childvictimsmodellaw_V0985205_EF
Correct misalignment Change languages order
childvictimsmodellaw.pdf (english)JUSTICE IN MATTERS INVOLVING CHILD VICTIMS AND WITNESSES OF CRIME: MODEL LAW AND RELATED COMMENTARY V0985205.doc (french)
Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Model Law and Related CommentaryUNODC wishes to acknowledge the support provided by the Governments of Canada and Sweden toward the development of this Model Law and its commentary.UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME Vienna United Nations New York, 2009 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Model Law and Related Commentaryiii Preface* 1. In its resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005, the Economic and Social Council adopted the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. The Guidelines form part of the body of United Nations standards and norms in crime prevention and criminal justice, which are internationally recognized normative principles in that area as developed by the international community since 1950.** 2. The Guidelines represent good practice based on the consensus reflected in contemporary knowledge and relevant international and regional norms, standards and principles and are meant to provide a practical framework for achieving the following objectives: (a) To assist in the design and review of national laws, procedures and practices with a view to ensuring full respect for the rights of child victims and witnesses of crime and to furthering the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child*** by the parties to that Convention; (b) To assist Governments, international organizations providing legal assistance to requesting States, public agencies, non-governmental and community-based organizations and other interested parties in designing and implementing legislation, policy, programmes and practices that address key issues related to child victims and witnesses of crime; (c) To guide professionals and, where appropriate, volunteers working with child victims and witnesses of crime in their day-to-day practice in the adult and juvenile justice process at the national, regional and international levels, consistent with the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (General Assembly resolution 40/34, annex); (d) To assist and support those caring for children in dealing sensitively with child victims and witnesses of crime. 3. To assist States in adapting their national legislation to the provisions contained in the Guidelines and in other relevant international instruments, the present Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime is intended as a tool for drafting legal provisions concerning assistance to and the protection of child victims and witnesses of crime, particularly within the justice process. The Model Law, developed by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in cooperation with * The introduction is intended as an explanatory note on the genesis, nature and scope of the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime; it is not part of the text of the Model Law. ** For a compilation of existing United Nations standards and norms in crime prevention and criminal justice, see http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/justice-and-prison-reform/compendium.html. *** United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, No. 27531.iv the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the International Bureau for Children’s Rights, was reviewed at a meeting of experts representing different legal traditions. 4. Designed to be adaptable to the needs of each State, the Model Law was drafted paying special attention to the provisions of the Guidelines whose implementation requires legislation and to key issues related to child victims and witnesses of crime, in particular the role of child victims and witnesses within the justice process. 5. In drafting the Model Law, care was taken to reflect the need to accommodate the specificities of national legislation and judicial procedures, the legal, social, economic, cultural and geographical conditions of each country and the various main legal traditions. 6. The scope of application of the Model Law relates mainly to the criminal justice system. However, States are invited to draw inspiration from the principles and provisions contained in the Model Law when designing legislation dealing with other areas in which children need protection, such as custody, divorce, adoption, immigration and refugee law. 7. The Model Law was drafted as well with a view to allowing informal and customary justice systems to use and implement its principles and provisions. 8. The concept of protection of child victims as used in the Model Law includes the protection of children not willing or not able to testify or provide information and child suspects or perpetrators who have been victimized, intimidated or forced to act illegally or who have done so under duress. 9. To further assist States in interpreting and implementing its provisions, the Model Law is accompanied by a commentary that is intended to serve as guidelines for interpretation and implementation.v Contents Page Preface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter I. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses. . . . 7 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 A. General provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 B. During the investigation phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 C. During the trial phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 D. In the post-trial period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 E. Other proceedings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chapter IV. Final provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Part two. Commentary on the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chapter I. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses. . . . 35 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 A. General provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 B. During the investigation phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 C. During the trial phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 D. In the post-trial period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 E. Other proceedings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Chapter IV. Final provisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61Part one Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime3 Preamble [Option 1. Civil law countries Considering the obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child,1 which was adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 and entered into force on 2 September 1990, and the Optional Protocols thereto,2 as well as other relevant international legal instruments, Considering in particular Economic and Social Council resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005, which includes as an annex the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (the “Guidelines”), Considering also that every child victim or witness of crime has the right to have his or her best interests given primary consideration, while safeguarding the rights of accused persons and convicted offenders, Bearing in mind the following rights of child victims and witnesses of crime, in particular those contained in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and in the Guidelines: (a) The right to be treated with dignity and compassion; (b) The right to be protected from discrimination; (c) The right to be informed; (d) The right to be heard and to express views and concerns; (e) The right to effective assistance; (f) The right to privacy; (g) The right to be protected from hardship during the justice process; (h) The right to safety; (i) The right to special preventive measures; (j) The right to reparation, Considering that improved responses for child victims and witnesses of crime can make children and their families more willing to disclose instances of victimization and more supportive of the justice process. The Law has been adopted on ... (day) ... (month) ... (year).] [Option 2. Common law countries An Act to provide for assistance to and the protection of child victims and witnesses of crime, particularly within the justice process, in accordance with existing 4 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime international instruments, especially the Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989, and other related international instruments, including the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime adopted by the Economic and Social Council in its resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005 (the “Guidelines”); 1. This Act may be cited as the “Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Act”. 2. It shall extend throughout [name of State]. 3. It shall come into force [on day, month and year] [upon publication in the Official Gazette].]5 Chapter I. Definitions For the purposes of the present [Law] [Act], the following definitions shall apply: (a) “Child victim or witness” means a person under the age of 18 who is a victim of or witness to a crime, regardless of his or her role in the offence or in the prosecution of the alleged offender or groups of offenders. Unless otherwise specified, “child” denotes both child victims and child witnesses; (b) “Professionals” means persons who, in the context of their work, are in contact with child victims and witnesses of crime or are responsible for addressing the needs of children in the justice system and to whom the [Law] [Act] is applicable. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: child and victim advocates and support persons; child protection service practitioners; child welfare agency staff; prosecutors and defence lawyers; diplomatic and consular staff; domestic violence programme staff; magistrates and judges; court staff; law enforcement officials; probation officers; medical and mental health professionals; and social workers; (c) “Justice process” encompasses detection of the crime, the making of the complaint, investigation, prosecution and trial and post-trial procedures, regardless of whether the case is handled in a national, international or regional criminal justice system for adults or juveniles or in customary or informal justice systems; (d) “Child-sensitive” means an approach that gives primary consideration to a child’s right to protection and that takes into account a child’s individual needs and views; (e) “Support person” means a specially trained person designated to assist a child throughout the justice process in order to prevent the risk of duress, revictimization or secondary victimization; (f) “Child’s guardian” means a person who has been formally recognized under national law as responsible for looking after a child’s interests when the parents of the child do not have parental responsibility over him or her or have died; (g) “Guardian ad litem” means a person appointed by the court to protect a child’s interests in proceedings affecting his or her interests; (h) “Secondary victimization” means victimization that occurs not as a direct result of a criminal act but through the response of institutions and individuals to the victim; (i) “Revictimization” means a situation in which a person suffers more than one criminal incident over a specific period of time.7 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses Article 1. Best interests of the child Every child, especially child victims and witnesses, in the context of the [Law] [Act], has the right to have his or her best interests given primary consideration, while safeguarding the rights of an accused or convicted offender. Article 2. General principles 1. A child victim or witness shall be treated without discrimination of any kind, irrespective of the child’s or his or her parents’ or legal guardian’s race, colour, religion, beliefs, age, family status, culture, language, ethnicity, national or social origin, citizenship, gender, sexual orientation, political or other opinions, disabilities if any or status of birth, property or other condition. 2. A child victim or witness of crime shall be treated in a caring and sensitive manner that is respectful of his or her dignity throughout the legal proceedings, taking into account his or her personal situation and immediate and special needs, age, gender, disabilities if any and level of maturity. 3. Interference in the child’s private life shall be limited to the minimum necessary as defined by law in order to ensure high standards of evidence and a fair and equitable outcome of the proceedings. 4. The privacy of a child victim or witness shall be protected. 5. Information that would tend to identify a child as a witness or victim shall not be published without the express permission of the court. 6. A child victim or witness shall have the right to express his or her views, opinions and beliefs freely, in his or her own words, and shall have the right to contribute to decisions affecting his or her life, including those taken in the course of the justice process. Article 3. Duty to report offences involving a child victim or witness 1. Teachers, doctors, social workers and other professional categories, as deemed appropriate, shall have a duty to notify [name of competent authority] if they have reasonable cause to suspect that a child is a victim of or a witness to a crime. 8 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2. The persons referred to in paragraph 1 of this article shall assist the child to the best of their abilities until the child is provided with appropriate professional assistance. 3. The duty to report established in paragraph 1 of this article supersedes any obligation of confidentiality, except in the case of lawyer-client confidentiality. Article 4. Protection of children from contact with offenders 1. Any person who has been convicted in a final verdict of a qualifying criminal offence against a child shall not be eligible to work in a service, institution or association providing services to children. 2. Services, institutions or associations providing services to children shall take appropriate measures to ensure that persons who have been charged with a qualifying criminal offence against a child shall not come into contact with children. 3. For the purposes of paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article, [name of competent body] shall promulgate regulations that contain the following: (a) A definition of a qualifying criminal offence with respect to the severity of the sentence that may be imposed by the court; (b) A list of mandatory qualifying criminal offences; (c) The mandate of the court to issue an order preventing an individual convicted of such criminal offences from working in services, institutions or associations providing services to children; (d) A definition of services, institutions and associations providing services to children; (e) Measures to be taken by services, institutions and associations providing services to children to ensure that persons charged with a qualifying criminal offence do not come into contact with children. 4. Any person who knowingly violates paragraph 1 or 2 of this article shall be guilty of an offence and shall be subject to the punishment specified in the regulations to be established pursuant to paragraph 3 of this article. Article 5. National [authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses [Option for States establishing a national authority: 1. A national authority for the protection of child victims and witnesses (the “Authority”) is hereby established. 2. The Authority shall comprise: (a) One judge of [name of competent court]; (b) One representative of the prosecutor’s office, specialized in cases involving children;Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 9 (c) One representative of law enforcement agencies; (d) One representative of the child protection services or of any other relevant service within the ministry responsible for social affairs; (e) One representative of the ministry responsible for health; (f) One representative of the bar association, if possible, specialized in cases involving children; (g) One representative of each recognized victim support organization providing services to children; (h) One representative of the ministry responsible for education; [Optional: (i) Any other representative in accordance with local requirements]. 3. The members of the Authority shall be appointed by [name of competent minister] within [...] months of the entry into force of this [Law] [Act].] [Option for States preferring not to establish a national authority but to rely on an existing body or ministry: 1. An office for the protection of child victims and witnesses (the “Office”) shall be established within [name of competent body or ministry]. 2. The Office shall comprise: (a) One judge of [name of competent court]; (b) One representative of the prosecutor’s office, specialized in cases involving children; (c) One representative of law enforcement agencies; (d) One representative of the child protection services or of any other relevant service within the ministry responsible for social affairs; (e) One representative of the ministry responsible for health; (f) One representative of the bar association, if possible, specialized in cases involving children; (g) One representative of each recognized victim support organization providing services to children; (h) One representative of the ministry responsible for education; [Optional: (i) Any other representative in accordance with local requirements]. 3. The Office shall perform the functions set forth in article 6 of the present [Law] [Act].]10 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 6. Functions of the [national authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses The [Authority] [Office] shall perform the following functions: (a) It shall adopt general national policies related to child victims and witnesses; (b) On the basis of national policies, it shall develop recommendations on relevant prevention and protection programmes and submit them to the relevant public authorities; (c) It shall promote and ensure national-level coordination of services and institutions that provide assistance or treatment to child victims and witnesses by: (i) Monitoring the implementation of existing procedures related to the reporting of criminal acts and to providing assistance to child victims and witnesses, including legal representation and placement, and establishing such procedures where they do not exist; (ii) Making recommendations to the competent ministry or ministries on the issuance of regulations and protocols; (d) It shall establish guidelines for the establishment of mechanisms such as hotlines for child protection, to be regulated by [name of competent body]; (e) It shall establish guidelines for the training of professionals working with child victims and witnesses; (f) It shall initiate research on matters relating to child victims and witnesses; (g) It shall disseminate information concerning assistance to child victims and witnesses among persons and institutions responsible for children, including schools, public organizations, institutions and centres accessible to children; (h) It shall publish annual reports on the performance of the bodies subject to the provisions of this [Law] [Act] and on its own activities. Article 7. Confidentiality 1. In addition to any existing legal protection of the privacy of child victims and witnesses in accordance with article 3, paragraph 3, of this [Law] [Act], all persons working with a child victim or witness as well as all members of the [Authority] [Office] established under article 5 of the present [Law] [Act] shall maintain the confidentiality of all information on child victims and witnesses that they may have acquired in the performance of their duty. 2. Any person violating paragraph 1 of this article shall be guilty of an offence and shall be subject to a term of imprisonment of [...] or a fine of [...] or both.Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 11 Article 8. Training 1. Professionals working with child victims and witnesses shall undergo appropriate training on issues related to child victims and witnesses. 