childvictimsmodellaw_V0985206_ES
Correct misalignment Change languages order
childvictimsmodellaw.pdf (english)JUSTICE IN MATTERS INVOLVING CHILD VICTIMS AND WITNESSES OF CRIME: MODEL LAW AND RELATED COMMENTARY V0985206.doc (spanish)
Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Model Law and Related CommentaryUNODC wishes to acknowledge the support provided by the Governments of Canada and Sweden toward the development of this Model Law and its commentary.UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME Vienna United Nations New York, 2009 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Model Law and Related Commentaryiii Preface* 1. In its resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005, the Economic and Social Council adopted the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. The Guidelines form part of the body of United Nations standards and norms in crime prevention and criminal justice, which are internationally recognized normative principles in that area as developed by the international community since 1950.** 2. The Guidelines represent good practice based on the consensus reflected in contemporary knowledge and relevant international and regional norms, standards and principles and are meant to provide a practical framework for achieving the following objectives: (a) To assist in the design and review of national laws, procedures and practices with a view to ensuring full respect for the rights of child victims and witnesses of crime and to furthering the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child*** by the parties to that Convention; (b) To assist Governments, international organizations providing legal assistance to requesting States, public agencies, non-governmental and community-based organizations and other interested parties in designing and implementing legislation, policy, programmes and practices that address key issues related to child victims and witnesses of crime; (c) To guide professionals and, where appropriate, volunteers working with child victims and witnesses of crime in their day-to-day practice in the adult and juvenile justice process at the national, regional and international levels, consistent with the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (General Assembly resolution 40/34, annex); (d) To assist and support those caring for children in dealing sensitively with child victims and witnesses of crime. 3. To assist States in adapting their national legislation to the provisions contained in the Guidelines and in other relevant international instruments, the present Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime is intended as a tool for drafting legal provisions concerning assistance to and the protection of child victims and witnesses of crime, particularly within the justice process. The Model Law, developed by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in cooperation with * The introduction is intended as an explanatory note on the genesis, nature and scope of the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime; it is not part of the text of the Model Law. ** For a compilation of existing United Nations standards and norms in crime prevention and criminal justice, see http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/justice-and-prison-reform/compendium.html. *** United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, No. 27531.iv the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the International Bureau for Children’s Rights, was reviewed at a meeting of experts representing different legal traditions. 4. Designed to be adaptable to the needs of each State, the Model Law was drafted paying special attention to the provisions of the Guidelines whose implementation requires legislation and to key issues related to child victims and witnesses of crime, in particular the role of child victims and witnesses within the justice process. 5. In drafting the Model Law, care was taken to reflect the need to accommodate the specificities of national legislation and judicial procedures, the legal, social, economic, cultural and geographical conditions of each country and the various main legal traditions. 6. The scope of application of the Model Law relates mainly to the criminal justice system. However, States are invited to draw inspiration from the principles and provisions contained in the Model Law when designing legislation dealing with other areas in which children need protection, such as custody, divorce, adoption, immigration and refugee law. 7. The Model Law was drafted as well with a view to allowing informal and customary justice systems to use and implement its principles and provisions. 8. The concept of protection of child victims as used in the Model Law includes the protection of children not willing or not able to testify or provide information and child suspects or perpetrators who have been victimized, intimidated or forced to act illegally or who have done so under duress. 9. To further assist States in interpreting and implementing its provisions, the Model Law is accompanied by a commentary that is intended to serve as guidelines for interpretation and implementation.v Contents Page Preface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter I. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses. . . . 7 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 A. General provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 B. During the investigation phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 C. During the trial phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 D. In the post-trial period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 E. Other proceedings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chapter IV. Final provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Part two. Commentary on the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chapter I. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses. . . . 35 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 A. General provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 B. During the investigation phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 C. During the trial phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 D. In the post-trial period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 E. Other proceedings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Chapter IV. Final provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61Part one Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime3 Preamble [Option 1. Civil law countries Considering the obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child,1 which was adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 and entered into force on 2 September 1990, and the Optional Protocols thereto,2 as well as other relevant international legal instruments, Considering in particular Economic and Social Council resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005, which includes as an annex the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (the “Guidelines”), Considering also that every child victim or witness of crime has the right to have his or her best interests given primary consideration, while safeguarding the rights of accused persons and convicted offenders, Bearing in mind the following rights of child victims and witnesses of crime, in particular those contained in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and in the Guidelines: (a) The right to be treated with dignity and compassion; (b) The right to be protected from discrimination; (c) The right to be informed; (d) The right to be heard and to express views and concerns; (e) The right to effective assistance; (f) The right to privacy; (g) The right to be protected from hardship during the justice process; (h) The right to safety; (i) The right to special preventive measures; (j) The right to reparation, Considering that improved responses for child victims and witnesses of crime can make children and their families more willing to disclose instances of victimization and more supportive of the justice process. The Law has been adopted on ... (day) ... (month) ... (year).] [Option 2. Common law countries An Act to provide for assistance to and the protection of child victims and witnesses of crime, particularly within the justice process, in accordance with existing 4 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime international instruments, especially the Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989, and other related international instruments, including the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime adopted by the Economic and Social Council in its resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005 (the “Guidelines”); 1. This Act may be cited as the “Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Act”. 2. It shall extend throughout [name of State]. 3. It shall come into force [on day, month and year] [upon publication in the Official Gazette].]5 Chapter I. Definitions For the purposes of the present [Law] [Act], the following definitions shall apply: (a) “Child victim or witness” means a person under the age of 18 who is a victim of or witness to a crime, regardless of his or her role in the offence or in the prosecution of the alleged offender or groups of offenders. Unless otherwise specified, “child” denotes both child victims and child witnesses; (b) “Professionals” means persons who, in the context of their work, are in contact with child victims and witnesses of crime or are responsible for addressing the needs of children in the justice system and to whom the [Law] [Act] is applicable. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: child and victim advocates and support persons; child protection service practitioners; child welfare agency staff; prosecutors and defence lawyers; diplomatic and consular staff; domestic violence programme staff; magistrates and judges; court staff; law enforcement officials; probation officers; medical and mental health professionals; and social workers; (c) “Justice process” encompasses detection of the crime, the making of the complaint, investigation, prosecution and trial and post-trial procedures, regardless of whether the case is handled in a national, international or regional criminal justice system for adults or juveniles or in customary or informal justice systems; (d) “Child-sensitive” means an approach that gives primary consideration to a child’s right to protection and that takes into account a child’s individual needs and views; (e) “Support person” means a specially trained person designated to assist a child throughout the justice process in order to prevent the risk of duress, revictimization or secondary victimization; (f) “Child’s guardian” means a person who has been formally recognized under national law as responsible for looking after a child’s interests when the parents of the child do not have parental responsibility over him or her or have died; (g) “Guardian ad litem” means a person appointed by the court to protect a child’s interests in proceedings affecting his or her interests; (h) “Secondary victimization” means victimization that occurs not as a direct result of a criminal act but through the response of institutions and individuals to the victim; (i) “Revictimization” means a situation in which a person suffers more than one criminal incident over a specific period of time.7 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses Article 1. Best interests of the child Every child, especially child victims and witnesses, in the context of the [Law] [Act], has the right to have his or her best interests given primary consideration, while safeguarding the rights of an accused or convicted offender. Article 2. General principles 1. A child victim or witness shall be treated without discrimination of any kind, irrespective of the child’s or his or her parents’ or legal guardian’s race, colour, religion, beliefs, age, family status, culture, language, ethnicity, national or social origin, citizenship, gender, sexual orientation, political or other opinions, disabilities if any or status of birth, property or other condition. 2. A child victim or witness of crime shall be treated in a caring and sensitive manner that is respectful of his or her dignity throughout the legal proceedings, taking into account his or her personal situation and immediate and special needs, age, gender, disabilities if any and level of maturity. 3. Interference in the child’s private life shall be limited to the minimum necessary as defined by law in order to ensure high standards of evidence and a fair and equitable outcome of the proceedings. 4. The privacy of a child victim or witness shall be protected. 5. Information that would tend to identify a child as a witness or victim shall not be published without the express permission of the court. 6. A child victim or witness shall have the right to express his or her views, opinions and beliefs freely, in his or her own words, and shall have the right to contribute to decisions affecting his or her life, including those taken in the course of the justice process. Article 3. Duty to report offences involving a child victim or witness 1. Teachers, doctors, social workers and other professional categories, as deemed appropriate, shall have a duty to notify [name of competent authority] if they have reasonable cause to suspect that a child is a victim of or a witness to a crime. 8 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2. The persons referred to in paragraph 1 of this article shall assist the child to the best of their abilities until the child is provided with appropriate professional assistance. 3. The duty to report established in paragraph 1 of this article supersedes any obligation of confidentiality, except in the case of lawyer-client confidentiality. Article 4. Protection of children from contact with offenders 1. Any person who has been convicted in a final verdict of a qualifying criminal offence against a child shall not be eligible to work in a service, institution or association providing services to children. 2. Services, institutions or associations providing services to children shall take appropriate measures to ensure that persons who have been charged with a qualifying criminal offence against a child shall not come into contact with children. 3. For the purposes of paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article, [name of competent body] shall promulgate regulations that contain the following: (a) A definition of a qualifying criminal offence with respect to the severity of the sentence that may be imposed by the court; (b) A list of mandatory qualifying criminal offences; (c) The mandate of the court to issue an order preventing an individual convicted of such criminal offences from working in services, institutions or associations providing services to children; (d) A definition of services, institutions and associations providing services to children; (e) Measures to be taken by services, institutions and associations providing services to children to ensure that persons charged with a qualifying criminal offence do not come into contact with children. 4. Any person who knowingly violates paragraph 1 or 2 of this article shall be guilty of an offence and shall be subject to the punishment specified in the regulations to be established pursuant to paragraph 3 of this article. Article 5. National [authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses [Option for States establishing a national authority: 1. A national authority for the protection of child victims and witnesses (the “Authority”) is hereby established. 2. The Authority shall comprise: (a) One judge of [name of competent court]; (b) One representative of the prosecutor’s office, specialized in cases involving children;Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 9 (c) One representative of law enforcement agencies; (d) One representative of the child protection services or of any other relevant service within the ministry responsible for social affairs; (e) One representative of the ministry responsible for health; (f) One representative of the bar association, if possible, specialized in cases involving children; (g) One representative of each recognized victim support organization providing services to children; (h) One representative of the ministry responsible for education; [Optional: (i) Any other representative in accordance with local requirements]. 3. The members of the Authority shall be appointed by [name of competent minister] within [...] months of the entry into force of this [Law] [Act].] [Option for States preferring not to establish a national authority but to rely on an existing body or ministry: 1. An office for the protection of child victims and witnesses (the “Office”) shall be established within [name of competent body or ministry]. 2. The Office shall comprise: (a) One judge of [name of competent court]; (b) One representative of the prosecutor’s office, specialized in cases involving children; (c) One representative of law enforcement agencies; (d) One representative of the child protection services or of any other relevant service within the ministry responsible for social affairs; (e) One representative of the ministry responsible for health; (f) One representative of the bar association, if possible, specialized in cases involving children; (g) One representative of each recognized victim support organization providing services to children; (h) One representative of the ministry responsible for education; [Optional: (i) Any other representative in accordance with local requirements]. 3. The Office shall perform the functions set forth in article 6 of the present [Law] [Act].]10 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 6. Functions of the [national authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses The [Authority] [Office] shall perform the following functions: (a) It shall adopt general national policies related to child victims and witnesses; (b) On the basis of national policies, it shall develop recommendations on relevant prevention and protection programmes and submit them to the relevant public authorities; (c) It shall promote and ensure national-level coordination of services and institutions that provide assistance or treatment to child victims and witnesses by: (i) Monitoring the implementation of existing procedures related to the reporting of criminal acts and to providing assistance to child victims and witnesses, including legal representation and placement, and establishing such procedures where they do not exist; (ii) Making recommendations to the competent ministry or ministries on the issuance of regulations and protocols; (d) It shall establish guidelines for the establishment of mechanisms such as hotlines for child protection, to be regulated by [name of competent body]; (e) It shall establish guidelines for the training of professionals working with child victims and witnesses; (f) It shall initiate research on matters relating to child victims and witnesses; (g) It shall disseminate information concerning assistance to child victims and witnesses among persons and institutions responsible for children, including schools, public organizations, institutions and centres accessible to children; (h) It shall publish annual reports on the performance of the bodies subject to the provisions of this [Law] [Act] and on its own activities. Article 7. Confidentiality 1. In addition to any existing legal protection of the privacy of child victims and witnesses in accordance with article 3, paragraph 3, of this [Law] [Act], all persons working with a child victim or witness as well as all members of the [Authority] [Office] established under article 5 of the present [Law] [Act] shall maintain the confidentiality of all information on child victims and witnesses that they may have acquired in the performance of their duty. 2. Any person violating paragraph 1 of this article shall be guilty of an offence and shall be subject to a term of imprisonment of [...] or a fine of [...] or both.Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 11 Article 8. Training 1. Professionals working with child victims and witnesses shall undergo appropriate training on issues related to child victims and witnesses. 2. Where appropriate, the [Authority] [Office] established under article 5 of the present [Law] [Act] shall develop and publish training curricula for professionals working with child victims and witnesses of crime. The training should cover the following: (a) Relevant human rights norms, standards and principles, including the rights of the child; (b) Principles and ethical duties related to the performance of their functions; (c) Signs and symptoms that are indicative of crimes against children; (d) Crisis assessment skills and techniques, especially for making referrals, with an emphasis placed on the need for confidentiality; (e) The dynamics and nature of violence against children and the impact and consequences, including negative physical and psychological effects, of crimes against children; (f) Special measures and techniques to assist child victims and witnesses in the justice process; (g) Information on children’s developmental stages as well as cross-cultural and age-related linguistic, ethnic, religious, social and gender issues, with particular attention to children from disadvantaged groups; (h) Appropriate adult-child communication skills, including a child-sensitive approach; (i) Interview and assessment techniques that minimize distress or trauma to children while maximizing the quality of information received from them, including skills to deal with child victims and witnesses in a sensitive, understanding, constructive and reassuring manner; (j) Methods to protect and present evidence and to question child witnesses; (k) Roles of, and methods used by, professionals working with child victims and witnesses.13 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process A. General provisions Article 9. Right to be informed A child victim or witness, his or her parents or guardian, his or her lawyer, the support person, if designated, or other appropriate person designated to provide assistance shall, from their first contact with the justice process and throughout that process, be promptly informed by [name of competent authority] about the stage of the process and, to the extent feasible and appropriate, about the following: (a) Procedures of the adult and juvenile criminal justice process, including the role of child victims or witnesses, the importance, timing and manner of testimony, and the ways in which interviews will be conducted during the investigation and trial; (b) Existing support mechanisms for a child victim or witness when making a complaint and participating in investigations and court proceedings, including making available a victim’s lawyer or other appropriate person designated to provide assistance; (c) Specific places and times of hearings and other relevant events; (d) Availability of protective measures; (e) Existing mechanisms for the review of decisions affecting the child victim or witness; (f) Relevant rights of child victims and witnesses pursuant to applicable national legislation, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and other international legal instruments, including the Guidelines and the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power, adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 40/34 of 29 November 1985; (g) Existing opportunities to obtain reparation from the offender or from the State through the justice process, through alternative civil proceedings or through other processes; (h) Availability and functioning of restorative justice schemes; (i) Availability of health, psychological, social and other relevant services and the means of accessing such services, as well as the availability of legal or other advice or representation and emergency financial support, where applicable; (j) The progress and disposition of the specific case, including the apprehension, arrest and custodial status of the accused and any pending changes to that status, the prosecutorial decision and relevant post-trial developments and the outcome of the case.14 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 10. Legal assistance A child victim or witness shall be assigned a lawyer by the State free of charge throughout the justice process in the following instances: (a) At his or her request; (b) At the request of his or her parents or guardian; (c) At the request of the support person, if one has been designated; (d) Pursuant to an order of the court on its own motion, if the court considers the assignment of a lawyer to be in the best interests of the child. Article 11. Protective measures At any stage in the justice process where the safety of a child victim or witness is deemed to be at risk, [name of competent authority] shall arrange to have protective measures put in place for the child. Those measures may include the following: (a) Avoiding direct contact between a child victim or witness and the accused at any point in the justice process; (b) Requesting restraining orders from a competent court, supported by a registry system; (c) Requesting a pretrial detention order for the accused from a competent court, with “no contact” bail conditions; (d) Requesting an order from a competent court to place the accused under house arrest; (e) Requesting protection for a child victim or witness by the police or other relevant agencies and safeguarding the whereabouts of the child from disclosure; (f) Making or requesting from competent authorities other protective measures that may be deemed appropriate. Article 12. Language, interpreter and other special assistance measures 1. The court shall ensure that proceedings relevant to the testimony of a child victim or witness are conducted in language that is simple and comprehensible to a child. 2. If a child needs the assistance of interpretation into a language that the child understands, an interpreter shall be provided free of charge. 3. If, in view of the child’s age, level of maturity or special individual needs, which may include but are not limited to disabilities if any, ethnicity, poverty or risk of revictimization, the child requires special assistance measures in order to testify or participate in the justice process, such measures shall be provided free of charge.Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 15 B. During the investigation phase The provisions contained in the present section (“B. During the investigation phase”) of this [Law] [Act] shall apply to all national competent authorities involved in the investigation of cases involving a child victim or witness. Article 13. Specially trained investigator 1. An investigator specially trained in dealing with children shall be appointed by [name of competent authority] to guide the interview of the child, using a child-sensitive approach. 2. The investigator shall, to the extent possible, avoid repetition of the interview during the justice process in order to prevent secondary victimization of the child. Article 14. Medical examinations and the taking of bodily samples 1. A child victim or witness shall be subjected to medical examination or to the taking of a bodily sample only if the following two conditions are met: (a) His or her parents or guardian or the support person is present, unless the child decides otherwise; (b) Written authorization for a medical examination or the taking of a bodily sample has been provided by the court, a senior police officer or the prosecutor. 2. The court, a senior police officer or the prosecutor shall provide written authorization for a medical examination or the taking of a bodily sample only if there are reasonable grounds for believing that such an examination or taking of a bodily sample is necessary. 3. If at any time during the investigation phase, there is any doubt as to the health of a child victim or witness, including the child’s mental health, the competent authority conducting the proceedings shall ensure that a comprehensive medical examination is carried out on the child by a physician as soon as possible. 4. Following such a medical examination, the competent authority conducting the proceedings shall use its best endeavours to ensure that the child receives such treatment as recommended by the physician, including, where necessary, admission to hospital. Article 15. Support person As from the beginning of the investigation phase and during the entire justice process, child victims and witnesses shall be supported by a person with training and 16 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime professional skills to communicate with and assist children of different ages and backgrounds in order to prevent the risk of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization. Article 16. Designation of a support person 1. The investigator shall inform [name of competent authority] of his or her intention to invite a child victim or witness for an interview and shall ask for the designation of a support person. 2. The support person shall be designated by [name of competent body]. Prior to the designation, [name of competent authority] shall consult with the child and his or her parents or guardian, including with respect to the gender of the support person to be designated. 3. The support person shall be given sufficient time to make acquaintance with the child before the first interview takes place. 4. When inviting the child to an interview, the investigator shall inform the child’s support person of the time and place of the interview to take place. 5. Any interview of a child victim or witness conducted as part of the justice process shall take place in the presence of the support person. 6. The continuity of the relationship between the child and the support person shall be ensured to the greatest extent possible throughout the justice process. 7. [Name of competent body], which designated the support person, shall monitor the work of the support person and assist him or her, if necessary. If the support person fails to perform his or her duties and functions in accordance with this [Law] [Act], [name of competent body] shall designate a replacement support person after consultation with the child. Article 17. Functions of the support person The support person shall, inter alia: (a) Provide general emotional support to the child; (b) Provide assistance, in a child-sensitive manner, to the child during the entire justice process. Such assistance may include measures to alleviate the negative effects of the criminal offence on the child, measures to assist the child in carrying out his or her daily life and measures to assist the child in dealing with administrative matters arising from the circumstances of the case; (c) Advise whether therapy or counselling is necessary;Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 17 (d) Liaise and communicate with the child’s parents or guardian, family, friends and lawyer, as appropriate; (e) Inform the child about the composition of the investigation team or court and all other issues as stated in article 9 of this [Law] [Act]; (f) In coordination with the lawyer representing the child or in the absence of a lawyer representing the child, discuss with the court, the child and his or her parents or guardian the different options for giving evidence, such as, where available, video recording and other means to safeguard the best interests of the child; (g) In coordination with the lawyer representing the child or in the absence of a lawyer representing the child, discuss with the law enforcement agencies, the prosecutor and the court the advisability of ordering protective measures; (h) Request that protective measures be ordered, if necessary; (i) Request special assistance measures if the child’s circumstances warrant them. Article 18. Information to be provided to the support person In addition to the information to be provided pursuant to article 9 of this [Law] [Act], at all stages of the justice process the support person shall be kept informed of: (a) The charges against the accused; (b) The relationship between the accused and the child; (c) The custodial status of the accused. Article 19. Functions of the support person in case of the release of the accused The support person, having been informed by the competent authority of the release of the accused from custody or pretrial detention, shall inform the child and his or her parents or guardian and lawyer accordingly and shall assist him or her in requesting appropriate protection measures, if necessary. C. During the trial phase Article 20. Reliability of child evidence 1. A child is deemed to be a capable witness unless proved otherwise through a competency examination administered by the court in accordance with article 21 of this [Law] [Act], and his or her testimony shall not be presumed invalid or untrustworthy by reason of his or her age alone provided that his or her age and maturity allow the giving of intelligible and credible testimony. 18 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2. For the purposes of this section (“C. During the trial phase”), a child’s testimony includes testimony given with technical communication aids or through the assistance of an expert specialized in understanding and communicating with children. 3. The weight given to the testimony of a child shall be in accordance with his or her age and maturity. 4. A child, irrespective of whether he or she will provide testimony, shall have the opportunity to express his or her personal views and concerns on matters related to the case, his or her involvement in the justice process in particular his or her safety with respect to the accused, his or her preference to testify or not and the manner in which the testimony is to be given, as well as any other relevant matter affecting him or her. In cases where his or her views have not been accommodated, the child should receive a clear explanation of the reasons for not taking them into account. 5. A child shall not be required to testify in the justice process against his or her will or without the knowledge of his or her parents or guardian. His or her parents or guardian shall be invited to accompany the child except in the following circumstances: (a) The parents or the guardian are the alleged perpetrator of the offence committed against the child; (b) The child expresses a concern about being accompanied by his or her parents or guardian; (c) The court deems it not to be in the best interest of the child to be accompanied by his or her parents or guardian. Article 21. Competency examination 1. A competency examination of a child may be conducted only if the court determines that there are compelling reasons to do so. The reasons for such a decision shall be recorded by the court. In deciding whether or not to carry out a competency examination, the best interest of the child shall be a primary consideration. 2. The competency examination is aimed at determining whether or not the child is able to understand questions that are put to him or her in a language that a child understands as well as the importance of telling the truth. The child’s age alone is not a compelling reason for requesting a competency examination. 3. The court may appoint an expert for the purpose of examining the child’s competency. Aside from the expert, the only other persons who may be present at a competency examination are: (a) The magistrate or judge; (b) The public prosecutor; (c) The defence lawyer;Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 19 (d) The child’s lawyer; (e) The support person; (f) A court reporter or clerk; (g) Any other person, including the child’s parents or guardian or a guardian ad litem, whose presence, in the opinion of the court, is necessary for the welfare of the child. 4. If the court does not appoint an expert, the competency examination of a child shall be conducted by the court on the basis of questions submitted by the public prosecutor and the defence lawyer. 5. The questions shall be asked in a child-sensitive manner appropriate to the age and developmental level of the child and shall not be related to the issues involved in the trial. They shall focus on determining the child’s ability to understand simple questions and answer them truthfully. 6. Psychological or psychiatric examinations to assess the competency of a child shall not be ordered unless compelling reasons to do so are demonstrated. 7. A competency examination shall not be repeated. Article 22. Oath 1. At the discretion of the presiding magistrate or judge, a child witness shall not be required to swear an oath, for instance, if the child is unable to understand the consequences of taking an oath. In such cases, the presiding magistrate or judge may offer the child the opportunity to promise to tell the truth. In either event, the court shall nevertheless hear the child’s testimony. 2. A child witness shall not be prosecuted for giving false testimony. Article 23. Designation of a support person during the trial 1. Before inviting a child victim or witness to court, the competent magistrate or judge shall verify that the child is already receiving the assistance of a support person. 2. If a support person has not already been designated, the competent magistrate or judge shall appoint one in consultation with the child and his or her parents or guardian, and shall provide the support person with adequate time to familiarize him or herself with the case and liaise with the child. 3. The competent magistrate or judge shall inform the support person of the date and venue of the trial or court session.20 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 24. Waiting areas 1. The competent magistrate or judge shall ensure that child victims and witnesses can wait in appropriate waiting areas equipped in a child-friendly manner. 2. Waiting areas used by child victims and witnesses shall not be visible to or accessible to persons accused of having committed a criminal offence. 3. Where possible, the waiting areas used by child victims and witnesses should be separate from the waiting area provided for adult witnesses. 4. The competent magistrate or judge may, if appropriate, order a child victim or witness to wait in a location away from the courtroom and invite the child to appear when required. 5. The magistrate or judge shall give priority to hearing the testimony of a child victims and witnesses in order to minimize their waiting time during the court appearance. Article 25 Emotional support for child victims and witnesses 1. In addition to the child’s parents or guardian and his or her lawyer or other appropriate person designated to provide assistance, the competent magistrate or judge shall allow the support person to accompany a child victim or witness throughout his or her participation in the court proceedings in order to reduce anxiety or stress. 2. The competent magistrate or judge shall inform the support person that he or she, as well as the child himself or herself, may ask the court for a recess whenever the child needs one. 3. The court may order a child’s parents or guardian to be removed from a hearing only when it is in the best interests of the child. Article 26. Courtroom facilities 1. The competent magistrate or judge shall ensure that appropriate arrangements for child victims or witnesses are made in the courtroom, such as, but not limited to, providing elevated seats and assistance for children with disabilities. 