmes spécifiques des enfants et des femmes et en faire bénéficier les fonctionnaires de tous les organismes étatiques et non étatiques concernés, notamment les fonctionnaires des services de détection, de répression, d’immigration, des organismes chargés du travail et les autres fonctionnaires compétents, les membres de l’appareil judiciaire, les agents des services juridiques, les travailleurs sociaux et les professionnels de la santé, les prestataires de services locaux et les autres professionnels et acteurs de la société civile concernés pour: a) Les sensibiliser au phénomène de la traite des personnes, à la législation pertinente et aux droits et besoins des victimes de la traite; b) Leur permettre d’identifier correctement les victimes de la traite des personnes; c) Leur permettre d’apporter une assistance et une protection efficaces aux victimes et de les informer de leurs droits, compte dûment tenu des besoins spécifiques des enfants victimes et des autres groupes particulièrement vulnérables; d) Encourager la coopération pluridisciplinaire et interinstitutions. Source: Protocole, article 10, paragraphe 2. Le paragraphe 2 de l’article 10 du Protocole oblige les États parties à assurer ou renforcer la formation des agents des services de détection, de répression, d’immigration et d’autres services compétents, y compris les fonctionnaires des organismes chargés du travail, à la prévention de la traite, et à favoriser la coopération avec les organisations non gouvernementales, réaffirmant ainsi la nécessité, pour les organismes publics, de collaborer avec les organisations non gouvernementales.94 Loi type contre la traite des personnes Il est important de mettre en place une formation, une sélection et des procédures appropriées pour protéger les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels et répondre à leurs besoins spécifiques, car la nature de la victimisation affecte diversement différentes catégories d’enfants; c’est le cas par exemple de l’agression sexuelle des enfants, en particulier des filles. (Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels).95 Chapitre X. Pouvoir réglementaire Commentaire La section sur les règlements et le texte faisant autorité varieront selon la culture juridique et le contexte local, si toutefois ils sont inclus dans la loi. Article 38. Règles et règlements Commentaire Disposition facultative 1. Autorité(s) ayant compétence pour promulguer des règles et règlements 1. Le pouvoir de promulguer des règlements en vertu de la présente loi incombe [à l’autorité] [aux autorités], qui agit [agissent] en étroite consultation avec l’organisme national de coordination de la lutte contre la traite de [l’État]. 2. Publication des règles et règlements 2. Au plus tard 180 jours après la date de promulgation de la présente loi, l’autorité compétente publie des règles et règlements d’application afin de: a) Prévenir la traite des personnes; b) Sensibiliser le public au phénomène de la traite des personnes; c) Identifier, protéger, aider et réinsérer les victimes de la traite des personnes, leur donner accès à des conseils, des possibilités de formation et d’emploi et autres services pertinents, protéger leurs droits et leur éviter de subir une nouvelle victimisation ou d’être de nouveau victimes de la traite; d) Collecter des données sur l’ampleur et la nature de la traite des personnes, ses causes profondes et d’autres éléments pertinents;96 Loi type contre la traite des personnes e) Élaborer des programmes de formation à l’intention des agents des services de police, des services d’immigration, des organismes chargés du travail et autres compétents, des membres de l’appareil judiciaire, des travailleurs sociaux et des autres professionnels et acteurs de la société civile concernés; f) Lutter contre les facteurs qui rendent les personnes vulnérables à la traite et à l’exploitation, tels que la pauvreté, le sous-développement, la discrimination et l’inégalité des chances; g) Mettre en place des mesures de contrôle aux frontières; h) Instaurer une coopération entre les organismes publics, les organisations non gouvernementales et les autres éléments de la société civile, les organisations internationales et les autres organisations concernées par la prévention de la traite des personnes, la poursuite des trafiquants et l’apport d’une assistance et d’une protection aux victimes.Centre international de Vienne, Boîte postale 500, 1400 Vienne (Autriche) Tél.: (+43-1) 26060-0, Fax: (+43-1) 26060-5866, www.unodc.org V.09-86358—Mars 2010