2. Where appropriate, the [Authority] [Office] established under article 5 of the present [Law] [Act] shall develop and publish training curricula for professionals working with child victims and witnesses of crime. The training should cover the following: (a) Relevant human rights norms, standards and principles, including the rights of the child; (b) Principles and ethical duties related to the performance of their functions; (c) Signs and symptoms that are indicative of crimes against children; (d) Crisis assessment skills and techniques, especially for making referrals, with an emphasis placed on the need for confidentiality; (e) The dynamics and nature of violence against children and the impact and consequences, including negative physical and psychological effects, of crimes against children; (f) Special measures and techniques to assist child victims and witnesses in the justice process; (g) Information on children’s developmental stages as well as cross-cultural and age-related linguistic, ethnic, religious, social and gender issues, with particular attention to children from disadvantaged groups; (h) Appropriate adult-child communication skills, including a child-sensitive approach; (i) Interview and assessment techniques that minimize distress or trauma to children while maximizing the quality of information received from them, including skills to deal with child victims and witnesses in a sensitive, understanding, constructive and reassuring manner; (j) Methods to protect and present evidence and to question child witnesses; (k) Roles of, and methods used by, professionals working with child victims and witnesses.13 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process A. General provisions Article 9. Right to be informed A child victim or witness, his or her parents or guardian, his or her lawyer, the support person, if designated, or other appropriate person designated to provide assistance shall, from their first contact with the justice process and throughout that process, be promptly informed by [name of competent authority] about the stage of the process and, to the extent feasible and appropriate, about the following: (a) Procedures of the adult and juvenile criminal justice process, including the role of child victims or witnesses, the importance, timing and manner of testimony, and the ways in which interviews will be conducted during the investigation and trial; (b) Existing support mechanisms for a child victim or witness when making a complaint and participating in investigations and court proceedings, including making available a victim’s lawyer or other appropriate person designated to provide assistance; (c) Specific places and times of hearings and other relevant events; (d) Availability of protective measures; (e) Existing mechanisms for the review of decisions affecting the child victim or witness; (f) Relevant rights of child victims and witnesses pursuant to applicable national legislation, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and other international legal instruments, including the Guidelines and the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power, adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 40/34 of 29 November 1985; (g) Existing opportunities to obtain reparation from the offender or from the State through the justice process, through alternative civil proceedings or through other processes; (h) Availability and functioning of restorative justice schemes; (i) Availability of health, psychological, social and other relevant services and the means of accessing such services, as well as the availability of legal or other advice or representation and emergency financial support, where applicable; (j) The progress and disposition of the specific case, including the apprehension, arrest and custodial status of the accused and any pending changes to that status, the prosecutorial decision and relevant post-trial developments and the outcome of the case.14 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 10. Legal assistance A child victim or witness shall be assigned a lawyer by the State free of charge throughout the justice process in the following instances: (a) At his or her request; (b) At the request of his or her parents or guardian; (c) At the request of the support person, if one has been designated; (d) Pursuant to an order of the court on its own motion, if the court considers the assignment of a lawyer to be in the best interests of the child. Article 11. Protective measures At any stage in the justice process where the safety of a child victim or witness is deemed to be at risk, [name of competent authority] shall arrange to have protective measures put in place for the child. Those measures may include the following: (a) Avoiding direct contact between a child victim or witness and the accused at any point in the justice process; (b) Requesting restraining orders from a competent court, supported by a registry system; (c) Requesting a pretrial detention order for the accused from a competent court, with “no contact” bail conditions; (d) Requesting an order from a competent court to place the accused under house arrest; (e) Requesting protection for a child victim or witness by the police or other relevant agencies and safeguarding the whereabouts of the child from disclosure; (f) Making or requesting from competent authorities other protective measures that may be deemed appropriate. Article 12. Language, interpreter and other special assistance measures 1. The court shall ensure that proceedings relevant to the testimony of a child victim or witness are conducted in language that is simple and comprehensible to a child. 2. If a child needs the assistance of interpretation into a language that the child understands, an interpreter shall be provided free of charge. 3. If, in view of the child’s age, level of maturity or special individual needs, which may include but are not limited to disabilities if any, ethnicity, poverty or risk of revictimization, the child requires special assistance measures in order to testify or participate in the justice process, such measures shall be provided free of charge.Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 15 B. During the investigation phase The provisions contained in the present section (“B. During the investigation phase”) of this [Law] [Act] shall apply to all national competent authorities involved in the investigation of cases involving a child victim or witness. Article 13. Specially trained investigator 1. An investigator specially trained in dealing with children shall be appointed by [name of competent authority] to guide the interview of the child, using a child-sensitive approach. 2. The investigator shall, to the extent possible, avoid repetition of the interview during the justice process in order to prevent secondary victimization of the child. Article 14. Medical examinations and the taking of bodily samples 1. A child victim or witness shall be subjected to medical examination or to the taking of a bodily sample only if the following two conditions are met: (a) His or her parents or guardian or the support person is present, unless the child decides otherwise; (b) Written authorization for a medical examination or the taking of a bodily sample has been provided by the court, a senior police officer or the prosecutor. 2. The court, a senior police officer or the prosecutor shall provide written authorization for a medical examination or the taking of a bodily sample only if there are reasonable grounds for believing that such an examination or taking of a bodily sample is necessary. 3. If at any time during the investigation phase, there is any doubt as to the health of a child victim or witness, including the child’s mental health, the competent authority conducting the proceedings shall ensure that a comprehensive medical examination is carried out on the child by a physician as soon as possible. 4. Following such a medical examination, the competent authority conducting the proceedings shall use its best endeavours to ensure that the child receives such treatment as recommended by the physician, including, where necessary, admission to hospital. Article 15. Support person As from the beginning of the investigation phase and during the entire justice process, child victims and witnesses shall be supported by a person with training and 16 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime professional skills to communicate with and assist children of different ages and backgrounds in order to prevent the risk of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization. Article 16. Designation of a support person 1. The investigator shall inform [name of competent authority] of his or her intention to invite a child victim or witness for an interview and shall ask for the designation of a support person. 2. The support person shall be designated by [name of competent body]. Prior to the designation, [name of competent authority] shall consult with the child and his or her parents or guardian, including with respect to the gender of the support person to be designated. 3. The support person shall be given sufficient time to make acquaintance with the child before the first interview takes place. 4. When inviting the child to an interview, the investigator shall inform the child’s support person of the time and place of the interview to take place. 5. Any interview of a child victim or witness conducted as part of the justice process shall take place in the presence of the support person. 6. The continuity of the relationship between the child and the support person shall be ensured to the greatest extent possible throughout the justice process. 7. [Name of competent body], which designated the support person, shall monitor the work of the support person and assist him or her, if necessary. If the support person fails to perform his or her duties and functions in accordance with this [Law] [Act], [name of competent body] shall designate a replacement support person after consultation with the child. Article 17. Functions of the support person The support person shall, inter alia: (a) Provide general emotional support to the child; (b) Provide assistance, in a child-sensitive manner, to the child during the entire justice process. Such assistance may include measures to alleviate the negative effects of the criminal offence on the child, measures to assist the child in carrying out his or her daily life and measures to assist the child in dealing with administrative matters arising from the circumstances of the case; (c) Advise whether therapy or counselling is necessary;Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 17 (d) Liaise and communicate with the child’s parents or guardian, family, friends and lawyer, as appropriate; (e) Inform the child about the composition of the investigation team or court and all other issues as stated in article 9 of this [Law] [Act]; (f) In coordination with the lawyer representing the child or in the absence of a lawyer representing the child, discuss with the court, the child and his or her parents or guardian the different options for giving evidence, such as, where available, video recording and other means to safeguard the best interests of the child; (g) In coordination with the lawyer representing the child or in the absence of a lawyer representing the child, discuss with the law enforcement agencies, the prosecutor and the court the advisability of ordering protective measures; (h) Request that protective measures be ordered, if necessary; (i) Request special assistance measures if the child’s circumstances warrant them. Article 18. Information to be provided to the support person In addition to the information to be provided pursuant to article 9 of this [Law] [Act], at all stages of the justice process the support person shall be kept informed of: (a) The charges against the accused; (b) The relationship between the accused and the child; (c) The custodial status of the accused. Article 19. Functions of the support person in case of the release of the accused The support person, having been informed by the competent authority of the release of the accused from custody or pretrial detention, shall inform the child and his or her parents or guardian and lawyer accordingly and shall assist him or her in requesting appropriate protection measures, if necessary. C. During the trial phase Article 20. Reliability of child evidence 1. A child is deemed to be a capable witness unless proved otherwise through a competency examination administered by the court in accordance with article 21 of this [Law] [Act], and his or her testimony shall not be presumed invalid or untrustworthy by reason of his or her age alone provided that his or her age and maturity allow the giving of intelligible and credible testimony. 18 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2. For the purposes of this section (“C. During the trial phase”), a child’s testimony includes testimony given with technical communication aids or through the assistance of an expert specialized in understanding and communicating with children. 3. The weight given to the testimony of a child shall be in accordance with his or her age and maturity. 4. A child, irrespective of whether he or she will provide testimony, shall have the opportunity to express his or her personal views and concerns on matters related to the case, his or her involvement in the justice process in particular his or her safety with respect to the accused, his or her preference to testify or not and the manner in which the testimony is to be given, as well as any other relevant matter affecting him or her. In cases where his or her views have not been accommodated, the child should receive a clear explanation of the reasons for not taking them into account. 5. A child shall not be required to testify in the justice process against his or her will or without the knowledge of his or her parents or guardian. His or her parents or guardian shall be invited to accompany the child except in the following circumstances: (a) The parents or the guardian are the alleged perpetrator of the offence committed against the child; (b) The child expresses a concern about being accompanied by his or her parents or guardian; (c) The court deems it not to be in the best interest of the child to be accompanied by his or her parents or guardian. Article 21. Competency examination 1. A competency examination of a child may be conducted only if the court determines that there are compelling reasons to do so. The reasons for such a decision shall be recorded by the court. In deciding whether or not to carry out a competency examination, the best interest of the child shall be a primary consideration. 2. The competency examination is aimed at determining whether or not the child is able to understand questions that are put to him or her in a language that a child understands as well as the importance of telling the truth. The child’s age alone is not a compelling reason for requesting a competency examination. 3. The court may appoint an expert for the purpose of examining the child’s competency. Aside from the expert, the only other persons who may be present at a competency examination are: (a) The magistrate or judge; (b) The public prosecutor; (c) The defence lawyer;Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 19 (d) The child’s lawyer; (e) The support person; (f) A court reporter or clerk; (g) Any other person, including the child’s parents or guardian or a guardian ad litem, whose presence, in the opinion of the court, is necessary for the welfare of the child. 4. If the court does not appoint an expert, the competency examination of a child shall be conducted by the court on the basis of questions submitted by the public prosecutor and the defence lawyer. 5. The questions shall be asked in a child-sensitive manner appropriate to the age and developmental level of the child and shall not be related to the issues involved in the trial. They shall focus on determining the child’s ability to understand simple questions and answer them truthfully. 6. Psychological or psychiatric examinations to assess the competency of a child shall not be ordered unless compelling reasons to do so are demonstrated. 7. A competency examination shall not be repeated. Article 22. Oath 1. At the discretion of the presiding magistrate or judge, a child witness shall not be required to swear an oath, for instance, if the child is unable to understand the consequences of taking an oath. In such cases, the presiding magistrate or judge may offer the child the opportunity to promise to tell the truth. In either event, the court shall nevertheless hear the child’s testimony. 2. A child witness shall not be prosecuted for giving false testimony. Article 23. Designation of a support person during the trial 1. Before inviting a child victim or witness to court, the competent magistrate or judge shall verify that the child is already receiving the assistance of a support person. 2. If a support person has not already been designated, the competent magistrate or judge shall appoint one in consultation with the child and his or her parents or guardian, and shall provide the support person with adequate time to familiarize him or herself with the case and liaise with the child. 3. The competent magistrate or judge shall inform the support person of the date and venue of the trial or court session.20 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 24. Waiting areas 1. The competent magistrate or judge shall ensure that child victims and witnesses can wait in appropriate waiting areas equipped in a child-friendly manner. 2. Waiting areas used by child victims and witnesses shall not be visible to or accessible to persons accused of having committed a criminal offence. 3. Where possible, the waiting areas used by child victims and witnesses should be separate from the waiting area provided for adult witnesses. 4. The competent magistrate or judge may, if appropriate, order a child victim or witness to wait in a location away from the courtroom and invite the child to appear when required. 5. The magistrate or judge shall give priority to hearing the testimony of a child victims and witnesses in order to minimize their waiting time during the court appearance. Article 25 Emotional support for child victims and witnesses 1. In addition to the child’s parents or guardian and his or her lawyer or other appropriate person designated to provide assistance, the competent magistrate or judge shall allow the support person to accompany a child victim or witness throughout his or her participation in the court proceedings in order to reduce anxiety or stress. 2. The competent magistrate or judge shall inform the support person that he or she, as well as the child himself or herself, may ask the court for a recess whenever the child needs one. 3. The court may order a child’s parents or guardian to be removed from a hearing only when it is in the best interests of the child. Article 26. Courtroom facilities 1. The competent magistrate or judge shall ensure that appropriate arrangements for child victims or witnesses are made in the courtroom, such as, but not limited to, providing elevated seats and assistance for children with disabilities. 2. The courtroom layout shall ensure that, in so far as possible, the child shall be able to sit close to his or her parents or guardian, support person or lawyer during all proceedings. [Article 27. Cross-examination (option for common law countries) Where applicable, and with due regard for the rights of the accused, the competent magistrate or judge shall not allow cross-examination of a child victim or witness by Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 21 the accused. Such cross-examination may be undertaken by the defence lawyer under the supervision of the competent magistrate or judge, who will have the duty to prevent the asking of any question that may expose the child to intimidation, hardship or undue distress.] Article 28. Measures to protect the privacy and well-being of child victims and witnesses At the request of a child victim or witness, his or her parents or guardian, his or her lawyer, the support person, other appropriate person designated to provide assistance or on its own motion, the court, taking into account the best interests of the child, may order one or more of the following measures to protect the privacy and physical and mental well-being of the child and to prevent undue distress and secondary victimization: (a) Expunging from the public record any names, addresses, workplaces, professions or any other information that could be used to identify the child; (b) Forbidding the defence lawyer from revealing the identity of the child or disclosing any material or information that would tend to identify the child; (c) Ordering the non-disclosure of any records that identify the child, until such time as the court may find appropriate; (d) Assigning a pseudonym or a number to a child, in which case the full name and date of birth of the child shall be revealed to the accused within a reasonable period for the preparation of his or her defence; (e) Efforts to conceal the features or physical description of the child giving testimony or to prevent distress or harm to the child, including testifying: (i) Behind an opaque shield; (ii) Using image-or voice-altering devices; (iii) Through examination in another place, transmitted simultaneously to the courtroom by means of closed-circuit television; (iv) By way of videotaped examination of the child witness prior to the hearing, in which case the counsel for the accused shall attend the examination and be given the opportunity to examine the child witness or victim; (v) Through a qualified and suitable intermediary, such as, but not limited to, an interpreter for children with hearing, sight, speech or other disabilities; (f) Holding closed sessions; (g) Giving orders to temporarily remove the accused from the courtroom if the child refuses to give testimony in the presence of the accused or if circumstances show that the child may be inhibited from speaking the truth in that person’s presence. In such cases, the defence lawyer shall remain in the courtroom and question the child, and the accused’s right of confrontation shall thus be guaranteed; 22 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (h) Allowing recesses during the child’s testimony; (i) Scheduling hearings at times of day appropriate to the age and maturity of the child; (j) Taking any other measure that the court may deem necessary, including, where applicable, anonymity, taking into account the best interests of the child and the rights of the accused. D. In the post-trial period Article 29. Right to restitution and compensation [Option if a State victims fund exists: 1. The court shall inform a child victim, his or her parents or guardian and his or her lawyer about the procedures for claiming compensation. 2. A child victim who is not a national shall have to right to claim compensation.] [Option 1. Common law countries 3. Upon conviction of the accused and in addition to any other measure imposed on him or her, the court may, at the request of the prosecutor, the victim, his or her parents or guardian or the victim’s lawyer, or on its own motion, order that the offender make restitution or compensation to a child as follows: (a) In cases of damage to or loss or destruction of property of a child victim as a result of the commission of the offence or the arrest or attempted arrest of the offender, the court may order the offender to pay to the child or to his or her legal representative the replacement value in the event that the property cannot be returned in full; (b) In cases of bodily or psychological harm to a child as a result of the commission of the offence or the arrest or attempted arrest of the offender, the court may order the offender to financially compensate the child for all damages incurred as a result of the harm, including expenses related to social and education reintegration, medical treatment, mental health care and legal services; (c) In cases of bodily harm or threat of bodily harm to a child who was a member of the offender’s household at the relevant time, the court may order the offender to pay the child compensation for the expenses incurred as a result of moving from the offender’s household.] [Option 2. Countries where criminal courts have no jurisdiction in civil claims 3. After delivering the verdict, the court shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the child’s lawyer of the right to restitution and compensation in accordance with national law.]Part one. Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 23 [Option 3. Countries where criminal courts have jurisdiction in civil claims 3. The court shall order full restitution or compensation to the child, where appropriate, and inform the child of the possibility of seeking assistance for enforcement of the restitution or compensation order.] Article 30. Restorative justice measures If restorative justice measures are considered, [name of competent body] shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the child’s lawyer of available restorative justice programmes and how to access such programmes, as well as the possibility of seeking restitution and compensation in court if the restorative justice programme fails to achieve an agreement between the child victim and the offender. Article 31. Information on the outcome of the trial 1. The competent magistrate or judge shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the support person of the outcome of the trial. 2. The competent magistrate or judge shall invite the support person to provide emotional support to the child to help him or her to come to terms with the outcome of the trial, if necessary. [Option for common law countries: 3. The court shall inform the child, his or her parents or guardian and the child’s lawyer of existing procedures for the granting of parole to the offender and of the child’s right to express his or her views in that regard.] Article 32. Role of the support person after the conclusion of the proceedings 1. Immediately after the conclusion of the proceedings, the support person shall liaise with appropriate agencies or professionals to ensure that further counselling or treatment for the child victim or witness is provided if necessary. 2. In the event that a child victim or witness needs to be repatriated, the support person shall liaise with the competent authorities, including consulates, in order to ensure correct implementation of the relevant national and international provisions governing the repatriation of children and to assist the child in the preparations for repatriation. 24 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 33. Information on the release of convicted persons 1. In the event that a convicted person is to be released from detention, [name of competent authority], through the support person, if applicable, or through the child’s lawyer, shall inform the child and his or her parents or guardians of that release. The information shall be provided by [name of competent authority] as early as possible after such a decision has been taken, at the latest one day prior to the release. 2. The court shall inform a child victim or witness of the release of a convicted person at least up to a period of [...] years after the child has reached the age of 18. E. Other proceedings Article 34. Extended application to other proceedings The provisions of this [Law] [Act] shall apply, mutatis mutandis, to all matters pertaining to a child victim or witness, including civil matters.25 [Chapter IV. Final provisions] [Article 35. Final provisions (option for civil law countries) The present [Law] [Act] shall enter into force in accordance with existing national procedures under the national legislation of [name of country].]Part two Commentary on the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime29 Introduction In its resolution 2005/20 of 22 July 2005, the Economic and Social Council adopted the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (the “Guidelines”), contained in the annex to that resolution. The Guidelines form part of the body of the United Nations standards and norms in crime prevention and criminal justice, which are internationally recognized normative principles in that area as developed by the international community since 1950. In order to assist countries, international organizations providing legal assistance to requesting States, public agencies and non-governmental and community-based organizations, as well as practitioners, in implementing the Guidelines, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, in cooperation with UNICEF, has developed a series of technical tools, including the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. The purpose of the Model Law is to assist Governments in drafting relevant national legislation in conformity with the principles contained in the Guidelines and other relevant international legal instruments such as the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The present commentary on the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime has been designed to provide a better understanding of the provisions of the Model Law. Furthermore, the commentary contains references to laws, jurisprudence and international norms as well as explanations and examples related to the various articles of the Model Law. First, it is important to stress that the Model Law establishes the principle that there are several categories of professionals that can and should provide assistance to child victims and witnesses of crime throughout the justice process. It has often been argued that it is a primary right, as well as a duty, of the parents to provide such assistance and that the intervention of the State in this regard could infringe that right and duty. However, it was also recognized that multi-disciplinary expertise of professionals can support parents, who are often unfamiliar with the justice process, on how to best assist their children. With respect to its scope, the Model Law is intended to cover all persons under the age of 18 giving testimony in the justice process, who are victims or witnesses of crime. However, the Model Law is also intended to protect and assist children who may be both victim and perpetrator, as well as those child victims who do not wish to testify. In accordance with the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which provides the same basic rights for all children, this Model Law does not differentiate between victims who are also witnesses and victims who are not witnesses, or between victims and witnesses in conflict with the law and those who are not. 30 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Unless indicated otherwise, the provisions of the Model Law are intended to cover both child victims and witnesses. In view of the fact that there are different legal systems, with different drafting traditions, the Model Law contains some optional articles and provisions in order to accommodate such differences. The Model Law is intended to be applicable either as a whole or in part, based on the needs and the unique circumstances of each country.31 Preamble In its preamble, the Model Law on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime provides two options: one for civil law countries and one for common law countries. The fourth paragraph of the option for civil law countries contains a list of rights of child victims and witnesses of crime. The rights listed in the paragraph derive from different legal sources, namely the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 and entered into force on 2 September 1990, and the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime (Economic and Social Council resolution 2005/20, annex), which have different legal implications. Whereas the rights mentioned in the Convention are of a binding nature for those countries which have ratified the Convention, the rights specified in the Guidelines do not have the same legal force. Nevertheless, the rights contained in the two instruments are interrelated, and it is their combination and interconnectedness that provide the framework for a full and comprehensive system of protection for child victims and witnesses of crime. 33 Chapter I. Definitions 1. The definitions of “child victim or witness”, “professionals”, “justice process” and “child-sensitive” contained in the Model Law are drawn from paragraph 9 of the Guidelines. Support person 2. The concept of “support person” has been incorporated into the legislation of several countries under different names and at different stages of the justice process. The common denominator of this institution is the provision of support and assistance to child victims and witnesses, from the earliest possible stage of the justice process, by a person specialized and trained in assisting children in a way that a child understands and accepts. The main purpose of the presence of a support person is to protect the child victim or witness from the risks of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization. Child’s guardian 3. To provide a definition of a “child’s guardian”, the Model Law has opted to refer to the relevant legal provisions of each Member State. Secondary victimization 4. The definition of “secondary victimization” contained in the Model Law has been drawn from the Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power3 developed by the Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention in 1999. Revictimization 5. The definition of “revictimization” contained in the Model Law draws on the definition contained in Council of Europe recommendation Rec (2006) 8 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on assistance to crime victims of 14 June 2006.435 Chapter II. General provisions on assistance to child victims and witnesses Article 1. Best interests of the child 1. Subparagraph 8 (c) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime states that while the rights of accused and convicted offenders should be safeguarded, every child has the right to have his or her best interests given primary consideration. Article 3, paragraph 1, of the Convention on the Rights of the Child provides that, in all actions concerning children, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration. 2. The concept of the “best interests of the child” is also present in several regional treaties, in particular the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child,5 the American Convention on Human Rights,6 the Inter-American Convention on International Traffic in Minors,7 the European Convention on the Exercise of Children’s Rights8 and other legal instruments.9 3. The concept of the “best interests of the child” is considered self-explanatory in the legislation of several States, for example Australia,10 while other States, such as South Africa,11 have opted for providing a definition in their domestic law. An interesting approach is that contained in the legislation of Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), according to which the “best interests of the child” are considered a principle of interpretation and application of the law.12 4. It was therefore decided not to include a definition of the principle in the Model Law but to leave it to national legislators to decide on the best approach. 5. However, it should be stressed that in the context of criminal justice proceedings, the principle of the “best interests of a child”, while it should be a primary consideration, cannot jeopardize or undermine the rights of an accused or convicted person. A balance has to be struck between the protection of the child victim or witness of crime and the safeguarding of the rights of the accused. Therefore, the language of article 1 reflects that balance and mirrors the language of subparagraph 8 (c) of the Guidelines. Article 2. General principles Article 2 provides general guiding principles that apply to the implementation of the law.36 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 3. Duty to report offences involving a child victim or witness 1. Several countries make it a general legal obligation to report offences against children to the competent authorities immediately upon their discovery.13 In those countries, failure to report such a crime may constitute a criminal offence (by omission). 2. According to the national legislation of some countries, that duty is even more stringent for certain categories of professionals working in contact with children, including civil servants in the ministry responsible for education,14 social workers,15 doctors16 and nurses.17 3. The approach chosen in the Model Law is to explicitly establish a duty to report such offences, with legal consequences for not complying with that duty, for specific professional categories that are in close contact with children, such as teachers, doctors and social workers. The Model Law also leaves to national legislators the option of extending the duty to report to other professional categories as is deemed appropriate and in accordance with other national laws. Article 4. Protection of children from contact with offenders 1. Several States have created special lists of persons convicted of specific offences such as sexual crimes.18 The lists can be used by the police to track criminals, but they are also sometimes made available to potential employers, which make use of them to gather information on the applicant’s criminal record. 2. The Terre des Hommes International Federation, an international non-governmental organization, has issued a guidebook, for internal use, to prevent the recruitment of persons having been in conflict with the law in connection with offences against children. The guidebook provides important information and input in this regard.19 3. Under the Model Law, any person convicted of a qualifying offence against a child shall not be eligible to work in a service, institution or association providing services to children. That provision protects children from the risk of becoming victims of recidivist offenders. Failure by an employer to comply with article 4, paragraph 2, of the Model Law is considered an offence. Article 5. National [authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses 1. Establishing a centralized government body or authority to coordinate the various activities related to victims’ assistance is often an appropriate first step towards achieving effective coordination among the main actors involved in providing assistance to victims.20 The Model Law includes this provision reflecting best practices.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 37 2. Several States have established specific authorities in charge of coordinating activities to promote and protect children’s rights.21 However, in some countries, usually due to a lack of resources, the protection of and assistance to children is carried out mainly by non-governmental organizations, whose operations are supervised by government authorities.22 3. In some countries, the task of coordinating child protection is undertaken at the local or regional level. In the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, for example, the Area Child Protection Committees bring together representatives of the main agencies and professionals involved in child protection to coordinate different activities to be undertaken in the local area to safeguard children. The Committees, inter alia, develop local policies for inter-agency work within the national framework, assist in improving the quality of child protection through training and raise awareness within the community on the necessity of safeguarding children’s rights.23 Similar initiatives can be found in countries such as Bolivia, India and Tunisia.24 4. In Belgium, a coordination commission for child victims of maltreatment has been established in every French-speaking judiciary district. The purpose of the commissions is to inform local entities and coordinate their efforts to assist child victims of maltreatment in order to improve the effectiveness of such entities. The membership of the commissions comprises representatives of political parties, magistrates, law enforcement officials and social workers.25 5. Legislation for the establishment of specific coordination mechanisms to assist victims of specific types of crime can be found in countries such as Bulgaria (for victims of trafficking in human beings), Estonia (for victims of negligence, mistreatment and physical, mental or sexual abuse), Indonesia (for victims of child trafficking) and the Philippines (for victims of child prostitution or other sexual abuse and child trafficking).26 6. The coordinating authority should include representatives of all relevant authorities. Thus, subparagraph 2 (i) of article 5 has been included as an option to facilitate the appointment of any other representative in accordance with local requirements and legislation. 7. In order to ensure the implementation of the provision, which may be delayed owing to budgetary considerations, it is also suggested that Governments set a limited period of time for the appointment of members. Article 6. Functions of the [national authority] [office] for the protection of child victims and witnesses Article 6 sets out the functions that the national authority or office for the protection of child victims and witnesses should perform. 38 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 7. Confidentiality 1. The intention of article 7 is to protect the privacy and safety of child victims and witnesses by providing that members of the authority established under article 5 shall maintain confidentiality of information related to child victims and witnesses. 2. A good example of domestic legislation guaranteeing confidentiality of information related to child victims and witnesses is that of the United States of America relating to the rights of child victims and witnesses,27 which provides the following: “(D) Privacy Protection. “(1) Confidentiality of Information “(A) A person acting in a capacity described in subparagraph (B) in connection with a criminal proceeding shall: “(i) keep all documents that disclose the name or any other information concerning a child in a secure place to which no person who does not have reason to know their contents has access; and “(ii) disclose documents described in clause (i) or the information in them that concerns a child only to person who, by reason of their participation in the proceeding, have reason to know such information. “(B) Subparagraph (A) applies to: “(i) all employees of the Government connected with the case, including employees of the Department of Justice, any law enforcement agency involved in the case, and any person hired by the Government to provide assistance in the proceeding; “(ii) employees of the Court; “(iii) the defendant and employees of the defendant, including the attorney for the defendant and persons hired by the defendant or the attorney for the defendant to provide assistance in the proceeding; and “(iv) members of the jury.” 3. In several States, usually on the basis of provisions contained in existing laws on the media or in the youth codes or laws on child protection, the prohibition of the dissemination of child-related information to the public is strengthened by provisions that ensure the prohibition of the publication or broadcasting of such information, including pictures of children, by the media, to the extent that, even when such information leaks out despite the restrictions, the media are prohibited from making use of it.28 Broadcasting such protected information may constitute a criminal offence.29 4. As most national laws already contain such prohibitions, the Model Law does not include a specific provision on the media’s publication of such information.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 39 Article 8. Training 1. In line with paragraph 40 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, the Model Law provides that those professionals who in their work come in contact with child victims or witnesses of crime, in particular those responsible for providing assistance to such children, shall receive appropriate training. 2. In Bolivia (Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 12) and Bulgaria (Child Protection Act (2004), art. 3, para. 6), for example, training of law enforcement officials who come in contact with child victims and witnesses of crimes is a requirement. 3. Ideally, the training for those dealing with child victims and witnesses of crime should contain a common, multidisciplinary component intended for all professionals, combined with more specific modules addressing the specific needs of each profession. For example, while training for judges and prosecutors may essentially focus on legislation and specific procedures, law enforcement officials may require training on broader issues, including psychological and behavioural issues. The training of social workers, meanwhile, may focus more on assistance, while training for medical personnel should focus on forensic examination techniques to assemble a solid evidentiary basis. 4. In many countries, law enforcement officials, because they are responsible for receiving reports of criminal offences and for investigating those offences, are the first professionals with whom victims and witnesses of crime come in contact. Therefore, law enforcement officials should receive specific and appropriate training on assisting child victims and witnesses and their families. It is important to stress that adequate training of law enforcement officials can contribute to conducting a proper investigation while minimizing potential harm. 5. Such training should, inter alia: (a) enable law enforcement officials to understand and apply the main provisions of legislative and departmental policies concerning the treatment of child victims and witnesses of crime; (b) raise awareness of the issues covered in the Guidelines and relevant regional and international instruments; and (c) familiarize law enforcement officials with specific protocols for intervention, in particular with respect to the initial contact between a child victim and the law enforcement agency, the initial interview of a child victim or witness, the investigation of an offence and victim’s support. 