2. The courtroom layout shall ensure that, in so far as possible, the child shall be able to sit close to his or her parents or guardian, support person or lawyer during all proceedings. [Article 27. Cross-examination (option for common law countries) Where applicable, and with due regard for the rights of the accused, the competent magistrate or judge shall not allow cross-examination of a child victim or witness by Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 21 the accused. Such cross-examination may be undertaken by the defence lawyer under the supervision of the competent magistrate or judge, who will have the duty to prevent the asking of any question that may expose the child to intimidation, hardship or undue distress.] Article 28. Measures to protect the privacy and well-being of child victims and witnesses At the request of a child victim or witness, his or her parents or guardian, his or her lawyer, the support person, other appropriate person designated to provide assistance or on its own motion, the court, taking into account the best interests of the child, may order one or more of the following measures to protect the privacy and physical and mental well-being of the child and to prevent undue distress and secondary victimization: (a) Expunging from the public record any names, addresses, workplaces, professions or any other information that could be used to identify the child; (b) Forbidding the defence lawyer from revealing the identity of the child or disclosing any material or information that would tend to identify the child; (c) Ordering the non-disclosure of any records that identify the child, until such time as the court may find appropriate; (d) Assigning a pseudonym or a number to a child, in which case the full name and date of birth of the child shall be revealed to the accused within a reasonable period for the preparation of his or her defence; (e) Efforts to conceal the features or physical description of the child giving testimony or to prevent distress or harm to the child, including testifying: (i) Behind an opaque shield; (ii) Using image-or voice-altering devices; (iii) Through examination in another place, transmitted simultaneously to the courtroom by means of closed-circuit television; (iv) By way of videotaped examination of the child witness prior to the hearing, in which case the counsel for the accused shall attend the examination and be given the opportunity to examine the child witness or victim; (v) Through a qualified and suitable intermediary, such as, but not limited to, an interpreter for children with hearing, sight, speech or other disabilities; (f) Holding closed sessions; (g) Giving orders to temporarily remove the accused from the courtroom if the child refuses to give testimony in the presence of the accused or if circumstances show that the child may be inhibited from speaking the truth in that person’s presence. In such cases, the defence lawyer shall remain in the courtroom and question the child, and the accused’s right of confrontation shall thus be guaranteed; 22 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (h) Allowing recesses during the child’s testimony; (i) Scheduling hearings at times of day appropriate to the age and maturity of the child; (j) Taking any other measure that the court may deem necessary, including, where applicable, anonymity, taking into account the best interests of the child and the rights of the accused. D. In the post-trial period Article 29. Right to restitution and compensation [Option if a State victims fund exists: 1. The court shall inform a child victim, his or her parents or guardian and his or her lawyer about the procedures for claiming compensation. 2. A child victim who is not a national shall have to right to claim compensation.] [Option 1. Common law countries 3. Upon conviction of the accused and in addition to any other measure imposed on him or her, the court may, at the request of the prosecutor, the victim, his or her parents or guardian or the victim’s lawyer, or on its own motion, order that the offender make restitution or compensation to a child as follows: (a) In cases of damage to or loss or destruction of property of a child victim as a result of the commission of the offence or the arrest or attempted arrest of the offender, the court may order the offender to pay to the child or to his or her legal representative the replacement value in the event that the property cannot be returned in full; (b) In cases of bodily or psychological harm to a child as a result of the commission of the offence or the arrest or attempted arrest of the offender, the court may order the offender to financially compensate the child for all damages incurred as a result of the harm, including expenses related to social and education reintegration, medical treatment, mental health care and legal services; (c) In cases of bodily harm or threat of bodily harm to a child who was a member of the offender’s household at the relevant time, the court may order the offender to pay the child compensation for the expenses incurred as a result of moving from the offender’s household.] [Option 2. Countries where criminal courts have no jurisdiction in civil claims 3. After delivering the verdict, the court shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the child’s lawyer of the right to restitution and compensation in accordance with national law.]Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 23 [Option 3. Countries where criminal courts have jurisdiction in civil claims 3. The court shall order full restitution or compensation to the child, where appropriate, and inform the child of the possibility of seeking assistance for enforcement of the restitution or compensation order.] Article 30. Restorative justice measures If restorative justice measures are considered, [name of competent body] shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the child’s lawyer of available restorative justice programmes and how to access such programmes, as well as the possibility of seeking restitution and compensation in court if the restorative justice programme fails to achieve an agreement between the child victim and the offender. Article 31. Information on the outcome of the trial 1. The competent magistrate or judge shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the support person of the outcome of the trial. 2. The competent magistrate or judge shall invite the support person to provide emotional support to the child to help him or her to come to terms with the outcome of the trial, if necessary. [Option for common law countries: 3. The court shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the child’s lawyer of existing procedures for the granting of parole to the offender and of the child’s right to express his or her views in that regard.] Article 32. Role of the support person after the conclusion of the proceedings 1. Immediately after the conclusion of the proceedings, the support person shall liaise with appropriate agencies or professionals to ensure that further counselling or treatment for the child victim or witness is provided if necessary. 2. In the event that a child victim or witness needs to be repatriated, the support person shall liaise with the competent authorities, including consulates, in order to ensure correct implementation of the relevant national and international provisions governing the repatriation of children and to assist the child in the preparations for repatriation. 24 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 33. Information on the release of convicted persons 1. In the event that a convicted person is to be released from detention, [name of competent authority], through the support person, if applicable, or through the child’s lawyer, shall inform the child and his or her parents or guardians of that release. The information shall be provided by [name of competent authority] as early as possible after such a decision has been taken, at the latest one day prior to the release. 2. The court shall inform a child victim or witness of the release of a convicted person at least up to a period of [...] years after the child has reached the age of 18. E. Other proceedings Article 34. Extended application to other proceedings The provisions of this [Law] [Act] shall apply, mutatis mutandis, to all matters pertaining to a child victim or witness, including civil matters.25 [Chapter IV. Final provisions] [Article 35. Final provisions (option for civil law countries) The present [Law] [Act] shall enter into force in accordance with existing national procedures under the national legislation of [name of country].]Part two Commentary on the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime29 Introduction In its resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005, the Economic and Social Council adopted the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (the “Guidelines”), contained in the annex to that resolution. The Guidelines form part of the body of the United Nations standards and norms in crime prevention and criminal justice, which are internationally recognized normative principles in that area as developed by the international community since 1950. In order to assist countries, international organizations providing legal assistance to requesting States, public agencies and non-governmental and community-based organizations, as well as practitioners, in implementing the Guidelines, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, in cooperation with UNICEF, has developed a series of technical tools, including the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. The purpose of the Model Law is to assist Governments in drafting relevant national legislation in conformity with the principles contained in the Guidelines and other relevant international legal instruments such as the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The present commentary on the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime has been designed to provide a better understanding of the provisions of the Model Law. Furthermore, the commentary contains references to laws, jurisprudence and international norms as well as explanations and examples related to the various articles of the Model Law. First, it is important to stress that the Model Law establishes the principle that there are several categories of professionals that can and should provide assistance to child victims and witnesses of crime throughout the justice process. It has often been argued that it is a primary right, as well as a duty, of the parents to provide such assistance and that the intervention of the State in this regard could infringe that right and duty. However, it was also recognized that multi-disciplinary expertise of professionals can support parents, who are often unfamiliar with the justice process, on how to best assist their children. With respect to its scope, the Model Law is intended to cover all persons under the age of 18 giving testimony in the justice process, who are victims or witnesses of crime. However, the Model Law is also intended to protect and assist children who may be both victim and perpetrator, as well as those child victims who do not wish to testify. In accordance with the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which provides the same basic rights for all children, this Model Law does not differentiate between victims who are also witnesses and victims who are not witnesses, or between victims and witnesses in conflict with the law and those who are not. 30 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Unless indicated otherwise, the provisions of the Model Law are intended to cover both child victims and witnesses. In view of the fact that there are different legal systems, with different drafting traditions, the Model Law contains some optional articles and provisions in order to accommodate such differences. The Model Law is intended to be applicable either as a whole or in part, based on the needs and the unique circumstances of each country.31 Preamble In its preamble, the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime provides two options: one for civil law countries and one for common law countries. The fourth paragraph of the option for civil law countries contains a list of rights of child victims and witnesses of crime. The rights listed in the paragraph derive from different legal sources, namely the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 and entered into force on 2 September 1990, and the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (Economic and Social Council resolution 2005/20, annex), which have different legal implications. Whereas the rights mentioned in the Convention are of a binding nature for those countries which have ratified the Convention, the rights specified in the Guidelines do not have the same legal force. Nevertheless, the rights contained in the two instruments are interrelated, and it is their combination and interconnectedness that provide the framework for a full and comprehensive system of protection for child victims and witnesses of crime. 33 Chapter I. Definitions 1. The definitions of “child victim or witness”, “professionals”, “justice process” and “child-sensitive” contained in the Model Law are drawn from paragraph 9 of the Guidelines. Support person 2. The concept of “support person” has been incorporated into the legislation of several countries under different names and at different stages of the justice process. The common denominator of this institution is the provision of support and assistance to child victims and witnesses, from the earliest possible stage of the justice process, by a person specialized and trained in assisting children in a way that a child understands and accepts. The main purpose of the presence of a support person is to protect the child victim or witness from the risks of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization. Child’s guardian 3. To provide a definition of a “child’s guardian”, the Model Law has opted to refer to the relevant legal provisions of each Member State. Secondary victimization 4. The definition of “secondary victimization” contained in the Model Law has been drawn from the Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power3 developed by the Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention in 1999. Revictimization 5. The definition of “revictimization” contained in the Model Law draws on the definition contained in Council of Europe recommendation Rec (2006) 8 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on assistance to crime victims of 14 June 2006.435 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses Article 1. Best interests of the child 1. Subparagraph 8 (c) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime states that while the rights of accused and convicted offenders should be safeguarded, every child has the right to have his or her best interests given primary consideration. Article 3, paragraph 1, of the Convention on the Rights of the Child provides that, in all actions concerning children, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration. 2. The concept of the “best interests of the child” is also present in several regional treaties, in particular the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child,5 the American Convention on Human Rights,6 the Inter-American Convention on International Traffic in Minors,7 the European Convention on the Exercise of Children’s Rights8 and other legal instruments.9 3. The concept of the “best interests of the child” is considered self-explanatory in the legislation of several States, for example Australia,10 while other States, such as South Africa,11 have opted for providing a definition in their domestic law. An interesting approach is that contained in the legislation of Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), according to which the “best interests of the child” are considered a principle of interpretation and application of the law.12 4. It was therefore decided not to include a definition of the principle in the Model Law but to leave it to national legislators to decide on the best approach. 5. However, it should be stressed that in the context of criminal justice proceedings, the principle of the “best interests of a child”, while it should be a primary consideration, cannot jeopardize or undermine the rights of an accused or convicted person. A balance has to be struck between the protection of the child victim or witness of crime and the safeguarding of the rights of the accused. Therefore, the language of article 1 reflects that balance and mirrors the language of subparagraph 8 (c) of the Guidelines. Article 2. General principles Article 2 provides general guiding principles that apply to the implementation of the law.36 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 3. Duty to report offences involving a child victim or witness 1. Several countries make it a general legal obligation to report offences against children to the competent authorities immediately upon their discovery.13 In those countries, failure to report such a crime may constitute a criminal offence (by omission). 2. According to the national legislation of some countries, that duty is even more stringent for certain categories of professionals working in contact with children, including civil servants in the ministry responsible for education,14 social workers,15 doctors16 and nurses.17 3. The approach chosen in the Model Law is to explicitly establish a duty to report such offences, with legal consequences for not complying with that duty, for specific professional categories that are in close contact with children, such as teachers, doctors and social workers. The Model Law also leaves to national legislators the option of extending the duty to report to other professional categories as is deemed appropriate and in accordance with other national laws. Article 4. Protection of children from contact with offenders 1. Several States have created special lists of persons convicted of specific offences such as sexual crimes.18 The lists can be used by the police to track criminals, but they are also sometimes made available to potential employers, which make use of them to gather information on the applicant’s criminal record. 2. The Terre des Hommes International Federation, an international non-governmental organization, has issued a guidebook, for internal use, to prevent the recruitment of persons having been in conflict with the law in connection with offences against children. The guidebook provides important information and input in this regard.19 3. Under the Model Law, any person convicted of a qualifying offence against a child shall not be eligible to work in a service, institution or association providing services to children. That provision protects children from the risk of becoming victims of recidivist offenders. Failure by an employer to comply with article 4, paragraph 2, of the Model Law is considered an offence. Article 5. National [authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses 1. Establishing a centralized government body or authority to coordinate the various activities related to victims’ assistance is often an appropriate first step towards achieving effective coordination among the main actors involved in providing assistance to victims.20 The Model Law includes this provision reflecting best practices.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 37 2. Several States have established specific authorities in charge of coordinating activities to promote and protect children’s rights.21 However, in some countries, usually due to a lack of resources, the protection of and assistance to children is carried out mainly by non-governmental organizations, whose operations are supervised by government authorities.22 3. In some countries, the task of coordinating child protection is undertaken at the local or regional level. In the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, for example, the Area Child Protection Committees bring together representatives of the main agencies and professionals involved in child protection to coordinate different activities to be undertaken in the local area to safeguard children. The Committees, inter alia, develop local policies for inter-agency work within the national framework, assist in improving the quality of child protection through training and raise awareness within the community on the necessity of safeguarding children’s rights.23 Similar initiatives can be found in countries such as Bolivia, India and Tunisia.24 4. In Belgium, a coordination commission for child victims of maltreatment has been established in every French-speaking judiciary district. The purpose of the commissions is to inform local entities and coordinate their efforts to assist child victims of maltreatment in order to improve the effectiveness of such entities. The membership of the commissions comprises representatives of political parties, magistrates, law enforcement officials and social workers.25 5. Legislation for the establishment of specific coordination mechanisms to assist victims of specific types of crime can be found in countries such as Bulgaria (for victims of trafficking in human beings), Estonia (for victims of negligence, mistreatment and physical, mental or sexual abuse), Indonesia (for victims of child trafficking) and the Philippines (for victims of child prostitution or other sexual abuse and child trafficking).26 6. The coordinating authority should include representatives of all relevant authorities. Thus, subparagraph 2 (i) of article 5 has been included as an option to facilitate the appointment of any other representative in accordance with local requirements and legislation. 7. In order to ensure the implementation of the provision, which may be delayed owing to budgetary considerations, it is also suggested that Governments set a limited period of time for the appointment of members. Article 6. Functions of the [national authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses Article 6 sets out the functions that the national authority or office for the protection of child victims and witnesses should perform. 38 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 7. Confidentiality 1. The intention of article 7 is to protect the privacy and safety of child victims and witnesses by providing that members of the authority established under article 5 shall maintain confidentiality of information related to child victims and witnesses. 2. A good example of domestic legislation guaranteeing confidentiality of information related to child victims and witnesses is that of the United States of America relating to the rights of child victims and witnesses,27 which provides the following: “(D) Privacy Protection. “(1) Confidentiality of Information “(A) A person acting in a capacity described in subparagraph (B) in connection with a criminal proceeding shall: “(i) keep all documents that disclose the name or any other information concerning a child in a secure place to which no person who does not have reason to know their contents has access; and “(ii) disclose documents described in clause (i) or the information in them that concerns a child only to person who, by reason of their participation in the proceeding, have reason to know such information. “(B) Subparagraph (A) applies to: “(i) all employees of the Government connected with the case, including employees of the Department of Justice, any law enforcement agency involved in the case, and any person hired by the Government to provide assistance in the proceeding; “(ii) employees of the Court; “(iii) the defendant and employees of the defendant, including the attorney for the defendant and persons hired by the defendant or the attorney for the defendant to provide assistance in the proceeding; and “(iv) members of the jury.” 3. In several States, usually on the basis of provisions contained in existing laws on the media or in the youth codes or laws on child protection, the prohibition of the dissemination of child-related information to the public is strengthened by provisions that ensure the prohibition of the publication or broadcasting of such information, including pictures of children, by the media, to the extent that, even when such information leaks out despite the restrictions, the media are prohibited from making use of it.28 Broadcasting such protected information may constitute a criminal offence.29 4. As most national laws already contain such prohibitions, the Model Law does not include a specific provision on the media’s publication of such information.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 39 Article 8. Training 1. In line with paragraph 40 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, the Model Law provides that those professionals who in their work come in contact with child victims or witnesses of crime, in particular those responsible for providing assistance to such children, shall receive appropriate training. 2. In Bolivia (Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 12) and Bulgaria (Child Protection Act (2004), art. 3, para. 6), for example, training of law enforcement officials who come in contact with child victims and witnesses of crimes is a requirement. 3. Ideally, the training for those dealing with child victims and witnesses of crime should contain a common, multidisciplinary component intended for all professionals, combined with more specific modules addressing the specific needs of each profession. For example, while training for judges and prosecutors may essentially focus on legislation and specific procedures, law enforcement officials may require training on broader issues, including psychological and behavioural issues. The training of social workers, meanwhile, may focus more on assistance, while training for medical personnel should focus on forensic examination techniques to assemble a solid evidentiary basis. 4. In many countries, law enforcement officials, because they are responsible for receiving reports of criminal offences and for investigating those offences, are the first professionals with whom victims and witnesses of crime come in contact. Therefore, law enforcement officials should receive specific and appropriate training on assisting child victims and witnesses and their families. It is important to stress that adequate training of law enforcement officials can contribute to conducting a proper investigation while minimizing potential harm. 5. Such training should, inter alia: (a) enable law enforcement officials to understand and apply the main provisions of legislative and departmental policies concerning the treatment of child victims and witnesses of crime; (b) raise awareness of the issues covered in the Guidelines and relevant regional and international instruments; and (c) familiarize law enforcement officials with specific protocols for intervention, in particular with respect to the initial contact between a child victim and the law enforcement agency, the initial interview of a child victim or witness, the investigation of an offence and victim’s support. 6. In addition, a law enforcement official specialized in child-related issues should also receive training on how to put victims and witnesses in contact with available support groups, on providing information and helping victims to deal with the effects of victimization and on eliminating the risk of secondary victimization. A good example of legislation providing for specific training targeting police units is that of India (Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 (No. 56 of 2000), art. 63). Similar initiatives can be found in other countries, such as Morocco (Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 19) and Peru (Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Law No. 27.337, 40 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2000), arts. 151-153). The development and dissemination of domestic guidelines addressing the issue of child victims and witnesses from the police’s viewpoint should also be encouraged. 7. In common law countries, the training of prosecutors on child-friendly procedures may ensure that prosecutors, when preparing a case and in presenting it to the court, truly and fully take into account the specific requirements related to the situation of child victims and witnesses of crimes. When leading the investigation and preparing a case for trial, prosecutors have an opportunity to ensure that the rights of child victims and witnesses are respected. They can keep the child informed of the court’s procedures and proceedings, ensure that the pretrial and court settings are appropriate and follow up with referrals. Training of prosecutors may ensure that they provide a basic level of assistance and information to child victims and witnesses, including notification regarding the status of the case and the use of special measures such as waiting areas for child victims and witnesses and their families. 8. Prosecutors may also be encouraged to develop agreements with non-governmental organizations in order to provide key services to children, including after the completion of the case and the conviction of the offender. In the United Kingdom, the Judicial Studies Board has developed a child witness training programme for barristers and magistrates, focusing on the Human Rights Act of 1998. It is a self-taught course followed by a one‑day training programme. In addition, a victim and witness training pack published by the Magistrates’ Courts Committees provides detailed information on the process of identifying potentially vulnerable and intimidated witnesses. The participants are shown a video portraying a victim’s experience and then given the opportunity to explore their own experiences of vulnerability. Finally, the Crown Prosecution Service of the United Kingdom has developed a four-level programme of victim and witness training that focuses on the following: (a) raising awareness among the Crown Prosecution Service staff of issues relating to victims and witnesses and their role and responsibilities; (b) ensuring effective identification of vulnerable or intimidated witnesses and their eligibility for access to special measures; (c) ensuring effective support of witnesses and case management; and (d) ensuring effective communication, including dealing with prosecution decisions. 9. Another example is that of Mexico, where prosecution services have developed a programme of awareness and support for victims of crime, which includes, inter alia, training and workshops on the protection of victims (Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 22 (VIII)). 10. Development of domestic guidelines addressing the issue of child victims and witnesses from the prosecutor’s viewpoint, such as the Guidelines for Crown Prosecutors30 of Canada, should also be encouraged. The National Prosecuting Authority of South Africa developed the Child Law Manual for Prosecutors (Pretoria, 2001), which has been used as a basis for the training of prosecutors throughout the country. 11. In civil law countries where legislation provides that victims be assisted by an appointed lawyer for victims, training similar to that described above should be provided Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 41 for lawyers representing victims. Because of a child victim’s special relationship with his or her lawyer, who is appointed expressly to protect his or her rights, that lawyer is in the best position to ensure that the child victim receives all appropriate available assistance and care. In France, several bar associations have taken the initiative of creating groups of specialized lawyers who are provided with continuing education on child-related issues, including through legal updates and the expertise of other relevant professionals, such as psychologists, social workers and judges.31 12. Similarly, it is of crucial importance that all judges be trained in, or are at least well informed, on child-related issues. The institution of specialized juvenile judges does not exist in all countries, and even in those countries where it does exist, judges very often have to shift within the justice system from penal to civil matters, from specialized to general matters and vice versa. But in many countries, child-related issues are reserved for a special category of magistrates who have received proper training, making them specialists in these matters. These magistrates often work exclusively on these issues, which may include, in addition to family law and juvenile justice, granting judicial orders for the protection of children and measures for dealing with children requiring special care and protection (for example, Brazil, Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente, Law No 8.069 (1990), art. 145). 13. Health-care professionals may also provide first-line assistance to child victims and witnesses of crime, as they may be the first to come into contact with them or may even be the ones who discover that a child has been a victim of a crime. Training programmes and protocols for relevant hospital personnel on the rights and needs of child victims and witnesses, including medical and psychological support, as well as a victim-sensitive code of ethics for medical staff, should be developed. A good example of this kind of training programmes for health-care professionals is the certificate programme on the protection of child victims of abuse and maltreatment created by the Social Workers Training School of Saint Joseph University in Beirut.32 In Belgium, legislation provides that at least one person in each centre for social-medical assistance shall receive specific training on child victims issues (Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, art. 11). 14. Social workers also play an important role in providing proper assistance and care to child victims and witnesses since, because of their functions, they are in a unique position to intervene in the best interests of children. Awareness of social workers on these issues could be enhanced through specific training and workshops, such as those reported by the Islamic Republic of Iran, where one expert on child affairs from each province was selected and trained on child-related issues, and workshops on the rights of the child were organized for social workers.33 A comprehensive programme of training and coordination for social workers is also undertaken in Ukraine (Law on Social Work with Children and Youth, 2001). Brochures and leaflets to raise awareness among this category of professionals have been disseminated in several countries.34 15. In conclusion, an efficient way to ensure effective awareness of all professionals who share the responsibility of protecting child victims and witnesses of crime is to 42 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime centralize the training in a single institution that can monitor whether all categories of professionals are reached and how they can be reached. A good example of such an institution is found in Egypt, where the General Administration for the Legal Protection of Children of the Ministry of Justice is responsible for designing training and qualification programmes for members of legal institutions, sociologists and psychologists concerned with matters related to minors (Decree on legal protection of children, No. 2235, 1997, para. 14 (e)). Other States have undertaken similar initiatives, such as Bulgaria (Child Protection Act (2004), art. 1, paras. 3-4) and Malaysia (Child Act 2001, Act No. 611, sect. 3, subsect. (2) (g)). 16. The Model Law assigns responsibility for training to the national coordinating authority and includes a non-exhaustive list of topics for training, which legislators should adapt to the specific needs of their country.43 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process A. General provisions Article 9. Right to be informed 1. In line with the main international instruments on assistance for victims and paragraphs 19 and 20 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, as well as with the national legislation of several States, the Model Law advocates the importance of giving child victims and witnesses of crime access to information relevant to their case and information relevant for the protection and exercise of their rights. An effective way of making information available to victims of crime is to disseminate brochures or leaflets in police stations, hospitals, waiting rooms, schools, social services and other public offices and on the Internet. 2. Guidance can also be taken from legislation requiring that victims be given appropriate, relevant information in a timely manner.35 That could be achieved, for example, by putting the burden of informing victims on the police upon its first contact with them.36 The legislation of some States provides that such information shall be given to the victim only if he or she expressly requests it, following what is referred to as an “opt-in” policy. However, although such an “opt-in” option aims to protect the victims from feeling harassed due to receiving unsolicited information, it may result in the victim not receiving useful information that he or she would have wished to receive. The same respect for a victim’s wish not to know about the proceedings can be fulfilled by replacing the “opt-in” system with an “opt-out” option, by which the victim would automatically receive all relevant information unless he or she expressly requests not to receive it. 3. In many countries with limited resources, access to information about the case can be hampered for various reasons, such as an underresourced justice system, illiteracy of victims and the lack of transport facilities or means of communication for victims. Practical solutions can be found by assigning social workers and community organizations to assist the victims in their participation in the justice process. 4. Some States, going beyond the right of victims to be informed of the proceedings, recognize the right of child victims to receive from judges explanations concerning the proceedings and the decisions rendered, as in Bulgaria, (Child Protection Act (2004), art. 15, para. 3), Costa Rica (Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No.7739 (1998), art. 107 (d)) and New Zealand (Children, Young Persons and Their Families Act 1989, sect. 10). Such an approach should be encouraged. 5. In countries where victims are represented by a lawyer, the victim should receive information related to the proceedings from his or her lawyer. However, the client-lawyer 44 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime relationship is not always balanced, and this system may prove insufficient. Coupling the information conveyed by lawyers with other sources of information better protects the victim’s right to be informed. In most cases, the assistance of a support person (see articles 15-19 of the Model Law) constitutes the best practice in ensuring that the victim receives full information in a timely manner. 6. In all legal systems, identifying the persons responsible for conveying the information to victims is a necessary step towards ensuring that the victim’s right to be informed is upheld. The details of sharing responsibilities in that regard should be regulated, as it is, for example, by the legislation of the United States (United States Code collection, Title 42, chap. 112, sect. 10607, Services to victims, subsect. (a) and (c)). 