6. In addition, a law enforcement official specialized in child-related issues should also receive training on how to put victims and witnesses in contact with available support groups, on providing information and helping victims to deal with the effects of victimization and on eliminating the risk of secondary victimization. A good example of legislation providing for specific training targeting police units is that of India (Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 (No. 56 of 2000), art. 63). Similar initiatives can be found in other countries, such as Morocco (Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 19) and Peru (Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Law No. 27.337, 40 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2000), arts. 151-153). The development and dissemination of domestic guidelines addressing the issue of child victims and witnesses from the police’s viewpoint should also be encouraged. 7. In common law countries, the training of prosecutors on child-friendly procedures may ensure that prosecutors, when preparing a case and in presenting it to the court, truly and fully take into account the specific requirements related to the situation of child victims and witnesses of crimes. When leading the investigation and preparing a case for trial, prosecutors have an opportunity to ensure that the rights of child victims and witnesses are respected. They can keep the child informed of the court’s procedures and proceedings, ensure that the pretrial and court settings are appropriate and follow up with referrals. Training of prosecutors may ensure that they provide a basic level of assistance and information to child victims and witnesses, including notification regarding the status of the case and the use of special measures such as waiting areas for child victims and witnesses and their families. 8. Prosecutors may also be encouraged to develop agreements with non-governmental organizations in order to provide key services to children, including after the completion of the case and the conviction of the offender. In the United Kingdom, the Judicial Studies Board has developed a child witness training programme for barristers and magistrates, focusing on the Human Rights Act of 1998. It is a self-taught course followed by a one‑day training programme. In addition, a victim and witness training pack published by the Magistrates’ Courts Committees provides detailed information on the process of identifying potentially vulnerable and intimidated witnesses. The participants are shown a video portraying a victim’s experience and then given the opportunity to explore their own experiences of vulnerability. Finally, the Crown Prosecution Service of the United Kingdom has developed a four-level programme of victim and witness training that focuses on the following: (a) raising awareness among the Crown Prosecution Service staff of issues relating to victims and witnesses and their role and responsibilities; (b) ensuring effective identification of vulnerable or intimidated witnesses and their eligibility for access to special measures; (c) ensuring effective support of witnesses and case management; and (d) ensuring effective communication, including dealing with prosecution decisions. 9. Another example is that of Mexico, where prosecution services have developed a programme of awareness and support for victims of crime, which includes, inter alia, training and workshops on the protection of victims (Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 22 (VIII)). 10. Development of domestic guidelines addressing the issue of child victims and witnesses from the prosecutor’s viewpoint, such as the Guidelines for Crown Prosecutors30 of Canada, should also be encouraged. The National Prosecuting Authority of South Africa developed the Child Law Manual for Prosecutors (Pretoria, 2001), which has been used as a basis for the training of prosecutors throughout the country. 11. In civil law countries where legislation provides that victims be assisted by an appointed lawyer for victims, training similar to that described above should be provided Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 41 for lawyers representing victims. Because of a child victim’s special relationship with his or her lawyer, who is appointed expressly to protect his or her rights, that lawyer is in the best position to ensure that the child victim receives all appropriate available assistance and care. In France, several bar associations have taken the initiative of creating groups of specialized lawyers who are provided with continuing education on child-related issues, including through legal updates and the expertise of other relevant professionals, such as psychologists, social workers and judges.31 12. Similarly, it is of crucial importance that all judges be trained in, or are at least well informed, on child-related issues. The institution of specialized juvenile judges does not exist in all countries, and even in those countries where it does exist, judges very often have to shift within the justice system from penal to civil matters, from specialized to general matters and vice versa. But in many countries, child-related issues are reserved for a special category of magistrates who have received proper training, making them specialists in these matters. These magistrates often work exclusively on these issues, which may include, in addition to family law and juvenile justice, granting judicial orders for the protection of children and measures for dealing with children requiring special care and protection (for example, Brazil, Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente, Law No 8.069 (1990), art. 145). 13. Health-care professionals may also provide first-line assistance to child victims and witnesses of crime, as they may be the first to come into contact with them or may even be the ones who discover that a child has been a victim of a crime. Training programmes and protocols for relevant hospital personnel on the rights and needs of child victims and witnesses, including medical and psychological support, as well as a victim-sensitive code of ethics for medical staff, should be developed. A good example of this kind of training programmes for health-care professionals is the certificate programme on the protection of child victims of abuse and maltreatment created by the Social Workers Training School of Saint Joseph University in Beirut.32 In Belgium, legislation provides that at least one person in each centre for social-medical assistance shall receive specific training on child victims issues (Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, art. 11). 14. Social workers also play an important role in providing proper assistance and care to child victims and witnesses since, because of their functions, they are in a unique position to intervene in the best interests of children. Awareness of social workers on these issues could be enhanced through specific training and workshops, such as those reported by the Islamic Republic of Iran, where one expert on child affairs from each province was selected and trained on child-related issues, and workshops on the rights of the child were organized for social workers.33 A comprehensive programme of training and coordination for social workers is also undertaken in Ukraine (Law on Social Work with Children and Youth, 2001). Brochures and leaflets to raise awareness among this category of professionals have been disseminated in several countries.34 15. In conclusion, an efficient way to ensure effective awareness of all professionals who share the responsibility of protecting child victims and witnesses of crime is to 42 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime centralize the training in a single institution that can monitor whether all categories of professionals are reached and how they can be reached. A good example of such an institution is found in Egypt, where the General Administration for the Legal Protection of Children of the Ministry of Justice is responsible for designing training and qualification programmes for members of legal institutions, sociologists and psychologists concerned with matters related to minors (Decree on legal protection of children, No. 2235, 1997, para. 14 (e)). Other States have undertaken similar initiatives, such as Bulgaria (Child Protection Act (2004), art. 1, paras. 3-4) and Malaysia (Child Act 2001, Act No. 611, sect. 3, subsect. (2) (g)). 16. The Model Law assigns responsibility for training to the national coordinating authority and includes a non-exhaustive list of topics for training, which legislators should adapt to the specific needs of their country.43 Chapter III. Assistance to child victims and witnesses during the justice process A. General provisions Article 9. Right to be informed 1. In line with the main international instruments on assistance for victims and paragraphs 19 and 20 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, as well as with the national legislation of several States, the Model Law advocates the importance of giving child victims and witnesses of crime access to information relevant to their case and information relevant for the protection and exercise of their rights. An effective way of making information available to victims of crime is to disseminate brochures or leaflets in police stations, hospitals, waiting rooms, schools, social services and other public offices and on the Internet. 2. Guidance can also be taken from legislation requiring that victims be given appropriate, relevant information in a timely manner.35 That could be achieved, for example, by putting the burden of informing victims on the police upon its first contact with them.36 The legislation of some States provides that such information shall be given to the victim only if he or she expressly requests it, following what is referred to as an “opt-in” policy. However, although such an “opt-in” option aims to protect the victims from feeling harassed due to receiving unsolicited information, it may result in the victim not receiving useful information that he or she would have wished to receive. The same respect for a victim’s wish not to know about the proceedings can be fulfilled by replacing the “opt-in” system with an “opt-out” option, by which the victim would automatically receive all relevant information unless he or she expressly requests not to receive it. 3. In many countries with limited resources, access to information about the case can be hampered for various reasons, such as an underresourced justice system, illiteracy of victims and the lack of transport facilities or means of communication for victims. Practical solutions can be found by assigning social workers and community organizations to assist the victims in their participation in the justice process. 4. Some States, going beyond the right of victims to be informed of the proceedings, recognize the right of child victims to receive from judges explanations concerning the proceedings and the decisions rendered, as in Bulgaria, (Child Protection Act (2004), art. 15, para. 3), Costa Rica (Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No.7739 (1998), art. 107 (d)) and New Zealand (Children, Young Persons and Their Families Act 1989, sect. 10). Such an approach should be encouraged. 5. In countries where victims are represented by a lawyer, the victim should receive information related to the proceedings from his or her lawyer. However, the client-lawyer 44 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime relationship is not always balanced, and this system may prove insufficient. Coupling the information conveyed by lawyers with other sources of information better protects the victim’s right to be informed. In most cases, the assistance of a support person (see articles 15-19 of the Model Law) constitutes the best practice in ensuring that the victim receives full information in a timely manner. 6. In all legal systems, identifying the persons responsible for conveying the information to victims is a necessary step towards ensuring that the victim’s right to be informed is upheld. The details of sharing responsibilities in that regard should be regulated, as it is, for example, by the legislation of the United States (United States Code collection, Title 42, chap. 112, sect. 10607, Services to victims, subsect. (a) and (c)). 7. As relates to the content and type of information that the child victims and witnesses of crime should receive, the Model Law reflects the provisions of the existing relevant legislation of several countries.37 8. The Model Law indicates that the information should be provided by a competent authority that is to be designated by the Government. The Model Law does not include opt-in or opt-out clauses, but national legislators may consider whether to adopt such provisions. Article 10. Legal assistance 1. As stated in paragraph 22 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, effective assistance for child victims and witnesses during the proceedings may require access to legal assistance. States should consider providing legal assistance, free of charge, to child victims in those cases in which it is required during the criminal justice process. The main consideration is the principle of the best interests of the child. 2. In common law countries, because victims are not a party to the proceedings, they are usually not provided with legal assistance throughout the proceedings as a right. This is why, with some notable exceptions, most countries recognizing the right of victims to legal assistance belong to the civil law tradition. Most civil law countries recognize the right of child victims to legal assistance, for example, Armenia (Criminal Procedure Code, 1999, art. 10 (3)-(4)), Bulgaria (Child Protection Act, 2004, art. 15 (8)) and the Philippines (Anti-Violence against Women and their Children Act of 2004, No. 9262 (2004), sect. 35 (b)). Such assistance is provided free of charge for those who cannot afford to pay their counsel, for example, in France (Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-50); Iceland (Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002 (2002), article 60) and Peru (Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Law No. 27.337, 2000), article 146). Original solutions have sometimes been found to reduce the cost to the State of legal assistance. In Colombia (in accordance with the Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 137, Intervención de las víctimas en la actuación penal), victims who cannot afford counsel can be assisted by other legal professionals or law students, and, if there are multiple victims, the number of lawyers representing them in the case can be limited to two. Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 45 3. A few common law countries recognize the right of child victims to legal assistance in criminal proceedings. In such circumstances, the cost is paid by the State, as is the case in Pakistan, under the Juvenile Justice System Ordinance, 2000. In countries where such provisions do not exist, recognizing that child victims of crime have a right to legal assistance in criminal proceedings promotes the protection of child victims and witnesses during their involvement in the justice process. 4. In that context, it should be noted that the International Criminal Court has recognized a long list of rights of victims, in particular with respect to access to a lawyer.38 Article 11. Protective measures Article 11 describes measures to be taken, at all stages of the justice process, to protect the safety of a child victim or witness who is deemed to be at risk. Article 12. Language, interpreter and other special assistance measures 1. Paragraph 25 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime recognizes the need to develop and implement measures to assist children in testifying and giving evidence. 2. The provisions and requirements contained in article 12 of the Model Law are based on national legislation of several countries, including Colombia, Costa Rica, France, Kazakhstan, Mexico, South Africa and Thailand.39 B. During the investigation phase Article 13. Specially trained investigator 1. According to paragraph 29 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, professionals should take measures to prevent hardship during the investigation. According to paragraph 41 of the Guidelines, professionals should be trained to effectively protect child victims and witnesses and meet their needs. 2. Depending on the domestic legal system of the State, professionals such as police officers, prosecutors, lawyers and other criminal justice professionals may be working in the investigation of a case involving a child victim or witness of crime. It is essential for such professionals to receive specific training on child-related issues as a prerequisite for working with child victims and witnesses. 3. In the area of investigation, some significant progress has been made through the establishment of the so-called “child advocacy model”, which adopts a multidisciplinary 46 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime approach during the investigation. The most important component of this model is the fact that law enforcement officials are accompanied by child specialists and mentalhealth-care providers when they conduct interviews of children. This model offers greater potential for protecting not only the child but also the accused, because it ensures that interviews are conducted in a more thorough and accurate way. Article 14. Medical examinations and the taking of bodily samples 1. Article 14 deals with the child’s right to be treated with dignity and to be protected from hardship during the justice process. Medical examinations, especially in case of sexual abuse, can be a highly stressful experience for children. It is preferable that such examinations be ordered only when absolutely necessary and that they be as less intrusive and as limited as possible. 2. When a medical examination reveals health problems, the child is entitled to receive medical care. 3. The provisions of article 14 are based on best practices of several Member States. Article 15. Support person 1. The functions of a support person are described in paragraph 24 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime. However, the term is not defined in the Guidelines. 2. According to the domestic legislation of several countries, the purpose of a support person is to provide emotional support to child victims and witnesses and to reduce the harmful impact of a court appearance by ensuring that the child is accompanied at all times by an adult whose presence will be helpful if the child feels unduly stressed.40 3. Thus, the presence of a support person can help the child to express his or her views and contribute to the child’s right to participation. It is a measure that judges may favour in order to make a child’s appearance before the court go smoothly. It is also a measure that a prosecutor or, where applicable, the child’s lawyer may request. 4. Another important element related to the functions and role played by the support person is continuity. In order to be of real support, there needs to be a relationship of trust between the support person and the child. That can be achieved by appointing a support person at the beginning of the justice process (i.e. the reporting of the criminal offence) and ensuring that the same person accompanies the child throughout the whole process. 5. Finally, the guiding principle for the functions and activity of the support person is that his or her main concern in the justice process is the protection of the child against any form of hardship.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 47 Article 16. Designation of a support person 1. The Model Law calls for the designation of a support person by the competent authority, which has been designated by the State, as soon as the officials in charge of the investigation decide to summon the child victim or witnesses for the first interview. The underlying principle is that the support person should accompany the child from the moment of his or her first contact with the justice process. 2. State practice shows that the criteria for designating a support person vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In Italy, article 609 decies of the Criminal Code specifies that a child victim of sexual exploitation shall be assisted at every step of the proceedings. In some States, such as Switzerland,41 it is specified that the support person shall be of the same gender as the victim. In some common law countries, the decision of designating a support person for a child victim is taken by a judge, who takes that decision proprio motu or at the request of the prosecution or the defence. In other countries, the power to assign a support person is specifically provided in the law, for example, in Canada (Criminal Code (R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.1, subsect. 1). The assistance of a support person may also be requested by the victim or witness, as in Austria (article 162 (2) of the Criminal code of procedure). 3. The way that the support person is defined varies in different domestic legal systems, with definitions such as a “person of the child’s choice”,42 a “person of confidence”,43 an “adult”,44 a “child’s parent or legal guardian”,45 a “friend or a member of his or her family”,46 a “specially qualified person”,47 “other person close to the child”48 or any other “person approved by the court”.49 In that regard, the Model Law states that the support person should be someone with training and professional skills to communicate with and assist the child in order to prevent the risk of duress, revictimization and secondary victimization. In general, in assessing who should be designated as the support person, it is important to respect the child’s choice. However, care must be taken to prevent the manipulation of the child’s choice. The Model Law also states that before the support person is designated, the child should be consulted about his or her preference with respect to the gender of the support person. 4. The support person should fulfil two other important requirements: (a) they should offer full and concrete support to the child; and (b) they should not hamper the justice process. Child victim support groups or victim service units may offer specially qualified persons for that purpose. Article 17. Functions of the support person 1. The Model Law has amplified the functions of the support person on the basis of best practices. Examples of domestic legislation show that the purpose of the presence of such a support person next to the child victim or witness is to provide emotional support and reduce the harmful impact of a court appearance by ensuring that the child is accompanied at all times by an adult whose presence will be helpful if the child feels unduly stressed. 48 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 2. The functions of the support person, as defined in article 17, flow from this purpose and reflect national best practices. 3. For example, subsection (i) of the Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights (United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509) provides the following: “The court, at its discretion, may allow the adult attendant to remain in close physical proximity to or in contact with the child while the child testifies. The court may allow the adult attendant to hold the child’s hand or allow the child to sit on the adult attendant’s lap throughout the course of the proceeding. An adult attendant shall not provide the child with an answer to any question directed to the child during the course of the child’s testimony or otherwise prompt the child. The image of the child attendant, for the time the child is testifying or being deposed, shall be recorded on videotape.” 4. The state legislation of Arizona, United States, gives the support person a more active role, especially in the preparation and assistance of the child victim by providing the following: “[The minor’s representative] shall accompany the minor through all proceedings [...] and, before the minor’s courtroom appearance, shall explain to the minor the nature of the proceedings and what the minor will be asked to do, including telling the minor that the minor is expected to tell the truth. The representative shall be available to observe the minor in all aspects of the case in order to consult with the court as to any special needs of the minor. Those consultations shall take place before the minor testifies. [The minor’s representative] shall not discuss the facts and circumstances of the case with the minor witness [...] unless the court orders otherwise upon a showing that it is in the best interests of the minor.”50 Article 18. Information to be provided to the support person Article 18 provides that a support person shall be informed of the charges against the accused, the relationship between the accused and the child and the custodial status of the accused. That is the minimum necessary for the support person to fulfil his or her functions. It is possible to include in the article additional types of information that should be provided. Article 19. Functions of the support person in case of the release of the accused The release of the accused from custody is a situation that may cause hardship for the child victim or witness. In such cases, the support person is responsible for receiving the information from the authorities and communicating it to the child in a childsensitive manner.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 49 C. During the trial phase Article 20. Reliability of child evidence 1. In accordance with article 12, paragraph 2, of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the starting point for evidence given in court by a child is that the child shall be provided with the opportunity to be heard. However, this right is not absolute: article 12, paragraph 2, of the Convention envisages that this right be exercised “in a manner consistent with the procedural rules of national law”. 2. Such procedural rules usually exist in national law in order to ensure that the court is able to trust any testimony given by a child in judicial or administrative proceedings. Two legal hurdles typically exist. According to the legal system in question, either or both may be applied by the court. The first is the question of the admissibility of a child’s evidence. The second is the question of the reliability of a child’s evidence. 3. The question of admissibility relates to whether the court is able to take any evidence given by the child into account at all in determination of the case. The question of reliability relates to the weight that the court should subsequently attach to admissible evidence given by a child. 4. In most legal systems, it is the role of the court to take such decisions on admissibility and reliability on a case-by-case basis. If necessary, that may be done with the expert assistance of a qualified child psychologist or a specialist in child development. However, international standards specify one key restriction. In deciding upon the admissibility and/or reliability of a child’s evidence, the court may not do so merely upon the basis of the child’s age alone. This restriction is set out in paragraph 18 of the Guidelines on Justice involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime: “[the child’s] testimony should not be presumed invalid or untrustworthy by reason of the child’s age alone”. 5. Nonetheless, the court can pose the question of whether the child’s age and maturity allow the giving of intelligible and credible testimony. The court may, for example, take such factors into account when considering evidence given by a child in the context of the case as a whole. If compelling reasons exist, it may also carry out tests in order to establish the extent to which the child is able to give valid testimony. Such tests may seek to establish competencies, such as whether the child is able to understand questions and whether he or she also understands the importance of telling the truth. 6. In the United Kingdom (Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act, 1999, sect. 53), for example, the criteria of witness competency are independent of the age of the witness. Instead, the question of competency relates to the capacity of the witness to understand questions put to him or her as a witness and to give answers that can be understood. If a witness is not able to understand questions or provide intelligible answers, his or her evidence is likely to be inadmissible for the purposes of court proceedings.50 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 7. In the case of child victims and witnesses, however, international standards suggest that testimony given by a child should not be declared inadmissible lightly. Paragraph 18 of the Guidelines on Justice involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, for instance, is based on the presumption that “every child should be treated as a capable witness”. Indeed, a survey of national laws demonstrates that it is good practice to presume the prima facie competence of a child to testify, irrespective of his or her age.51 8. Article 20 of the Model Law follows that good practice by providing that a child is to be deemed a capable witness (and his or her evidence is admissible) unless proven otherwise by means of a competency examination. Article 21 of the Model Law explains that this assumption may be departed from—and a competency examination subsequently administered—only if the court believes that compelling reasons exist. Such reasons may not, of course, include the child’s age alone. 9. If the child does not pass the competency examination, his or her evidence must be declared inadmissible for the purposes of the court proceedings. Naturally, if the child passes the examination, his or her evidence is admissible. The important point is that the competency examination not be used routinely for child victims and witnesses. Rather, there must be compelling reasons for the court to order the examination. Such an approach is supported by national practice. Under the New Zealand Evidence Act 1908, for example, the judge may not instruct the jury with respect to any general need to scrutinize the evidence of young children with special care or suggest to the jury that children generally have tendencies to invention or distortion.52 Where a child gives evidence at a jury trial, the trial judge should inform the jury that a child is not disqualified from giving evidence simply by reason of age alone and that there is no precise age that determines competency.53 The jury should be instructed that a child’s competency depends on the child’s capacity to understand the difference between truth and falsehood and to appreciate the duty to tell the truth.54 10. When a child gives admissible evidence, the Model Law anticipates one further legal hurdle. Under article 20, paragraph 3, of the Model Law, the court may give a particular weight to the testimony of the child in accordance with his or her age, maturity and ability to give an intelligible account. Again, the court may not base this decision on the child’s age alone. Rather, the court must form an overall assessment of the validity and trustworthiness of the child’s testimony, as it would with any other witness. If a competency examination has previously been carried out, the results of that examination may also be a relevant factor in this assessment. Evidence from national laws indicates that it is appropriate to take factors such as age and maturity into account when assessing the reliability of testimony.55 11. Finally, paragraphs 4 and 5 of article 20 of the Model Law contain two important safeguards. Paragraph 4 provides that irrespective of whether the child will provide testimony or whether such testimony is found to be inadmissible, the child shall have the opportunity to express his or her views concerning his or her involvement in the justice process. Paragraph 5 states that a child shall not be required to testify in court proceedings against his or her will or without the knowledge of his or her parents or guardian. It also ensures that the parents or guardian of a child giving testimony in Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 51 court are invited to be present. The Model Law makes logical exceptions, however, for situations in which the parents or guardian are alleged to be the perpetrator of the offence, the child expresses concern about being accompanied by his or her parents or guardian or the court deems it not to be in the best interests of the child. Article 21. Competency examination 1. Article 21 of the Model Law provides procedural details for the competency examination referred to in article 20. It makes clear that a competency examination shall be conducted only if the court determines that there are compelling reasons to do so. As set out in article 20, that a child’s testimony may be declared inadmissible only if he or she fails to pass a competency examination. Article 21 states clearly that the purpose of the competency examination is to determine whether the child is able to understand questions put to him or her as well as the importance of telling the truth. 2. The United States Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights (United States Code Collection, sect. 3509, subsect. (c)) establishes that upon a party’s motion showing compelling reasons for doing so, the judge may order the child to be submitted to a competency examination. The examination is conducted by the court, out of the sight of the jury, on the basis of questions submitted by the parties. The questions shall be appropriate to the age and developmental level of the child, shall not be related to the issues at trial and shall focus on determining the child’s ability to understand and answer simple questions. 3. It is important to stress that the provision, contained in article 21, paragraph 7, stating that a competency examination shall not be repeated does not invalidate the right to appeal of the accused. In fact, the court can, without repeating the competency examination, evaluate the results in accordance with the circumstances of the case. Thus, the danger that a defence lawyer might try to undermine the credibility of the child by re-examining him or her and thus creating hardship for the child is avoided. Article 22. Oath 1. Most countries require witnesses in criminal proceedings to testify under oath, which is a solemn undertaking to tell the truth. A failure to tell the truth when testifying under oath is a criminal offence in almost all jurisdictions. 2. Some national legal systems exempt children under a certain age from giving evidence under oath.56 The primary result of giving unsworn evidence (evidence given when not under oath) is that the child may be protected in certain respects from the consequences of proceedings for giving false testimony. Article 22 of the Model Law provides that child witnesses be given complete immunity from criminal prosecution for giving false testimony, irrespective of whether the court allows child witnesses to give sworn or unsworn evidence. 52 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 3. It is important to note that the fact that a child gives unsworn evidence, as opposed to evidence on oath, should have no effect, in and of itself, on the way in which that evidence is received by the court. National legislation, for example the United Kingdom Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 treats the question of whether sworn or unsworn evidence is given as separate from the question of the competency of a witness. Both sworn and unsworn evidence is received by the court in the same way.57 However, the fact that a child may not have sufficient appreciation of the particular responsibility to tell the truth inherent in taking an oath, may, in some jurisdictions be used by parties to the proceedings as an indicator of the child’s maturity and, hence, of the weight to be given to his or her evidence. In the United States, for example, such motion may lead, if compelling reasons are given by the applicant, to a competency examination being ordered by the court.58 4. A good example of an alternative to testimony under oath is found in New Zealand, where a child is permitted to make an informal promise to tell the truth, once it is been determined that the child has an appreciation of the solemnity of the occasion.59 That applies, in particular, in cases of adults charged with sexual misconduct against children. That specific option has been included in the Model Law. Article 23. Designation of a support person during the trial Article 23 complements article 15 by ensuring that the judge, at the beginning of the trial, verifies whether a support person has been appointed for the child victim or witness and orders the appointment of such a person if no support person was appointed during the investigation phase. Article 24. Waiting areas 1. One way of protecting the child from hardship during the justice process and protecting the child’s privacy is to designate special child-friendly waiting areas for children. 2. Waiting areas for children may be equipped with toys or other things such as drawing utensils, cartoons and books to occupy the child. Depending on the climate, such waiting areas may not need to be inside a building but may be located in a garden or another safe place. Waiting areas may also be furnished with toilets, beds, drinks and food so that the child always feels at ease. Most important, children shall always be kept in a separate room, away from the accused, defence counsels and other witnesses. 3. Although expeditiousness of the proceedings is an important requirement in handling cases involving children, the capacity of children to endure lengthy hearings scheduled without consideration for their difficult situation is another element to be considered in the context of the timeframe of proceedings. Those responsible for the scheduling of the judicial process are invited to find ways to reduce the time that Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 53 children spend on the premises of the court and ensure that those periods fit with the child’s private life and needs. Ultimately, any reduction of the child’s stress will help to make his or her evidence of the best quality possible. 4. Other child-sensitive procedures may be considered by the courts, such as scheduling the hearings on days when the child does not have to go to school. The Model Law does not include such procedures, but they may be provided for in regulations or guidelines. Article 25. Emotional support for child victims and witnesses Article 25 ensures the presence of the support person in the courtroom, to provide the child with emotional support. Article 26. Courtroom facilities 1. According to subparagraph 30 (d) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, professionals shall make use of modified court environments that take the situation of child victims and witnesses into consideration. 2. Formalities of court proceedings and court surroundings can be intimidating for children. Although there is an argument that the observance of such formalities engenders respect for the legal system, it may cause children fear or make them reluctant to talk. The shortage of child-friendly facilities such as appropriate seating or the lack of a properly placed microphone at the witness’s position in the courtroom to ensure that a child’s testimony is audible in key positions in the courtroom, in particular the bench, the bar table, the jury box and the dock, may impede children from giving the best possible evidence, as may the impression caused by the formal dress of members of the judiciary and legal personnel. 3. Some domestic legislation requires the hearing of victims under the age of 18 years to be conducted in an informal and friendly atmosphere.60 The solemnity of court dress, which may have a frightening effect on young children, is also taken into account in the Supplementary Pre-Trial Checklist for Cases Involving Young Witnesses of the United Kingdom, which provides that child witnesses may express their views about court dress,61 which may be removed if found necessary.62 4. With respect to the environment of the child interview, some domestic legislation makes the attendance of a female police officer, or a police officer of the same gender as the child, a requirement in specific cases, in particular those involving rape or other sexual assaults.63 Article 26 of the Model Law gives the judge the authority to order such modifications, as appropriate. 54 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Article 27. Cross-examination (option for common law countries) 1. Subparagraph 31 (b) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime stresses the necessity of protecting a child from being crossexamined by the accused if that protection is compatible with the legal system and the rights of the accused. In the common law procedural system, the right to cross-examine prosecution witnesses constitutes an essential element of the right of the accused to challenge the testimony of his or her accuser. Cross-examination is usually carried out by the legal representative of the accused. However, when the accused refuses to engage a legal representative and wishes to defend him or herself, direct cross-examination of vulnerable witnesses, such as children, becomes an issue. 2. Some domestic legislation prohibits unrepresented accused from cross-examining child witnesses, especially in the case of sexual offences, for example in Canada (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.3, subsect. 1), New Zealand (Evidence Act 1908, sect. 23F(1) and Evidence Act 2006, sect. 95) and the United Kingdom (Criminal Justice Act 1988, sect. 34A). In those States, judges must deny requests made by unrepresented accused to cross-examine child witnesses. In some countries, it is provided, alternatively, that the judge may appoint a representative for the accused for the specific purpose of such cross-examination; the representative relays the questions of the accused to the child, thereby avoiding direct contact and potential intimidation, as is done in Australia (Western Australia Evidence of Children and Others (Amendment) Act 1992, sect. 8). 3. Presiding judges should exercise close scrutiny and strict supervision of the crossexamination of children. Domestic practice in common law countries in particular prohibits any intimidating, harassing or disrespectful questions (see, for example, the National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development of South Africa and the National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases of the Department of Justice of South Africa (Pretoria, 1998), chap. 10, para. 1 and the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995, sect. 274 of the United Kingdom). More generally, as with other types of questioning, cross-examination shall be conducted keeping in mind that vulnerable witnesses, including children, shall be addressed in a simple, careful and respectful way. Where necessary, it is up to the judges to remind the parties of that important requirement. 4. The Model Law provides that the child victim or witness shall not be crossexamined by the accused. Cross-examination by the defence lawyer shall be closely supervised by the judge. Article 28. Measures to protect the privacy and well-being of a child victim and witness 1. In accordance with article 28 of the Model Law, protective measures may be ordered to protect the privacy and the physical and mental well-being of a child and to prevent undue distress and secondary victimization of a child. Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 55 2. Often when a child testifies, he or she will have to be in direct eye contact with the accused. In cases in which it is alleged that the accused abused the child, such contact can be a traumatic event for the child. The provision contained in subparagraph 31 (b) of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime is aimed at reducing as much as possible the feeling of intimidation that child victims and witnesses may have while appearing before the court, in particular when confronting the alleged offender. 3. A variety of measures can be taken to assist in the giving of evidence by children and the receipt of evidence from children. Those measures concern the admissibility of evidence, such as videotaped recordings of their pretrial statement and the use of facilities allowing the child to give evidence, without having to see the accused, from a special interview room on the premises of the court by means of closed-circuit television or with a removable screen or curtain to break the line of sight between the witness and the accused. Another way of avoiding such confrontation is to order the removal of the accused from the courtroom. 4. The use of screens between the child and the accused is often seen as a less expensive alternative to the use of closed-circuit television. They are far easier to install and move. Various types of screens are used in different jurisdictions, for example, a removable opaque partition preventing the child and the accused from seeing each other, a one-way mirror allowing the accused to see the child but not vice versa or a removable opaque partition with a video camera transmitting the image of the child to a television monitor visible to the accused. The use of such devices is provided for in the domestic legislation of several countries, such as Canada (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.2, subsect. 1) and Spain (Ley de Enjuiciamiento Criminal, art. 448, para. 3, and art. 707). 5. Such measures shall be ordered by the judge and may be automatic or discretionary. Judges may order such a measure proprio motu or at the request of a party, including the child or his or her parents or legal guardian. In Fiji, for example, a parent or a guardian may ask the prosecutor for a screen to be put around the child, and the prosecutor then relays this request to the court.64 The removal of the accused from the courtroom while the child testifies is another measure provided in some domestic systems, for example, in Brazil, (Código de Processo Penal, art. 217), Kazakhstan (Criminal Procedural Code, art. 352 (3)) and Switzerland (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, art. 5 (4) and 10 (b)). The accused is usually allowed to follow the child’s testimony on a monitor from a separate room. 6. Another aspect of protecting victims and witnesses, including children, is limiting the disclosure of information about their identity and whereabouts. The degree of restriction may vary, depending on the circumstances and risks. A first degree of restriction on disclosure of information on the victim’s or witness’ whereabouts can easily be implemented by authorizing the victim or witness not to reveal the address of his or her residence and workplace. Sometimes, for purpose of communication, the victim or witness can give a police office as his or her contact address (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-57) or, as in Honduras (Código Procesal Penal, 56 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Decreto No. 9-99-E, art. 237, Protección de los testigos), the court itself can be given as an address for such purposes. 7. More prejudicial to the rights of the defence is the complete restriction on disclosure of information related to the identity of the victim or witness, who can then be authorized to testify anonymously. This always constitutes an exceptional measure, as in France (Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-58) and the Netherlands (Code of Criminal Procedure, 1994, art. 226a). In countries where such a measure is permitted, it can be achieved by authorizing victims or witnesses to testify or be confronted by the defendant by way of videoconference with voice-or image-distortion mechanisms (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-61). Even more exceptional, and usually limited to organized crime-related cases, is the step of giving anonymous witnesses authorization to change their identity (France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 706-63-1) or the facilitation of their relocation (United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 224, Protection of witnesses, sect. 3521, Witness relocation and protection, subsect. (a), para. 1). 8. The law of New Zealand provides an interesting set of protective measures for child victims and witnesses of crime. In addition to a general ban on publishing the name of any person under the age of 17 years who is called as a witness, child complainants may be authorized to give written evidence and may be exempted from examination or cross-examination on their statement. When the child gives oral evidence, only specified persons accepted by the presiding judge or requested by the child may be present. The court may issue orders prohibiting publication of certain matters, such as reports or accounts with respect to acts that the victim is alleged to have been compelled or induced to perform, or any acts that the victim is alleged to have been compelled or induced to consent to or acquiesce in. The victim’s evidence may also be adduced by way of videotaped statement recorded during the pretrial phase. 9. In the case of an offence of a sexual nature involving a child complainant, a judge may, on application by the prosecutor before the trial, give any of the following directions with respect to the mode in which the complainant’s evidence is to be given. First, where a videotape of the complainant’s evidence was shown at the preliminary hearing, the judge may direct that the evidence be admitted in that form, with such excisions, if any, as the judge may order. Secondly, if the judge is satisfied that the necessary facilities and equipment are available, a direction may be given for the complainant to give evidence outside the courtroom but within the court precincts, the evidence being transmitted to the courtroom by means of closed-circuit television. Thirdly, the judge may direct that, while the complainant is giving evidence or is being examined in respect of that evidence, a screen or one-way mirror be so placed that the complainant cannot see the accused but the judge, jury and counsel for the accused can see the complainant. Fourthly, in cases in which the judge is satisfied that the necessary facilities and equipment are available, he or she may give a direction that, while the complainant is giving evidence or is being examined in respect of that evidence, the complainant be placed behind a specially constructed wall or partition, enabling those in the courtroom to see the complainant while preventing the complainant from seeing them, the evidence being given through an appropriate audio link. Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 57 Fifthly, in cases in which the judge is satisfied that the necessary facilities and equipment are available, a direction may be given that the complainant give evidence at a location outside the court precincts. In such a case, the evidence is to be admitted on videotape, with such excisions, if any, as the judge may order. Where a videotape of the complainant’s evidence is to be shown at the trial, the judge is to give directions as considered appropriate as to the manner in which any cross-examination or reexamination of the complainant is to be conducted. D. In the post-trial period Article 29. Right to restitution and compensation 1. Article 29 of the Model Law implements paragraph 35 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime, on the right to remedies for child victims. Paragraph 37 of the Guidelines provides a non-exhaustive list of what such reparation may include. Article 29 of the Model Law attempts to provide more specific guidance on this matter. 2. Paragraph 8 of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (General Assembly resolution 40/34, annex) states the following: “Offenders or third parties responsible for their behaviour should, where appropriate, make fair restitution to victims, their families or dependants. Such restitution should include the return of property or payment for the harm or loss suffered, reimbursement of expenses incurred as a result of the victimization, the provision of services and the restoration of rights.” 3. Paragraph 12 of the Declaration states the following: “When compensation is not fully available from the offender or other sources, States should endeavour to provide financial compensation to: “(a) Victims who have sustained significant bodily injury or impairment of physical or mental health as a result of serious crimes; “(b) The family, in particular dependants of persons who have died or become physically or mentally incapacitated as a result of such victimization.” 4. In paragraph 8 of its recommendation Rec (2006) 8, the Committee of Ministers to member States of the Council of Europe on assistance to crime victims recommends the following: “Compensation should be provided for treatment and rehabilitation for physical and psychological injuries; “States should consider compensation for loss of income, funeral expenses and loss of maintenance for dependants; States may also consider compensation for pain and suffering; “States may consider means to compensate damage resulting from crimes against property.” 58 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 5. The Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparations for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law (General Assembly resolution 60/147, annex) might not apply in most common cases in which children are victims, but the definitions provided in that international instrument are of great assistance in defining the scope of remedies necessary in a given case. 6. In cases of human trafficking, the Basic Principles and Guidelines might apply to a large extent and should be taken into consideration, as very often the basic rights of victims of trafficking are violated in judicial proceedings due to the fact that too often the victim is considered to have violated domestic laws, for example, laws relating to the victim’s immigration status, instead of being considered a victim.65 7. The Basic Principles and Guidelines describe forms of remedies that must be considered and addressed, as appropriate, in a given case. They include the following: (a) Restitution. This form of remedy would be more applicable in cases of trafficking in human beings but may also apply partially in cases of child victims of domestic violence; (i) Enjoyment of human rights (family life); (ii) Return to the place of residence; (iii) Restoration of employment (including the possibility of continuing education) and return of property; (b) Compensation (monetary compensation for assessable damages for); (i) Physical or mental harm; (ii) Lost opportunities (employment, education and social benefits); (iii) Material damages and loss of earnings (including loss of earning potential); (iv) Costs of legal or expert assistance, medical services and other assistance; (c) Rehabilitation (medical and psychological care and required legal and social services). Option 1. Common law countries 8. This option is intended for common law countries where the criminal proceedings may be followed by an order for compensation by the same court. This model legislative provision is drawn from legislation of Canada (Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 738, subsect. 1). That legislation contains more details with respect to the correct definition of replacement value, the definition of pecuniary damages and the problem of compensation when the child had to leave a household shared with the perpetrator.Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 59 Option 2. Countries where criminal courts have no jurisdiction in civil claims 9. Paragraph 36 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime states that, provided that the criminal proceedings are child-sensitive and respect the Guidelines, combined criminal and reparations proceedings should be encouraged. However, that may not be the case in some jurisdictions. Option 2 ensures that at the end of the criminal proceedings, the child shall be informed of the procedures for claiming compensation. Option 3. Countries where criminal courts have jurisdiction in civil claims 10. In many civil law countries, the civil claim can be decided as part of the criminal proceedings. Option 3 is intended for such jurisdictions. Article 30. Restorative justice measures 1. Paragraph 36 of the Guidelines on Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime states that reparations proceedings can be combined with restorative justice measures. Article 30 of the Model Law provides for this option, subject to the availability of formal proceedings, if restorative justice measures fail. 2. A restorative justice process is any process in which the victim and the offender and, where appropriate, other individuals or community members affected by a crime actively participate together in the resolution of matters arising from the crime, generally with the help of a facilitator. Restorative justice implies a process for resolving crime by focusing on redressing the harm done to victims, holding offenders accountable for their actions and, often, engaging the community in the resolution of that conflict. 3. Restorative justice programmes have the following characteristics: (a) a flexible response to circumstances of the crime, the offender and the victim that allows each case to be considered individually; (b) a response to the crime that respects the dignity and equality of each person, builds understanding and promotes social harmony through the healing of victims, offenders and communities; (c) an approach that can be used in conjunction with traditional justice processes and sanctions; (d) an approach that incorporates problem-solving and addresses the underlying causes of conflict; (e) an approach that addresses the harms and needs of victims; and (f) a response that recognizes the role of the community as of the primary forum for preventing and responding to crime and social disorder.66 4. As such processes are based on the agreement of the parties, they are not always successful and may result in the return of the case to the courts for judicial determination.60 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 5. However, it should be pointed out that the restorative justice process may involve some risks for the victim, in particular in cases involving child victims. Therefore, the use of such processes should be carefully studied before they are used in cases involving child victims. 6. Additional information on the use of restorative justice programmes in criminal matters can be found in the basic principles on the use of restorative justice programmes in criminal matters (Economic and Social Council resolution 2002/12, annex). Additional information on the features of such programmes can be found in the Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes67 of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. Also of use is Council of Europe recommendation No. R (99) 19 of the Committee of Ministers to member States concerning mediation in penal matters. Article 31. Information on the outcome of the trial The right of victims to receive information on the outcome of the trial, as well as other decisions affecting their interests, is provided for in several States.68 The Model Law adopts this provision as a best practice. Article 32. Role of the support person after the conclusion of the proceedings The support person should provide assistance to the child as long as assistance is needed. That may include, at the conclusion of the proceedings, referring the child for further treatment and care or repatriating the child to his or her home country. Article 33. Information on the release of convicted persons The right of victims to receive information on the status of a convicted person, including his or her potential release, is provided for in several States.69 The Model Law adopts this provision as best practice. E. Other proceedings Article 34. Extended application to other proceedings The provisions of the Model Law should apply in administrative proceedings involving child victims and witnesses, in order to provide children the same protection to which they are entitled under the law and ensure they do not suffer undue hardship.61 Chapter IV. Final provisions Article 35. Final dispositions (option for civil law countries) This article is an option for civil law countries. Notes 1. United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1577, No. 27531. 2. Ibid., vols. 2171 and 2173, No. 27531. 3. United Nations, Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention, Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (New York, 1999). 4. Point 1.2. of the appendix to recommendation (2006) 8. 5. African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, July 1990, article 4, and article 9, paragraph 2. 6. American Convention on Human Rights: Pact of San José, (United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 1144, No. 17955), article 17, paragraph 4. 7. Inter-American Convention on International Traffic in Minors, adopted at Mexico City on 18 March 1994, article 1 (a) and (c) and articles 11 and 18. 8. European Convention on the Exercise of Children’s Rights (United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 2135, No. 37249), article 1, paragraph 2; article 6, subparagraph (a); and article 10, paragraph 1. 9. International Bureau for Children’s Rights, The Rights of Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime: a Compilation of Selected Provisions Drawn from International and Regional Instruments (Montreal, Canada, 2005). 10. Australia, High Court, Secretary, Department of Health and Community Services (NT) v JWB and SMB (Marion’s Case) (1992), 175 CLR 218 F.C. 92/010. 11. South Africa, Children’s Act, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 June 2006, sect. 7, para. 1. 12. Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Ley Organica para la Protección del Niño y del Adolescente, (1998), Gaceta Oficial, No. 5.266, art. 8. The content of the principle is detailed in article 8, paragraph 1, of the law. 13. For example, Belarus, Law on Child’s Rights, No. 2570-XII, 1993 (as amended in 2004), art. 9, al. 3; Morocco, Penal Code, art. 40 (as referred to in the report on the mission of the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography on the issue of commercial sexual exploitation of children to Morocco (E/CN.4/2001/78/Add.1, para. 75); Portugal, Lei de protecção de crianças e jovens em perigo, Law No. 147/99 (1999), art. 4, para. 3; Russian Federation, third periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/125/Add.5), para. 170 (child abuse). 14. France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 40; Code de l’éducation, art. L.542-1. 15. France, Code de la santé publique, art. L.2112-6 and Code de l’action sociale et des familles, art. L.221 6. 16. France, Code de déontologie médicale, arts. 43-44. 17. France, Décret No. 93-221 du 16 février 1993 relatif aux règles professionnelles des infirmiers et infirmières, art. 7.62 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 18. Canada, Sex Offender Information Registration Act, S.C. 2004, C-16; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (England), Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Bill, House of Lords (HL) Bill 79 (2006), explanatory notes, para. 4; United Kingdom (Scotland), Protection of Children (Scotland) Bill, (Scottish Parliament (SP)) SP Bill 61, 2002, sect. 1. 19. See website: http://www.terredeshommes.org. 20. For example, Canada (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q. chap. A-13.2) (1988), art. 8 (Bureau d’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels); Iceland, Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002 (2002), arts. 5-9 (Ministry of Social Affairs); Italy, Institution of the Parliamentary Commission for Childhood and of the National Observatory on Childhood, No. 451 (1997) arts. 1-2; Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), arts. 4-6. 21. For example, Belgium, Décret instituant un délégué général de la Communauté française aux droits de l’enfant (2002), art. 2; Costa Rica, Decreto por el que se Crea la Figura del Defensor de la Infancia, No. 17.733-J (1987) (Defensor de la Infancia); Denmark, Notification Respecting a Children’s Council, No. 2, 1998; Dominican Republic, Decreto por el que se Crea la Dirección General de Promoción de la Juventud, No. 2981 (1985) (Dirección General de Promoción de la Juventud); Egypt, Decree No. 2235 (1997) (General Administration for the Legal Protection of Children); Iceland, Act on the Ombudsman for Children, No. 83 (1994); Iceland, Regulation on the Child Welfare Council, No. 49 (1994); Indonesia, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/65/Add.23), para. 32; Kenya, Children and Young Persons Act (cap. 141) (Children’s Department of the Ministry for Home Affairs and National Heritage); Luxembourg, Loi du 25 juillet 2002 portant institution d’un comité luxembourgeois des droits de l’enfant appelé “Ombuds-Comité fir d’Rechter vum Kand” (“ORK”), No. A-N.85 (2002), arts. 2-3; Malaysia, Child Act 2001, Act No. 611, sect. 3 (Coordinating Council for the Protection of Children); Malta, Children and Young Persons (Care Orders) Act, chap. 285, 1980, art. 11, para. 1 (Children and Young Persons Advisory Board); Mauritania, report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/8/Add.42), paras. 