7. As relates to the content and type of information that the child victims and witnesses of crime should receive, the Model Law reflects the provisions of the existing relevant legislation of several countries.37 8. The Model Law indicates that the information should be provided by a competent authority that is to be designated by the Government. The Model Law does not include opt-in or opt-out clauses, but national legislators may consider whether to adopt such provisions. Article 10. Legal assistance 1. As stated in paragraph 22 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, effective assistance for child victims and witnesses during the proceedings may require access to legal assistance. States should consider providing legal assistance, free of charge, to child victims in those cases in which it is required during the criminal justice process. The main consideration is the principle of the best interests of the child. 2. In common law countries, because victims are not a party to the proceedings, they are usually not provided with legal assistance throughout the proceedings as a right. This is why, with some notable exceptions, most countries recognizing the right of victims to legal assistance belong to the civil law tradition. Most civil law countries recognize the right of child victims to legal assistance, for example, Armenia (Criminal Procedure Code, 1999, art. 10 (3)-(4)), Bulgaria (Child Protection Act, 2004, art. 15 (8)) and the Philippines (Anti-Violence against Women and their Children Act of 2004, No. 9262 (2004), sect. 35 (b)). Such assistance is provided free of charge for those who cannot afford to pay their counsel, for example, in France (Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-50); Iceland (Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002 (2002), article 60) and Peru (Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Law No. 27.337, 2000), article 146). Original solutions have sometimes been found to reduce the cost to the State of legal assistance. In Colombia (in accordance with the Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 137, Intervención de las víctimas en la actuación penal), victims who cannot afford counsel can be assisted by other legal professionals or law students, and, if there are multiple victims, the number of lawyers representing them in the case can be limited to two. Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 45 3. A few common law countries recognize the right of child victims to legal assistance in criminal proceedings. In such circumstances, the cost is paid by the State, as is the case in Pakistan, under the Juvenile Justice System Ordinance, 2000. In countries where such provisions do not exist, recognizing that child victims of crime have a right to legal assistance in criminal proceedings promotes the protection of child victims and witnesses during their involvement in the justice process. 4. In that context, it should be noted that the International Criminal Court has recognized a long list of rights of victims, in particular with respect to access to a lawyer.38 Article 11. Protective measures Article 11 describes measures to be taken, at all stages of the justice process, to protect the safety of a child victim or witness who is deemed to be at risk. Article 12. Language, interpreter and other special assistance measures 1. Paragraph 25 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime recognizes the need to develop and implement measures to assist children in testifying and giving evidence. 2. The provisions and requirements contained in article 12 of the Model Law are based on national legislation of several countries, including Colombia, Costa Rica, France, Kazakhstan, Mexico, South Africa and Thailand.39 B. During the investigation phase Article 13. Specially trained investigator 1. According to paragraph 29 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, professionals should take measures to prevent hardship during the investigation. According to paragraph 41 of the Guidelines, professionals should be trained to effectively protect child victims and witnesses and meet their needs. 2. Depending on the domestic legal system of the State, professionals such as police officers, prosecutors, lawyers and other criminal justice professionals may be working in the investigation of a case involving a child victim or witness of crime. It is essential for such professionals to receive specific training on child-related issues as a prerequisite for working with child victims and witnesses. 3. In the area of investigation, some significant progress has been made through the establishment of the so-called “child advocacy model”, which adopts a multidisciplinary 46 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime approach during the investigation. The most important component of this model is the fact that law enforcement officials are accompanied by child specialists and mentalhealth-care providers when they conduct interviews of children. This model offers greater potential for protecting not only the child but also the accused, because it ensures that interviews are conducted in a more thorough and accurate way. Article 14. Medical examinations and the taking of bodily samples 1. Article 14 deals with the child’s right to be treated with dignity and to be protected from hardship during the justice process. Medical examinations, especially in case of sexual abuse, can be a highly stressful experience for children. It is preferable that such examinations be ordered only when absolutely necessary and that they be as less intrusive and as limited as possible. 2. When a medical examination reveals health problems, the child is entitled to receive medical care. 3. The provisions of article 14 are based on best practices of several Member States. Article 15. Support person 1. The functions of a support person are described in paragraph 24 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. However, the term is not defined in the Guidelines. 2. According to the domestic legislation of several countries, the purpose of a support person is to provide emotional support to child victims and witnesses and to reduce the harmful impact of a court appearance by ensuring that the child is accompanied at all times by an adult whose presence will be helpful if the child feels unduly stressed.40 3. Thus, the presence of a support person can help the child to express his or her views and contribute to the child’s right to participation. It is a measure that judges may favour in order to make a child’s appearance before the court go smoothly. It is also a measure that a prosecutor or, where applicable, the child’s lawyer may request. 4. Another important element related to the functions and role played by the support person is continuity. In order to be of real support, there needs to be a relationship of trust between the support person and the child. That can be achieved by appointing a support person at the beginning of the justice process (i.e. the reporting of the criminal offence) and ensuring that the same person accompanies the child throughout the whole process. 5. Finally, the guiding principle for the functions and activity of the support person is that his or her main concern in the justice process is the protection of the child against any form of hardship.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 47 Article 16. Designation of a support person 1. The Model Law calls for the designation of a support person by the competent authority, which has been designated by the State, as soon as the officials in charge of the investigation decide to summon the child victim or witnesses for the first interview. The underlying principle is that the support person should accompany the child from the moment of his or her first contact with the justice process. 2. State practice shows that the criteria for designating a support person vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In Italy, article 609 decies of the Criminal Code specifies that a child victim of sexual exploitation shall be assisted at every step of the proceedings. In some States, such as Switzerland,41 it is specified that the support person shall be of the same gender as the victim. In some common law countries, the decision of designating a support person for a child victim is taken by a judge, who takes that decision proprio motu or at the request of the prosecution or the defence. In other countries, the power to assign a support person is specifically provided in the law, for example, in Canada (Criminal Code (R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.1, subsect. 1). The assistance of a support person may also be requested by the victim or witness, as in Austria (article 162 (2) of the Criminal code of procedure). 3. The way that the support person is defined varies in different domestic legal systems, with definitions such as a “person of the child’s choice”,42 a “person of confidence”,43 an “adult”,44 a “child’s parent or legal guardian”,45 a “friend or a member of his or her family”,46 a “specially qualified person”,47 “other person close to the child”48 or any other “person approved by the court”.49 In that regard, the Model Law states that the support person should be someone with training and professional skills to communicate with and assist the child in order to prevent the risk of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization. In general, in assessing who should be designated as the support person, it is important to respect the child’s choice. However, care must be taken to prevent the manipulation of the child’s choice. The Model Law also states that before the support person is designated, the child should be consulted about his or her preference with respect to the gender of the support person. 4. The support person should fulfil two other important requirements: (a) they should offer full and concrete support to the child; and (b) they should not hamper the justice process. Child victim support groups or victim service units may offer specially qualified persons for that purpose. Article 17. Functions of the support person 1. The Model Law has amplified the functions of the support person on the basis of best practices. Examples of domestic legislation show that the purpose of the presence of such a support person next to the child victim or witness is to provide emotional support and reduce the harmful impact of a court appearance by ensuring that the child is accompanied at all times by an adult whose presence will be helpful if the child feels unduly stressed. 48 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2. The functions of the support person, as defined in article 17, flow from this purpose and reflect national best practices. 3. For example, subsection (i) of the Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights (United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509) provides the following: “The court, at its discretion, may allow the adult attendant to remain in close physical proximity to or in contact with the child while the child testifies. The court may allow the adult attendant to hold the child’s hand or allow the child to sit on the adult attendant’s lap throughout the course of the proceeding. An adult attendant shall not provide the child with an answer to any question directed to the child during the course of the child’s testimony or otherwise prompt the child. The image of the child attendant, for the time the child is testifying or being deposed, shall be recorded on videotape.” 4. The state legislation of Arizona, United States, gives the support person a more active role, especially in the preparation and assistance of the child victim by providing the following: “[The minor’s representative] shall accompany the minor through all proceedings [...] and, before the minor’s courtroom appearance, shall explain to the minor the nature of the proceedings and what the minor will be asked to do, including telling the minor that the minor is expected to tell the truth. The representative shall be available to observe the minor in all aspects of the case in order to consult with the court as to any special needs of the minor. Those consultations shall take place before the minor testifies. [The minor’s representative] shall not discuss the facts and circumstances of the case with the minor witness [...] unless the court orders otherwise upon a showing that it is in the best interests of the minor.”50 Article 18. Information to be provided to the support person Article 18 provides that a support person shall be informed of the charges against the accused, the relationship between the accused and the child and the custodial status of the accused. That is the minimum necessary for the support person to fulfil his or her functions. It is possible to include in the article additional types of information that should be provided. Article 19. Functions of the support person in case of the release of the accused The release of the accused from custody is a situation that may cause hardship for the child victim or witness. In such cases, the support person is responsible for receiving the information from the authorities and communicating it to the child in a childsensitive manner.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 49 C. During the trial phase Article 20. Reliability of child evidence 1. In accordance with article 12, paragraph 2, of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the starting point for evidence given in court by a child is that the child shall be provided with the opportunity to be heard. However, this right is not absolute: article 12, paragraph 2, of the Convention envisages that this right be exercised “in a manner consistent with the procedural rules of national law”. 2. Such procedural rules usually exist in national law in order to ensure that the court is able to trust any testimony given by a child in judicial or administrative proceedings. Two legal hurdles typically exist. According to the legal system in question, either or both may be applied by the court. The first is the question of the admissibility of a child’s evidence. The second is the question of the reliability of a child’s evidence. 3. The question of admissibility relates to whether the court is able to take any evidence given by the child into account at all in determination of the case. The question of reliability relates to the weight that the court should subsequently attach to admissible evidence given by a child. 4. In most legal systems, it is the role of the court to take such decisions on admissibility and reliability on a case-by-case basis. If necessary, that may be done with the expert assistance of a qualified child psychologist or a specialist in child development. However, international standards specify one key restriction. In deciding upon the admissibility and/or reliability of a child’s evidence, the court may not do so merely upon the basis of the child’s age alone. This restriction is set out in paragraph 18 of the Guidelines on Justice involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime: “[the child’s] testimony should not be presumed invalid or untrustworthy by reason of the child’s age alone”. 5. Nonetheless, the court can pose the question of whether the child’s age and maturity allow the giving of intelligible and credible testimony. The court may, for example, take such factors into account when considering evidence given by a child in the context of the case as a whole. If compelling reasons exist, it may also carry out tests in order to establish the extent to which the child is able to give valid testimony. Such tests may seek to establish competencies, such as whether the child is able to understand questions and whether he or she also understands the importance of telling the truth. 6. In the United Kingdom (Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act, 1999, sect. 53), for example, the criteria of witness competency are independent of the age of the witness. Instead, the question of competency relates to the capacity of the witness to understand questions put to him or her as a witness and to give answers that can be understood. If a witness is not able to understand questions or provide intelligible answers, his or her evidence is likely to be inadmissible for the purposes of court proceedings.50 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 7. In the case of child victims and witnesses, however, international standards suggest that testimony given by a child should not be declared inadmissible lightly. Paragraph 18 of the Guidelines on Justice involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, for instance, is based on the presumption that “every child should be treated as a capable witness”. Indeed, a survey of national laws demonstrates that it is good practice to presume the prima facie competence of a child to testify, irrespective of his or her age.51 8. Article 20 of the Model Law follows that good practice by providing that a child is to be deemed a capable witness (and his or her evidence is admissible) unless proven otherwise by means of a competency examination. Article 21 of the Model Law explains that this assumption may be departed from—and a competency examination subsequently administered—only if the court believes that compelling reasons exist. Such reasons may not, of course, include the child’s age alone. 9. If the child does not pass the competency examination, his or her evidence must be declared inadmissible for the purposes of the court proceedings. Naturally, if the child passes the examination, his or her evidence is admissible. The important point is that the competency examination not be used routinely for child victims and witnesses. Rather, there must be compelling reasons for the court to order the examination. Such an approach is supported by national practice. Under the New Zealand Evidence Act 1908, for example, the judge may not instruct the jury with respect to any general need to scrutinize the evidence of young children with special care or suggest to the jury that children generally have tendencies to invention or distortion.52 Where a child gives evidence at a jury trial, the trial judge should inform the jury that a child is not disqualified from giving evidence simply by reason of age alone and that there is no precise age that determines competency.53 The jury should be instructed that a child’s competency depends on the child’s capacity to understand the difference between truth and falsehood and to appreciate the duty to tell the truth.54 10. When a child gives admissible evidence, the Model Law anticipates one further legal hurdle. Under article 20, paragraph 3, of the Model Law, the court may give a particular weight to the testimony of the child in accordance with his or her age, maturity and ability to give an intelligible account. Again, the court may not base this decision on the child’s age alone. Rather, the court must form an overall assessment of the validity and trustworthiness of the child’s testimony, as it would with any other witness. If a competency examination has previously been carried out, the results of that examination may also be a relevant factor in this assessment. Evidence from national laws indicates that it is appropriate to take factors such as age and maturity into account when assessing the reliability of testimony.55 11. Finally, paragraphs 4 and 5 of article 20 of the Model Law contain two important safeguards. Paragraph 4 provides that irrespective of whether the child will provide testimony or whether such testimony is found to be inadmissible, the child shall have the opportunity to express his or her views concerning his or her involvement in the justice process. Paragraph 5 states that a child shall not be required to testify in court proceedings against his or her will or without the knowledge of his or her parents or guardian. It also ensures that the parents or guardian of a child giving testimony in Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 51 court are invited to be present. The Model Law makes logical exceptions, however, for situations in which the parents or guardian are alleged to be the perpetrator of the offence, the child expresses concern about being accompanied by his or her parents or guardian or the court deems it not to be in the best interests of the child. Article 21. Competency examination 1. Article 21 of the Model Law provides procedural details for the competency examination referred to in article 20. It makes clear that a competency examination shall be conducted only if the court determines that there are compelling reasons to do so. As set out in article 20, that a child’s testimony may be declared inadmissible only if he or she fails to pass a competency examination. Article 21 states clearly that the purpose of the competency examination is to determine whether the child is able to understand questions put to him or her as well as the importance of telling the truth. 2. The United States Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights (United States Code Collection, sect. 3509, subsect. (c)) establishes that upon a party’s motion showing compelling reasons for doing so, the judge may order the child to be submitted to a competency examination. The examination is conducted by the court, out of the sight of the jury, on the basis of questions submitted by the parties. The questions shall be appropriate to the age and developmental level of the child, shall not be related to the issues at trial and shall focus on determining the child’s ability to understand and answer simple questions. 3. It is important to stress that the provision, contained in article 21, paragraph 7, stating that a competency examination shall not be repeated does not invalidate the right to appeal of the accused. In fact, the court can, without repeating the competency examination, evaluate the results in accordance with the circumstances of the case. Thus, the danger that a defence lawyer might try to undermine the credibility of the child by re-examining him or her and thus creating hardship for the child is avoided. Article 22. Oath 1. Most countries require witnesses in criminal proceedings to testify under oath, which is a solemn undertaking to tell the truth. A failure to tell the truth when testifying under oath is a criminal offence in almost all jurisdictions. 2. Some national legal systems exempt children under a certain age from giving evidence under oath.56 The primary result of giving unsworn evidence (evidence given when not under oath) is that the child may be protected in certain respects from the consequences of proceedings for giving false testimony. Article 22 of the Model Law provides that child witnesses be given complete immunity from criminal prosecution for giving false testimony, irrespective of whether the court allows child witnesses to give sworn or unsworn evidence. 52 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 3. It is important to note that the fact that a child gives unsworn evidence, as opposed to evidence on oath, should have no effect, in and of itself, on the way in which that evidence is received by the court. National legislation, for example the United Kingdom Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 treats the question of whether sworn or unsworn evidence is given as separate from the question of the competency of a witness. Both sworn and unsworn evidence is received by the court in the same way.57 However, the fact that a child may not have sufficient appreciation of the particular responsibility to tell the truth inherent in taking an oath, may, in some jurisdictions be used by parties to the proceedings as an indicator of the child’s maturity and, hence, of the weight to be given to his or her evidence. In the United States, for example, such motion may lead, if compelling reasons are given by the applicant, to a competency examination being ordered by the court.58 4. A good example of an alternative to testimony under oath is found in New Zealand, where a child is permitted to make an informal promise to tell the truth, once it is been determined that the child has an appreciation of the solemnity of the occasion.59 That applies, in particular, in cases of adults charged with sexual misconduct against children. That specific option has been included in the Model Law. Article 23. Designation of a support person during the trial Article 23 complements article 15 by ensuring that the judge, at the beginning of the trial, verifies whether a support person has been appointed for the child victim or witness and orders the appointment of such a person if no support person was appointed during the investigation phase. Article 24. Waiting areas 1. One way of protecting the child from hardship during the justice process and protecting the child’s privacy is to designate special child-friendly waiting areas for children. 2. Waiting areas for children may be equipped with toys or other things such as drawing utensils, cartoons and books to occupy the child. Depending on the climate, such waiting areas may not need to be inside a building but may be located in a garden or another safe place. Waiting areas may also be furnished with toilets, beds, drinks and food so that the child always feels at ease. Most important, children shall always be kept in a separate room, away from the accused, defence counsels and other witnesses. 3. Although expeditiousness of the proceedings is an important requirement in handling cases involving children, the capacity of children to endure lengthy hearings scheduled without consideration for their difficult situation is another element to be considered in the context of the timeframe of proceedings. Those responsible for the scheduling of the judicial process are invited to find ways to reduce the time that Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 53 children spend on the premises of the court and ensure that those periods fit with the child’s private life and needs. Ultimately, any reduction of the child’s stress will help to make his or her evidence of the best quality possible. 4. Other child-sensitive procedures may be considered by the courts, such as scheduling the hearings on days when the child does not have to go to school. The Model Law does not include such procedures, but they may be provided for in regulations or guidelines. Article 25. Emotional support for child victims and witnesses Article 25 ensures the presence of the support person in the courtroom, to provide the child with emotional support. Article 26. Courtroom facilities 1. According to subparagraph 30 (d) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, professionals shall make use of modified court environments that take the situation of child victims and witnesses into consideration. 2. Formalities of court proceedings and court surroundings can be intimidating for children. Although there is an argument that the observance of such formalities engenders respect for the legal system, it may cause children fear or make them reluctant to talk. The shortage of child-friendly facilities such as appropriate seating or the lack of a properly placed microphone at the witness’s position in the courtroom to ensure that a child’s testimony is audible in key positions in the courtroom, in particular the bench, the bar table, the jury box and the dock, may impede children from giving the best possible evidence, as may the impression caused by the formal dress of members of the judiciary and legal personnel. 3. Some domestic legislation requires the hearing of victims under the age of 18 years to be conducted in an informal and friendly atmosphere.60 The solemnity of court dress, which may have a frightening effect on young children, is also taken into account in the Supplementary Pre-Trial Checklist for Cases Involving Young Witnesses of the United Kingdom, which provides that child witnesses may express their views about court dress,61 which may be removed if found necessary.62 4. With respect to the environment of the child interview, some domestic legislation makes the attendance of a female police officer, or a police officer of the same gender as the child, a requirement in specific cases, in particular those involving rape or other sexual assaults.63 Article 26 of the Model Law gives the judge the authority to order such modifications, as appropriate. 54 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 27. Cross-examination (option for common law countries) 1. Subparagraph 31 (b) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime stresses the necessity of protecting a child from being crossexamined by the accused if that protection is compatible with the legal system and the rights of the accused. In the common law procedural system, the right to cross-examine prosecution witnesses constitutes an essential element of the right of the accused to challenge the testimony of his or her accuser. Cross-examination is usually carried out by the legal representative of the accused. However, when the accused refuses to engage a legal representative and wishes to defend him or herself, direct cross-examination of vulnerable witnesses, such as children, becomes an issue. 2. Some domestic legislation prohibits unrepresented accused from cross-examining child witnesses, especially in the case of sexual offences, for example in Canada (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.3, subsect. 1), New Zealand (Evidence Act 1908, sect. 23F(1) and Evidence Act 2006, sect. 95) and the United Kingdom (Criminal Justice Act 1988, sect. 34A). In those States, judges must deny requests made by unrepresented accused to cross-examine child witnesses. In some countries, it is provided, alternatively, that the judge may appoint a representative for the accused for the specific purpose of such cross-examination; the representative relays the questions of the accused to the child, thereby avoiding direct contact and potential intimidation, as is done in Australia (Western Australia Evidence of Children and Others (Amendment) Act 1992, sect. 8). 3. Presiding judges should exercise close scrutiny and strict supervision of the crossexamination of children. Domestic practice in common law countries in particular prohibits any intimidating, harassing or disrespectful questions (see, for example, the National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development of South Africa and the National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases of the Department of Justice of South Africa (Pretoria, 1998), chap. 10, para. 1 and the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995, sect. 274 of the United Kingdom). More generally, as with other types of questioning, cross-examination shall be conducted keeping in mind that vulnerable witnesses, including children, shall be addressed in a simple, careful and respectful way. Where necessary, it is up to the judges to remind the parties of that important requirement. 4. The Model Law provides that the child victim or witness shall not be crossexamined by the accused. Cross-examination by the defence lawyer shall be closely supervised by the judge. Article 28. Measures to protect the privacy and well-being of a child victim and witness 1. In accordance with article 28 of the Model Law, protective measures may be ordered to protect the privacy and the physical and mental well-being of a child and to prevent undue distress and secondary victimization of a child. Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 55 2. Often when a child testifies, he or she will have to be in direct eye contact with the accused. In cases in which it is alleged that the accused abused the child, such contact can be a traumatic event for the child. The provision contained in subparagraph 31 (b) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime is aimed at reducing as much as possible the feeling of intimidation that child victims and witnesses may have while appearing before the court, in particular when confronting the alleged offender. 3. A variety of measures can be taken to assist in the giving of evidence by children and the receipt of evidence from children. Those measures concern the admissibility of evidence, such as videotaped recordings of their pretrial statement and the use of facilities allowing the child to give evidence, without having to see the accused, from a special interview room on the premises of the court by means of closed-circuit television or with a removable screen or curtain to break the line of sight between the witness and the accused. Another way of avoiding such confrontation is to order the removal of the accused from the courtroom. 4. The use of screens between the child and the accused is often seen as a less expensive alternative to the use of closed-circuit television. They are far easier to install and move. Various types of screens are used in different jurisdictions, for example, a removable opaque partition preventing the child and the accused from seeing each other, a one-way mirror allowing the accused to see the child but not vice versa or a removable opaque partition with a video camera transmitting the image of the child to a television monitor visible to the accused. The use of such devices is provided for in the domestic legislation of several countries, such as Canada (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.2, subsect. 1) and Spain (Ley de Enjuiciamiento Criminal, art. 448, para. 3, and art. 707). 5. Such measures shall be ordered by the judge and may be automatic or discretionary. Judges may order such a measure proprio motu or at the request of a party, including the child or his or her parents or legal guardian. In Fiji, for example, a parent or a guardian may ask the prosecutor for a screen to be put around the child, and the prosecutor then relays this request to the court.64 The removal of the accused from the courtroom while the child testifies is another measure provided in some domestic systems, for example, in Brazil, (Código de Processo Penal, art. 217), Kazakhstan (Criminal Procedural Code, art. 352 (3)) and Switzerland (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, art. 5 (4) and 10 (b)). The accused is usually allowed to follow the child’s testimony on a monitor from a separate room. 6. Another aspect of protecting victims and witnesses, including children, is limiting the disclosure of information about their identity and whereabouts. The degree of restriction may vary, depending on the circumstances and risks. A first degree of restriction on disclosure of information on the victim’s or witness’ whereabouts can easily be implemented by authorizing the victim or witness not to reveal the address of his or her residence and workplace. Sometimes, for purpose of communication, the victim or witness can give a police office as his or her contact address (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-57) or, as in Honduras (Código Procesal Penal, 56 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Decreto No. 9-99-E, art. 237, Protección de los testigos), the court itself can be given as an address for such purposes. 7. More prejudicial to the rights of the defence is the complete restriction on disclosure of information related to the identity of the victim or witness, who can then be authorized to testify anonymously. This always constitutes an exceptional measure, as in France (Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-58) and the Netherlands (Code of Criminal Procedure, 1994, art. 226a). In countries where such a measure is permitted, it can be achieved by authorizing victims or witnesses to testify or be confronted by the defendant by way of videoconference with voice-or image-distortion mechanisms (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-61). Even more exceptional, and usually limited to organized crime-related cases, is the step of giving anonymous witnesses authorization to change their identity (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-63-1) or the facilitation of their relocation (United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 224, Protection of witnesses, sect. 3521, Witness relocation and protection, subsect. (a), para. 1). 8. The law of New Zealand provides an interesting set of protective measures for child victims and witnesses of crime. In addition to a general ban on publishing the name of any person under the age of 17 years who is called as a witness, child complainants may be authorized to give written evidence and may be exempted from examination or cross-examination on their statement. When the child gives oral evidence, only specified persons accepted by the presiding judge or requested by the child may be present. The court may issue orders prohibiting publication of certain matters, such as reports or accounts with respect to acts that the victim is alleged to have been compelled or induced to perform, or any acts that the victim is alleged to have been compelled or induced to consent to or acquiesce in. The victim’s evidence may also be adduced by way of videotaped statement recorded during the pretrial phase. 9. In the case of an offence of a sexual nature involving a child complainant, a judge may, on application by the prosecutor before the trial, give any of the following directions with respect to the mode in which the complainant’s evidence is to be given. First, where a videotape of the complainant’s evidence was shown at the preliminary hearing, the judge may direct that the evidence be admitted in that form, with such excisions, if any, as the judge may order. Secondly, if the judge is satisfied that the necessary facilities and equipment are available, a direction may be given for the complainant to give evidence outside the courtroom but within the court precincts, the evidence being transmitted to the courtroom by means of closed-circuit television. Thirdly, the judge may direct that, while the complainant is giving evidence or is being examined in respect of that evidence, a screen or one-way mirror be so placed that the complainant cannot see the accused but the judge, jury and counsel for the accused can see the complainant. Fourthly, in cases in which the judge is satisfied that the necessary facilities and equipment are available, he or she may give a direction that, while the complainant is giving evidence or is being examined in respect of that evidence, the complainant be placed behind a specially constructed wall or partition, enabling those in the courtroom to see the complainant while preventing the complainant from seeing them, the evidence being given through an appropriate audio link. Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 57 Fifthly, in cases in which the judge is satisfied that the necessary facilities and equipment are available, a direction may be given that the complainant give evidence at a location outside the court precincts. In such a case, the evidence is to be admitted on videotape, with such excisions, if any, as the judge may order. Where a videotape of the complainant’s evidence is to be shown at the trial, the judge is to give directions as considered appropriate as to the manner in which any cross-examination or reexamination of the complainant is to be conducted. D. In the post-trial period Article 29. Right to restitution and compensation 1. Article 29 of the Model Law implements paragraph 35 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, on the right to remedies for child victims. Paragraph 37 of the Guidelines provides a non-exhaustive list of what such reparation may include. Article 29 of the Model Law attempts to provide more specific guidance on this matter. 