6-7 (National Council for Children); Pakistan, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/65/Add.21), para. 5 (National Commission for Child Welfare and Development); Peru, Código de los Niños y Adolescentes (Law No. 27.337, 2000), arts. 27 and 29; Qatar, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (CRC/C/OPSA/QAT/1), para. 102 (Child’s Friend Office); Sweden, Children’s Ombudsman Act, No. 335 (1993); Uganda, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/65/Add.33), p. 3 (Uganda National Programme of Action for Children); United Kingdom, Children Act 2004, chap. 31 (Children’s Commissioner); United States of America, United States Code collection, title 42, chap. 112, sect. 10605, Establishment of Office for Victims of Crime, subsects. (a)-(c) (Office for Victims of Crime). 22. For example, Myanmar, The Child Law, No. 9/93 (1993), art. 63. 23. http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/lscb. 24. For example, Bolivia, Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 176 (Comisión de la Niñez y Adolescencia); India, Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000 (No. 56 of 2000), arts. 29, 37 and 39 (Child Welfare Committee); Tunisia, Code de la protection de l’enfant, 1995, arts. 3-6 (Délégué à la protection de l’enfance). 25. Belgium, Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, arts. 3-6 (Commission de coordination de l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitance). 26. For example, Bulgaria, National Programme for Prevention and Counteraction to Trafficking in Human Beings and Protection of the Victims for 2006; Estonia, Victim Support Act, 2003 (RT I 2004, 2, 3) (entered into force in 2004), arts. 3-4 (negligence, mistreatment, physical, mental or sexual abuse); Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), pp. 45-46 (anti-trafficking unit); Philippines, Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act, No. 7610 (1992), art. II, sect. 4 (child prostitution and other sexual abuse, child trafficking, obscene publications and indecent shows).Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 63 27. United States, United States Code collection, title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child Victims’ and Child Witnesses’ Rights, sect. (d) (Privacy protection), paras. 1-2 and 4. 28. For example, Bangladesh, Children’s Act, sect. 17 (as referred to in Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Bangladesh (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 37); Bolivia, Código del Niño, Niña y Adolescente, art. 10 (Reserva y resguardo de identidad) al. 2; Canada (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse, L.R.Q., chap. P-34.1, 1977, art. 83; Canada, Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, subsects. 276.2-276.3, 486.3-4) and 486.4.1; Iceland, Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002 (2002), art. 58; Ireland, Children Act, 2001, sect. 252; Italy, Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 114; Japan, Law for Punishing Acts Related to Child Prostitution and Child Pornography and for Protecting Children, 1999 (as updated in 2004), art. 13; Kenya, The Children Act, (Chap. 586 of the Laws of Kenya, 2002) (as referred to in the second periodic report of Kenya to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, CRC/C/KEN/2), para. 212), sect. 76 (5); Philippines, Special Protection of Children against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act, No. 7610 (1992), art. XI, sect. 29, para. 2; Russian Federation, draft federal law on countering trafficking in persons, 2003, art. 28(3), (5)-(6); South Africa, Children’s Act, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 June 2006, sect. 74; Syrian Arab Republic, Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1974, art. 54 (as referred to in the initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (CRC/C/OPSC/SYR/1), para. 230); Thailand, Act Instituting Juvenile and Family Courts and Juvenile and Family Procedures, art. 98 (as referred to in the second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), para. 516); Tunisia, Child Protection Code (1995), art. 120 (as referred to in the initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.1), para. 242); Turkey, Law on Juvenile Courts, 1979, art. 40 (as referred to in the initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/51/Add.4), para. 511); United Kingdom (Scotland), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (chap. 36), sect. 44, subsect. 1; Zambia, initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2002 (CRC/C/11/Add.25), para. 527. 29. For example, Italy, Penal Code, art. 734 (a); Sri Lanka, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/70/Add.17), para. 65; United Kingdom (Scotland), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (chap. 36), sect. 44, subsect. 2; Zambia, initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/11/Add.25) para. 527. 30. Canada, Department of Justice, A Handbook for Police and Crown Prosecutors on Criminal Harassment (Ottawa, 2004), part. IV. 31. See for instance in France: http://www.barreau-marseille.avocat.fr/textes.cgi?rubrique=9. 32. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Independent Evaluation Report: Juvenile Justice Reform in Lebanon (Vienna, July 2005), para. 38. 33. Iran (Islamic Republic of), second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/104/Add.3), para. 36. 34. France, Ministry of Justice, Direction des affaires criminelles et des grâces, “Enfants victimes d’infractions pénales: guide de bonnes pratiques; du signalement au procès pénal” (Paris, 2003). 35. For example, United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-62. 36. For example, Switzerland, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, Recueil systématique du droit fédéral (RS) 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (1). 37. With respect to article 9 (a) of the Model Law, on procedures for the adult and juvenile criminal justice process, including the role of child victims and witnesses, the importance, timing and manner of testimony and ways in which “questioning” will be conducted during the investigation and trial, see Iceland, Child Protection Act, No. 80/2002, art. 55, para. 1; Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 215 (3); New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, sect. 12, subsect. 1; and United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-72; with respect to article 9 (b) of the Model Law, on existing support mechanisms for the child when making a complaint and participating in the investigation and court proceedings, including the availability of a victim’s lawyer, see Canada (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse (L.R.Q., chap. P-34.1), 1977, art. 5; 64 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime Canada (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q., chap. A-13.2), 1988, art. 4; Canada, Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, 2003, principle 7; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 136, paras. 1-2 and 6; Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 20; Netherlands, “De Beaufort Guidelines”, 1989, para. 6; New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act, 2002, sect. 11(1), 12; Nicaragua, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 406, 2001, art. 110 (1); United Kingdom (Scotland), Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (chap. 36), sect. 20, subsect. 1; and United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-62 (1), (7); with respect to article 9 (c) of the Model Law, on specific places and times of hearings and other relevant events, see Canada, Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, 2003, principle 6; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 136, paras. 12 and 14; New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, sect. 12, subsect. 1 (d); Spain, Ley 35/1995, de 11 de diciembre, de Ayudas y Asistencia a las Víctimas de Delitos Violentos y contra la Libertad Sexual, art. 15 (4); United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 237, sect. 3771, Crime victims’ rights, subsect. (a), (2); United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-72 (2). 38. International Criminal Court, Rule 90(5) of the Rules of Procedure and Evidence and regulation 83.2 of the regulations of the Court. 39. Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 11 (j); Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (b); France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 102; Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 75 (6); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. V; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as updated in 2006), art. 13, sect. 3; Thailand, Criminal Procedure Code, art. 13 (as referred to in the second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, para. 515). 40. For example, Australia (Western Australia), Evidence Act 1906, sect. 106E; United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (i). 41. Switzerland (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, 1991, art. 6 (3)). 42. For example, Canada, Criminal Code, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, sect. 486.1, subsect. 1. 43. For example, Argentina, Código Procesal Penal, art. 80 (c); Austria, Criminal code of procedure, art. 162 (2); Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (c); Peru, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 957 (2004), art. 95, sect. 3; Switzerland, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 7 (1). 44. For example, United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (i). 45. For example, Bulgaria, Child Protection Act, 2004, art. 15 (5); Dominican Republic, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 76-02, 2002, art. 202; Honduras, Código Procesal Penal, Decreto No. 9-99-E, 2000, art. 331; Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 215 and art. 352 (1); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. XVI; Norway, Criminal Procedure Act, No. 25, 1981 (as amended on 30 June 2006), sect. 128; Oman, Code of Criminal Procedure, art.14 (as referred to in Oman, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/OMN/2), paras. 29-30); Peru, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 957 (2004), art. 378, sect. 3; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as amended in 2006), art. 349. 46. For example, France, Code de procédure pénale (as amended by loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; South Africa, Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, “National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences; Department of Justice – National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases” (Pretoria 1998), chap. 7, para. 1; United States (Delaware), Del. Code Ann. Iti.11, §5134 (1995). 47. For example, Costa Rica, Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Law No. 7739 (1998), art. 107 (c); Czech Republic, Criminal Procedure Rules, No. 141, 1961, sect. 102 (1); Dominican Republic, Código Procesal Penal (Ley No. 76-02 of 2002), art. 202; France, Code de procédure Part two. Commentary on the Model Law 65 pénale (as amended by loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures, Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 52; Kyrgyzstan, Criminal Procedure Code, No. 156, 1999, arts. 193 and 293; the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Code of Criminal Procedures, art. 223 (4); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Victimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. XVI; Norway, Criminal Procedure Act, No. 25, 1981 (as amended on 30 June 2006), sect. 239; Peru, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 957 (2004), art. 378, sect. 3; El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as amended in 2006), art. 349; Thailand, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, paras. 148 and 511. 48. For example, Bulgaria, Child Protection Act, 2004, art. 15 (5). 49. For example, Australia (Queensland), Evidence Act 1977, sect. 21A (2) (d); Austria, Criminal code of procedure, art. 162 (2); France, Code de procédure pénale (as amended by loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la repression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; United Kingdom, Home Office and others, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, Including Children (London, 2006), sect. 4.28; United Kingdom (Scotland), Vulnerable Witnesses (Scotland) Act 2004, sect. 271H, subsect. 1 (d). 50. United States (Arizona), Arizona Revised Statutes (Ariz.Rev.Stat.) §13-4403 (E). 51. For example, Australia (Queensland), Evidence Act 1977, sect. 9; Thailand, Civil and Commercial Procedure Code, sect. 95 (as referred to in the second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 para. 105); United Kingdom, Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999, sect. 53 (1); United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (c), para. 2. 52. New Zealand, Evidence Act 1908, sect. 23H, para. (c). 53. New Zealand, R. v. Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354 at 359. 54. Ibid. 55. For example, Honduras, Código Procesal Penal, Decreto No. 9-99-E, 2000, art. 331, al. 3. 56. For example, Algeria, Code de procédure pénale, 1966, art. 228; Republic of the Congo, Loi No. 1-63 du 13 janvier 1963 portant code de procédure pénale, arts. 91 and 382; Egypt, Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 283 (as referred to in the report of Egypt to the Human Rights Committee under article 40 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (CCPR/C/EGY/2001/3), 2002, para. 570); France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 108; Haiti, Code d’instruction criminelle (as amended in 1985), art. 66; Indonesia, Report on Laws and Legal Procedures Concerning the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Indonesia (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 50; Oman, Code of Criminal Procedure, art. 196 (as referred to in Oman, second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/OMN/2), para. 107); Thailand, Civil and Commercial Procedure Code, sect. 112 (as referred to in the second period report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 para. 105). 57. See Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 (c.23), sects. 55-57. 58. For example, United States, United States Code collection, Title 18, chap. 223, sect. 3509, Child victims’ and child witnesses’ rights, subsect. (c), para. 3. 59. New Zealand, R. v Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354. 60. For example, El Salvador, Código Procesal Penal, Law No. 904, 1997 (as amended in 2006), art. 13, sect. 13; United States (Colorado), Children’s Code, Title 19, sect. 19-1-106(2). 61. United Kingdom, Crown Prosecution Service, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, including Children (London, 2006), sect. 4.28. 62. United Kingdom, Crown Prosecution Service, Children’s Charter, 2005, sect. 4.19. 63. For example, Switzerland, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (3).66 Justice in Matters involving Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime 64. http://www.fijiwomen.com/. 65. Sometimes victims of trafficking are threatened with prosecution for having entered a country illegally; no special assistance has been provided to them while they are in police custody, not even when the victims are of a very young age and no protection measures have been granted. The whole issue of traumatization through trafficking and repeated rape has not been evaluated to its full extent, if any. 66. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.06.V.15), pp. 5-8. 67. United Nations publication, Sales No. E.06.V.15. 68. For example, Armenia, Criminal Procedure Code, 1999, art. 59, sect. 1, para. 11; Colombia, Código de Procedimiento Penal, Law No. 906, 2004, art. 11 (g); Kazakhstan, Criminal Procedural Code, Law No. 206, 1997, art. 75 (6); Mexico, Ley de Atención y Apoyo a las Víctimas del Delito para el Distrito Federal (2003), art. 11, sect. XIX; Netherlands, “De Beaufort Guidelines”,1989, para. 6.1; New Zealand, Victims’ Rights Act 2002, sect. 12, subsect. 1 (e); United Kingdom, Crown Prosecution Service, “Code for Crown Prosecutors” (London, 2004), sect. 5.13; United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-63 (a), 15-23-72 (1) and 15-23-75 (1); United States (Alaska), Constitution of the State of Alaska, Rights of crime victims, art. I, sect. 24; United States (Connecticut), Connecticut Joint Resolution No. 13, para. 2; United States (Idaho), Constitution of the State of Idaho, Rights of crime victims, art. 1, sect. 22, para. (3) United States (Illinois), Constitution of the State of Illinois, Crime victim’s rights, art. I, , sect. 8.1 (Crime victim’s rights), subsect. (a) (5); United States (Michigan), Constitution of the State of Michigan, art. I, sect. 24 (1) 9; United States (Oregon), Constitution of the State or Oregon, art. 1, sect. 42 (1) (b); United States (South Carolina), Constitution of the State of South Carolina, art. 1, sect. 24 (3); United States (Tennessee), Constitution of the State of Tennessee, Amendment for victims’ rights, 1998, para. 5; United States (Texas), Constitution of the State of Texas, art. 1, sect. 30, Rights of crime victims, para. (b) (5); United States (Virginia), Constitution of Virginia, art. 1, sect. 8-A, para. 6; United States (Wisconsin), Constitution of the State of Wisconsin, art. 1, sect. 9m (9). 69. For example, Australia, Victims of Crime Act, A1994-83, 1994 (as amended on 13 April 2004), No. 83 of 1994, sect. 4 (l); Canada, Corrections and Conditional Release Act, S.C. 1992, c. 20, sect. 26, subsect. 1; United Kingdom (Scotland), Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill, SP Bill 50, 2003, sect. 16; United Kingdom, Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 (chap. 28), chap. 2, sect. 35, subsects. (4)-(5); United States, United States Code collection, Title 42, chap. 112, sect. 10606, Victims’ rights, 2004, subsect. (b), para. 7; United States (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Title 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-75 (5), 15-23-78; United States (Alaska), Constitution of the State of Alaska, Rights of crime victims, art. I, sect. 24; United States (Arizona), Arizona Constitution, sect. 2.1 (A), para. 2; United States (Idaho), Constitution of the State of Idaho, Rights of crime victims, art. 1, sect. 22, para. (3); United States (Illinois), Constitution of the State of Illinois, Crime victim’s rights, art. I,, sect. 8.1 (Crime victim’s rights), subsect. (a) (5); United States (Louisiana), Constitutional Amendment for Victims’ Rights, art. I, sect. 25; United States (Michigan), Constitution of the State of Michigan, art. I, sect. 24 (1) 9; United States (Oregon), Constitution of the State or Oregon, art.1, sect. 42 (1) (b); United States (South Carolina), Constitution of the State of South Carolina, art. 1, sect. 24 (2) and (10); United States (Tennessee), Constitution of the State of Tennessee, Amendment for victims’ rights, 1998, para. 5; United States (Texas), Constitution of the State of Texas, art. 1, sect. 30, Rights of crime victims, para. (b) (5); United States (Virginia), Constitution of Virginia, art. 1, sect. 8-A, para. 6; United States (Wisconsin), Constitution of the State of Wisconsin, art. 1, sect. 9m (9).Vienna International Centre, PO Box 500, 1400 Vienna, Austria Tel.: (+43-1) 26060-0, Fax: (+43-1) 26060-5866, www.unodc.org Printed in Austria V.08-58962—April 2009Justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels Loi type et commentaire L’UNODC tient à remercier les gouvernements canadien et suédois pour leur soutien dans la rédaction de la présente Loi type et son commentaire. OFFICE DES NATIONS UNIES CONTRE LA DROGUE ET LE CRIME Vienne Justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels Loi type et commentaire Nations Unies New York 2009 Préface* 1. Dans sa résolution 2005/20 du 22 juillet 2005, le Conseil économique et social a adopté les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Ces Lignes directrices font partie de l’ensemble des règles et normes des Nations Unies en matière de prévention du crime et de justice pénale, qui sont les principes normatifs universellement reconnus élaborés dans ce domaine par la communauté internationale depuis 1950.** 2. Les Lignes directrices représentent les bonnes pratiques établies à partir du consensus du savoir actuel ainsi que des normes, règles et principes internationaux et régionaux et fournissent le cadre pratique permettant d’atteindre les objectifs suivants: a) Aider au réexamen des lois, procédures et pratiques nationales et internes de manière que celles-ci garantissent le respect total des droits des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels et contribuent à l’application de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant*** par les parties à la Convention; b) Aider les gouvernements, les organisations internationales qui fournissent une assistance juridique aux États qui en font la demande, les organismes publics, les organisations non gouvernementales et les organisations à assise communautaire ainsi que les autres parties intéressées à élaborer et à appliquer des lois, politiques programmes et pratiques qui traitent des principales questions concernant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels; c) Guider les professionnels et, le cas échéant, les bénévoles qui travaillent avec des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels dans leurs pratiques quotidiennes du processus de justice pour adultes et mineurs aux niveaux national, régional et international, conformément à la Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir (résolution 40/34, annexe); d) Aider et soutenir ceux qui s’occupent d’enfants pour qu’ils traitent les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels avec sensibilité. 