2. Paragraph 8 of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (General Assembly resolution 40/34, annex) states the following: “Offenders or third parties responsible for their behaviour should, where appropriate, make fair restitution to victims, their families or dependants. Such restitution should include the return of property or payment for the harm or loss suffered, reimbursement of expenses incurred as a result of the victimization, the provision of services and the restoration of rights.” 3. Paragraph 12 of the Declaration states the following: “When compensation is not fully available from the offender or other sources, States should endeavour to provide financial compensation to: “(a) Victims who have sustained significant bodily injury or impairment of physical or mental health as a result of serious crimes; “(b) The family, in particular dependants of persons who have died or become physically or mentally incapacitated as a result of such victimization.” 4. In paragraph 8 of its recommendation Rec (2006) 8, the Committee of Ministers to member States of the Council of Europe on assistance to crime victims recommends the following: “Compensation should be provided for treatment and rehabilitation for physical and psychological injuries; “States should consider compensation for loss of income, funeral expenses and loss of maintenance for dependants; States may also consider compensation for pain and suffering; “States may consider means to compensate damage resulting from crimes against property.” 58 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 5. The Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparations for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law (General Assembly resolution 60/147, annex) might not apply in most common cases in which children are victims, but the definitions provided in that international instrument are of great assistance in defining the scope of remedies necessary in a given case. 6. In cases of human trafficking, the Basic Principles and Guidelines might apply to a large extent and should be taken into consideration, as very often the basic rights of victims of trafficking are violated in judicial proceedings due to the fact that too often the victim is considered to have violated domestic laws, for example, laws relating to the victim’s immigration status, instead of being considered a victim.65 7. The Basic Principles and Guidelines describe forms of remedies that must be considered and addressed, as appropriate, in a given case. They include the following: (a) Restitution. This form of remedy would be more applicable in cases of trafficking in human beings but may also apply partially in cases of child victims of domestic violence; (i) Enjoyment of human rights (family life); (ii) Return to the place of residence; (iii) Restoration of employment (including the possibility of continuing education) and return of property; (b) Compensation (monetary compensation for assessable damages for); (i) Physical or mental harm; (ii) Lost opportunities (employment, education and social benefits); (iii) Material damages and loss of earnings (including loss of earning potential); (iv) Costs of legal or expert assistance, medical services and other assistance; (c) Rehabilitation (medical and psychological care and required legal and social services). Option 1. Common law countries 8. This option is intended for common law countries where the criminal proceedings may be followed by an order for compensation by the same court. This model legislative provision is drawn from legislation of Canada (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 738, subsect. 1). That legislation contains more details with respect to the correct definition of replacement value, the definition of pecuniary damages and the problem of compensation when the child had to leave a household shared with the perpetrator.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 59 Option 2. Countries where criminal courts have no jurisdiction in civil claims 9. Paragraph 36 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime states that, provided that the criminal proceedings are child-sensitive and respect the Guidelines, combined criminal and reparations proceedings should be encouraged. However, that may not be the case in some jurisdictions. Option 2 ensures that at the end of the criminal proceedings, the child shall be informed of the procedures for claiming compensation. Option 3. Countries where criminal courts have jurisdiction in civil claims 10. In many civil law countries, the civil claim can be decided as part of the criminal proceedings. Option 3 is intended for such jurisdictions. Article 30. Restorative justice measures 1. Paragraph 36 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime states that reparations proceedings can be combined with restorative justice measures. Article 30 of the Model Law provides for this option, subject to the availability of formal proceedings, if restorative justice measures fail. 2. A restorative justice process is any process in which the victim and the offender and, where appropriate, other individuals or community members affected by a crime actively participate together in the resolution of matters arising from the crime, generally with the help of a facilitator. Restorative justice implies a process for resolving crime by focusing on redressing the harm done to victims, holding offenders accountable for their actions and, often, engaging the community in the resolution of that conflict. 3. Restorative justice programmes have the following characteristics: (a) a flexible response to circumstances of the crime, the offender and the victim that allows each case to be considered individually; (b) a response to the crime that respects the dignity and equality of each person, builds understanding and promotes social harmony through the healing of victims, offenders and communities; (c) an approach that can be used in conjunction with traditional justice processes and sanctions; (d) an approach that incorporates problem-solving and addresses the underlying causes of conflict; (e) an approach that addresses the harms and needs of victims; and (f) a response that recognizes the role of the community as of the primary forum for preventing and responding to crime and social disorder.66 4. As such processes are based on the agreement of the parties, they are not always successful and may result in the return of the case to the courts for judicial determination.60 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 5. However, it should be pointed out that the restorative justice process may involve some risks for the victim, in particular in cases involving child victims. Therefore, the use of such processes should be carefully studied before they are used in cases involving child victims. 6. Additional information on the use of restorative justice programmes in criminal matters can be found in the basic principles on the use of restorative justice programmes in criminal matters (Economic and Social Council resolution 2002/12, annex). Additional information on the features of such programmes can be found in the Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes67 of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. Also of use is Council of Europe recommendation No. R (99) 19 of the Committee of Ministers to member States concerning mediation in penal matters. Article 31. Information on the outcome of the trial The right of victims to receive information on the outcome of the trial, as well as other decisions affecting their interests, is provided for in several States.68 The Model Law adopts this provision as a best practice. Article 32. Role of the support person after the conclusion of the proceedings The support person should provide assistance to the child as long as assistance is needed. That may include, at the conclusion of the proceedings, referring the child for further treatment and care or repatriating the child to his or her home country. Article 33. Information on the release of convicted persons The right of victims to receive information on the status of a convicted person, including his or her potential release, is provided for in several States.69 The Model Law adopts this provision as best practice. E. Other proceedings Article 34. Extended application to other proceedings The provisions of the Model Law should apply in administrative proceedings involving child victims and witnesses, in order to provide children the same protection to which they are entitled under the law and ensure they do not suffer undue hardship.61 Chapter IV. Final provisions Article 35. Final dispositions (option for civil law countries) This article is an option for civil law countries. Notes 1. United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, No. 27531. 2. Ibid., vols. 2171 and 2173, No. 27531. 3. United Nations, Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention, Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (New York, 1999). 4. Point 1.2. of the appendix to recommendation (2006) 8. 5. African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, July 1990, article 4, and article 9, paragraph 2. 6. American Convention on Human Rights: Pact of San José, (United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1144, No. 17955), article 17, paragraph 4. 7. Inter-American Convention on International Traffic in Minors, adopted at Mexico City on 18 March 1994, article 1 (a) and (c) and articles 11 and 18. 8. European Convention on the Exercise of Children’s Rights (United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 2135, No. 37249), article 1, paragraph 2; article 6, subparagraph (a); and article 10, paragraph 1. 9. International Bureau for Children’s Rights, The Rights of Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime: a Compilation of Selected Provisions Drawn from International and Regional Instruments (Montreal, Canada, 2005). 10. Australia, High Court, Secretary, Department of Health and Community Services (NT) v JWB and SMB (Marion’s Case) (1992), 175 CLR 218 F.C. 92/010. 11. South Africa, Children’s Act, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 June 2006, sect. 7, para. 1. 12. Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Ley Organica para la Protección del Niño y del Adolescente, (1998), Gaceta Oficial, No. 5.266, art. 8. The content of the principle is detailed in article 8, paragraph 1, of the law. 13. For example, Belarus, Law on Child’s Rights, No. 2570-XII, 1993 (as amended in 2004), art. 9, al. 3; Morocco, Penal Code, art. 40 (as referred to in the report on the mission of the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography on the issue of commercial sexual exploitation of children to Morocco (E/CN.4/2001/78/Add.1, para. 75); Portugal, Lei de protecção de crianças e jovens em perigo, Law No. 147/99 (1999), art. 4, para. 3; Russian Federation, third periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/125/Add.5), para. 170 (child abuse). 14. France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 40; Code de l’éducation, art. L.542-1. 15. France, Code de la santé publique, art. L.2112-6 and Code de l’action sociale et des familles, art. L.221 6. 16. France, Code de déontologie médicale, arts. 43-44. 17. France, Décret No. 93-221 du 16 février 1993 relatif aux règles professionnelles des infirmiers et infirmières, art. 7.62 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 18. Canada, Sex Offender Information Registration Act, S.C. 2004, C-16; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (England), Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Bill, House of Lords (HL) Bill 79 (2006), explanatory notes, para. 4; United Kingdom (Scotland), Protection of Children (Scotland) Bill, (Scottish Parliament (SP)) SP Bill 61, 2002, sect. 1. 19. See website: http://www.terredeshommes.org. 20. For example, Canada (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q. chap. A-13.2) (1988), art. 8 (Bureau d’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels); Iceland, Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002 (2002), arts. 5-9 (Ministry of Social Affairs); Italy, Institution of the Parliamentary Commission for Childhood and of the National Observatory on Childhood, No. 451 (1997) arts. 1-2; Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), arts. 4-6. 21. For example, Belgium, Décret instituant un délégué général de la Communauté française aux droits de l’enfant (2002), art. 2; Costa Rica, Decreto por el que se Crea la Figura del Defensor de la Infancia, No. 17.733-J (1987) (Defensor de la Infancia); Denmark, Notification Respecting a Children’s Council, No. 2, 1998; Dominican Republic, Decreto por el que se Crea la Dirección General de Promoción de la Juventud, No. 2981 (1985) (Dirección General de Promoción de la Juventud); Egypt, Decree No. 2235 (1997) (General Administration for the Legal Protection of Children); Iceland, Act on the Ombudsman for Children, No. 83 (1994); Iceland, Regulation on the Child Welfare Council, No. 49 (1994); Indonesia, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/65/Add.23), para. 32; Kenya, Children and Young Persons Act (cap. 141) (Children’s Department of the Ministry for Home Affairs and National Heritage); Luxembourg, Loi du 25 juillet 2002 portant institution d’un comité luxembourgeois des droits de l’enfant appelé “Ombuds-Comité fir d’Rechter vum Kand” (“ORK”), No. A-N.85 (2002), arts. 2-3; Malaysia, Child Act 2001, Act No. 611, sect. 3 (Coordinating Council for the Protection of Children); Malta, Children and Young Persons (Care Orders) Act, chap. 285, 1980, art. 11, para. 1 (Children and Young Persons Advisory Board); Mauritania, report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/8/Add.42), paras. 6-7 (National Council for Children); Pakistan, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/65/Add.21), para. 5 (National Commission for Child Welfare and Development); Peru, Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Law No. 27.337, 2000), arts. 27 and 29; Qatar, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (CRC/C/OPSA/QAT/1), para. 102 (Child’s Friend Office); Sweden, Children’s Ombudsman Act, No. 335 (1993); Uganda, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/65/Add.33), p. 3 (Uganda National Programme of Action for Children); United Kingdom, Children Act 2004, chap. 31 (Children’s Commissioner); United States of America, United States Code collection, title 42, chap. 112, sect. 10605, Establishment of Office for Victims of Crime, subsects. (a)-(c) (Office for Victims of Crime). 22. For example, Myanmar, The Child Law, No. 9/93 (1993), art. 63. 23. http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/lscb. 24. For example, Bolivia, Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 176 (Comisión de la Niñez y Adolescencia); India, Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 (No. 56 of 2000), arts. 29, 37 and 39 (Child Welfare Committee); Tunisia, Code de la protection de l’enfant, 1995, arts. 3-6 (Délégué à la protection de l’enfance). 25. Belgium, Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, arts. 3-6 (Commission de coordination de l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitance). 26. For example, Bulgaria, National Programme for Prevention and Counteraction to Trafficking in Human Beings and Protection of the Victims for 2006; Estonia, Victim Support Act, 2003 (RT I 2004, 2, 3) (entered into force in 2004), arts. 3-4 (negligence, mistreatment, physical, mental or sexual abuse); Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), pp. 45-46 (anti-trafficking unit); Philippines, Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act, No. 7610 (1992), art. II, sect. 4 (child prostitution and other sexual abuse, child trafficking, obscene publications and indecent shows).Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 63 27. United States, United States Code collection, title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights, sect. (d) (Privacy protection), paras. 1-2 and 4. 28. For example, Bangladesh, Children’s Act, sect. 17 (as referred to in Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Bangladesh (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 37); Bolivia, Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 10 (Reserva y resguardo de identidad) al. 2; Canada (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse, L.R.Q., chap. P-34.1, 1977, art. 83; Canada, Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, subsects. 276.2-276.3, 486.3-4) and 486.4.1; Iceland, Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002 (2002), art. 58; Ireland, Children Act, 2001, sect. 252; Italy, Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 114; Japan, Law for Punishing Acts Related to Child Prostitution and Child Pornography and for Protecting Children, 1999 (as updated in 2004), art. 13; Kenya, The Children Act, (Chap. 586 of the Laws of Kenya, 2002) (as referred to in the second periodic report of Kenya to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, CRC/C/KEN/2), para. 212), sect. 76 (5); Philippines, Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act, No. 7610 (1992), art. XI, sect. 29, para. 2; Russian Federation, draft federal law on countering trafficking in persons, 2003, art. 28(3), (5)-(6); South Africa, Children’s Act, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 June 2006, sect. 74; Syrian Arab Republic, Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1974, art. 54 (as referred to in the initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (CRC/C/OPSC/SYR/1), para. 230); Thailand, Act Instituting Juvenile and Family Courts and Juvenile and Family Procedures, art. 98 (as referred to in the second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), para. 516); Tunisia, Child Protection Code (1995), art. 120 (as referred to in the initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.1), para. 242); Turkey, Law on Juvenile Courts, 1979, art. 40 (as referred to in the initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/51/Add.4), para. 511); United Kingdom (Scotland), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (chap. 36), sect. 44, subsect. 1; Zambia, initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2002 (CRC/C/11/Add.25), para. 527. 29. For example, Italy, Penal Code, art. 734 (a); Sri Lanka, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/70/Add.17), para. 65; United Kingdom (Scotland), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (chap. 36), sect. 44, subsect. 2; Zambia, initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/11/Add.25) para. 527. 30. Canada, Department of Justice, A Handbook for Police and Crown Prosecutors on Criminal Harassment (Ottawa, 2004), part. IV. 31. See for instance in France: http://www.barreau-marseille.avocat.fr/textes.cgi?rubrique=9. 32. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Independent Evaluation Report: Juvenile Justice Reform in Lebanon (Vienna, July 2005), para. 38. 33. Iran (Islamic Republic of), second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/104/Add.3), para. 36. 34. France, Ministry of Justice, Direction des affaires criminelles et des grâces, “Enfants victimes d’infractions pénales: guide de bonnes pratiques; du signalement au procès pénal” (Paris, 2003). 35. For example, United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-62. 36. For example, Switzerland, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, Recueil systématique du droit fédéral (RS) 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (1). 37. With respect to article 9 (a) of the Model Law, on procedures for the adult and juvenile criminal justice process, including the role of child victims and witnesses, the importance, timing and manner of testimony and ways in which “questioning” will be conducted during the investigation and trial, see Iceland, Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002, art. 55, para. 1; Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 215 (3); New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, sect. 12, subsect. 1; and United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-72; with respect to article 9 (b) of the Model Law, on existing support mechanisms for the child when making a complaint and participating in the investigation and court proceedings, including the availability of a victim’s lawyer, see Canada (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse (L.R.Q., chap. P-34.1), 1977, art. 5; 64 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Canada (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q., chap. A-13.2), 1988, art. 4; Canada, Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, 2003, principle 7; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 136, paras. 1-2 and 6; Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 20; Netherlands, “De Beaufort Guidelines”, 1989, para. 6; New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act, 2002, sect. 11(1), 12; Nicaragua, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 406, 2001, art. 110 (1); United Kingdom (Scotland), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (chap. 36), sect. 20, subsect. 1; and United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-62 (1), (7); with respect to article 9 (c) of the Model Law, on specific places and times of hearings and other relevant events, see Canada, Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, 2003, principle 6; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 136, paras. 12 and 14; New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, sect. 12, subsect. 1 (d); Spain, Ley 35/1995, de 11 de diciembre, de Ayudas y Asistencia a las Víctimas de Delitos Violentos y contra la Libertad Sexual, art. 15 (4); United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 237, sect. 3771, Crime victims’ rights, subsect. (a), (2); United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-72 (2). 38. International Criminal Court, Rule 90(5) of the Rules of Procedure and Evidence and regulation 83.2 of the regulations of the Court. 39. Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 11 (j); Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (b); France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 102; Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 75 (6); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. V; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as updated in 2006), art. 13, sect. 3; Thailand, Criminal Procedure Code, art. 13 (as referred to in the second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, para. 515). 40. For example, Australia (Western Australia), Evidence Act 1906, sect. 106E; United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (i). 41. Switzerland (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, 1991, art. 6 (3)). 42. For example, Canada, Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.1, subsect. 1. 43. For example, Argentina, Código Procesal Penal, art. 80 (c); Austria, Criminal code of procedure, art. 162 (2); Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (c); Peru, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 957 (2004), art. 95, sect. 3; Switzerland, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 7 (1). 44. For example, United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (i). 45. For example, Bulgaria, Child Protection Act, 2004, art. 15 (5); Dominican Republic, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 76-02, 2002, art. 202; Honduras, Código Procesal Penal, Decreto No. 9-99-E, 2000, art. 331; Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 215 and art. 352 (1); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. XVI; Norway, Criminal Procedure Act, No. 25, 1981 (as amended on 30 June 2006), sect. 128; Oman, Code of Criminal Procedure, art.14 (as referred to in Oman, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/OMN/2), paras. 29-30); Peru, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 957 (2004), art. 378, sect. 3; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as amended in 2006), art. 349. 46. For example, France, Code de procédure pénale (as amended by loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; South Africa, Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, “National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences; Department of Justice – National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases” (Pretoria 1998), chap. 7, para. 1; United States (Delaware), Del. Code Ann. Iti.11, §5134 (1995). 47. For example, Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (c); Czech Republic, Criminal Procedure Rules, No. 141, 1961, sect. 102 (1); Dominican Republic, Código Procesal Penal (Ley No. 76-02 of 2002), art. 202; France, Code de procédure Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 65 pénale (as amended by loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures, Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 52; Kyrgyzstan, Criminal Procedure Code, No. 156, 1999, arts. 193 and 293; the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Code of Criminal Procedures, art. 223 (4); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. XVI; Norway, Criminal Procedure Act, No. 25, 1981 (as amended on 30 June 2006), sect. 239; Peru, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 957 (2004), art. 378, sect. 3; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as amended in 2006), art. 349; Thailand, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, paras. 148 and 511. 48. For example, Bulgaria, Child Protection Act, 2004, art. 15 (5). 49. For example, Australia (Queensland), Evidence Act 1977, sect. 21A (2) (d); Austria, Criminal code of procedure, art. 162 (2); France, Code de procédure pénale (as amended by loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; United Kingdom, Home Office and others, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, Including Children (London, 2006), sect. 4.28; United Kingdom (Scotland), Vulnerable Witnesses (Scotland) Act 2004, sect. 271H, subsect. 1 (d). 50. United States (Arizona), Arizona Revised Statutes (Ariz.Rev.Stat.) §13-4403 (E). 51. For example, Australia (Queensland), Evidence Act 1977, sect. 9; Thailand, Civil and Commercial Procedure Code, sect. 95 (as referred to in the second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 para. 105); United Kingdom, Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999, sect. 53 (1); United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (c), para. 2. 52. New Zealand, Evidence Act 1908, sect. 23H, para. (c). 53. New Zealand, R. v. Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354 at 359. 54. Ibid. 55. For example, Honduras, Código Procesal Penal, Decreto No. 9-99-E, 2000, art. 331, al. 3. 56. For example, Algeria, Code de procédure pénale, 1966, art. 228; Republic of the Congo, Loi No. 1-63 du 13 janvier 1963 portant code de procédure pénale, arts. 91 and 382; Egypt, Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 283 (as referred to in the report of Egypt to the Human Rights Committee under article 40 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (CCPR/C/EGY/2001/3), 2002, para. 570); France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 108; Haiti, Code d’instruction criminelle (as amended in 1985), art. 66; Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 50; Oman, Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 196 (as referred to in Oman, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/OMN/2), para. 107); Thailand, Civil and Commercial Procedure Code, sect. 112 (as referred to in the second period report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 para. 105). 57. See Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 (c.23), sects. 55-57. 58. For example, United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (c), para. 3. 59. New Zealand, R. v Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354. 60. For example, El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as amended in 2006), art. 13, sect. 13; United States (Colorado), Children’s Code, Title 19, sect. 19-1-106(2). 61. United Kingdom, Crown Prosecution Service, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, including Children (London, 2006), sect. 4.28. 62. United Kingdom, Crown Prosecution Service, Children’s Charter, 2005, sect. 4.19. 63. For example, Switzerland, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (3).66 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 64. http://www.fijiwomen.com/. 65. Sometimes victims of trafficking are threatened with prosecution for having entered a country illegally; no special assistance has been provided to them while they are in police custody, not even when the victims are of a very young age and no protection measures have been granted. The whole issue of traumatization through trafficking and repeated rape has not been evaluated to its full extent, if any. 66. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.06.V.15), pp. 5-8. 67. United Nations publication, Sales No. E.06.V.15. 68. For example, Armenia, Criminal Procedure Code, 1999, art. 59, sect. 1, para. 11; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 11 (g); Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 75 (6); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. XIX; Netherlands, “De Beaufort Guidelines”,1989, para. 6.1; New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, sect. 12, subsect. 1 (e); United Kingdom, Crown Prosecution Service, “Code for Crown Prosecutors” (London, 2004), sect. 5.13; United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-63 (a), 15-23-72 (1) and 15-23-75 (1); United States (Alaska), Constitution of the State of Alaska, Rights of crime victims, art. I, sect. 24; United States (Connecticut), Connecticut Joint Resolution No. 13, para. 2; United States (Idaho), Constitution of the State of Idaho, Rights of crime victims, art. 1, sect. 22, para. (3) United States (Illinois), Constitution of the State of Illinois, Crime victim’s rights, art. I, , sect. 8.1 (Crime victim’s rights), subsect. (a) (5); United States (Michigan), Constitution of the State of Michigan, art. I, sect. 24 (1) 9; United States (Oregon), Constitution of the State or Oregon, art. 1, sect. 42 (1) (b); United States (South Carolina), Constitution of the State of South Carolina, art. 1, sect. 24 (3); United States (Tennessee), Constitution of the State of Tennessee, Amendment for victims’ rights, 1998, para. 5; United States (Texas), Constitution of the State of Texas, art. 1, sect. 30, Rights of crime victims, para. (b) (5); United States (Virginia), Constitution of Virginia, art. 1, sect. 8-A, para. 6; United States (Wisconsin), Constitution of the State of Wisconsin, art. 1, sect. 9m (9). 69. For example, Australia, Victims of Crime Act, A1994-83, 1994 (as amended on 13 April 2004), No. 83 of 1994, sect. 4 (l); Canada, Corrections and Conditional Release Act, S.C. 1992, c. 20, sect. 26, subsect. 1; United Kingdom (Scotland), Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill, SP Bill 50, 2003, sect. 16; United Kingdom, Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 (chap. 28), chap. 2, sect. 35, subsects. (4)-(5); United States, United States Code collection, Title 42, chap. 112, sect. 10606, Victims’ rights, 2004, subsect. (b), para. 7; United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-75 (5), 15-23-78; United States (Alaska), Constitution of the State of Alaska, Rights of crime victims, art. I, sect. 24; United States (Arizona), Arizona Constitution, sect. 2.1 (A), para. 2; United States (Idaho), Constitution of the State of Idaho, Rights of crime victims, art. 1, sect. 22, para. (3); United States (Illinois), Constitution of the State of Illinois, Crime victim’s rights, art. I,, sect. 8.1 (Crime victim’s rights), subsect. (a) (5); United States (Louisiana), Constitutional Amendment for Victims’ Rights, art. I, sect. 25; United States (Michigan), Constitution of the State of Michigan, art. I, sect. 24 (1) 9; United States (Oregon), Constitution of the State or Oregon, art.1, sect. 42 (1) (b); United States (South Carolina), Constitution of the State of South Carolina, art. 1, sect. 24 (2) and (10); United States (Tennessee), Constitution of the State of Tennessee, Amendment for victims’ rights, 1998, para. 5; United States (Texas), Constitution of the State of Texas, art. 1, sect. 30, Rights of crime victims, para. (b) (5); United States (Virginia), Constitution of Virginia, art. 1, sect. 8-A, para. 6; United States (Wisconsin), Constitution of the State of Wisconsin, art. 1, sect. 9m (9).Vienna International Centre, PO Box 500, 1400 Vienna, Austria Tel.: (+43-1) 26060-0, Fax: (+43-1) 26060-5866, www.unodc.org Printed in Austria V.08-58962—April 2009La justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos: Ley modelo y comentario La Oficina de las Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito desea expresar su agradecimiento al apoyo prestado por los Gobiernos del Canadá y de Suecia en la elaboración de esta Ley modelo y su comentario. OFICINA DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS CONTRA LA DROGA Y EL DELITO Viena La justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos: Ley modelo y comentario Naciones Unidas Nueva York, 2009 TEXTO EN ENCABEZADOS (TEXT IN HEADERS) En páginas pares a lo largo de todo el texto: (EVEN PAGES) La justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos En páginas impares de la primera parte: (EVEN PAGES FIRST PART) Primera parte. Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos En páginas impares de la segunda parte: (ODD PAGES SECOND PART) Segunda parte. Comentario sobre la Ley modelo Prefacio* 1. En su resolución 2005/20, de 22 de julio de 2005, el Consejo Económico y Social aprobó las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. Las Directrices forman parte del conjunto de reglas y normas de las Naciones Unidas en la esfera de la prevención del delito y la justicia penal, principios normativos en la materia reconocidos internacionalmente que la comunidad internacional ha venido elaborando desde 1950**. 2. Las Directrices representan prácticas adecuadas, basadas en el consenso, que reflejan los conocimientos actuales y las reglas, normas y principios regionales e internacionales pertinentes y que tienen por objeto establecer un marco útil para alcanzar los objetivos siguientes: a) Prestar asistencia para la formulación y el examen de las leyes, los procedimientos y las prácticas nacionales a fin de garantizar el pleno respeto de los derechos de los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos y promover la aplicación de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos del Niño*** por las Partes en dicha Convención; b) Prestar asistencia a los gobiernos, las organizaciones internacionales que proporcionan asistencia jurídica a los Estados que lo solicitan, los organismos públicos, las organizaciones no gubernamentales y comunitarias y demás interesados para la elaboración y aplicación de leyes, políticas, programas y prácticas que traten de cuestiones clave relacionadas con los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos; c) Orientar a los profesionales y, cuando proceda, a los voluntarios que trabajen con niños víctimas y testigos de delitos en sus actividades cotidianas en el marco de los procesos de justicia concernientes a adultos y menores en los planos nacional, regional e internacional, de conformidad con la Declaración sobre los principios fundamentales de justicia para las víctimas de delitos y del abuso de poder (resolución 40/34 de la Asamblea General, anexo); d) Prestar asistencia y apoyo a quienes estén dedicados al cuidado de los niños para que traten con sensibilidad a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. 3. Con el fin de ayudar a los Estados a adaptar su legislación a las disposiciones contenidas en las Directrices y en otros instrumentos internacionales pertinentes, la presente Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos tiene por objeto servir de instrumento para elaborar disposiciones legales en materia de asistencia y protección a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, en particular en el marco del proceso de justicia. La Ley modelo, elaborada por la Oficina de las Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito en colaboración con el Fondo de las Naciones Unidas para la Infancia (UNICEF) y la Oficina Internacional de los Derechos del Niño, se examinó en una reunión de expertos celebrada en Viena en mayo de 2007 en la que participaron representantes de distintas tradiciones jurídicas. 4. A efectos de que pudiera ser adaptada a las necesidades de cada Estado, al redactarla se prestó especial atención a las disposiciones de las Directrices para cuya aplicación se necesita legislación, así como a las cuestiones clave relativas a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, en particular el papel de estos en el proceso de justicia. 5. En la elaboración de la Ley modelo se tuvo especial cuidado en reflejar la necesidad de tener en cuenta las peculiaridades de las legislaciones y los procedimientos judiciales nacionales, el contexto jurídico, social, económico, cultural y geográfico de cada país y las distintas tradiciones jurídicas más importantes. 6. El ámbito de aplicación de la Ley modelo está relacionado principalmente con el sistema de justicia penal. No obstante, se invita a los Estados a que se inspiren en los principios y disposiciones de la Ley modelo al formular leyes relativas a otros ámbitos en que los menores puedan necesitar protección, entre ellos la custodia, el divorcio, la adopción, la inmigración y el derecho de los refugiados. 7. La Ley modelo también se elaboró con miras a que sus principios y disposiciones se pudieran utilizar y aplicar en los sistemas informales de justicia y los sistemas de justicia consuetudinaria. 8. El concepto de protección de los niños víctimas, tal como se utiliza en la Ley modelo, abarca la protección de los niños que no deseen o no sean capaces de testificar o de proporcionar información y de los menores sospechosos o autores de delitos que hayan sido objeto de victimización o intimidación, u obligados a actuar de forma ilegal, o que lo hayan hecho bajo coacción. 9. Con el fin de ayudar a los Estados a interpretar y aplicar sus disposiciones, la Ley modelo va acompañada de un comentario que servirá de directrices de interpretación y aplicación. Índice Página Prefacio iii Primera parte. Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos Preámbulo 3 Capítulo I. Definiciones 5 Capítulo II. Disposiciones generales sobre asistencia a los menores víctimas y testigos 7 Capítulo III. Asistencia a los menores víctimas y testigos durante el proceso de justicia 14 A. Disposiciones generales 14 B. Durante la fase de investigación 16 C. Durante la fase del juicio 20 D. En el período posterior al juicio 26 E. Otros procedimientos 28 Capítulo IV. Disposiciones finales 29 Segunda parte. Comentario sobre la Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos 30 Introducción 31 Preámbulo 33 Capítulo I. Definiciones 34 Capítulo II. Disposiciones generales sobre asistencia a los menores víctimas y testigos 35 Capítulo III. Asistencia a menores víctimas y testigos durante el proceso de justicia 46 A. Disposiciones generales 46 B. Durante la fase de investigación 49 C. Durante el juicio 54 D. En el período posterior al juicio 65 E. Otros procedimientos 70 Capítulo IV. Disposiciones finales 71 Primera parte Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos Preámbulo [Variante 1. Países de tradición jurídica romanista Considerando las obligaciones contraídas en virtud de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño, que fue aprobada por la Asamblea General en su resolución 44/25, de 20 de noviembre de 1989, y entró en vigor el 2 de septiembre de 1990, y sus Protocolos Facultativos, así como otros instrumentos jurídicos internacionales pertinentes, Considerando, en particular, la resolución 2005/20 del Consejo Económico y Social, de 22 de julio de 2005, en cuyo anexo figuran las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos (“las Directrices”), Considerando también que todo niño víctima o testigo de un delito tiene derecho a que su interés superior sea la consideración primordial, si bien deberán salvaguardarse al mismo tiempo los derechos de los acusados y los delincuentes condenados, Teniendo presentes los siguientes derechos de los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, en particular los mencionados en la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño y en las Directrices: a) El derecho a un trato digno y comprensivo; b) El derecho a la protección contra la discriminación; c) El derecho a ser informado; d) El derecho a ser oído y a expresar opiniones y preocupaciones; e) El derecho a una asistencia eficaz; f) El derecho a la intimidad; g) El derecho a ser protegido de sufrimientos durante el proceso de justicia; h) El derecho a la seguridad; i) El derecho a medidas preventivas especiales; j) El derecho a la reparación, Considerando que una mejor atención a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos puede hacer que estos y sus familias estén más dispuestos a comunicar los casos de victimización y a prestar más apoyo al proceso de justicia. Se aprueba la presente Ley el (día) ... de (mes) ... de (año).] [Variante 2. Países de tradición jurídica anglosajona Ley de asistencia y protección a los menores víctimas y testigos de delitos, en particular en el proceso de justicia, de conformidad con los instrumentos internacionales vigentes, especialmente la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño, aprobada por la Asamblea General en su resolución 44/25, de 20 de noviembre de 1989, y otros instrumentos internacionales conexos, entre ellos las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, aprobadas por el Consejo Económico y Social en su resolución 2005/20, de 22 de julio de 2005 (“las Directrices”). 1. La ley puede ser denominada “Ley sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos”. 2. Su ámbito de aplicación abarcará todo el territorio de [nombre del Estado]. 3. Entrará en vigor [el día, mes y año] [tras su publicación en el Boletín Oficial del Estado]]. Capítulo I. Definiciones Para los fines de la presente Ley se aplicarán las siguientes definiciones: a) “Por “niños víctimas o testigos” se entenderá los menores de 18 años que sean víctimas o testigos de un delito, independientemente de su papel en el delito o en el enjuiciamiento del presunto delincuente o grupo de delincuentes. A menos que se indique otra cosa, por “niño” se entenderá el niño víctima y el niño testigo; b) Por “profesionales” se entenderá las personas que, en el contexto de su trabajo, estén en contacto con niños víctimas y testigos de delitos o tengan la responsabilidad de atender a las necesidades de los menores en el sistema de justicia y para quienes sea aplicable la presente Ley. Este término incluye, entre otros, a defensores de niños y víctimas y personal de apoyo; especialistas de servicios de protección de menores; personal de organismos de asistencia pública infantil; fiscales y abogados defensores; personal diplomático y consular; personal de los programas contra la violencia doméstica; magistrados y jueces; personal judicial; funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley; agentes de libertad vigilada; profesionales médicos y de la salud mental; y trabajadores sociales; c) Por “proceso de justicia” se entenderá los aspectos de detección del delito, presentación de la denuncia, instrucción de la causa, enjuiciamiento y actuaciones posteriores al juicio, independientemente de que la causa se haya visto ante un tribunal nacional, internacional o regional para delincuentes adultos o menores o por alguna vía consuetudinaria o informal; d) Por “adaptado a los niños” se entenderá un enfoque en que el derecho del niño a ser protegido sea una consideración primordial y se tengan en cuenta sus propias necesidades y opiniones; e) Por “persona de apoyo” se entenderá una persona especialmente capacitada que haya sido designada para prestar asistencia a un menor a lo largo del proceso de justicia con objeto de evitar el riesgo de coacción, victimización repetida o victimización secundaria; f) Por “tutor del menor” se entenderá una persona reconocida oficialmente con arreglo a la legislación nacional como responsable de velar por los intereses del menor cuando los padres de éste no tengan la patria potestad o hayan fallecido; g) Por “curador ad litem” se entenderá una persona nombrada por el tribunal para proteger los intereses del menor en un procedimiento que afecte a sus intereses; h) Por “victimización secundaria” se entenderá la victimización producida no como resultado directo del acto delictivo, sino por la respuesta de las instituciones y personas individuales en relación con la víctima; i) Por “victimización repetida” se entenderá una situación en que una persona sea víctima de más de un incidente delictivo a lo largo de un período determinado. Capítulo II. Disposiciones generales sobre asistencia a los menores víctimas y testigos Artículo 1. El interés superior del niño Todo niño, en especial los niños víctimas y testigos, tendrá derecho, en el contexto de la presente Ley, a que su interés superior sea la consideración primordial, si bien al mismo tiempo deberán protegerse los derechos del acusado o el delincuente condenado. Artículo 2. Principios generales 1. Todo niño víctima o testigo será tratado sin discriminación alguna, independientemente de su raza, color, religión, creencias, edad, situación familiar, cultura, idioma, grupo étnico, origen nacional o social, ciudadanía, sexo, orientación sexual, opinión política o de otra índole, discapacidad, si la tuviera, nacimiento, patrimonio u otra condición cualquiera, o de los de sus progenitores o sus representantes legales. 2. Todo niño víctima o testigo de un delito será tratado con tacto y sensibilidad, respetando su dignidad a lo largo de todo el procedimiento judicial, teniendo en cuenta su situación personal y sus necesidades inmediatas y especiales, edad, sexo, discapacidad, si la tuviera, y grado de madurez. 3. La injerencia en la vida privada del niño se limitará al mínimo necesario, con arreglo a lo establecido por la ley, para garantizar la aplicación de normas rigurosas para la reunión de pruebas y un resultado justo y equitativo del procedimiento. 4. Se protegerá la intimidad de todo niño víctima o testigo. 5. No se publicará ninguna información que pueda revelar la condición de víctima o testigo de un niño sin la autorización expresa del tribunal. 6. Todo niño víctima o testigo tendrá derecho a expresar sus creencias, opiniones y pareceres libremente y en sus propias palabras y tendrá derecho a aportar su contribución a las decisiones que le afecten, incluidas las adoptadas en el curso del proceso de justicia. Artículo 3. Obligación de informar de un delito que afecte a un niño víctima o testigo 1. Los docentes, médicos, trabajadores sociales y demás profesionales que se estimen oportunos deberán informar a [nombre de la autoridad competente] si tienen motivos razonables para sospechar que un niño es víctima o testigo de un delito. 2. Las personas mencionadas en el párrafo 1 del presente artículo harán todo lo posible por prestar asistencia al niño hasta que se le proporcione asistencia profesional apropiada. 3. El deber de informar establecido en el párrafo 1 del presente artículo subroga toda obligación de confidencialidad, salvo en el caso del secreto profesional entre abogado y cliente. Artículo 4. Protección de los menores de todo contacto con delincuentes 1. Toda persona que haya sido declarada culpable en sentencia firme de un delito tipificado contra un menor quedará inhabilitada para trabajar en un establecimiento, institución o asociación que preste servicios a menores. 2. Todo establecimiento, institución o asociación que preste servicios a menores tomará las medidas adecuadas para garantizar que las personas que hayan sido acusadas de un delito tipificado contra un menor no tengan contacto con niños. 3. A los efectos de los párrafos 1 y 2 del presente artículo, el [nombre del órgano competente] promulgará un reglamento que contenga lo siguiente: a) una definición de delito tipificado con respecto a la gravedad de la sentencia que pueda ser impuesta por el tribunal; b) una lista de los delitos de tipificación obligatoria; c) el mandato del tribunal para dictar una orden encaminada a impedir que una persona declarada culpable de tales delitos trabaje en establecimientos, instituciones o asociaciones que presten servicios a menores; d) la individualización de los establecimientos, instituciones y asociaciones que prestan servicios a menores; e) las medidas que han de adoptar los establecimientos, instituciones y asociaciones que presten servicios a menores con el fin de garantizar que las personas acusadas de un delito tipificado no tengan contacto con niños. 4. Toda persona que, a sabiendas, infrinja lo dispuesto en el párrafo 1 o 2 del presente artículo será considerada culpable de un delito y estará sujeta a la pena estipulada en el reglamento que se establecerá en virtud del párrafo 3 del presente artículo. Artículo 5. [Organismo] [Oficina] nacional para la protección de los niños víctimas o testigos [Variante para los Estados que establezcan un organismo nacional: 1. Por la presente Ley se establece un organismo nacional para la protección de los niños víctimas y testigos (el “Organismo”). 2. El Organismo estará integrado por: a) un juez de [nombre del tribunal competente]; b) un representante del ministerio público especializado en causas de menores; c) un representante de los organismos encargados de hacer cumplir la ley; d) un representante de los servicios de protección del menor o de cualquier otro servicio pertinente del ministerio encargado de los asuntos sociales; e) un representante del ministerio encargado de la salud; f) un representante del colegio de abogados, si es posible especializado en causas relacionadas con menores; g) un representante de cada una de las organizaciones reconocidas de apoyo a las víctimas que presten servicios a menores; h) un representante del ministerio encargado de la educación; [Optativo: i) cualquier otro representante con arreglo a las normas locales]. 3. Los miembros del Organismo serán nombrados por [nombre del ministro competente] en un plazo de [...] meses a partir de la entrada en vigor de la presente Ley.] [Variante para los Estados que no deseen crear un organismo nacional y prefieran utilizar un órgano o ministerio existente: 1. Se creará una oficina para la protección de los niños víctimas y testigos (la “Oficina”) en el [nombre del órgano o ministerio competente]. 2. La Oficina estará integrada por: a) un juez de [nombre del tribunal competente]; b) un representante del ministerio público especializado en causas de menores; c) un representante de los organismos encargados de hacer cumplir la ley; d) un representante de los servicios de protección del menor o de cualquier otro servicio pertinente del ministerio encargado de los asuntos sociales; e) un representante del ministerio encargado de la salud; f) un representante del colegio de abogados, si es posible especializado en causas relacionadas con menores; g) un representante de cada una de las organizaciones reconocidas de apoyo a las víctimas que presten servicios a menores; h) un representante del ministerio encargado de la educación; [Optativo: i) cualquier otro representante con arreglo a las normas locales]. 3. La Oficina desempeñará las funciones establecidas en el artículo 6 de la presente Ley. Artículo 6. Funciones del [Organismo] la [Oficina] nacional para la protección de los niños víctimas y testigos [El Organismo] [La Oficina] desempeñará las funciones siguientes: a) Adoptará políticas nacionales generales en relación con los niños víctimas y testigos; b) Tomando como base las políticas nacionales, formulará recomendaciones respecto de los programas de prevención y protección pertinentes y las comunicará a las autoridades públicas competentes; c) Promoverá y garantizará la coordinación nacional de los servicios e instituciones que proporcionen asistencia o tratamiento a los niños víctimas y testigos del modo siguiente: i) vigilando la aplicación de los procedimientos existentes relativos a la notificación de actos delictivos y prestando asistencia a los niños víctimas y testigos, entre otras cosas brindándoles representación letrada y servicios de acogida, y estableciendo dichos procedimientos cuando no existan; ii) haciendo recomendaciones al ministerio o los ministerios competentes acerca de la promulgación de reglamentos y protocolos; d) Establecerá directrices para la puesta en marcha de mecanismos, entre ellos líneas de consulta telefónica directa permanente para la protección de menores, que serán regulados por [nombre del órgano competente]; e) Establecerá directrices para la capacitación de profesionales que trabajen con niños víctimas y testigos; f) Emprenderá trabajos de investigación sobre cuestiones relativas a niños víctimas y testigos; g) Difundirá información acerca de la prestación de asistencia a niños víctimas y testigos entre las personas e instituciones que se ocupen de los menores, por ejemplo, escuelas, organismos públicos e instituciones y centros a que tengan acceso los niños; h) Publicará informes anuales sobre la actuación de los órganos sujetos a lo dispuesto en la presente Ley y a sus propias actividades. Artículo 7. Confidencialidad 1. Además de las medidas vigentes destinadas a la protección legal de la intimidad de los niños víctimas y testigos adoptadas de conformidad con lo dispuesto en el párrafo 3 del artículo 3 de la presente Ley, todas las personas que trabajen con niños víctimas o testigos, así como todos los miembros [del Organismo establecido] [de la Oficina establecida] en virtud del artículo 5 de la presente Ley, respetarán el carácter confidencial de toda la información relativa a los niños víctimas y testigos que haya llegado a su poder en el ejercicio de sus funciones. 2. Toda persona que infrinja lo dispuesto en el párrafo 1 del presente artículo será considerada culpable de un delito y podrá ser castigada con una pena de prisión de [...] o una multa de [...], o ambas sanciones. Artículo 8. Formación 1. Los profesionales que trabajen con niños víctimas y testigos recibirán la debida formación sobre las cuestiones relacionadas con estos. 2. Cuando proceda, [el Organismo establecido] [la Oficina establecida] en virtud del artículo 5 de la presente Ley elaborará y publicará planes de estudio para la formación de los profesionales que trabajen con niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. La formación deberá abarcar: a) reglas, normas y principios pertinentes de derechos humanos, incluidos los derechos del niño; b) principios y deberes éticos relativos al ejercicio de sus funciones; c) signos y síntomas indicativos de delitos cometidos contra menores; d) conocimientos especializados y técnicas para la evaluación de crisis, en particular para la remisión de casos, con especial hincapié en la confidencialidad; e) la dinámica y naturaleza de la violencia contra los niños y el impacto y las consecuencias de los delitos contra los niños, incluidos los efectos físicos y psicológicos negativos; f) medidas y técnicas especiales para ayudar a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos durante el proceso de justicia; g) información relativa a las etapas de desarrollo del niño y a cuestiones multiculturales y relacionadas con la edad de carácter lingüístico, étnico, religioso, social y de género, prestando especial atención a los niños pertenecientes a grupos desfavorecidos; h) técnicas apropiadas de comunicación entre adultos y niños, entre otras cosas, métodos adaptados a los niños; i) técnicas de interrogatorio y evaluación que reduzcan al mínimo la posibilidad de que los niños sufran angustia o trauma y, al mismo tiempo, permitan obtener de ellos la mejor información posible, entre ellas técnicas para tratar a los niños víctimas y testigos con sensibilidad y comprensión, de manera constructiva y que inspire confianza; j) métodos para proteger y presentar pruebas y para interrogar a los niños testigos; k) la función de los profesionales que trabajen con niños víctimas y testigos de delitos y los métodos utilizados por ellos. Capítulo III. Asistencia a los menores víctimas y testigos durante el proceso de justicia A. Disposiciones generales Artículo 9. Derecho a ser informado En la medida de lo posible y apropiado, los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, sus padres o tutores o sus representantes legales, la persona de apoyo, si hubiera sido designada, u otra persona designada para prestarles asistencia, desde su primer contacto con el proceso de justicia y a lo largo de todo ese proceso, deberán ser informados sin demora por [nombre de la autoridad competente] acerca de la fase en que se encuentre el proceso, así como de lo siguiente: a) Los procedimientos aplicables en el proceso de justicia penal para adultos y menores, incluido el papel de los niños víctimas y testigos, la importancia, el momento y la manera de prestar testimonio, y la forma en que se realizará el “interrogatorio” durante la investigación y el juicio; b) Los mecanismos de apoyo a disposición del niño víctima o testigo cuando haga una denuncia y participe en la investigación y en el proceso judicial, como por ejemplo poner a disposición de la víctima un abogado o cualquier otra persona designada para prestar asistencia.; c) Las fechas y los lugares específicos de las vistas y otros acontecimientos importantes; d) Las medidas de protección disponibles; e) Los mecanismos existentes para revisar las decisiones que afecten a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos; f) Los derechos correspondientes a los niños víctimas o testigos de conformidad con la legislación nacional vigente, la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño y otros instrumentos jurídicos internacionales, tales como las Directrices y la Declaración sobre los principios fundamentales de justicia para las víctimas de delitos y del abuso de poder, aprobada por la Asamblea General en su resolución 40/34 de 29 de noviembre de 1985; g) Las posibilidades que existan para obtener reparación por parte del delincuente o del Estado mediante el proceso de justicia, procedimientos civiles alternativos u otros procedimientos; h) La existencia y el funcionamiento de programas de justicia restaurativa; i) La disponibilidad de servicios médicos, psicológicos, sociales y otros servicios de interés, y el medio de acceder a ellos, así como el asesoramiento letrado o representación legal o de otro tipo, y el apoyo financiero de emergencia disponible, según proceda; j) La evolución y estado de la causa en cuestión, incluidos datos sobre la captura y detención del acusado, su situación en cuanto a privación o no de libertad, así como cualquier cambio inminente de esa situación, la decisión de la fiscalía y la situación de interés que se produzca después del juicio y la resolución de la causa. Artículo 10. Asistencia letrada El Estado deberá asignar un abogado de forma gratuita a todo niño víctima o testigo a lo largo de todo el proceso de justicia en los siguientes casos: a) a petición de éste; b) a petición de sus padres o tutores; c) a petición de la persona de apoyo, en caso de que haya sido designada; d) mediante decisión judicial adoptada de oficio, si el tribunal considera que la asignación de un abogado redunda en el interés superior del niño. Artículo 11. Medidas de protección En cualquier momento del proceso de justicia en que se estime que la seguridad de un niño víctima o testigo está en riesgo, el [nombre de la autoridad competente] dispondrá lo necesario con el fin de adoptar medidas de protección del menor. Tales medidas pueden incluir lo siguiente: a) Evitar el contacto directo entre los niños víctimas o testigos y los acusados en todo momento del proceso de justicia; b) Solicitar órdenes de alejamiento al tribunal competente, respaldadas por un sistema de registro; c) Pedir al tribunal competente que ordene la prisión preventiva del acusado e imponga condiciones de libertad bajo fianza que veden todo contacto; d) Solicitar al tribunal competente que ordene el arresto domiciliario del acusado; e) Solicitar que se conceda a los niños víctimas o testigos de delitos protección policial o de otros organismos pertinentes, y adoptar medidas para que no se revele su paradero; f) Solicitar a las autoridades competentes la adopción de otras medidas de protección que se estimen convenientes; Artículo 12. Idioma, intérprete y otras medidas especiales de asistencia 1. El tribunal deberá garantizar que la parte del procedimiento correspondiente a la prestación de testimonio de un niño víctima o testigo se desarrolle en un lenguaje sencillo y comprensible para el menor. 2. Si el menor necesita servicios de interpretación a un idioma que pueda comprender, se proporcionará un intérprete de forma gratuita. 3. Si, habida cuenta de la edad, el grado de madurez o las necesidades particulares de un niño, que podrían incluir, sin limitarse a ello la discapacidad, si la hubiera, el grupo étnico, la pobreza o el riesgo de victimización repetida, éste requiere medidas especiales de asistencia con el fin de prestar declaración o participar en el proceso de justicia, tales medidas se proporcionarán de forma gratuita. B. Durante la fase de investigación Las disposiciones contenidas en esta sección (“B. Durante la fase de investigación”) de la presente [Ley] deberán ser aplicadas por todas las autoridades nacionales competentes que participen en la investigación de causas que atañen a niños víctimas o testigos. Artículo 13. Investigador especialmente capacitado 1. El [nombre de la autoridad competente] nombrará a un investigador especialmente capacitado en el trato con menores para dirigir el interrogatorio que se haga al niño, utilizando métodos adaptados a éste. 2. En la medida de lo posible, el investigador evitará repetir el interrogatorio durante el proceso de justicia, con el fin de evitar la victimización secundaria del menor. Artículo 14. Exámenes médicos y obtención de muestras corporales 1. Los niños víctimas y testigos serán objeto de examen médico o de toma de muestras corporales únicamente si se dan las dos condiciones siguientes: a) En presencia de sus padres o tutores, o la persona de apoyo, salvo que el menor decida lo contrario; b) El tribunal, un oficial superior de policía o el fiscal emite una autorización por escrito para un examen médico o la toma de muestras corporales. 2. El tribunal, un oficial superior de policía o el fiscal otorgarán una autorización por escrito para la realización de un examen médico o para la toma de muestras corporales, únicamente si existen motivos razonables para creer que dicho examen o toma de muestras corporales son necesarios. 3. Si en algún momento de la fase de investigación existe alguna duda respecto de la salud de un niño víctima o testigo, incluida su salud mental, la autoridad competente encargada del procedimiento se asegurará de que el niño sea objeto de un examen médico exhaustivo por un facultativo lo antes posible. 4. Una vez realizado dicho examen médico, la autoridad competente encargada del procedimiento pondrá el mayor empeño en asegurar que el niño reciba el tratamiento recomendado por el facultativo, incluida, en caso necesario, la hospitalización. Artículo 15. Persona de apoyo Desde el inicio de la fase de investigación y durante todo el proceso de justicia, todo niño víctima o testigo recibirá el apoyo de un profesional cualificado, especialista en técnicas de comunicación con menores y asistencia a niños de diferentes edades y contextos culturales y familiares, con el fin de evitar el riesgo de coacción, victimización repetida y victimización secundaria. Artículo 16. Designación de una persona de apoyo 1. El investigador notificará a [nombre de la autoridad competente] su intención de invitar al niño víctima o testigo a un interrogatorio y solicitará que se designe una persona de apoyo. 2. La persona de apoyo será designada por la [nombre de la autoridad competente]. Con anterioridad a su designación, la [nombre de la autoridad competente] consultará con el niño y sus padres o tutores, incluso con respecto al sexo de la persona de apoyo que será designada. 3. Se dará suficiente tiempo a la persona de apoyo para conocer al niño antes de que tenga lugar el primer interrogatorio. 4. Cuando se invite a un niño a un interrogatorio, el investigador informará a la persona de apoyo del menor de la hora y el lugar en que vaya a celebrarse. 5. Todo interrogatorio que se realice a un niño víctima o testigo como parte del proceso de justicia deberá tener lugar en presencia de la persona de apoyo. 6. A lo largo de todo el proceso de justicia deberá garantizarse la continuidad de la relación entre el menor y la persona de apoyo en la mayor medida posible . 7. El [nombre del organismo competente] que haya designado a la persona de apoyo supervisará la labor de ésta y le prestará asistencia, en caso necesario. Si la persona de apoyo no ejerciera sus deberes y funciones de conformidad con la presente [Ley], el [nombre del organismo competente] designará otra persona de apoyo que la sustituya tras consultar con el niño. Artículo 17. Funciones de la persona de apoyo Entre otras cosas, la persona de apoyo: a) Brindará apoyo general de carácter emocional al niño; b) Prestará asistencia al menor, de un modo adaptado a éste, durante todo el proceso de justicia. Tal asistencia puede incluir medidas destinadas a paliar los efectos negativos del delito penal en el menor; medidas para ayudar al niño a seguir con su vida cotidiana; y medidas para ayudar al niño a resolver cuestiones administrativas derivadas de las circunstancias de la causa; c) Asesorará al niño respecto de la necesidad de recibir tratamiento o apoyo psicológico; d) Actuará de enlace y canal de comunicación con los padres o tutores, familiares, amigos y abogado del niño, según proceda; e) Informará al niño respecto de la composición del equipo de investigación o el tribunal, y de todas las demás cuestiones previstas en el artículo 9 de la presente [Ley]; f) En coordinación con el abogado que represente al niño o en ausencia de dicho abogado, consultará con el tribunal, el niño y sus padres o tutor las distintas opciones para prestar declaración, tales como, cuando exista la posibilidad, la grabación en vídeo y otros medios que permitan proteger el interés superior del niño; g) En coordinación con el abogado que represente al niño o en ausencia de dicho abogado, consultará con los organismos encargados de hacer cumplir la ley, el fiscal y el tribunal la conveniencia de dictar medidas de protección; h) Solicitará que se dicten medidas de protección, en caso necesario; i) Solicitará medidas especiales de asistencia, si la situación del niño lo justifica. Artículo 18. Información que deberá proporcionarse a la persona de apoyo Además de la información que debe facilitarse en cumplimiento del artículo 9 de la presente [Ley], en todas las fases del proceso de justicia, deberá informarse a la persona de apoyo de: a) los cargos que se imputan al acusado; b) la relación entre el acusado y el menor; c) la detención del acusado. Artículo 19. Funciones de la persona de apoyo en caso de puesta en libertad del acusado La persona de apoyo, habiendo sido informada por la autoridad competente de la puesta en libertad o el levantamiento de la prisión preventiva del acusado, informará en consecuencia al menor o a sus padres o tutor, y a su abogado, y le prestará asistencia para solicitar medidas de protección, en caso necesario. C. Durante la fase del juicio Artículo 20. Fiabilidad de la declaración del niño 1. Se considerará que todo niño puede ser un testigo capaz, salvo que se demuestre lo contrario mediante una prueba de capacidad, administrada por el tribunal de conformidad con el artículo 21 de la presente [Ley], y su testimonio no se considerará carente de validez o de credibilidad sólo en razón de su edad, siempre que por su edad y madurez pueda prestar testimonio de forma inteligible y creíble. 2. A efectos de esta sección (“C. Durante la fase del juicio”), por testimonio de un menor también se entenderá el testimonio prestado mediante el uso de ayudas técnicas de comunicación o mediante la asistencia de un experto especializado en conocimiento de niños y comunicación con ellos. 3. El peso dado al testimonio del menor estará en consonancia con su edad y madurez. 4. Todo niño, con independencia de si presta testimonio o no, tendrá la oportunidad de expresar sus opiniones y preocupaciones personales en asuntos relacionados con la causa, su participación en el proceso de justicia, en particular con relación a su seguridad respecto del acusado, su preferencia para testificar o no y el modo en que se prestará declaración, así como cualquier otra cuestión pertinente que pueda afectarle. En los casos en que no haya atendido a sus opiniones, el menor deberá recibir una explicación clara de las razones por las que no se han tenido en cuenta. 5. Ningún niño será obligado a testificar en el proceso de justicia contra su voluntad o sin el conocimiento de sus padres o tutor. Se pedirá a los padres o tutor del menor que lo acompañen, salvo en las siguientes circunstancias: a) Si los padres o el tutor son los presuntos autores del delito cometido contra el niño; b) Si el niño expresa preocupación respecto del hecho de estar acompañado por sus padres o tutor; c) Si el tribunal considera que el hecho de estar acompañado por sus padres o tutor es contrario al interés superior del niño; Artículo 21. Prueba de capacidad 1. Únicamente se podrá someter al niño a una prueba de capacidad, si el tribunal determina que hay razones imperiosas que lo justifiquen. El tribunal dejará constancia de las razones de esa decisión. A la hora de decidir si se ha de efectuar una prueba de capacidad, el interés superior del niño será la consideración primordial. 2. La prueba de capacidad tiene por objeto determinar si el menor es capaz de comprender las preguntas que se le formulen en un lenguaje comprensible para un niño, así como la importancia de decir la verdad. La edad del niño no constituye, por sí sola, una razón imperiosa que permita solicitar una prueba de capacidad. 3. El tribunal podrá nombrar a un experto con el fin de que determine la capacidad del menor. Además del experto, las únicas personas que podrán estar presentes en la prueba de capacidad son: a) el magistrado o juez; b) el fiscal; c) el abogado defensor; d) el abogado del niño; e) la persona de apoyo; f) un taquígrafo de actas o un secretario judicial; g) cualquier otra persona, incluidos los padres, tutor o curador ad litem del niño, cuya presencia, en opinión del tribunal, sea necesaria para el bienestar del menor. 4. Si el tribunal no designa a un experto, será el tribunal quien lleve a cabo la prueba de capacidad del niño, basándose en las preguntas presentadas por el fiscal y el abogado defensor. 5. Las preguntas se formularán de forma adaptada al niño y en un modo apropiado a su edad y nivel de desarrollo, y no estarán relacionadas con cuestiones que tengan que ver con el juicio. Éstas se centrarán en determinar la capacidad del menor para comprender preguntas sencillas y responder a ellas con veracidad. 6. No se prescribirá un examen psicológico o psiquiátrico para evaluar la capacidad del menor, salvo que se demuestre la existencia de razones imperiosas que lo justifiquen. 7. La prueba de capacidad no podrá repetirse. Artículo 22. Juramento 1. A juicio del magistrado o juez presidente del tribunal, ningún niño testigo será obligado a prestar juramento, si, por ejemplo, el niño no es capaz de comprender las consecuencias que ello tiene. En tales casos, el magistrado o juez presidente del tribunal puede ofrecer al niño la posibilidad de prometer que dirá la verdad. No obstante, en cualquiera de los dos casos, el tribunal escuchará el testimonio del menor. 2. Ningún niño testigo será procesado por prestar falso testimonio. Artículo 23. Designación de una persona de apoyo durante el juicio 1. Antes de invitar a un niño víctima o testigo a comparecer ante los tribunales, el magistrado o juez competente comprobará que el niño ya está recibiendo la asistencia de una persona de apoyo. 2. Si aún no se ha designado una persona de apoyo, el magistrado o juez competente nombrará a una persona de apoyo en consulta con el niño y sus padres o tutor, y dará a ésta tiempo suficiente para familiarizarse con la causa y trabar conocimiento con el niño. 3. El magistrado o juez competente informará a la persona de apoyo de la fecha y lugar de celebración del juicio o la vista. Artículo 24. Salas de espera 1. El magistrado o juez competente se asegurará de que los niños víctimas y testigos puedan esperar en salas apropiadas adaptadas para niños. 2. Las salas de espera que utilicen los niños víctimas y testigos no serán accesibles a los acusados de haber cometido un delito penal, ni estarán a la vista de éstos. 3. Siempre que sea posible, las salas de espera utilizadas por los niños víctimas y testigos estarán separadas de las salas de espera para los adultos testigos. 4. El magistrado o juez competente podrá, si procede, dictar que un niño víctima o testigo espere un lugar alejado del juzgado e invitan al niño a que comparezca cuando sea necesario. 5. El magistrado o juez dará prioridad a oír la declaración de los niños víctimas y testigos, con el fin de reducir al mínimo el tiempo de espera de los menores durante su comparecencia ante el tribunal. Artículo 25. Apoyo emocional a los niños víctimas y testigos 1. Además de los padres o el tutor del niño y su abogado, o cualquier otra persona pertinente designada para prestar asistencia, el magistrado o juez competente permitirá a la persona de apoyo que acompañe al niño víctima o testigo durante toda su participación en el procedimiento judicial, con el fin de reducir el nivel de ansiedad o estrés. 2. El magistrado o juez competente informará a la persona de apoyo de que tanto ésta como el niño podrán solicitar al tribunal una suspensión de actividades siempre que el niño lo necesite. 3. El tribunal podrá ordenar que los padres o el tutor del niño que abandonen una vista únicamente cuando sea en el interés superior del niño. Artículo 26. Los juzgados 1. El magistrado o juez competente se asegurará de que en la sala de audiencias se disponga lo necesario para los niños víctimas o testigos, tales como asientos elevados y asistencia para niños con discapacidades. 2. En la medida de lo posible, la disposición de la sala debe permitir que el niño pueda sentarse cerca de sus padres o tutor, persona de apoyo o abogado durante todo el procedimiento. [Artículo 27. Interrogatorio por la parte contraria (opción para países de tradición jurídica anglosajona) Cuando proceda, y teniendo debidamente en cuenta los derechos del acusado, el magistrado o juez competente no permitirá que el niño víctima o testigo sea sometido a interrogatorio por el acusado. Dicho interrogatorio podrá ser realizado por el abogado defensor bajo la supervisión del magistrado o juez competente, quien tendrá el deber de impedir que se formulen preguntas que puedan suponer intimidación, angustia o sufrimiento injustificado para el niño.] Artículo 28. Medidas para proteger la intimidad y el bienestar de los niños víctimas y testigos A petición del niño víctima o testigo, sus padres o tutor, su abogado, la persona de apoyo, cualquier otra persona pertinente designada para prestar asistencia, o de oficio, el tribunal podrá dictar, teniendo en cuenta el interés superior del niño, una o más de las medidas siguientes para proteger la intimidad y el bienestar físico y mental del menor, y evitar todo sufrimiento injustificado y victimización secundaria: a) Suprimir de las actas del juicio todo nombre, dirección, lugar de trabajo, profesión o cualquier otra información que pudiera servir para identificar al menor; b) Prohibir al abogado defensor que desvele la identidad del niño o divulgue cualquier otro material o información que pudiera conducir a su identificación; c) Ordenar la no divulgación de cualquier acta en que se identifique al niño, hasta que el tribunal lo considere oportuno; d) Asignar un seudónimo o un número al niño, en cuyo caso el nombre completo y la fecha de nacimiento del menor deberán revelarse al acusado en un período de tiempo razonable para la preparación de su defensa; e) Adoptar medidas para ocultar los rasgos o la descripción física del niño que preste testimonio o para evitar todo daño o sufrimiento al menor, incluida la prestación de declaración del modo siguiente: i) detrás de una pantalla opaca; ii) utilizando medios de alteración de la imagen o de la voz; iii) realizando el interrogatorio en otro lugar, transmitiéndolo a la sala de forma simultánea a través de un circuito cerrado de televisión; iv) mediante grabación en vídeo del interrogatorio del niño testigo antes de la celebración de la vista. En ese caso, el abogado del acusado asistirá a dicho interrogatorio y se le dará la oportunidad de interrogar al niño víctima o testigo; v) a través de un intermediario cualificado y adecuado, como por ejemplo un intérprete para niños con discapacidad auditiva, visual, del habla o de otro tipo, entre otros; f) Celebrando sesiones a puerta cerrada; g) Ordenando que el acusado abandone la sala temporalmente, si el niño se niega a prestar testimonio en su presencia o si las circunstancias son tales que podrían impedir al niño decir la verdad en presencia de esa persona. En tales casos, el abogado defensor permanecerá en la sala e interrogará al niño, quedando, así, garantizado el derecho al careo del acusado; h) Permitiendo supervisiones de las vistas durante el testimonio del niño; i) Programando las vistas a horas del día apropiadas para la edad y madurez del niño; j) Mediante la adopción de cualquier otra medida que el tribunal estime necesaria, incluido el anonimato, cuando proceda, teniendo en cuenta el interés superior del niño y los derechos del acusado. D. En el período posterior al juicio Artículo 29. Derecho de resarcimiento e indemnización [Opción si existe un fondo público para las víctimas: 1. El tribunal informará al niño víctima, a sus padres o al tutor, y a su abogado acerca del procedimiento para pedir una indemnización. 2. Todo niño víctima que no sea nacional del Estado tendrá derecho a pedir una indemnización.] [Opción 1. Países de tradición jurídica anglosajona 3. Tras la condena del acusado, y además de cualquier otra medida impuesta contra éste, el tribunal podrá ordenar de oficio, o a petición del fiscal, la víctima, sus padres o tutor, o su abogado, que el delincuente resarza o indemnice al niño del modo siguiente: a) En los casos de pérdida, deterioro o destrucción de los bienes del niño víctima como resultado de la comisión del delito o la detención o intento de detención del delincuente, el tribunal podrá ordenar que el delincuente pague al niño o a sus representantes legales el valor de sustitución de los bienes cuando éstos no puedan ser restituidos en su totalidad; b) En los casos en que el niño haya sufrido lesiones corporales o daño psicológico a consecuencia de la comisión del delito o de la detención o intento de detención del delincuente, el tribunal podrá ordenar que el delincuente indemnice económicamente al niño por los daños y perjuicios sufridos a consecuencia de dicho daño o lesiones, incluidos los gastos derivados de la reinserción social y educativa, el tratamiento médico, la atención de salud mental y los servicios jurídicos; c) En los casos de lesiones corporales o amenaza de lesiones corporales sufridas por un niño que era miembro del núcleo familiar del delincuente en el momento de los hechos, el tribunal podrá ordenar que el delincuente indemnice económicamente al niño por los gastos incurridos debido a la necesidad de mudarse del domicilio del delincuente.] [Opción 2. Países donde los tribunales penales no tienen jurisdicción en las demandas civiles 3. Tras pronunciar sentencia, el tribunal informará al niño, a sus padres o tutor y a su abogado de su derecho de resarcimiento e indemnización, de conformidad con la legislación nacional.] [Opción 3. Países donde los tribunales penales tienen jurisdicción en las demandas civiles 3. El tribunal ordenará que el niño sea totalmente resarcido e indemnizado, cuando proceda, e informará al menor de la posibilidad de obtener asistencia para que la orden de resarcimiento e indemnización sea ejecutada. Artículo 30. Medidas de justicia restaurativa? Hace referencia a lo que en realidad es JUSTICIA RESTAURATIVA En el supuesto de que se contemplen medidas de justicia restaurativa, el [nombre del órgano competente] informará al menor, a sus padres o tutor, y a su abogado sobre los programas de justicia restaurativa existentes y el modo de acceder a esos programas, y sobre la posibilidad de obtener resarcimiento e indemnización en los tribunales, si mediante el programa de justicia restaurativa no se logra llegar a un acuerdo entre el niño víctima y el delincuente. Artículo 31. Información sobre el resultado del juicio 1. El magistrado o juez competente informará al menor, a sus padres o tutores, y a la persona de apoyo del resultado del juicio. 2. El magistrado o juez competente pedirá a la persona de apoyo que proporcione apoyo emocional al niño con el fin de ayudarle a avenirse al resultado del juicio, en caso necesario. [Opción para los países de tradición jurídica anglosajona: 3. El tribunal informará al menor, a sus padres o tutores, y a su abogado del procedimiento existente para conceder la libertad condicional al delincuente y del derecho del niño a expresar su opinión al respecto.] Artículo 32. Papel de la persona de apoyo tras la conclusión del procedimiento 1. Inmediatamente después de la conclusión del procedimiento, la persona de apoyo actuará de enlace con los organismos y profesionales adecuados a fin de que el niño víctima o testigo siga recibiendo apoyo psicológico o tratamiento, en caso necesario. 2. En el supuesto de que un niño víctima o testigo necesite ser repatriado, la persona de apoyo actuará de enlace con las autoridades competentes, incluidas las consulares, con el fin de que se apliquen correctamente las disposiciones nacionales e internacionales pertinentes que regulan la repatriación de menores, y prestará asistencia al niño en los preparativos para la repatriación. Artículo 33. Información sobre la puesta en libertad de reclusos 1. En el supuesto de que un recluso vaya a ser puesta en libertad, [nombre de la autoridad competente] informará al menor y a sus padres o tutores de dicha puesta en libertad a través de la persona de apoyo, cuando proceda, o del abogado del niño. La información será facilitada por [nombre de la autoridad competente] lo antes posible tras la adopción de tal decisión, a más tardar un día antes de la puesta en libertad. 2. El tribunal informará a todo niño víctima o testigo de la puesta en libertad de un recluso durante un período de al menos [...] años, una vez que el menor haya cumplido 18 años. E. Otros procedimientos Artículo 34. Ampliación de la aplicación a otros procedimientos Las disposiciones de la presente [Ley] serán aplicables, mutatis mutandis, a todos los asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas o testigos, incluidos los civiles. [Capítulo IV. Disposiciones finales] [Artículo 35. Disposiciones finales (opción para los países de tradición jurídica romanista) La presente [Ley] entrará en vigor con arreglo a los procedimientos nacionales vigentes en virtud de la legislación nacional de [nombre del país].] Segunda parte Comentario sobre la Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos Introducción En su resolución 2005/20, de 22 de julio de 2005, el Consejo Económico y Social aprobó las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos (las “Directrices”), contenidas en el anexo de esa resolución. Las Directrices forman parte del corpus de reglas y normas de las Naciones Unidas en la esfera de la prevención del delito y la justicia penal, que son principios normativos reconocidos internacionalmente en la materia, elaborados por la comunidad internacional desde 1950. Con el fin de prestar asistencia en la aplicación de las Directrices a los países, las organizaciones internacionales que proporcionan asistencia jurídica a los Estados que lo solicitan, los organismos públicos y las organizaciones no gubernamentales y comunitarias, así como a los especialistas, la Oficina de las Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito, en colaboración con el UNICEF, ha elaborado una serie de instrumentos técnicos, incluida la Ley modelo sobre la Justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos. La Ley modelo se ha concebido para prestar asistencia a los gobiernos en la elaboración de la legislación nacional correspondiente, de conformidad con los principios contenidos en las Directrices y en otros instrumentos jurídicos internacionales pertinentes, tales como la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño. El propósito del presente comentario sobre la Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos es contribuir a una mejor comprensión de las disposiciones de esa Ley. Además, el comentario contiene referencias a leyes, jurisprudencia y normas internacionales, así como explicaciones y ejemplos relacionados con los distintos artículos de la Ley modelo. En primer lugar, cabe subrayar que la Ley modelo parte del principio de que existen distintas categorías de profesionales que pueden y deben prestar asistencia a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos a lo largo de todo el proceso de justicia. A menudo se sostiene que los padres tienen el derecho y el deber primordiales de prestar esa asistencia y que la intervención del Estado a ese respecto podría conculcar dicho derecho y deber. No obstante, también se ha reconocido que los conocimientos especializados y multidisciplinarios de profesionales pueden servir de apoyo a los padres, que con frecuencia no están familiarizados con el proceso de justicia, a la hora de encontrar la mejor manera de ayudar a sus hijos. En lo tocante a su ámbito, la Ley modelo está prevista para proteger a todos los menores de 18 años que hayan de prestar testimonio en un proceso de justicia y sean víctimas o testigos de un delito. Ahora bien, la Ley modelo también está prevista para proteger y ayudar a los niños que sean al mismo tiempo víctimas y autores de un delito, así como a los niños víctimas que no deseen testificar. Conforme a la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño, que prevé los mismos derechos fundamentales para todos los niños, la presente Ley modelo no distingue entre víctimas que también son testigos y víctimas que no lo son, o entre víctimas y testigos en conflicto con la ley, y los que no lo están. Salvo que se indique lo contrario, las disposiciones de la Ley modelo están concebidas para proteger a los niños víctimas y a los niños testigos. Habida cuenta de la existencia de distintos sistemas jurídicos, con diferentes tradiciones en cuanto a su formulación, la Ley modelo contiene algunos artículos y disposiciones optativos, con el fin de dar cabida a esas diferencias. La Ley modelo ha sido concebida para su aplicación, bien en su totalidad o en parte, en función de las necesidades y las circunstancias específicas de cada país. Preámbulo En su preámbulo, la Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos prevé dos opciones: una para los países de tradición jurídica romanista y otra para los países de tradición jurídica anglosajona. El cuarto párrafo de la opción correspondiente a los países de tradición jurídica romanista contiene una lista de los derechos de los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. Los derechos enumerados en ese párrafo se derivan de distintas fuentes jurídicas, tales como la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño, aprobada por la Asamblea General en su resolución 44/25 de 20 de noviembre de 1989 y que entró en vigor el 2 de septiembre de 1990, y las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos (resolución 2005/20 del Consejo Económico y Social, anexo), que tiene distintas repercusiones jurídicas. Si bien los derechos contenidos en la Convención tienen carácter vinculante para los países que la han ratificado, los derechos que figuran en las Directrices no tienen la misma fuerza legal. Ahora bien, los derechos contenidos en los dos instrumentos están interrelacionados, y es la combinación de éstos y su interconexión lo que proporciona un marco que permite establecer un sistema integral y amplio de protección para los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. Capítulo I. Definiciones Las definiciones de “niños víctimas y testigos”, “profesionales”, “proceso de justicia” y “adaptado a los niños” contenidas en la Ley modelo están extraídas del párrafo 9 de las Directrices. Persona de apoyo El concepto de “persona de apoyo” se ha incorporado a la legislación de distintos países con términos diferentes y en diferentes etapas del proceso de justicia. El denominador común de esa institución es la prestación de apoyo y asistencia a los niños víctimas y testigos, desde la etapa más temprana posible del proceso de justicia, por una persona capacitada y especializada en prestar asistencia a menores, en un modo que el niño comprenda y acepte. El objetivo principal de la presencia de una persona de apoyo es proteger al niño víctima o testigo del riesgo de coacción, victimización repetida y victimización secundaria. Tutor del menor 3. En cuando a una definición de “tutor del menor”, la Ley modelo ha optado por remitir a la legislación pertinente de cada Estado Miembro. Victimización secundaria 4. La definición de “victimización secundaria” contenida en la Ley modelo se ha extraído de Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power preparado por la Oficina de Fiscalización de Drogas y de Prevención del Delito en 1999. Victimización repetida 5. La definición de “victimización repetida” contenida en la Ley modelo está inspirada en la definición que recoge la recomendación (2006) 8 del Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa a los Estados Miembros sobre asistencia a las víctimas de delitos, adoptada el 14 de junio de 2006. Capítulo II. Disposiciones generales sobre asistencia a los menores víctimas y testigos Artículo 1. El interés superior del niño 1. El apartado c) del párrafo 8 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos establece que, si bien deberán salvaguardarse los derechos de los acusados o delincuentes declarados culpables, todo niño tendrá derecho a que su interés superior sea la consideración primordial. En el párrafo 1 del artículo 3 de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño se establece que en todas las medidas concernientes a los niños una consideración primordial a que se atenderá será el interés superior del niño. 2. El concepto de “interés superior del niño” también figura en diversos tratados regionales, en particular en la Carta Africana sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño, la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos, la Convención Interamericana sobre Tráfico Internacional de Menores, el Convenio europeo sobre el ejercicio de los derechos del niño y otros instrumentos jurídicos. 3. En la legislación de distintos Estados, como, por ejemplo, Australia, se considera que el concepto “interés superior del niño” no requiere explicación, mientras que la de otros Estados, tales como Sudáfrica, han optado por proporcionar una definición en sus leyes internas. Un planteamiento interesante es el que contiene la legislación de Venezuela (República Bolivariana de), según el cual el “interés superior del niño” se considera un principio de interpretación y aplicación de la ley. 4. Así pues, se decidió no incluir una definición de este principio en la Ley modelo, sino dejar que los legisladores nacionales decidan el planteamiento más idóneo. 5. No obstante, cabe subrayar que en el contexto de los procedimientos penales, si bien el principio del “interés superior del niño” debería ser la consideración primordial, éste no puede poner en peligro o menoscabar los derechos de la persona acusada o declarada culpable. Es preciso llegar a un equilibrio entre la protección de los menores víctimas o testigos de delitos y la protección de los derechos de los acusados. Por consiguiente, el texto del artículo 1 refleja ese equilibrio y se expresa en los mismos términos que el apartado c) del párrafo 8 del las Directrices. Artículo 2. Principios generales El artículo 2 prevé los principios generales que han de regir la aplicación de la ley. Artículo 3. Obligación de informar de un delito que afecte a un niño víctima o testigo 1. En varios países existe la obligación general conforme a la ley de notificar cualquier delito cometido contra un menor a las autoridades competentes inmediatamente después de haber sido descubierto. En esos países, no informar de tal delito puede constituir un delito penal (por omisión). 2. Según la legislación nacional de algunos países, ese deber es aún más riguroso para algunas categorías de profesionales que trabajan con menores, entre éstas los funcionarios públicos del ministerio responsable de la educación, los asistentes sociales, los médicos y las enfermeras. 3. En la Ley modelo se ha optado por establecer de forma explícita el deber de informar de tales delitos, con consecuencias legales si dicho deber se incumple, para determinadas categorías profesionales que tienen contacto directo con menores, tales como los maestros, médicos y asistentes sociales. En la Ley modelo también se deja a discreción del legislador nacional la posibilidad de ampliar ese deber de informar a otras categorías de profesionales que se estimen oportunas y con arreglo a otras leyes nacionales. Artículo 4. Protección de los menores de todo contacto con delincuentes 1. Varios Estados han elaborado listas especiales de personas declaradas culpables de delitos específicos, tales como los delitos sexuales. La policía puede servirse de esas listas para seguir el rastro a delincuentes y a veces posibles empleadores, pueden tener acceso a esas listas para obtener información sobre los antecedentes penales del candidato. 2. Terre des Hommes - International Federation, organización no gubernamental internacional, ha publicado una guía para uso interno destinada a evitar la contratación de personas que hayan tenido problemas con la ley relacionados con delitos contra menores. La guía proporciona información y datos importantes al respecto. 3. Con arreglo a la Ley modelo, toda persona declarada culpable de un delito tipificado contra un menor quedará inhabilitada para trabajar en un establecimiento, institución o asociación que preste servicios a menores. Esa disposición protege a los niños del riesgo de convertirse en víctimas de delincuentes reincidentes. El incumplimiento del párrafo 2 del artículo 4 de la Ley modelo por parte de un empleador se considera delito. Artículo 5. [Organismo] [Oficina] nacional para la protección de los niños víctimas o testigos 1. Frecuentemente, el establecimiento de un órgano u organismo público centralizado para coordinar las distintas actividades relacionadas con la prestación de asistencia a las víctimas es, la primera medida eficaz para lograr que los principales agentes que prestan asistencia a las víctimas coordinen sus actividades con eficiencia. En la Ley modelo se prevé tal establecimiento y refleja las mejores prácticas. 2. Varios Estados han creado organismos específicos encargados de coordinar actividades encaminadas a promover y proteger los derechos del niño. Sin embargo, en algunos países, habitualmente debido a la falta de recursos, la protección de los niños y la prestación de asistencia a éstos se lleva a cabo principalmente por organizaciones no gubernamentales, cuyas operaciones están supervisadas por organismos públicos. 3. En algunos países, la coordinación de las actividades para la protección del menor se realiza a nivel local o regional. En el Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, por ejemplo, los comités locales de protección del menor aglutinan a representantes de los principales organismos y a profesionales del ámbito de la protección del menor, con el fin de coordinar las distintas actividades que se realizan en su circunscripción para proteger a los niños. Entre otras cosas, esos comités elaboran políticas locales para las actividades interinstitucionales en el contexto nacional, ayudan a mejorar la calidad de la protección de menores mediante cursos de formación, y llevan a cabo actividades de concienciación en las comunidades locales acerca de la necesidad de salvaguardar los derechos del niño. En países como Bolivia, la India y Túnez pueden encontrarse iniciativas similares. 4. En Bélgica, se ha creado una comisión de coordinación para niños víctimas de malos tratos en cada distrito judicial francófono. El propósito de las comisiones es informar a las entidades locales y coordinar sus esfuerzos en lo que respecta a la prestación de asistencia a los niños víctima de malos tratos, con el fin de mejorar la eficacia de tales entidades. Las comisiones están integradas por representantes de partidos políticos, magistrados, funcionarios de los organismos encargados de hacer cumplir la ley y asistentes sociales. 5. Existe legislación relativa al establecimiento de mecanismos específicos de coordinación para la asistencia a las víctimas de determinado tipo de delitos en países como Bulgaria (para las víctimas de la trata de seres humanos), Estonia (para las víctimas de descuido, malos tratos, maltrato psicológico y mental, o abusos sexuales), Indonesia, (para las víctimas de la trata de niños) y Filipinas (para las víctimas de la prostitución infantil y otros abusos sexuales, y la trata de niños). 6. El organismo coordinador debe estar integrado por representantes de todas las entidades pertinentes. Así pues, el inciso i) del párrafo 2 del artículo 5 se ha incluido como una opción para facilitar el nombramiento de cualquier otro representante de conformidad con la normativa y la legislación locales. 7. Con el fin de garantizar la aplicación de la disposición, que podría aplazarse por razones presupuestarias, también se propone que los gobiernos establezcan un plazo máximo para el nombramiento de sus miembros. Artículo 6. Funciones del [Organismo] la [Oficina] nacional para la protección de los niños víctimas y testigos En el artículo 6 se establecen las funciones el organismo o la oficina nacional para la protección de los niños víctimas o testigos. Artículo 7. Confidencialidad 1. El artículo 7 tiene por objeto proteger la intimidad y la seguridad de los niños víctimas y testigos, y en él se estipula que los miembros del organismo creado en virtud del artículo 5 mantengan la confidencialidad de la información relativa al niño víctima y testigo. 2. Un buen ejemplo de legislación nacional que garantiza la confidencialidad de la información relativa a los niños víctimas y testigos es la legislación de los Estados Unidos de América sobre los derechos de los niños víctimas y testigos, que prevé lo siguiente: “D) Protección de la intimidad. 1) Confidencialidad de la información. A) Toda persona que actúe en virtud de lo dispuesto en el subpárrafo B) con relación a un procedimiento penal: i) custodiará todos los documentos en que figure el nombre u otra información relativa a un niño en un lugar seguro al que no pueda acceder ninguna persona que no tenga motivo para conocer su contenido; ii) presentará los documentos a que se hace referencia en el inciso i) o facilitará la información relativa al niño contenida en éstos únicamente a la persona que, debido a su participación en el procedimiento, tenga motivos para conocer dicha información. B) El subpárrafo A) se aplica a: i) todos los funcionarios que tengan alguna relación con la causa, incluidos los del Departamento de Justicia, cualquier organismo encargado de hacer cumplir la ley que participe en la causa y cualquier persona contratada por el Gobierno para prestar asistencia en el procedimiento; ii) los funcionarios del tribunal; iii) el acusado y los empleados del acusado, incluido su abogado y las personas contratadas por el acusado o su abogado para prestar asistencia en el procedimiento; y iv) los miembros del jurado.” 3. En varios Estados, habitualmente sobre la base de disposiciones contenidas en las leyes vigentes en materia de medios de comunicación o en legislación relativa a jóvenes o leyes sobre protección de menores, la prohibición de hacer pública la información relativa a menores es más estricta debido a disposiciones que prohíben la publicación o retransmisión de esa información, incluidas imágenes de niños, por los medios de comunicación, hasta tal punto que, aun cuando pese a las restricciones la información se filtre, los medios de difusión tienen prohibido utilizada. La divulgación en los medios de comunicación de esa información protegida puede constituir un delito. 4. Dado que la mayoría de las legislaciones nacionales ya contienen tales prohibiciones, en la Ley modelo no figura una disposición específica relativa a la divulgación de esa información por los medios de comunicación. Artículo 8. Formación 1. En consonancia con el párrafo 40 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, la Ley modelo estipula que los profesionales que en su trabajo entren en contacto con niños víctimas o testigos de delitos, en particular los encargados de prestar asistencia a esos niños, deberán recibir formación adecuada. 2. Así, por ejemplo, en Bolivia (Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 12) y Bulgaria (Ley de protección del menor (2004), art. 3, párr. 6) es obligatorio que los funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley que entren en contacto con niños víctimas y testigos de delitos reciban formación. 3. En teoría, la formación de quienes tengan que tratar con menores víctimas y testigos de delitos debería incluir un componente común multidisciplinario para todos los profesionales, combinado con módulos más específicos en que se traten las necesidades propias de cada profesión. Por ejemplo, mientras que la formación de los jueces y fiscales podría centrarse fundamentalmente en la legislación y en procedimientos específicos, la de los funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley puede requerir formación en temas más amplios, tales como cuestiones psicológicas y de comportamiento. Por otro lado, la formación de los asistentes sociales puede estar más centrada en la prestación de asistencia, mientras que la capacitación del personal médico debe concentrarse en técnicas de examen forense para reunir una base probatoria sólida. 4. En muchos países, los funcionarios de los organismos encargados de hacer cumplir la ley, al ser los responsables de recibir las denuncias de delitos y de la investigación correspondiente, son los primeros profesionales con quienes las víctimas y testigos de delitos entran en contacto. Por consiguiente, tales funcionarios deberían recibir formación específica y apropiada en materia de asistencia a niños víctimas y testigos, y sus familias. Es importante hacer hincapié en que una formación adecuada de los funcionarios de las fuerzas y cuerpos de seguridad puede contribuir que se proceda a una investigación adecuada y se reduzca al mínimo cualquier posible daño. 5. Esa formación debería estar orientada entre otras cosas a: a) que los funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley comprendan y apliquen las principales disposiciones de las políticas legislativas y ministeriales relativas al trato de los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos; b) concienciar respecto de las cuestiones de que tratan las Directrices y los instrumentos regionales e internacionales pertinentes; y c) que los funcionarios de las fuerzas y cuerpos de seguridad conozcan los protocolos específicos, en particular en lo que atañe al contacto inicial entre el niño víctima y el organismo encargado de hacer cumplir la ley, el interrogatorio inicial al niño víctima o testigo, la investigación de un delito y el apoyo a la víctima. 6. Además, los funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley especializados en cuestiones relacionadas con menores también deberían recibir formación sobre cómo poner en contacto a las víctimas y testigos con los grupos de apoyo existentes; cómo facilitar información y ayudar a las víctimas a afrontar los efectos de la victimización; y cómo evitar el riesgo de victimización repetida. Un buen ejemplo de legislación que prevé capacitación específica dirigida a las dependencias policiales es la de la India (Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 (Núm. 56 de 2000), art. 63). Existen iniciativas similares en otros países, como Marruecos (Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 19) y el Perú (Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Ley Núm. 27.337, 2000), arts. 151-153). También debe promoverse la elaboración y difusión de directrices nacionales que se ocupen de los niños víctimas y testigos desde una perspectiva policial. 7. En los países de tradición jurídica anglosajona, la capacitación de fiscales en procedimientos adaptados a los niños puede contribuir a que, al preparar la causa y presentarla ante el tribunal, los fiscales tengan en la práctica y plenamente en cuenta los requisitos específicos relativos a la situación de los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. Al dirigir una investigación y prepara una causa, el fiscal tiene la posibilidad de velar por que se respeten los derechos de los niños víctimas y testigos. El fiscal puede mantener al niño informado de las actuaciones y los procedimientos del tribunal, asegurar que el entorno previo al juicio y en el juzgado sean los adecuados, y hacer un seguimiento en caso de remisión. La formación de los fiscales puede contribuir a que éstos proporcionen un nivel de asistencia e información básicos a los niños víctimas y testigos, lo que incluye informar al menor sobre la situación en que se encuentra la causa y sobre la aplicación de medidas especiales, como la utilización de salas de espera para los niños víctimas y testigos y sus familias. 8. También puede recomendarse a los fiscales que consensúen acuerdos con organizaciones no gubernamentales para que presten servicios básicos a los menores, incluso una vez concluidos el juicio y declarado culpable el delincuente. En el Reino Unido, el Consejo de Estudios Judiciales (Judicial Studies Board) ha elaborado un programa de capacitación sobre niños testigos dirigido a abogados y magistrados, que se centra en la ley británica sobre derechos humanos de 1998. Se trata de un curso de autoaprendizaje seguido de un cursillo CURSO de formación de un día. Además, en un componente de capacitación sobre víctimas y testigos publicado por los comités de jueces de juzgados (Magistrates’ Courts Committees) proporcionan información detallada sobre el procedimiento para determinar posibles testigos vulnerables e intimidados. Se muestra un vídeo a los participantes en que se describe la experiencia de una víctima, y luego se les da la oportunidad de examinar sus propias experiencias de vulnerabilidad. La Fiscalía de la Corona (Crown Prosecution Service) ha elaborado un programa de formación de cuatro niveles en materia de víctimas y testigos que se centra en lo siguiente: a) concienciar al personal de la Fiscalía respecto de cuestiones relativas a las víctimas y testigos, y a su papel y responsabilidades; b) asegurar la detección eficaz de testigos vulnerables o víctimas de intimidación, y sus condiciones para poder acogerse a medidas especiales; c) asegurar un apoyo efectivo a las víctimas y gestión de casos; y d) garantizar la comunicación efectiva, incluso en relación con decisiones de la fiscalía. 9. Otro ejemplo es el de México, donde los servicios de la fiscalía han preparado un programa de concienciación y apoyo destinado a las víctimas de delitos, que incluye, entre otras cosas, capacitación y unos cursos prácticos sobre la protección de las víctimas (Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 22 (VIII)). 10. También debe fomentarse la elaboración de directrices nacionales que aborden la cuestión de los niños víctimas y testigos desde el punto de vista del fiscal, como por ejemplo las directrices para los fiscales de la Corona (Guidelines for Crown Prosecutors) en Canadá. La Fiscalía del Estado (National Prosecuting Authority) de Sudáfrica elaboró un manual para fiscales sobre derecho del menor (Child Law Manual for Prosecutors, Pretoria, 2001) que se ha utilizado como base para la formación de los fiscales de todo el país. 11. En los países de tradición jurídica romanista en los que la legislación prevé que las víctimas reciban la asistencia de un abogado de oficio, debe impartirse una formación similar a la descrita anteriormente a los abogados encargados de representar a las víctimas. Debido a la especial relación que existe entre un niño víctima y su abogado, que se designa expresamente para proteger sus derechos, tal abogado se encuentra en la situación más indicada para garantizar que el niño víctima reciba toda la asistencia y los cuidados posibles. En Francia, varios colegios de abogados han tomado la iniciativa de crear grupos de abogados especializados que reciben formación continua en cuestiones relacionadas con menores, por ejemplo a través de actualizaciones de documentos legales y conocimientos especializados de otros profesionales de interés, como psicólogos, asistentes sociales y jueces. 12. Es igualmente decisivo que todos los jueces reciban formación en cuestiones relacionadas con menores, o al menos que estén bien informados en esa materia. No todos los países cuentan con una institución de jueces especializados en menores, e incluso en los países en que sí existe, muy frecuentemente los jueces tienen que alternar, dentro del sistema de justicia, entre asuntos penales y asuntos civiles y entre temas especializados y temas generales, y viceversa. Pero, en muchos países, las cuestiones relacionadas con menores están reservadas a una categoría especial de jueces que han recibido formación específica y, por consiguiente son especialistas en la materia. Con frecuencia, esos jueces se dedican exclusivamente a esas cuestiones que pueden incluir, además del derecho de familia y la justicia de menores, dictar órdenes judiciales para la protección de niños y medidas relativas a niños que necesitan cuidados y protección especiales (por ejemplo, Brasil, Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente, Ley Num. 8.069 (1990), art. 145). 13. Los profesionales de la salud también pueden prestar asistencia primaria y directa a niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, ya que pueden ser los primeros en entrar en contacto con ellos o incluso ser quienes descubran que un niño ha sido víctima de un delito. Han de elaborarse programas de formación y protocolos sobre los derechos y necesidades de los niños víctimas y testigos dirigidos al personal hospitalario pertinente, que incluyan la prestación de asistencia médica y psicológica, así como un código ético para el personal médico que tenga en cuenta las necesidades de las víctimas. Un buen ejemplo de ese tipo de programas de formación para profesionales de la salud es el programa para la obtención de un certificado en protección de niños víctimas de abusos y malos tratos, creado por la escuela para la formación de asistentes sociales de la Universidad de San José en Beirut. En Bélgica, la legislación establece que al menos una persona de cada establecimiento de asistencia social y médica debe recibir formación específica en materia de niños víctimas (Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, art. 11). 14. Los asistentes sociales también desempeñan un importante papel en cuanto a la prestación de asistencia y atención adecuadas a los niños víctimas y testigos pues, por sus funciones, están en una situación singular para intervenir en favor del interés superior del niño. La sensibilización de los asistentes sociales acerca de esas cuestiones podría aumentarse mediante capacitación y cursos prácticos específicos, de carácter análogo a los de la República Islámica del Irán, en que se seleccionó y capacitó al menos a un experto en asuntos relacionados con los niños de cada provincia y se organizaron cursos prácticos para trabajadores sociales sobre los derechos del niño. En Ucrania también se ha puesto en marcha un amplio programa para la formación y coordinación de asistentes sociales (Ley sobre asistencia social a niños y jóvenes, 2001). En varios países se han distribuido folletos y hojas informativas para aumentar la concienciación al respecto entre los profesionales de esa especialidad. 15. En conclusión, un modo eficaz de lograr una concienciación efectiva de todos los profesionales que comparten la responsabilidad de proteger a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos es centralizar la capacitación en una única institución que pueda cerciorase de que se llega a todas las categorías profesionales y de como lograrlo. Un buen ejemplo de tal institución existe en Egipto, donde la Administración general para la protección jurídica del menor del Ministerio de Justicia se encarga de la elaboración de programas de capacitación y titulaciones para miembros de instituciones jurídicas, sociólogos y psicólogos que se ocupan de asuntos relativos a menores (Decreto sobre la protección jurídica del menor, Núm. 2235, 1997, párr. 14 e)). Otros Estados también han emprendido iniciativas similares, como por ejemplo Bulgaria (Ley de protección del menor (2004), art. 1, párrs. 3-4) y Malasia (Child Act 2001, Act Núm. 611, secc. 3, subsecc. (2) (g)). 16. Según la Ley modelo la responsabilidad de la formación incumbiría al organismo nacional de coordinación, y en ella figura una lista no exhaustiva de materias de formación, que el legislador deberá adaptar a las necesidades específicas de su país. Capítulo III. Asistencia a menores víctimas y testigos durante el proceso de justicia A. Disposiciones generales Artículo 9. Derecho a ser informado 1. Conforme a los principales instrumentos internacionales sobre asistencia a las víctimas y los párrafos 19 y 20 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, así como con la legislación nacional de varios Estados, en la Ley modelo se propugna la importancia de dar a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos acceso a información relativa a su caso y a información relacionada con la protección y el ejercicio de sus derechos. Un modo eficaz de poner esa información a disposición de las víctimas de delitos es distribuir folletos u hojas informativas en las comisarías de policía, hospitales, salas de espera, escuelas, oficinas de servicios sociales y otros establecimientos públicos, así como en Internet. 2. También se puede obtener orientación de legislación en la que se requiera que se proporcione a las víctimas información adecuada y oportuna. Ello podría lograrse, por ejemplo, adscribiendo la responsabilidad de informar a las víctimas a la policía, durante su primer contacto con éstas. La legislación de algunos países estipula que esa información se proporcione a la víctima únicamente si ésta lo solicita expresamente, según un método denominado de “opción positiva”. No obstante, si bien esa “opción positiva” tiene por objeto evitar que las víctimas se sientan acosadas al recibir información que no han solicitado, ello puede tener como consecuencia que la víctima no reciba información útil que hubiera preferido recibir. También puede velarse por el respeto de deseo de la víctima de no saber nada del procedimiento sustituyendo el sistema de “opción positiva” por uno de “opción negativa”, mediante el cual la víctima recibirá automáticamente toda la información pertinente, a menos que solicite expresamente que no se le proporcione. 3. En muchos países con recursos limitados, el acceso a información sobre la causa puede verse obstaculizado por varias razones, tales como la existencia de un sistema de justicia infradotado, el analfabetismo de las víctimas y la falta de medios de transporte o de comunicación para las víctimas. Una solución práctica podría consistir en encargar a asistentes sociales y organizaciones comunitarias la prestación de asistencia a las víctimas en su participación en el proceso de justicia. 4. Algunos países transcienden el derecho de las víctimas a ser informadas del procedimiento y reconocen el derecho de los niños víctimas a recibir explicaciones de los jueces relativas al procedimiento y las decisiones adoptadas. Éste es el caso de Bulgaria (Ley de protección del menor (2004), art. 15, párr. 3), Costa Rica (Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Ley Núm. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (d)) y Nueva Zelandia (Children, Young Persons and Their Families Act 1989, secc. 10). Se deberían promover soluciones de ese carácter. 5. En los países en que las víctimas están representadas por un abogado, las víctimas deberían recibir información sobre el procedimiento a través de su abogado. Sin embargo, la relación entre cliente y abogado no es siempre equilibrada, y es posible que este sistema no corresponden. Si a la información transmitida por los abogados se le suman otras fuentes de información, podrá protegerse mejor el derecho de la víctima a ser informada. En la mayoría de los casos, la asistencia de una persona de apoyo (véanse los artículos 15 a 19 de la Ley modelo) es la mejor manera de asegurarse de que la víctima recibe toda la información a su debido tiempo. 6. En todos los sistemas jurídicos, un elemento necesario para garantizar el respeto del derecho de la víctima a ser informada es determinar quiénes son las personas encargadas de transmitir la información a las víctimas. Los detalles relativos al reparto de responsabilidades a ese respecto han de estar regulados, como ocurre, por ejemplo, en la legislación de los Estados Unidos (United States Code collection, Título 42, capítulo 112, secc. 10607, Services to victims, subsecc. (a) y (c)). 7. En cuanto al contenido y al tipo de información que los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos habían de recibir, en la Ley modelo se reflejan las disposiciones de la legislación vigente en varios países. 8. En la Ley modelo se indica que la información debe ser facilitada por la autoridad competente que designe el Gobierno, y no incluye ninguna cláusula de opción positiva o de opción negativa, si bien el legislador nacional puede considerar la posibilidad de adoptar tales disposiciones. Artículo 10. Asistencia letrada 1. Según lo expuesto en el párrafo 22 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, la prestación eficaz de asistencia a los niños víctimas y testigos durante un procedimiento podrá requerir que éstos puedan acceder a asistencia letrado. Los Estados deberían considerar la posibilidad de prestar asistencia letrada gratuita a los niños víctimas en los casos en que sea necesario durante el proceso de justicia penal. La consideración primordial ha de ser el principio del interés superior del niño. 2. En los países de tradición jurídica anglosajona, debido a que las víctimas son parte en el juicio, habitualmente éstas no tienen acceso por derecho durante el procedimiento a asistencia letrada. Por esa razón, con algunas notables excepciones, la mayoría de los países que reconocen el derecho de las víctimas a gozar de asistencia jurídica pertenecen a la tradición romanista. La mayor parte de los países de tradición jurídica romanista reconocen el derecho de los niños víctimas a recibir asistencia letrada: por ejemplo, Armenia (Código procesal penal, 1999, art. 10 (3)4)), Bulgaria (Ley de protección del menor, 2004, art. 15 8)) y Filipinas (AntiViolence against Women and their Children Act de 2004, Núm. 9262 (2004), secc. 35 (b)). Esa asistencia se proporciona de forma gratuita a quienes no pueden costear un abogado, por ejemplo, en Francia (Code de procédure pénale, art. 70650), Islandia (Ley de protección del menor, Núm. 80/2002 (2002), art. 60) y el Perú (Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Ley Núm. 27.337, 2000), art. 146). Algunos países han encontrado soluciones originales para reducir el costo de la asistencia letrada para el Estado. En Colombia (de conformidad con el Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 906, 2004, art. 137, Intervención de las víctimas en la actuación penal), las víctimas que no puedan pagar un abogado pueden ser asistidas por otros profesionales del derecho o por estudiantes de derecho; en caso de varias victimas, el número de abogados que las represente puede limitarse a dos. 3. Algunos países de tradición jurídica anglosajona reconocen el derecho de los niños víctimas a recibir asistencia letrada en los procedimientos penales. En tales circunstancias, es el Estado quien sufraga con los gastos, como por ejemplo en el Pakistán, en virtud de la Ordenanza sobre el sistema de justicia de menores de 2000. En los países en que no se contemplan tales disposiciones, el reconocimiento de que los niños víctimas de delitos tienen derecho a asistencia letrada en los procedimientos penales promoverá la protección de los niños víctimas y testigos durante su participación en los procesos de justicia. 4. En ese contexto, cabe señalar que la Corte Penal Internacional ha reconocido una larga lista de derechos de las víctimas, en particular con relación al acceso a un abogado. Artículo 11. Medidas de protección En el artículo 11 se describen las medidas que han de adoptarse en cada fase del proceso de justicia para proteger la seguridad de todo niño víctima o testigo que se considere que está en situación de riesgo. Artículo 12. Lenguaje, intérprete y otras medidas especiales de asistencia 1. En el párrafo 25 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos se reconoce la necesidad de elaborar y aplicar medidas para ayudar a los niños a testificar y prestar declaración. 2. Las disposiciones y obligaciones contenidas en el artículo 12 de la Ley modelo se basan en la legislación nacional de varios países, tales como Colombia, Costa Rica, Francia, Kazajstán, México, Sudáfrica y Tailandia. B. Durante la fase de investigación Artículo 13. Investigador especialmente capacitado 1. Según el párrafo 29 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos, los profesionales deberán tomar medidas para evitar al menor especiales dificultades durante la fase de investigación. Según el párrafo 41 de las Directrices, los profesionales deberán estar capacitados para proteger con eficacia a los niños víctimas y testigos y atender sus necesidades. 2. Dependiendo del ordenamiento jurídico nacional de cada Estado, profesionales como agentes de policía, fiscales, abogados y otros profesionales del sistema de justicia penal pueden trabajar en la investigación de una causa que afecte a un niño víctima o testigo de un delito. Es esencial que tales profesionales reciban formación específica en cuestiones relacionadas con menores como condición previa para trabajar con niños víctimas y testigos. 3. En el ámbito de la investigación, se han realizado importantes progresos gracias al establecimiento del denominado “modelo de defensa del menor”, mediante el cual se adopta un enfoque multidisciplinario durante la investigación. El componente más importante de ese modelo es el hecho de que los funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley van acompañados de especialistas en menores y profesionales especializados en atención de salud mental cuando someten a interrogatorio a un menor. Ese modelo ofrece más posibilidades de proteger no sólo al niño, sino también al acusado, pues permite que los interrogatorios se realicen de un modo más concienzudo y preciso. Artículo 14. Exámenes médicos y obtención de muestras corporales 1. El artículo 14 se ocupa del derecho del niño a ser tratado con dignidad y a que se le proteja de especiales dificultades durante el proceso de justicia. Los exámenes médicos, en especial en el caso de abusos sexuales, pueden ser una experiencia sumamente estresante para un niño. Es preferible que tales exámenes se ordenen únicamente cuando sea absolutamente necesario y que sean lo menos intrusivos y más limitados posible. 2. Si un examen médico indica la existencia de problemas de salud, el niño tendrá derecho a recibir atención médica. 3. Las disposiciones del artículo 14 se basan en las mejores prácticas de varios Estados Miembros. Artículo 15. Persona de apoyo 1. En el párrafo 24 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos se describen las funciones de la persona de apoyo. Sin embargo, el término no está definido en las Directrices. 2. Según la legislación nacional de varios países, la finalidad de la persona de apoyo es proporcionar apoyo emocional a los niños víctimas y testigos y para reducir los efectos perjudiciales derivados de su comparecencia ante un tribunal, velando por que el niño esté acompañado en todo momento por un adulto cuya presencia pueda serle de utilidad, si se siente excesivamente estresado. 3. Así pues, la presencia de la persona de apoyo puede ayudar al niño a expresar sus opiniones y a contribuir a que éste pueda ejercer su derecho a participar. Se trata de una medida que los jueces podrán favorecer, con el fin de que la comparecencia del menor ante el tribunal se realice sin contratiempos. El fiscal o, cuando proceda, el abogado del niño pueden solicitar la presencia de una persona de apoyo. 4. Otro elemento importante relacionado con las funciones y el papel de la persona de apoyo es la continuidad. Para que esa persona de apoyo sea realmente de utilidad, es preciso que exista una relación de confianza entre ella y el niño. Puede contribuir a que se llegue a esa confianza el nombramiento de la persona de apoyo al principio del proceso de justicia (esto es, cuando se denuncia el delito) garantizando, en la medida de lo posible, que sea la misma persona la que acompañe al menor a lo largo de todo el proceso. 5. Por último, el criterio y la principal preocupación de la persona de apoyo de las funciones y actividad de la persona de apoyo es proteger al niño frente a cualquier tipo de dificultad durante todo el proceso de justicia. Artículo 16. Designación de una persona de apoyo 1. En virtud de la Ley modelo, la autoridad competente que haya sido designada por el Estado debe designar a una persona de apoyo, tan pronto como los funcionarios encargados de la investigación decidan citar al niño víctima o testigo para el primer interrogatorio. El principio subyacente es el deber de que la persona de apoyo acompañe al menor desde el momento en que éste entre en contacto por primera vez con el proceso de justicia. 2. La práctica de los estados pone de manifiesto que los criterios para designar a la persona de apoyo varían de una jurisdicción a otra. En Italia, el artículo 609 decies del código penal especifica que un niño víctima de explotación sexual recibirá asistencia en cada fase del procedimiento. En algunos Estados, como Suiza, se especifica que la persona de apoyo será del mismo sexo que la víctima. En algunos países de tradición jurídica anglosajona, la decisión de designar a la persona de apoyo para un niño víctima es adoptada por el juez, quien puede hacerlo de oficio, o a petición del fiscal o de la defensa. En otros países, la facultad para designar a la persona de apoyo está establecida específicamente por ley, como por ejemplo en el Canadá (Criminal Code (R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, secc. 486.1, subsecc. 1). La víctima o testigo también puede solicitar la asistencia de una persona de apoyo, como en el caso de Austria (artículo 162 2) del Código de procedimiento penal). 3. Lo que se entiende por persona de apoyo varía entre los distintos sistemas jurídicos nacionales, como por ejemplo, “persona de la elección del menor”, una “persona de su confianza”, un “adulto”, “uno de los padres del menor o su representante legal”, un “amigo o miembro de la familia”, una “persona especialmente cualificada”, “otra persona cercana al menor” o cualquier otra “persona que apruebe el tribunal”. A ese respecto, en la Ley modelo se establece que la persona de apoyo sea un profesional cualificado, especialista en técnicas de comunicación con menores y asistencia a niños, con el fin de evitar el riesgo de coacción, victimización repetida y victimización secundaria. Por lo general, al evaluar a la persona que será designada como persona de apoyo, es importante respetar la elección del niño. No obstante, es preciso proceder con cautela para evitar la manipulación del niño cuando éste haga su elección. En la Ley modelo también se establece que antes de la designación de la persona de apoyo se debe consultar al menor acerca de sus preferencias respecto del sexo de esa persona. 4. La persona de apoyo ha de cumplir otros dos requisitos importantes: a) debe prestar un apoyo cabal y concreto al menor; y b) no debe obstaculizar el proceso de justicia. Los grupos de apoyo a los niños víctimas o las unidades de servicio a las víctimas pueden disponer de personas especialmente cualificadas para tal fin. Artículo 17. Funciones de la persona de apoyo 1. En virtud de la Ley modelo se han ampliado las funciones de la persona de apoyo sobre la base de prácticas óptimas. Hay ejemplos de distintas legislaciones nacionales que muestran que la finalidad de la presencia de una persona de apoyo junto al niño víctima o testigo es proporcionar apoyo emocional y reducir los efectos perjudiciales derivados de su comparecencia ante el tribunal, garantizando que el niño esté acompañado en todo momento por un adulto cuya presencia pueda serle de utilidad, si se siente excesivamente estresado. 2. Las funciones de la persona de apoyo, que figuran en el artículo 17, dimanan de ese fin y reflejan las mejores prácticas nacionales. 3. Por ejemplo, en el inciso i) de los Derechos de los niños víctimas y los niños testigos de los Estados Unidos (Code Collection, título 18, capítulo 223, secc. 3509) se establece lo siguiente: “El tribunal, si lo estima oportuno, podrá permitir que el adulto que asiste al menor permanezca físicamente cerca de éste o en contacto con él mientras presta declaración. El tribunal podrá permitir que el adulto que asiste al niño le tome la mano o que el niño se siente en su regazo durante el procedimiento. Ningún adulto que asista a un menor podrá proporcionar al niño la respuesta a una pregunta dirigida al menor durante su testimonio o sugerirle de algún otro modo lo que tiene que decir. Durante el tiempo en que el niño esté prestando testimonio o declaración, la imagen de la persona que asiste al niño será grabada en vídeo.” 4. La legislación del estado de Arizona (Estados Unidos) confiere a la persona de apoyo un papel más activo, en especial en cuanto a la preparación del niño víctima, y la prestación de asistencia y establece lo siguiente: “[El representante del menor] acompañará al niño durante todo el procedimiento [...] y le explicará, antes de la comparecencia del menor ante el tribunal, la naturaleza del procedimiento y lo que se le pedirá a ese respecto; también indicará al menor que se espera que diga la verdad. El representante estará disponible para observar al menor en lo tocante a todos los aspectos de la causa, con el fin de consultar con el tribunal cualquier necesidad especial del niño. Esas consultas tendrán lugar antes de que el menor testifique. [El representante del menor] no hablará de los hechos y circunstancias de la causa con el menor testigo [...] salvo que el tribunal ordene lo contrario si, a su juicio, ello redunda en el interés superior del niño”. Artículo 18. Información que se deberá proporcionar a la persona de apoyo En el artículo 18 se prevé que la persona de apoyo sea informada de los cargos que se imputan al acusado, la relación entre el acusado y el menor, y la situación del acusado respecto de su privación total o parcial de libertad. Para ejercer sus funciones, la persona de apoyo debe conocer, como mínimo esa información. En ese artículo, se podrá incluir otro tipo de información que deba facilitarse. Artículo 19. Funciones de la persona de apoyo en caso de puesta en libertad del acusado La puesta en libertad del acusado es una situación que puede provocar sufrimiento al niño víctima o testigo. En esos casos, la persona de apoyo es quien ha de ser informada al respecto por las autoridades y quien comunicará el hecho al niño de un modo adaptado a éste. C. Durante el juicio Artículo 20. Fiabilidad de la declaración del niño 1. Según el párrafo 2 del artículo 12 de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño, el principio subyacente a la prestación de declaración ante un tribunal por un niño es que debe darse al niño la oportunidad de ser oído. Ahora bien, ese derecho no es absoluto: en el párrafo 2 del artículo 12 de la Convención se prevé que ese derecho se ejerza “en consonancia con las normas de procedimiento de la ley nacional”. 2. Esas normas de procedimiento suelen existir en la legislación nacional con el fin de que el tribunal pueda confiar en todo testimonio prestado por un menor en un procedimiento judicial o administrativo. Habitualmente, existen dos trabas jurídicas. Según el sistema jurídico de que se trate, el tribunal podrá recurrir a una de ellas o a ambas. La primera se refiere a la admisibilidad de la declaración de un menor. La segunda a la fiabilidad de la declaración de un menor. 3. La cuestión de la admisibilidad está relacionada con el hecho de si, en un principio el tribunal puede tener en cuenta el testimonio de un niño en la resolución de la causa. La cuestión de la fiabilidad está relacionada con el peso que el tribunal debe atribuir al testimonio de un menor, si éste se considera admisible. 4. En la mayoría de los ordenamientos jurídicos, es el tribunal quien debe decidir respecto de la admisibilidad y fiabilidad según las circunstancias de cada caso. Si es necesario, ello puede hacerse con la asistencia especializada de un psicólogo infantil cualificado o de un especialista en desarrollo infantil. Sin embargo, las normas internacionales prevén una importante restricción. El tribunal, al decidir la admisibilidad o fiabilidad de la declaración de un menor, no puede basar su decisión únicamente en la edad del niño. Esa restricción figura en el párrafo 18 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos: el “testimonio [del menor] no se considerará carente de validez o de credibilidad sólo en razón de su edad”. 5. No obstante, el tribunal puede plantear la cuestión de si, por su edad y madurez, el niño puede prestar testimonio de forma inteligible y creíble. El tribunal puede, por ejemplo, tener esos factores en cuenta al considerar la declaración prestada por un menor en el contexto de la causa en su conjunto. Si existen razones imperiosas, el tribunal también puede realizar pruebas con el fin de establecer la capacidad del niño de prestar un testimonio válido. Esas pruebas pueden tener por objeto determinar aptitudes, tales como si el menor es capaz de comprender las preguntas y la importancia de decir la verdad. 6. Por ejemplo en el Reino Unido (Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act, 1999, secc. 53), los criterios para determinar la aptitud de un testigo son independientes de la edad de éste. Más bien, la cuestión de las aptitudes está relacionada con la capacidad del testigo para comprender las preguntas que se le hacen como tal y para responder de forma comprensible. Si el testigo no es capaz de comprender las preguntas o de proporcionar respuestas inteligibles, es probable que su testimonio no sea admisible para los fines de las actuaciones del tribunal. 7. Sin embargo, en el caso de los niños víctimas y testigos, las normas internacionales recomiendan que el testimonio prestado por un menor no sea declarado inadmisible a la ligera. Por ejemplo, el párrafo 18 de las Directrices sobre la justicia concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos se basa en la presunción de que “todo niño deberá ser tratado como un testigo capaz”. De hecho, un estudio realizado sobre distintas legislaciones nacionales quedó demostrado que es una buena práctica la presunción prima facie de la competencia de un menor para testificar, con independencia de su edad. 8. El artículo 20 de la Ley modelo hace suya esa buena práctica, y en él se estipula que un niño se considerará testigo capaz (y su testimonio admisible), salvo que se demuestre lo contrario mediante una prueba de capacidad. El artículo 21 de la Ley modelo se explica que esa presunción puede obviarse -y posteriormente administrarse una prueba de capacidad- únicamente si a juicio del tribunal existen razones imperiosas para ello. Huelga decir que esas razones no pueden basarse únicamente en la edad del niño. 9. Si el niño no supera la prueba de capacidad, su testimonio será declarado inadmisible para los efectos de las actuaciones del tribunal. Naturalmente, si el menor supera la prueba, su declaración será admisible. Se trata de que la prueba de capacidad no se utilice de forma sistemática con los niños víctimas y testigos. En cambio las razones para que el tribunal ordene dicha prueba deben ser imperiosas. Ese planteamiento está respaldado por las prácticas nacionales. Así por ejemplo, de acuerdo con la ley sobre declaración de testigos de 1908 de Nueva Zelandia (Evidence Act 1908), el juez no podrá dar instrucciones al jurado respecto de ninguna necesidad general de escrutinizar meticulosamente la declaración de niños pequeños o sugerir a éste que, en general, los niños tienden a inventar o distorsionar. Siempre que un niño preste testimonio en un juicio por jurado, el juez ha de informar a éste de que la edad del niño por sí sola no le inhabilita para prestar declaración y que no existe una edad precisa que determine esa capacidad. Debe informarse al jurado de que la aptitud del menor depende de su capacidad para comprender la diferencia entre la verdad y la falsedad, y entender la importancia del deber de decir la verdad. 10. La Ley modelo prevé otra dificultad jurídica que afecta al testimonio de un menor, una vez establecida su admisibilidad. En virtud del párrafo 3 del artículo 20 de la Ley modelo, el tribunal podrá dar un peso determinado al testimonio del menor en función de su edad, madurez y capacidad para expresarse de forma inteligible. Una vez más, el tribunal no puede fundamentar esa decisión únicamente en la edad del niño. El tribunal debe evaluar en su conjunto la validez y veracidad del testimonio del menor, del mismo modo que lo haría con cualquier otro testigo. Si previamente se ha efectuado una prueba de aptitud, los resultados de ésta también pueden ser un factor pertinente en la evaluación. Las legislaciones nacionales indican que es conveniente tener en cuenta factores como la edad y madurez a la hora de evaluar la fiabilidad de un testimonio. 11. Por último, los párrafos 4 y 5 del artículo 20 de la Ley modelo contienen dos salvaguardias importantes. En el párrafo 4 se establece que con independencia de si el niño presta o no testimonio, o de si dicho testimonio se considera inadmisible, éste tendrá la posibilidad de expresar sus opiniones con respecto a su participación en el proceso de justicia. En el párrafo 5 se establece que ningún niño será obligado a testificar en el proceso de justicia contra su voluntad o sin el conocimiento de sus padres o tutor. También se vela porque se invita a estar presentes a los padres o al tutor del menor que preste testimonio ante el tribunal. En la Ley modelo se incluyen, sin embargo, varias excepciones lógicas para los casos en que los padres o el tutor sean los presuntos autores del delito, el niño exprese su preocupación por estar acompañado por sus padres o tutor, o el tribunal estime que es contrario al interés superior del niño. Artículo 21. Prueba de capacidad 1. En el artículo 21 de la Ley modelo se establece las disposiciones de procedimiento relativas a la prueba de capacidad a que se hace referencia en el artículo 20. Se establece claramente que la prueba de capacidad deberá realizarse únicamente si el tribunal determina que existen razones imperiosas que lo justifiquen. Según el artículo 20, sólo podrá declararse inadmisible el testimonio de un menor si éste no supera la prueba de capacidad. En el artículo 21 se establece claramente que la finalidad de dicha prueba es determinar la capacidad del niño de comprender las preguntas que se le hacen, así como la importancia de decir la verdad. 2. En el Código de los Derechos de los niños víctimas y los niños testigos de los Estados Unidos (United States Code Collection, secc. 3509, subsecc. c)) se establece que a petición de una parte que demuestre que existen razones imperiosas que lo justifiquen, el juez podrá ordenar que el niño sea sometido a una prueba de capacidad. La prueba es llevada a cabo por el tribunal, sin la presencia del jurado y utilizando como base las preguntas presentadas por las partes. Las preguntas serán apropiadas a la edad y el nivel de desarrollo del niño, no estarán relacionadas con cuestiones que se traten en el juicio y se centrarán en determinar la capacidad del menor para comprender preguntas sencillas y responder a éstas. 3. Es importante subrayar que lo dispuesto en el párrafo 7 del artículo 21, según el cual la prueba de capacidad no podrá ser repetida, no invalida el derecho de apelación del acusado. De hecho, el tribunal puede evaluar los resultados con arreglo a las circunstancias de cada caso, sin repetir la prueba. Así, se evita el peligro de que el abogado defensor pueda tratar de socavar la credibilidad del menor sometiéndolo a un segundo interrogatorio y ocasionándole sufrimiento. Artículo 22. Juramento 1. En la mayoría de los países, los testigos de un procedimiento penal deben declarar bajo juramento, que es una promesa solemne de decir la verdad. Faltar a la verdad cuando se presta testimonio bajo juramento constituye un delito en casi todas las jurisdicciones. 2. Algunos ordenamientos jurídicos nacionales eximen a los niños menores de determinada edad de la obligación de prestar declaración bajo juramento. El principal efecto de testificar sin prestar juramento es que el menor quede protegido con relación a determinados aspectos de las consecuencias procesales derivadas de prestar falso testimonio. En el artículo 22 de la Ley modelo se estipula que se conceda a los menores testigos total inmunidad respecto de la prestación de falso testimonio, con independencia de si están eximidos o no por el tribunal de prestar declaración bajo juramento. 3. Es importante señalar que el hecho de que un niño testifique sin prestar juramento, en lugar de bajo juramento, no debe tener efecto alguno, en sí o por sí mismo, en cuanto al modo en que el tribunal recibe la declaración. Las legislaciones nacionales, como por ejemplo la del Reino Unido (Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999), tratan por separado la cuestión de si se ha de testificar sin prestar juramento o bajo juramento y la cuestión de la capacidad de un testigo. El tribunal recibe del mismo modo una declaración bajo juramento que una declaración realizada sin prestar juramento. Ahora bien, el hecho de que un niño pueda no comprender plenamente el deber específico de decir la verdad inherente a la prestación de juramento, puede utilizarse en algunas jurisdicciones por las partes en el procedimiento como indicador de la madurez del menor y, por consiguiente, del peso que ha de darse a su declaración. En los Estados Unidos, por ejemplo, tal petición puede dar lugar, si el solicitante aporta razones imperiosas, a que el tribunal ordene una prueba de capacidad. 4. Un buen ejemplo de una alternativa a la prestación de testimonio bajo juramento la encontramos en Nueva Zelandia, donde se permite al menor que haga una promesa informal de decir la verdad, una vez que queda determinado que es consciente de la solemnidad de la ocasión. Esto se aplica, en particular, en casos de acusaciones de conducta sexual indebida de un adulto contra un menor. La Ley modelo incluye esa opción específica. Artículo 23. Designación de una persona de apoyo durante el juicio El artículo 23 complementa al artículo 15 garantizando que, al principio del juicio, el juez compruebe si ha sido designada la persona de apoyo del niño víctima o testigo, y ordene que ésta sea nombrada, si se diera el caso de que durante la fase de investigación esa persona de apoyo no hubiera sido designada. Artículo 24. Salas de espera 1. Un modo de evitar aflicción al niño durante el proceso de justicia y de preservar su intimidad es asignando salas espera para menores específicamente diseñadas para niños. 2. Las salas de espera para menores pueden estar equipadas con juguetes y otros enseres, como material de dibujo, cuentos y libros para que el niño se mantenga entretenido. En función del clima, no será necesario que las salas de espera se encuentren en el interior del edificio, y podrían estar ubicadas en un jardín o en otro lugar seguro. Éstas también pueden estar provistas de aseos, camas, bebidas y comida, de forma que el niño siempre se sienta cómodo. Lo más importante es que los niños estén, en todo momento, en una sala separada, alejada del acusado, los abogados defensores y otros testigos. 3. Si bien la rapidez del procedimiento judicial es un requisito en lo que atañe a las causas en que intervienen menores, la capacidad de los niños para soportar vistas prolongadas, programadas sin tener en cuenta la dificultad de su situación, es otro elemento que hay que considerar en el contexto de la duración del proceso. Se pide a los responsables de la programación del proceso judicial que encuentren el modo de reducir el tiempo que los niños tienen que pasar en los juzgados, y que garanticen que esos períodos se ajustan a la vida privada y las necesidades del menor. En última instancia, cualquier reducción del nivel de estrés el niño contribuirá a que pueda prestar el mejor testimonio posible. 4. El tribunal puede considerar otros procedimientos adaptados a los niños, tales como programar las visitas en días en que el menor no tenga que ir a la escuela. La Ley modelo no incluye tales procedimientos, pero éstos podrán preverse en reglamentos o directrices. Artículo 25. Apoyo emocional a los niños víctimas y testigos En el artículo 25 se garantiza la presencia de la persona de apoyo en la sala con el fin de proporcionar al niño apoyo emocional. Artículo 26. Los juzgados 1. Según él apartado d) del párrafo 30 d) de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos, las salas de los juzgados utilizadas por los profesionales serán modificadas teniendo en cuenta la situación de los niños víctimas y testigos. 2. La formalidad de los procesos judiciales y el entorno de los juzgados pueden ser intimidantes para un niño. Si bien se aduce que la observancia de tales formalidades induce al respeto por el sistema judicial, ello puede provocar temor en el menor o hacer que sea reacio a hablar. La escasez de medios adaptados a los niños, como por ejemplo, asientos adecuados, o la colocación incorrecta del micrófono en el estrado de testigos que garanticen la audibilidad al testimonio del menor en lugares clave, como el estrado del juez, la mesa del abogado, la tribuna del jurado y el banquillo, pueden ser un obstáculo para que el menor preste la mejor declaración posible, como también pueden serlo la solemne vestimenta de los jueces y el personal judicial. 3. Algunas legislaciones nacionales exigen que la comparecencia ante el tribunal de víctimas menores de 18 años se lleve a cabo en un entorno informal y distendido. En el Reino Unido, en la lista de control complementaria previa al juicio para causas que afecten a menores testigos (Supplementary Pre-Trial Checklist for Cases Involving Young Witnesses), se tiene en cuenta la posibilidad de que el ropaje judicial pueda tener un efecto intimidador en niños pequeños, por lo que se prevé que los niños testigos puedan expresar su opinión sobre el ropaje del tribunal, que, en caso necesario, podrá ser suprimida. 4. En lo tocante al entorno del interrogatorio del menor, algunas legislaciones nacionales exigen la presencia de una agente de policía o de un agente de policía del mismo sexo que el niño en determinados casos, en particular en los de violación o agresiones sexuales. En virtud el artículo 26 de la Ley modelo al juez queda autorizado para ordenar las modificaciones que considere oportunas. Artículo 27. Interrogatorio por la parte contraria (opción para países de tradición jurídica anglosajona) 1. En el apartado b) del párrafo 31 b) de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos se subraya la necesidad de proteger al menor de ser interrogado por el acusado, si tal protección es compatible con el ordenamiento jurídico y los derechos del acusado. En el sistema procesal anglosajón, el derecho a interrogar a los testigos de cargo constituye un elemento fundamental del derecho del acusado a cuestionar el testimonio de su acusador. El representante legal del acusado suele encargarse del interrogatorio por la parte contraria. Ahora bien, cuando éste se niega a contratar a un representante legal y opta por la autodefensa, el interrogatorio directo de testigos vulnerables, como los niños, pasa a ser un problema. 2. La legislación nacional de algunos países prohíbe que un acusado que no tenga representación letrada pueda interrogar a un niño testigo, en especial cuando se trata de delitos sexuales. Ese es el caso, por ejemplo, del Canadá (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, secc. 486.3, subsecc. 1), Nueva Zelandia (Evidence Act 1908, secc. 23F(1) y Evidence Act 2006, secc. 95) y el Reino Unido (Criminal Justice Act 1988, secc. 34A). En esos países, el juez debe denegar cualquier petición de interrogatorio de un menor testigo realizada por un acusado sin representación. En algunos países, existe la alternativa de que el juez nombre a un representante para el acusado con la finalidad específica de que realice dicho interrogatorio; el representante transmite las preguntas del acusado al niño, evitándose, así, el contacto directo y una posible intimidación. Ese es el caso de Australia (Western Australia Evidence of Children y Others (Amendment) Act 1992, secc. 8). 3. El juez que presida el tribunal debe analizar minuciosamente y supervisar estrictamente el interrogatorio del menor por la parte contraria. La práctica nacional en los países de tradición jurídica anglosajona, en particular, prohíbe cualquier pregunta que pueda intimidar u hostigar, o sea irrespetuosa (véase, por ejemplo, National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences del Departamento de Justicia de Sudáfrica y Constitutional Development of South Africa y National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases del Departamento de Justicia de Sudáfrica (Pretoria, 1998), capítulo. 10, párr. 1), y Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995, secc. 274) del Reino Unido). En términos más generales, al igual que ocurre con cualquier otro tipo de interrogatorio, los interrogatorios por la parte contraria deben llevarse a cabo teniendo en cuenta que es preciso dirigirse a los testigos vulnerables, incluidos los niños, con sencillez, prudencia y respeto. En caso necesario, el juez podrá recordar a las partes ese importante requisito. 4. La Ley modelo prevé que los niños víctimas y testigos no puedan ser sometidos a interrogatorio por el acusado. Todo interrogatorio que realice el abogado defensor se llevará a cabo bajo la estricta vigilancia del juez. Artículo 28. Medidas para proteger la intimidad y el bienestar de los niños víctimas y testigos 1. De conformidad con el artículo 28 de la Ley modelo, podrán dictarse medidas para proteger la intimidad y el bienestar físico y mental del menor, así como para evitar toda aflicción injustificada y victimización secundaria de éste. 2. Frecuentemente, es inevitable que cuando un niño testifica, tenga que estar en contacto visual directo con el acusado. En los casos en que exista un alegato de malos tratos al niño por parte del acusado, ese contacto puede ser traumático para el menor. La disposición contenida en el apartado b) del párrafo 31 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos tiene por objeto reducir, al máximo posible, la sensación de intimidación que puedan experimentar los niños víctimas y testigos al comparecer ante un tribunal, en particular, al carearse con el presunto delincuente. 3. Son varias las medidas que se pueden adoptar para facilitar la prestación de declaración por el menor y la recepción de ésta. Esas medidas están relacionadas con la admisibilidad del testimonio e incluyen, entre otras cosas, la grabación en vídeo de las declaraciones del menor antes de la celebración del juicio y el uso de sistemas que permitan al niño prestar testimonio sin tener que ver al acusado, desde una sala especial para interrogatorios ubicada en el juzgado, mediante circuito cerrado de televisión, o utilizando pantallas móviles o cortinas que impidan el contacto visual directo entre el testigo y el acusado. Otra forma de evitar el careo es ordenar que el acusado abandone la sala. 4. El uso de pantallas entre el niño y el acusado suele considerarse una alternativa menos onerosa al uso de un circuito cerrado de televisión. Las pantallas se pueden instalar y trasladar con facilidad. En distintas jurisdicciones se utilizan distintos tipos de pantallas, como, por ejemplo, mamparas opacas móviles que impiden que el niño y el acusado puedan verse, espejos unidireccionales que permiten que el acusado pueda ver al niño pero que éste no pueda ver al acusado, o mamparas opacas móviles con una cámara de vídeo que transmite la imagen del niño a un monitor de televisión que pueda ver el acusado. El uso de tales sistemas está estipulado en la legislación nacional de distintos países, tales como el Canadá (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, secc. 486.2, subsecc. 1) y España (Ley de Enjuiciamiento Criminal, art. 448, párr. 3 y art. 707). 5. Esas medidas deberán ser ordenadas por el juez, y pueden ser automáticas o discrecionales. El juez podrá ordenar tales medidas de oficio o a petición de una de las partes, incluido el menor, sus padres o su representante legal. Así por ejemplo, en Fiji, bien los padres o el tutor del menor pueden solicitar al fiscal que se instale una pantalla en torno al niño, petición que seguidamente el fiscal transmite al tribunal. El abandono de la sala por el acusado mientras que el niño presta testimonio es otra medida prevista en algunos ordenamientos nacionales, como por ejemplo en el Brasil (Código de Processo Penal, art. 217), Kazajstán (Código de Procesamiento Penal, art. 352 3)) y Suiza (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, art. 5 4) y 10 b)). Habitualmente, se permite que el acusado pueda seguir la declaración del menor desde un monitor ubicado en una sala diferente. 6. Otro aspecto de la protección de las víctimas y los testigos, incluidos los niños, es la limitación de la divulgación de información sobre su identidad y paradero. El grado de restricción puede variar en función de las circunstancias y los riesgos. Un primer grado de restricción en la divulgación de información sobre el paradero de las víctimas o testigos puede aplicarse fácilmente autorizando a la víctima o testigo a que no revele la dirección de su residencia o lugar de trabajo. A veces, con el fin de facilitar la comunicación, puede indicarse a la víctima o testigo una comisaría de policía como dirección de contacto, como es el caso de Francia (Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-57) o de Honduras (Código Procesal Penal, Decreto Núm. 9-99-E, art. 237, Protección de los testigos). También puede indicarse la dirección del juzgado para tal fin. 7. Más perjudicial para los derechos de la defensa es la restricción completa de la difusión de información relacionada con la identidad de la víctima o testigo, quien puede entonces ser autorizada a testificar de forma anónima. Esa medida es siempre de carácter excepcional, como es el caso de Francia (Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-58) y los Países Bajos (Código de procedimiento penal, 1994, art. 226 a). En los países en que esa medida está permitida, ésta puede aplicarse autorizando a las víctimas o testigos a prestar declaración o a carearse con el acusado mediante videoconferencia, utilizando mecanismos de distorsión de la voz o la imagen (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-61). Aún más excepcional, y normalmente limitado a los casos de delincuencia organizada, es autorizar el cambio de identidad de los testigos anónimos (Francia, Code de procédure pénale, art. 70663-1) o facilitar su reubicación (Estados Unidos, United States Code collection, título 18, cap. 224, Protection of witnesses, secc. 3521, Witness relocation and protection, subsecc. a), párr. 1)). 8. La legislación de Nueva Zelandia prevé un interesante conjunto de medidas para la protección de los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos. Además de la prohibición general de la publicación del nombre de cualquier persona menor de 17 años que haya sido citada como testigo, se puede autorizar a los menores demandantes a prestar declaración por escrito y quedar eximidos de ser interrogados o contrainterrogados con relación a ésta. En los casos en que el menor preste declaración oral, únicamente podrán estar presentes las personas concretas que haya aceptado el juez que presida el tribunal o las personas que haya solicitado el menor. El tribunal puede dictar órdenes de prohibición de la publicación de ciertas cuestiones, tales como informes o declaraciones relativas a los actos que la víctima haya sido presupuestamente obligada o inducida a realizar, o cualquier otro acto que la víctima haya sido supuestamente obligada o inducida a consentir o tolerar. La víctima también puede prestar testimonio mediante una declaración grabada en vídeo durante la fase previa al juicio. 9. En el caso de un delito de carácter sexual que concierna a un menor demandante, el juez podrá dar, a petición del fiscal antes del juicio, cualquiera de las siguientes instrucciones con respecto al modo en que el demandante deberá prestar declaración. En primer lugar, en los casos en que se haya mostrado una grabación en vídeo de la declaración del demandante en una vista preliminar, el juez podrá ordenar que la declaración sea admitida en esa forma, con las supresiones que el juez ordene, si las hubiera. En segundo lugar, si el juez tiene constancia de que se dispone de los servicios y equipos necesarios, podrá ordenar que el demandante preste declaración fuera de la sala, pero dentro de las dependencias del juzgado; la declaración será transmitida a la sala mediante un circuito cerrado de televisión. En tercer lugar, el juez puede ordenar que, mientras el demandante presta declaración o es interrogado con respecto a la misma, se disponga una pantalla o un espejo unidireccional, de forma tal que no pueda tener contacto visual con el acusado, pero que el juez, el jurado y el abogado del acusado puedan ver al demandante. En cuarto lugar, en los casos en que el juez tenga constancia de que se dispone de los servicios y equipos necesarios, éste podrá ordenar que mientras el demandante presta declaración o es interrogado acerca de la misma, el demandante se ubique detrás de una mampara o un tabique construido a los efectos, que permita a las personas presentes en la sala ver al demandante y evite que éste pueda verlas a ellas; la declaración se prestará a través de un sistema de audio apropiado. En quinto lugar, en los casos en que el juez tenga constancia de que se dispone de los servicios y equipos necesarios, podrá ordenar que el demandante preste declaración en un lugar ubicado fuera de las dependencias del juzgado. En tales casos, el testimonio deberá ser aceptado en cinta de vídeo, con las supresiones que el juez ordene, si las hubiera. En los casos en que se muestre en el juicio la grabación en vídeo de la declaración del demandante, el juez dará las instrucciones que considere oportunas acerca de la manera en que deben realizarse al demandante el nuevo interrogatorio y interrogatorio por la parte contraria. D. En el período posterior al juicio Artículo 29. Derecho de resarcimiento e indemnización 1. Mediante el artículo 29 de la Ley modelo se aplica el párrafo 35 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos relativo al derecho a reparación de los niños víctimas. En el párrafo 37 de las Directrices se presenta una lista no exhaustiva de lo que puede incluir dicha reparación. En el artículo 29 de la Ley modelo se trata de establecer criterios más específicos sobre la materia. 2. En el párrafo 8 de la Declaración sobre los principios fundamentales de justicia para las víctimas de delitos y del abuso de poder (Resolución 40/34 de la Asamblea General, anexo) se declara lo siguiente: “Los delincuentes o los terceros responsables de su conducta resarcirán equitativamente, cuando proceda, a las víctimas, sus familiares o las personas a su cargo. Ese resarcimiento comprenderá la devolución de los bienes o el pago por los daños o pérdidas sufridos, el reembolso de los gastos realizados como consecuencia de la victimización, la prestación de servicios y la restitución de derechos.” 3. En el párrafo 12 de la Declaración se expone lo siguiente: “Cuando no sea suficiente la indemnización procedente del delincuente o de otras fuentes, los Estados procurarán indemnizar financieramente: a) a las víctimas de delitos que hayan sufrido importantes lesiones corporales o menoscabo de su salud física o mental como consecuencia de delitos graves; b) a la familia, en particular a las personas a cargo, de las víctimas que hayan muerto o hayan quedado física o mentalmente incapacitadas como consecuencia de la victimización.” 4. En el párrafo 8 de la recomendación (2006) 8 del Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa a los Estados Miembros sobre asistencia a las víctimas de delitos se recomienda lo siguiente: “Debe concederse indemnización para el tratamiento y la rehabilitación de lesiones físicas y daños psicológicos; Los Estados deben considerar la posibilidad de indemnizar por la pérdida de ingresos, los gastos funerarios y la pérdida de pensión alimenticia de las personas a cargo. Los Estados también podrán considerar la posibilidad de conceder indemnizaciones por el dolor y sufrimiento padecidos; Los Estados pueden considerar el establecimiento de mecanismos de indemnización por los daños ocasionados por los delitos contra la propiedad”. 5. Si bien los Principios y directrices básicos sobre el derecho de las víctimas de violaciones manifiestas de las normas internacionales de derechos humanos y de violaciones graves del derecho internacional humanitario a interponer recursos y obtener reparaciones (Resolución 60/147 de la Asamblea General, anexo) podrían no ser aplicables en los casos más frecuentes en que los niños son víctimas, las definiciones contenidas en ese instrumento internacional son de gran ayuda a la hora de definir la gama de las posibles reparaciones necesarias en un caso determinado. 6. En los casos de trata de personas, los Principios y directrices básicos podrían ser aplicables en gran medida y deberían tenerse en cuenta, pues muy a menudo los derechos fundamentales de las víctimas de la trata son violados en los procedimientos judiciales, debido a que suele considerarse que la víctima ha infringido las leyes nacionales, como, por ejemplo, las relativas a la condición jurídica de la víctima como inmigrante, en lugar de ser considerada una víctima. 7. En los Principios y directrices básicos se describen formas de reparación que deben considerarse y abordarse de forma apropiada en cada caso. Esas formas incluyen las siguientes: a) La restitución. Esta forma de reparación es aplicable más bien en los casos de trata de seres humanos, aunque también puede aplicarse parcialmente en los casos de niños víctimas de violencia doméstica, y comprende: i) el disfrute de los derechos humanos (la vida familiar); ii) el regreso al lugar de residencia; iii) la reintegración en el empleo (incluida la posibilidad de formación continua) y la devolución de los bienes; b) La indemnización (indemnización monetaria por los perjuicios económicamente valorables por): i) el daño físico o mental; ii) la pérdida de oportunidades (empleo, educación y prestaciones sociales); iii) los daños materiales y la pérdida de ingresos (incluido el lucro cesante); iv) los gastos de asistencia letrada o de expertos, servicios médicos y otro tipo de asistencia; c) La rehabilitación (atención médica y psicológica, así como servicios jurídicos y sociales). Opción 1. Países de tradición jurídica anglosajona 8. Esta opción ha sido concebida para los países de tradición jurídica anglosajona en los que a los procedimientos penales puede seguirse una orden de indemnización dictada por el mismo tribunal. Esta disposición legislativa modelo procede de la legislación del Canadá (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, secc. 738, subsecc.1), que contiene más detalles acerca de la definición correcta de valor de sustitución, la definición de daños pecuniarios y el problema de la indemnización cuando el menor tiene que abandonar un domicilio compartido con el autor del delito. Opción 2. Países en que los tribunales no tienen jurisdicción en las demandas civiles 9. En el párrafo 36 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos se establece que siempre que los procedimientos penales estén adaptados a los niños y respeten las Directrices, se fomenten procedimientos penales y de reparación combinados. No obstante, es posible que ese no sea el caso en algunas jurisdicciones. La opción 2 garantiza que al final del procedimiento penal, el niño sea informado de los trámites necesarios para reclamar una indemnización. Opción 3. Países en que los tribunales penales tienen jurisdicción en las demandas civiles 10. En muchos países de tradición jurídica romanista puede decidirse la inclusión de una demanda civil en el proceso penal. La opción 3 se ha previsto para esas jurisdicciones. Artículo 30. Medidas de justicia restaurativa lo mismo es JUSTICIA RESTAURATIVA 1. En el párrafo 36 de las Directrices sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a los niños víctimas y testigos de delitos se establece que los procedimientos de reparación se combinen con medidas de justicia restaurativa. En el artículo 30 de la Ley modelo se prevé esa opción, a reserva de recurrir a un procedimiento formal, en caso de inoperancia de las medidas de justicia restaurativa. 2. Por proceso de justicia restaurativa se entiende cualquier procedimiento en que la víctima y el delincuente y, cuando proceda, otros individuos o miembros de la comunidad afectados por el delito, toman parte activa en la resolución de asuntos derivados del delito, por lo general con la ayuda de un mediador. La justicia restaurativa consiste en un procedimiento para resolver un delito centrado en la reparación del perjuicio ocasionado a las víctimas, obligando a los delincuentes a que se responsabilicen de sus actos y en el que, frecuentemente la comunidad participa en la resolución del conflicto. 3. Los programas de justicia restaurativa tienen las características siguientes: a) proporcionan una respuesta flexible respecto de las circunstancias del delito, el delincuente y la víctima, que permite que cada caso sea considerado de forma individual; b) constituyen una respuesta frente al delito que respeta la dignidad y la igualdad de cada persona, genera comprensión y promueve la armonía social mediante la recuperación de las víctimas y las comunidades, y la rehabilitación de los delincuentes; c) ofrecen un enfoque que puede utilizarse en combinación con los procesos tradicionales de justicia y sanción; d) constituyen un enfoque que incorpora métodos de solución de problemas y aborda las causas subyacentes del conflicto; e) proporcionan un sistema para reparar el perjuicio ocasionado y atender las necesidades de las víctimas; y f) constituyen una respuesta que reconoce el papel de la comunidad como lugar primordial en que prevenir el delito y los problemas sociales y responder a éstos. 4. Dado que esos procesos están basados en el acuerdo entre las partes, los resultados no siempre son satisfactorios, y pueden dar lugar a que la causa se remita de nuevo a los tribunales para su resolución por la vía judicial. 5. No obstante, cabe señalar que los procesos de justicia restaurativa pueden entrañar riesgos para la víctima, en particular en los casos que afectan a niños víctimas. Por consiguiente, el uso de tales procedimientos debe ser objeto de un riguroso examen antes de aplicarlos en las causas de menores. 6. Puede encontrarse más información sobre la utilización de programas de justicia restaurativa en materia penal en los Principios básicos para la aplicación de programas de justicia restaurativa en materia penal (resolución 2002/12 del Consejo Económico y Social, anexo). Asimismo, puede encontrarse información complementaria sobre las características de esos programas en el manual sobre programas de justicia restaurativa (Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes) de la Oficina de las Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito. También es de utilidad la recomendación R (99) 19 del Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa a los Estados Miembros sobre mediación en materia penal. Artículo 31. Información sobre el resultado del juicio El derecho de las víctimas a recibir información sobre el resultado del juicio, así como respecto de otras decisiones que afecten sus intereses, está previsto en distintos Estados. En la Ley modelo se incorpora esa disposición como práctica óptima. Artículo 32. Papel de la persona de apoyo tras la conclusión del procedimiento La persona de apoyo deberá prestar asistencia al niño mientras éste la necesite. Ello podrá incluir, una vez concluido el proceso, remitir al menor para que siga recibiendo tratamiento y atención, o repatriarle a su país de origen. Artículo 33. Información sobre la puesta en libertad de personas declaradas culpables El derecho de las víctimas a ser informadas sobre la situación de la persona declarada culpable, incluida su posible puesta en libertad, está previsto en distintos Estados. En la Ley modelo se incorpora esa disposición como práctica óptima. E. Otros procedimientos Artículo 34. Aplicación ampliada a otros procedimientos Las disposiciones de la Ley modelo deberán aplicarse a los procedimientos administrativos que afecten a niños víctimas y testigos, con el fin de proporcionar al menor la misma protección de que goza en virtud de la ley y evitarle aflicción injustificada. Capítulo IV. Disposiciones finales Artículo 35. Disposiciones finales (opción para los países de tradición jurídica romanista) Este artículo es optativo para los países de tradición jurídica romanista. --- 1 1 V.09-85206 (S) 160909 160909 *0985206* iv v vii 78 77 Notas * La introducción constituye una nota explicativa acerca de la génesis, la naturaleza y el ámbito de aplicación de la Ley modelo sobre la justicia en asuntos concernientes a menores víctimas y testigos de delitos, y no forma parte del texto de esta. ** Para consultar la recopilación actualizada de reglas y normas de las Naciones Unidas en la esfera de la prevención del delito y la justicia penal, véase http:/www.unodc.org/es/justice-and-prison-reform/compendium.html. *** Naciones Unidas, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, Núm. 27531. Notas Naciones Unidas, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, Núm. 27531. Ibíd., vols. 2171 y 2173, Núm. 27531. Naciones Unidas, Oficina de Fiscalización de Drogas y de Prevención del Delito, Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (Nueva York, 1999). Punto 1.2. del anexo de la recomendación (2006) 8. Carta Africana sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño, de julio de 1990, artículo 4 y artículo 9, párrafo 2. Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos: Pacto de San José (Naciones Unidas, Treaty Series, vol. 1144, Núm. 17955), artículo 17, párrafo 4. Convención Interamericana sobre Tráfico Internacional de Menores, adoptada en Ciudad de México el 18 de marzo de 1994, artículo 1 a) y c), y artículos 11 y 18. Convenio europeo sobre el ejercicio de los derechos del niño (Naciones Unidas, Treaty Series, vol. 2135, Núm. 37249), artículo 1, párrafo 2; artículo 6, apartado (a) y artículo 10, párrafo 1. Oficina Internacional de los Derechos del Niño: The Rights of Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime: a Compilation of Selected Provisions Drawn from International and Regional Instruments (Montreal, Canadá, 2005). Australia, Tribunal Superior, Secretary, Department of Health and Community Services (NT) v JWB and SMB (Marion’s Case) (1992), 175 CLR 218 F.C. 92/010. Sudáfrica, Children’s Act, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 de junio de 2006, secc. 7, párr. 1. Venezuela (República Bolivariana de), Ley Orgánica para la Protección del Niño y del Adolescente (1998), Gaceta Oficial, Núm. 5.266, art. 8. El contenido del principio se detalla en el párrafo 1 del artículo 8 de la ley. Por ejemplo, Belarús, Ley sobre los derechos del niño, Núm. 2570-XII, 1993 (modificada en 2004), art. 9, al. 3; Marruecos, artículo 40 del Código Penal (tal como se menciona en el Informe de la Relatora Especial sobre su misión al Reino de Marruecos relacionada con la cuestión de la explotación sexual comercial de los niños (E/CN.4/2001/78/Add.1, párr. 75); Portugal, Lei de protecção de crianças e jovens em perigo, Ley Núm. 147/99 (1999), art. 4, párr. 3; Federación de Rusia, tercer informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/125/Add.5), párr. 170 (abusos contra los niños). Francia, Code de procédure pénale, art. 40; Code de l’éducation, art. L.542-1. Francia, Code de la santé publique, art. L.2112-6 y Code de l’action sociale et des familles, art. L.221-6. Francia, Code de déontologie médicale, arts. 43-44. Francia, Décret No. 93-221 du 16 février 1993 relatif aux règles professionnelles des infirmiers et infirmières, art. 7. Canadá, Sex Offender Information Registration Act, S.C. 2004, C-16; Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte (Inglaterra), Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Bill, House of Lords (HL) Bill 79 (2006), Explanatory notes, párr. 4; Reino Unido (Escocia), Protection of Children (Scotland) Bill (Scottish Parliament (SP)) SP Bill 61, 2002, secc. 1. Véase el sitio Web: http://www.terredeshommes.org. Por ejemplo, Canadá (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q. Cap. A13.2) (1988), art. 8 (Bureau d’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels); Islandia, Ley sobre la protección del menor, Núm. 80/2002 (2002), arts. 5-9 (Ministerio de Asuntos Sociales); Italia, establecimiento de una Comisión Parlamentaria Especial sobre los Niños y del Observatorio Nacional de los Niños y los Adolescentes (Ley Núm. 451/97), arts. 1-2; México, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), arts. 4-6. Por ejemplo, Bélgica, Décret instituant un délégué général de la Communauté française aux droits de l’enfant (2002), art. 2; Costa Rica, Decreto por el que se Crea la Figura del Defensor de la Infancia, Núm. 17.733-J (1987) (Defensor de la Infancia); Dinamarca, Notification Respecting a Children’s Council, Núm. 2, 1998; República Dominicana, Decreto por el que se Crea la Dirección General de Promoción de la Juventud, Núm. 2981 (1985) (Dirección General de Promoción de la Juventud); Egipto, Decreto Núm. 2235 (1997) (Administración General para la Protección Legal de Niños); Islandia, Ley sobre el Defensor del Menor, Núm. 83 (1994) ; Islandia, Normativa del Consejo sobre la protección de la infancia, Núm. 49 (1994); Indonesia, segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/65/Add.23), párr. 32; Kenya, Children and Young Persons Act (cap. 141) (Children’s Department of the Ministry for Home Affairs and National Heritage); Luxemburgo, Loi du 25 juillet 2002 portant institution d’un comité luxembourgeois des droits de l’enfant appelé “Ombuds-Comité fir d’Rechter vum Kand” (“ORK”), Núm. A-N.85 (2002), arts. 2-3; Malasia, Ley del menor de 2001, Ley Núm. 611, art. 3 (Consejo de Coordinación para la Protección de la Infancia); Malta, Ley del niño y del joven (órdenes de ingreso en una institución), Cap. 285, 1980, art. 11, párr. 1 (Consejo Asesor del niño y el joven); Mauritania, informe presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/8/Add.42), párr. 6-7 (Consejo Nacional de la Infancia); Pakistán, segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/65/Add.21), párr. 5 (Comisión Nacional para el Bienestar y el Desarrollo del Niño); Perú, Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Ley Núm. 27.337, 2000), arts. 27 y 29; Qatar, Informe inicial presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño sobre el Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a la venta de niños, la prostitución infantil y la utilización de niños en la pornografía (CRC/C/OPSA/QAT/1), párr. 102 (Oficina del Defensor del Niño); Suecia, Ley del Ombudsman de la Infancia, Núm. 335 (1993); Uganda, segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/65/Add.33), p. 3 (Programa Nacional de Acción para la Infancia de Uganda); Reino Unido, Children Act 2004, Cap. 31 (Children’s Commissioner); Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 42, Cap. 112, secc. 10605, Establishment of Office for Victims of Crime, subsecc. a)- c) (Office for Victims of Crime). Por ejemplo, Myanmar, Ley sobre la infancia, Núm. 9/93 (1993), art. 63. http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/lscb. Por ejemplo, Bolivia, Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 176 (Comisión de la Niñez y Adolescencia); India, Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 (Núm. 56 de 2000), arts. 29, 37 y 39 (Child Welfare Committee); Túnez, Code de la protection de l’enfant, 1995, arts. 3-6 (Délégué à la protection de l’enfance). Bélgica, Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, arts. 3-6 (Commission de coordination de l'aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitance). Por ejemplo, Bulgaria, Programa Nacional para prevenir y combatir la trata de personas y proteger a las víctimas en 2006; Estonia, Ley de apoyo a las víctimas, 2003 (RT I 2004, 2, 3) (entrada en vigor en 2004), arts. 3-4 (desatención, malos tratos, maltrato sicológico y mental, y abusos sexuales); Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), pp. 45-46 (Unidad de lucha contra la trata); Filipinas, Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act, Núm. 7610 (1992), art. II, secc. 4 (prostitución infantil y otros abusos sexuales, trata de niños, publicaciones obscenas y espectáculos indecentes). Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 18, Cap. 223, secc. 3509, Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights, secc. (d) (Privacy protection), párr. 1-2 y 4. Por ejemplo, Bangladesh, Ley del menor, secc. 17 (tal como se menciona en el Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Bangladesh (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 37); Bolivia, Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 10 (Reserva y resguardo de identidad) al. 2; Canadá (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse, L.R.Q., Cap. P-34.1, 1977, art. 83; Canadá, Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, subsecc. 276.2-276.3, 486.3-4) y 486.4.1; Islandia, Ley sobre la protección del menor, Núm. 80/2002 (2002), art. 58; Irlanda, Children Act, 2001, secc. 252; Italia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 114; Japón, Ley para castigar los actos relacionados con la prostitución infantil y la pornografía infantil y para la protección de la infancia, 1999 (actualizada en 2004), art. 13; Kenya, Ley de menores, (Cap. 586 de la Recopilación Legislativa de Kenya, 2002) (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado por Kenya al Comité de los Derechos del Niño, CRC/C/KEN/2), párr. 212), secc. 76 (5); Filipinas, Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act, Núm. 7610 (1992), art. XI, secc. 29, párr. 2; Federación de Rusia, proyecto de ley federal sobre la lucha contra la trata de personas, 2003, art. 28(3), (5)-(6); Sudáfrica, Children’s Act, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 de junio de 2006, secc. 74; República Árabe Siria, Ley sobre la delincuencia juvenil, 1974, art. 54 (tal como se menciona en el informe inicial presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño con arreglo al Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a la venta de niños, la prostitución infantil y la utilización de niños en la pornografía (CRC/C/OPSC/SYR/1), párr. 230); Tailandia, Ley por la que se instituyen los tribunales de menores y de la familia y los procedimientos para los tribunales de menores y de la familia, art. 98 (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/83/Add.15), párr. 516); Túnez, Código de Protección de la Infancia (1995), art. 120 (tal como se menciona en el informe inicial presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/83/Add.1), párr. 242); Turquía, Ley sobre el Tribunal de Justicia de Menores, 1979, art. 40 (tal como se menciona en el informe inicial presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/51/Add.4), párr. 511); Reino Unido (Escocia), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (Cap. 36), secc. 44, subsecc. 1; Zambia, informe inicial presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño, 2002 (CRC/C/11/Add.25), párr. 527. Por ejemplo, Italia, Código Penal, art. 734 (a); Sri Lanka, segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/70/Add.17), párr. 65; Reino Unido (Escocia), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (Cap. 36), secc. 44, subsecc. 2; Zambia, informe inicial presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/11/Add.25) párr. 527. Canadá, Department of Justice, A Handbook for Police and Crown Prosecutors on Criminal Harassment (Ottawa, 2004), part. IV. Véase, por ejemplo, en Francia: http://www.barreau-marseille.avocat.fr/textes.cgi?rubrique=9. Oficina de las Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito, Independent Evaluation Report: Juvenile Justice Reform in Lebanon (Viena, julio de 2005), párr. 38. Irán (República Islámica del), segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/104/Add.3), párr. 36. Francia, Ministerio de Justicia, Direction des affaires criminelles et des grâces, “Enfants victimes d’infractions pénales: guide de bonnes pratiques; du signalement au procès pénal” (París, 2003). Por ejemplo, Estados Unidos de América (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Título 15, art. 3, secc. 15-23-62. Por ejemplo, Suiza, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, Recueil systématique du droit fédéral (RS) 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (1). Con respecto al artículo 9 a) de la Ley modelo, sobre los procedimientos aplicables en el proceso de justicia penal para adultos y menores, incluido el papel de los niños víctimas y testigos, la importancia, el momento y la manera de prestar testimonio, y la forma en que se realizará el “interrogatorio” durante la investigación y el juicio, véase Islandia, Ley sobre la protección del menor, Núm. 80/2002, art. 55, párr. 1; Kazajstán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 206, 1997, art. 215 (3); Nueva Zelandia, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, secc. 12, subsecc. 1; y Estados Unidos de América (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Título 15, art. 3, secc. 15-23-72; con respecto al artículo 9 b) de la Ley modelo, sobre los mecanismos de apoyo a disposición del niño víctima o testigo cuando haga una denuncia y participe en la investigación y en el proceso judicial, como por ejemplo poner a disposición de la víctima un abogado, véase Canadá (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse (L.R.Q., Cap. P-34.1), 1977, art. 5; Canadá (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q., Cap. A-13.2), 1988, art. 4; Canadá, Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, [Sólo inglés y francés] 2003, principio 7; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 906, 2004, art. 136, párr. 1-2 y 6; Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Ley Núm. 7739 (1998), art. 20; Países Bajos, “De Beaufort Guidelines”, 1989, párr. 6; Nueva Zelandia, Victims’ Rights Act, 2002, secc. 11(1), 12; Nicaragua, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 406, 2001, art. 110 (1); Reino Unido (Escocia), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (Cap. 36), secc. 20, subsecc. 1; y Estados Unidos de América (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Título 15, art. 3, secc. 15-23-62 (1), (7); con respecto al artículo 9 c) de la Ley modelo, sobre las fechas y los lugares específicos de las vistas y otros sucesos importantes, véase Canadá, Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, 2003, principio 6; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 906, 2004, art. 136, párr. 12 y 14; Nueva Zelandia, Victims’ Rights Act, 2002, secc. 12, subsecc. 1 (d); España, Ley 35/1995, de 11 de diciembre, de Ayudas y Asistencia a las Víctimas de Delitos Violentos y contra la Libertad Sexual, art. 15 (4); Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 18, Cap. 237, secc. 3771, Crime victims’ rights, subsecc. (a), (2); Estados Unidos de América (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Título 15, art. 3, secc. 15-23-72 (2). Corte Penal Internacional, Regla 90.5) de las Reglas de Procedimiento y Prueba y norma 83.2 del Reglamento de la Corte. Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 906, 2004, art. 11 (j); Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, Ley Núm. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (b); Francia, Code de procédure pénale, art. 102; Kazajstán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 206, 1997, art. 75 (6); México, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, secc. V; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 904, 1997 (actualizada en 2006), art. 13, secc. 3; Tailandia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 13 (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, párr. 515). Por ejemplo, Australia (Australia occidental), Evidence Act 1906, secc. 106E; Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 18, Cap. 223, secc. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsecc. (i). Suiza (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, 1991, art. 6 (3)). Por ejemplo, Canadá, Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, secc. 486.1, subsecc. 1. Por ejemplo, Argentina, Código Procesal Penal, art. 80 (c); Austria, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 162 (2); Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Ley Núm. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (c); Perú, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 957 (2004), art. 95, secc. 3; Suiza, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 7 1). Por ejemplo, Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 18, Cap. 223, secc. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsecc. (i). Por ejemplo, Bulgaria, Ley de protección del menor, 2004, art. 15 (5); República Dominicana, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 76-02, 2002, art. 202; Honduras, Código Procesal Penal, Decreto Núm. 9-99-E, 2000, art. 331; Kazajstán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 206, 1997, art. 215 y art. 352 (1); México, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, secc. XVI; Noruega, Ley de procedimiento penal, Núm. 25, 1981 (modificada el 30 de junio de 2006), secc. 128; Omán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art.14 (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/OMN/2), párrs. 29-30); Perú, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 957 (2004), art. 378, secc. 3; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 904, 1997 (modificada en 2006), art. 349. Por ejemplo, Francia, Code de procédure pénale (modificado por la loi Núm. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la répression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Sudáfrica, Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, “National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences; Department of Justice – National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases” (Pretoria 1998), Cap. 7, párr. 1; Estados Unidos de América (Delaware), Del. Code Ann. Iti.11, §5134 (1995). Por ejemplo, Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Ley Núm. 7739 (1998), art. 107 c); República Checa, Código de procedimiento penal, Núm. 141, 1961, secc. 102 (1); República Dominicana, Código Procesal Penal (Ley Núm. 76-02 of 2002), art. 202; Francia, Code de procédure pénale (modificado por la loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), arts. 706-53; Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures, Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 52; Kirguistán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Núm. 156, 1999, arts. 193 y 293; Ex República Yugoslava de Macedonia, Código de procedimiento penal, art. 223 (4); México, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, secc. XVI; Noruega, Ley de procedimiento penal, Núm. 25, 1981 (modificada el 30 de junio de 2006), secc. 239; Perú, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 957 (2004), art. 378, secc. 3; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 904, 1997 (modificada en 2006), art. 349; Tailandia, segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, párrs. 148 y 511. Por ejemplo, Bulgaria, Ley de protección del menor, 2004, art. 15 5). Por ejemplo, Australia (Queensland), Evidence Act 1977, secc. 21A (2) (d); Austria, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 162 2); Francia, Code de procédure pénale (modificada por la loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Reino Unido, Home Office y otros, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, Including Children (London, 2006), secc. 4.28; Reino Unido (Escocia), Vulnerable Witnesses (Scotland) Act 2004, secc. 271H, subsecc. 1 (d). Estados Unidos de América (Arizona), Arizona Revised Statutes (Ariz.Rev.Stat.) §13-4403 (E). Por ejemplo, Australia (Queensland), Evidence Act 1977, secc. 9; Tailandia, Código de Procedimiento Civil y Comercial, secc. 95 (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño, (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 párr. 105); Reino Unido, Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999, secc. 53 (1); Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 18, Cap. 223, secc. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsecc. (c), párr. 2. Nueva Zelandia, Evidence Act 1908, secc. 23H, párr. c). Nueva Zelandia, R. v. Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354 at 359. Ibíd. Por ejemplo, Honduras, Código Procesal Penal, Decreto Núm. 9-99-E, 2000, art. 331, al. 3. Por ejemplo, Argelia, Code de procédure pénale, 1966, art. 228; República del Congo, Loi No. 1-63 du 13 janvier 1963 portant code de procédure pénale, arts. 91 y 382; Egipto, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 283 (tal como se menciona en el informe presentado por Egipto al Comité de Derechos Humanos de conformidad con las disposiciones del artículo 40 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos (CCPR/C/EGY/2001/3), 2002, párr. 570); Francia, Code de procédure pénale, art. 108; Haití, Code d’instruction criminelle (modificada en 1985), art. 66; Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures, Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 50; Omán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, art. 196 (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado por Omán al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/OMN/2), párr. 107); Tailandia, Código de Procedimiento Civil y Comercial, secc. 112 (tal como se menciona en el segundo informe periódico presentado al Comité de los Derechos del Niño (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 párr. 105). Véase Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 (c.23), secc. 55-57. Por ejemplo, Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 18, Cap. 223, secc. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsecc. (c), párr. 3. Nueva Zelandia, R. v Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354. Por ejemplo, El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Ley Núm. 904, 1997 (modificada en 2006), art. 13, secc. 13; Estados Unidos de América (Colorado), Children’s Code, Título 19, secc. 19-1-106(2). Reino Unido, Crown Prosecution Service, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, including Children (Londres, 2006), secc. 4.28. Reino Unido, Crown Prosecution Service, Children’s Charter, 2005, secc. 4.19. Por ejemplo, Suiza, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (3). http://www.fijiwomen.com/. A veces, las víctimas de la trata son amenazadas con ser procesadas por haber entrado ilegalmente en un país. No se les presta asistencia especial mientras están detenidas, aun cuando las víctimas sean muy jóvenes y no se hayan aplicado medidas de protección. El trauma provocado por la trata y las violaciones repetidas no se ha evaluado en toda su extensión, si es que se ha hecho. Oficina de las Naciones Unidas contra la Droga y el Delito, Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes (United Nations Publications, Sales Núm. E.06.V.15), págs. 5-8. United Nations Publications, Sales Núm. E.06.V.15. Por ejemplo, Armenia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, 1999, art. 59, secc. 1, párr. 11; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 906, 2004, art. 11 g); Kazajstán, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Ley Núm. 206, 1997, art. 75 6); México, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, secc. XIX; Países Bajos, “De Beaufort Guidelines”,1989, párr. 6.1; Nueva Zelandia, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, secc. 12, subsecc. 1 e); Reino Unido, Crown Prosecution Service, “Code for Crown Prosecutors” (Londres, 2004), secc. 5.13; Estados Unidos de América (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Título 15, art. 3, secc. 15-23-63 a), 15-23-72 1) y 15-23-75 1); Estados Unidos de América (Alaska), Constitution of the State of Alaska, Rights of crime victims, art. I, secc. 24; Estados Unidos de América (Connecticut), Connecticut Joint Resolution Núm. 13, párr. 2; Estados Unidos de América (Idaho), Constitution of the State of Idaho, Rights of crime victims, art. 1, secc. 22, párr. (3) Estados Unidos de América (Illinois), Constitution of the State of Illinois, secc. 8.1 (Crime victim’s rights), subsecc. a) 5); Estados Unidos de América (Michigan), Constitution of the State of Michigan, secc. 24 1) 9; Estados Unidos de América (Carolina del Sur), Constitution of the State of South Carolina, art. 1, secc. 24 3); Estados Unidos de América (Texas), Constitution of the State of Texas, secc. 30, Rights of crime victims, párr. b) 5); Estados Unidos de América (Virginia), Constitution of Virginia, art. 1, secc. 8-A, párr. 6; Estados Unidos de América (Wisconsin), Constitution of the State of Wisconsin, art. 1, secc. 9m 9). Por ejemplo, Australia, Victims of Crime Act, A1994-83, 1994 (modificada el 13 de abril de 2004), Núm. 83 de 1994, secc. 4 (l); Canadá, Corrections and Conditional Release Act, S.C. 1992, c. 20, secc. 26, subsecc. 1; Reino Unido (Escocia), Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill, SP Bill 50, 2003, secc. 16; Reino Unido, Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 (Cap. 28), secc. 35, subsecc. (4)-(5); Estados Unidos de América, United States Code collection, Título 42, Cap. 112, secc. 10606, Victims’ rights, 2004, subsecc. b), párr. 7; Estados Unidos de América (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Título 15, art. 3, secc. 15-23-75 5), 15-23-78; Estados Unidos de América (Alaska), Constitution of the State of Alaska, Rights of crime victims, art. I, secc. 24; Estados Unidos de América (Arizona), Arizona Constitution, secc. 2.1 A), párr. 2; Estados Unidos de América (Idaho), Constitution of the State of Idaho, Rights of crime victims, art. 1, secc. 22, párr. 3); Estados Unidos de América (Illinois), Constitution of the State of Illinois, secc. 8.1 (Crime victim’s rights), subsecc. a) 5); Estados Unidos de América (Louisiana), Constitutional Amendment for Victims’ Rights, art. I, secc. 25; Estados Unidos de América (Michigan), Constitution of the State of Michigan, secc. 24 1) 9; Estados Unidos de América (Carolina del Sur), Constitution of the State of South Carolina, art. 1, secc. 24 2) y 10); Estados Unidos de América (Texas), Constitution of the State of Texas, secc. 30, Rights of crime victims, párr. b) 5); Estados Unidos de América (Virginia), Constitution of Virginia, art. 1, secc. 8-A, párr. 6; Estados Unidos de América (Wisconsin), Constitution of the State of Wisconsin, art. 1, secc. 9m 9). Centro Internacional de Viena, PO Box 500, 1400 Viena (Austria) Tel.: (+43-1) 26060-0, Fax (+43-1)26060-5866, www.unodc.org Impreso en Austria