3. La Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, qui a pour but d’aider les États à aligner leur législation nationale sur les dispositions figurant dans les Lignes directrices et les autres instruments internationaux pertinents, se présente comme un outil qui devrait faciliter la rédaction des dispositions légales concernant la protection des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels et la protection qui doit leur être accordée, particulièrement dans le contexte de l’administration de la justice. Élaboré par l’Office des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime en coopération avec le Fonds des Nations Unies pour l’enfance (UNICEF) et le Bureau international des droits de l’enfant, le texte de la Loi type a été revu lors d’une réunion d’experts représentant les différents systèmes juridiques tenue à Vienne en mai 2007. 4. Conçue de manière à pouvoir être adaptée aux besoins de chaque État, la Loi type a été rédigée en ayant particulièrement en vue les dispositions des Lignes directrices dont la mise en œuvre appelle la publication de lois d’application et les principales questions concernant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, en particulier leur rôle dans le processus d’administration de la justice. 5. L’on a veillé, dans la rédaction de la Loi type, à tenir compte des spécificités des législations et procédures judiciaires nationales, du contexte juridique, social, économique, culturel et géographique de chaque pays ainsi que des principaux systèmes juridiques qu’ils représentent. 6. La Loi type, par son champ d’application, se rapporte principalement au système de justice pénale. Les États sont néanmoins invités à s’inspirer des principes et des dispositions reflétées dans la Loi type lorsqu’ils élaboreront des lois concernant les autres domaines dans lesquels les enfants doivent jouir d’une protection, comme la garde, le divorce, l’adoption, l’immigration et le droit des réfugiés. 7. La Loi type a également été rédigée de manière que les principes et les dispositions qui y sont reflétés puissent être appliqués et mis en œuvre par les systèmes de justice informelle ou coutumière. 8. Le concept de protection des enfants victimes, tel qu’il est utilisé dans la Loi type, englobe la protection des enfants qui ne veulent pas ou ne peuvent pas témoigner ou fournir des informations ainsi que des enfants soupçonnés d’avoir commis ou ayant commis des actes criminels qui ont été victimisés, intimidés ou forcés d’agir illégalement ou qui l’ont fait sous la contrainte. 9. La Loi type est accompagnée d’un commentaire qui a pour but d’aider les États à en interpréter et à en appliquer les dispositions. Table des matières Page Préface iii Première partie. Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels et commentaire Préambule 3 Chapitre I. Définitions 5 Chapitre II. Dispositions générales relatives à l’assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins 7 Chapitre III. Assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins pendant le processus de justice 13 A. Dispositions générales 13 B. Étape de l’enquête 15 C. Étape du procès 17 D. Étape postérieure au procès 21 E. Autres procédures 22 Chapitre IV. Dispositions finales 23 Deuxième partie. Commentaire de la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels Introduction 27 Préambule 29 Chapitre I. Définitions 31 Chapitre II. Dispositions générales relatives à l’assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins 33 Chapitre III. Assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins pendant le processus de justice 41 A. Dispositions générales 41 B. Étape de l’enquête 43 C. Étape du procès 46 D. Étape postérieure au procès 53 E. Autres procédures 56 Chapitre IV. Dispositions finales 57 Première partie Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels Préambule [Option 1. Pays de tradition romaniste Considérant les obligations découlant de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, adoptée par l’Assemblée générale dans sa résolution 44/25 du 20 novembre 1989 et entrée en vigueur le 2 septembre 1990, et des Protocoles facultatifs y afférents ainsi que des autres instruments juridiques internationaux pertinents, Considérant en particulier la résolution 2005/20 du Conseil économique et social en date du 22 juillet 2005, qui contient en annexe les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels (ci-après dénommées les “Lignes directrices”), Considérant également que, bien que les droits des accusés et des condamnés doivent être préservés, tout enfant victime ou témoin d’actes criminels a droit à ce que son intérêt supérieur soit pris en considération à titre prioritaire, Ayant à l’esprit les droits ci-après des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, et en particulier les droits consacrés dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et dans les Lignes directrices: Le droit d’être traité avec dignité et compassion; Le droit d’être protégé contre la discrimination; Le droit d’être informé; Le droit d’être entendu et d’exprimer ses opinions et ses préoccupations; Le droit à une assistance efficace; Le droit à la vie privée; Le droit d’être protégé contre des épreuves durant le processus de justice; Le droit à la sécurité; Le droit à ce que soient adoptées des mesures spéciales de prévention; Le droit à réparation, Considérant que, si les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels sont mieux traités, les enfants et leurs familles pourront se montrer plus disposés à signaler les cas de victimisation et à mieux appuyer le processus de justice, La présente loi a été adoptée le ... (jour) ... (mois) ... (année).] [Option 2. Pays de common law Loi relative à l’assistance et à la protection devant être accordées aux enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, en particulier dans le cadre du processus de justice, conformément aux instruments internationaux existants, en particulier la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, adoptée par l’Assemblée générale dans sa résolution 44/25 du 20 novembre 1989, ainsi qu’aux autres instruments internationaux connexes, dont les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, adoptées par le Conseil économique et social dans sa résolution 2005/20 du 22 juillet 2005 (ci-après dénommées les “Lignes directrices”); 1. L’intitulé de la présente loi est “Loi sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels”. 2. La présente loi s’applique sur l’ensemble du territoire de [nom de l’État]. 3. La présente loi entrera en vigueur [le ... (jour) ... (mois) ... (année)] [par publication au Journal officiel].] Chapitre premier. Définitions Aux fins de la présente Loi: a) Par “enfants victimes et témoins”, l’on entend les enfants et adolescents âgés de moins de 18 ans qui sont victimes ou témoins d’actes criminels, indépendamment de leur rôle dans l’infraction ou dans la poursuite du contrevenant ou des groupes de contrevenants présumés. Sauf indication contraire, l’expression “enfant” englobe aussi bien les enfants victimes que les enfants témoins; b) Par “professionnels”, l’on entend les personnes qui, de par leur travail, sont en contact avec des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels ou sont chargés de répondre aux besoins des enfants dans le système de justice, et auxquels s’applique la présente Loi. Il s’agit, sans que la liste soit exhaustive, des personnes suivantes: défenseurs des enfants et des victimes et personnes de soutien; praticiens des services de protection des enfants; personnel des organismes responsables du bien-être de l’enfant; procureurs et, le cas échéant, avocats de la défense; personnel diplomatique et consulaire; personnel des programmes contre la violence familiale; juges; personnel des tribunaux; agents des services de détection et de répression; personnel des services de probation; professionnels de la santé physique et mentale; et travailleurs sociaux; c) Par “processus de justice”, l’on entend la détection des actes criminels, le dépôt de la plainte, l’enquête, les poursuites et les procédures de jugement et d’après-jugement, que l’affaire soit traitée dans un système de justice pénale national, international ou régional, ou dans un système de justice pour adultes ou pour mineurs, ou encore dans un système de justice informelle ou coutumière; d) Par “adapté à l’enfant”, l’on entend une approche équilibrée du droit à la protection et tenant compte des besoins et points de vue individuels de l’enfant; e) Par “personne de soutien”, l’on entend une personne spécialement formée pour aider un enfant pendant tout le processus de justice afin de prévenir le risque de contrainte, de revictimisation ou de victimisation secondaire; f) Par “tuteur de l’enfant”, l’on entend une personne qui a été officiellement reconnue conformément à la législation nationale comme étant responsable de veiller aux intérêts de l’enfant lorsque les parents de celui-ci n’exercent pas la responsabilité parentale ou sont décédés; g) Par “tuteur ad litem”, l’on entend une personne désignée par le tribunal pour protéger les intérêts de l’enfant dans toute procédure pouvant les affecter; h) Par “victimisation secondaire”, l’on entend une victimisation qui ne résulte pas directement d’un acte criminel mais de la réaction d’institutions et de particuliers envers la victime; i) Par “revictimisation”, l’on entend une situation dans laquelle une personne est victime de plusieurs incidents criminels pendant une période déterminée. Chapitre II. Dispositions générales relatives à l’assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins Article premier. Intérêt supérieur de l’enfant Dans le contexte de la présente Loi, et bien que les droits des accusés et des condamnés doivent être préservés, tout enfant, surtout s’il est victime ou témoin, a droit à ce que son intérêt supérieur soit pris en considération à titre prioritaire. Article 2. Principes généraux 1. Tout enfant victime ou témoin est traité sans discrimination de quelque nature que ce soit, indépendamment de sa race, de sa couleur, de sa religion, de sa conviction, de son âge, de sa situation de famille, de sa culture, de sa langue, de son origine ethnique, nationale ou sociale, de sa nationalité, de son sexe, de son orientation sexuelle, de ses opinions politiques ou autres, de son handicap, de sa naissance, de sa fortune ou de toute autre situation ou de ceux de leurs parents ou représentants légaux. 2. Pendant toute la procédure, tout enfant victime ou témoin d’actes criminels est traité avec bienveillance et sensibilité, d’une manière qui respecte sa dignité compte tenu de sa situation personnelle, de ses besoins immédiats et de ses besoins particuliers, de son âge, de son sexe, de son handicap, le cas échéant, et de sa maturité intellectuelle. 3. Toute mesure pouvant constituer une intrusion dans la vie privée de l’enfant est limitée au minimum nécessaire, telle que définie ou par la loi, pour réunir les éléments de preuve répondant à des normes élevées et assurer le déroulement équitable de la procédure. 4. La vie privée d’un enfant victime ou témoin doit être protégée. 5. Les informations de nature à divulguer la qualité de témoin ou de victime de l’enfant ne sont publiées qu’avec l’autorisation expresse du tribunal. 6. Tout enfant victime ou témoin a le droit d’exprimer librement et dans ses propres mots ses points de vue, opinions et convictions et de contribuer en particulier aux décisions qui affectent sa vie, notamment celles prises lors du processus de justice. Article 3. Obligation de signaler les infractions impliquant un enfant victime ou témoin 1. Les maîtres, médecins, travailleurs sociaux et autres professionnels, selon ce qui sera jugé approprié, s’ils ont des raisons de soupçonner qu’un enfant est victime ou témoin d’un acte criminel sont tenus de le signaler à [nom de l’autorité compétente]. 2. Les personnes visées au paragraphe 1 du présent article aident l’enfant, au mieux de leurs capacités, jusqu’à ce qu’il reçoive une assistance professionnelle appropriée. 3. L’obligation de signalement visée au paragraphe 1 du présent article prévaut sur toute obligation de confidentialité, sauf dans le cas des rapports entre l’avocat et son client. Article 4. Protection des enfants contre tout contact avec les délinquants 1. Une personne ayant fait l’objet d’une condamnation définitive du chef d’une infraction pénale qualifiée contre un enfant ne peut travailler dans un service, une institution ou une association fournissant des services à l’enfance. 2. Les services, institutions ou associations fournissant des services à l’enfance prennent les mesures appropriées pour faire en sorte que les personnes inculpées d’une infraction pénale qualifiée contre un enfant n’aient aucun contact avec des enfants. 3. Aux fins des paragraphes 1 et 2 du présent article, le/la [nom de l’organe compétent] promulgue des règlements contenant: a) Une définition des infractions pénales qualifiées fondée sur la sévérité de la peine pouvant être imposée par le tribunal; b) Une liste des infractions pénales qualifiées ayant un caractère dirimant; c) Une habilitation autorisant le tribunal à rendre une ordonnance interdisant à une personne condamnée du chef de telles infractions pénales de travailler dans des services, institutions ou associations fournissant des services à l’enfance; d) Une définition des services, institutions et associations fournissant des services à l’enfance; e) Une indication des mesures que doivent adopter les services, institutions et associations fournissant des services à l’enfance pour faire en sorte que les personnes inculpées d’une infraction pénale qualifiée n’aient aucun contact avec des enfants. 4. Quiconque contrevient sciemment au paragraphe 1 ou 2 du présent article se rend coupable d’une infraction et est passible de la peine spécifiée dans les règlements devant être établis en application du paragraphe 3 du présent article. Article 5. [Autorité] [Office] national(e) pour la protection des enfants victimes et témoins [Option pour les États ayant décidé de créer une autorité nationale: 1. Il est créé une autorité nationale pour la protection des enfants victimes et témoins (ci-après dénommée l’”Autorité”). 2. L’Autorité est composée comme suit: a) Un juge de [nom du tribunal compétent]; b) Un représentant du Ministère public, spécialisé dans les affaires concernant les enfants; c) Un représentant des services de détection et de répression; d) Un représentant des services de protection de l’enfance ou de tout autre service compétent du Ministère chargé des affaires sociales; e) Un représentant du Ministère chargé de la santé; f) Un représentant du Barreau spécialisé, si possible, dans les affaires concernant les enfants; g) Un représentant de chacune des organisations reconnues d’appui aux victimes fournissant des services à l’enfance; h) Un représentant du Ministère chargé de l’éducation; [Facultatif: i) Tout autre représentant désigné conformément aux besoins locaux]. 3. Les membres de l’Autorité sont désignés par [nom du ministre compétent] dans les [...] mois suivant l’entrée en vigueur de la présente Loi.] [Option pour les États ayant décidé de ne pas créer d’autorité nationale mais d’avoir recours plutôt à un organe ou ministère existant: 1. Il est créé au sein du [organe ou ministère compétent] un Office pour la protection des enfants victimes et témoins (ci-après dénommé l’”Office”). 2. L’Office est composé comme suit: a) Un juge de [nom du tribunal compétent]; b) Un représentant du Ministère public, spécialisé dans les affaires concernant les enfants; c) Un représentant des services de détection et de répression; d) Un représentant des services de protection de l’enfance ou de tout autre service compétent du Ministère chargé des affaires sociales; e) Un représentant du Ministère chargé de la santé; f) Un représentant du Barreau spécialisé, si possible, dans les affaires concernant les enfants; g) Un représentant de chacune des organisations reconnues d’appui aux victimes fournissant des services à l’enfance; h) Un représentant du Ministère chargé de l’éducation; [Facultatif: i) Tout autre représentant désigné conformément aux besoins locaux]. 3. L’Office s’acquitte des attributions énoncées à l’article 6 de la présente Loi.] Article 6. Fonctions de l’[Autorité] [Office] national(e) pour la protection des enfants victimes et témoins Les fonctions de l’[Autorité] [Office] sont les suivantes: a) Adopter les politiques nationales de caractère général concernant les enfants victimes et témoins; b) Sur la base des politiques nationales, formuler des recommandations concernant les programmes de prévention et de protection pertinents et les soumettre aux autorités publiques compétentes; c) Promouvoir et assurer, au plan national, la coordination des services et institutions qui fournissent une assistance ou un traitement aux enfants victimes et témoins en: i) Suivant la mise en œuvre des procédures existantes concernant le signalement d’actes criminels et fournissant une assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins, notamment en matière de représentation légale et de placement, et en introduisant de telles procédures lorsqu’elles n’existent pas; ii) Formulant des recommandations au ministère ou aux ministères compétents concernant la promulgation de règlements et de protocoles; d) Élaborer des lignes directrices concernant l’établissement de mécanismes, comme services d’appels d’urgence pour la protection de l’enfance, devant être réglementés par [nom de l’organe compétent]; e) Élaborer des lignes directrices concernant la formation des professionnels qui travaillent avec les enfants victimes et témoins; f) Réaliser de recherches sur les questions concernant les enfants victimes et témoins; g) Diffuser des informations concernant l’assistance à fournir aux enfants victimes et témoins parmi les personnes et institutions chargées de l’enfance, comme écoles, organisations publiques, institutions et centres d’accueil des enfants; h) Publier des rapports annuels sur les activités des organes visés par les dispositions de la présente Loi et sur ses propres activités. Article 7. Confidentialité 1. Indépendamment des mesures légales existantes visant à protéger la vie privée des enfants victimes et témoins conformément au paragraphe 3 de l’article 3 de la présente Loi, toutes les personnes qui travaillent avec un enfant victime ou témoin ainsi que tous les membres de l’[Autorité] [Office] créé(e) conformément à l’article 5 de ladite Loi tiennent confidentielles toutes les informations concernant les enfants victimes et témoins dont ils ont pu avoir connaissance dans l’accomplissement de leurs fonctions. 2. Quiconque contrevient au paragraphe 1 du présent article est coupable d’une infraction et est passible d’une peine de prison de [...] ou d’une amende de [...] ou de l’une et l’autre peines. Article 8. Formation 1. Les professionnels qui travaillent avec les enfants victimes et témoins suivent une formation appropriée aux questions concernant lesdits enfants. 2. Lorsqu’il y a lieu, l’[Autorité] [Office] créé(e) conformément à l’article 5 de la présente Loi élabore et publie les programmes de formation destinés aux professionnels du travail avec des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Cette formation porte notamment sur les questions ci-après: a) Les normes, règles et principes pertinents relatifs aux droits de l’homme, y compris les droits de l’enfant; b) Les principes et devoirs éthiques inhérents à l’accomplissement de leurs fonctions; c) Les signes et les symptômes de la commission d’actes criminels contre des enfants; d) Les compétences et les techniques d’évaluation de crise, particulièrement pour les renvois de cas, l’accent étant mis sur le besoin de confidentialité; e) La dynamique et la nature de la violence contre les enfants et l’impact et les conséquences, y compris les séquelles physiques et psychologiques, que les actes criminels ont sur les enfants; f) Les mesures et techniques spéciales pour aider les enfants victimes et témoins dans le processus de justice; g) Les informations concernant les étapes de l’épanouissement des enfants ainsi que les questions linguistiques, ethniques, religieuses et sociales propres à l’un et l’autre sexe, en tenant compte des différentes cultures et de l’âge, une attention spéciale devant être accordée aux enfants de groupes désavantagés; h) Les compétences requises pour la communication adulte-enfant, y compris une approche adaptée à l’enfant; i) Les techniques d’entrevue et d’évaluation qui soient le moins stressantes ou traumatisantes possible pour l’enfant, tout en optimisant la qualité de l’information fournie par ce dernier, y compris les compétences nécessaires pour travailler de manière sensible, compréhensive, constructive et rassurante avec des enfants victimes et témoins; j) Les méthodes permettant de protéger et de présenter des preuves et d’interroger les enfants témoins; k) Le rôle des professionnels et les méthodes à utiliser lorsqu’ils travaillent avec des enfants victimes et témoins. Chapitre III. Assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins pendant le processus de justice A. Dispositions générales Article 9. Droit d’être informé Dès le premier contact avec le processus de justice et tout au long de celui-ci, l’enfant victime ou témoin, ses parents ou son tuteur, ses représentants légaux et la personne de soutien, s’il en a été désigné une, ou toute autre personne appropriée désignée pour fournir une assistance sont dûment et rapidement informés par [nom de l’autorité compétente] de l’étape à laquelle se trouve le processus et, dans la mesure où cela est possible et approprié: a) Du fonctionnement du système de justice pénale pour adultes et mineurs, notamment du rôle des enfants victimes et témoins, de l’importance, du moment et des modalités du témoignage et des façons dont l’interrogatoire sera mené pendant l’enquête et le procès; b) Des mécanismes de soutien à l’enfant existants lorsque celui-ci dépose une plainte et participe à l’enquête et à la procédure judiciaire, y compris pour ce qui est de mettre à la disposition de la victime un avocat ou une autre personne appropriée chargé de fournir une assistance; c) Des lieux et moments précis des audiences et de tout autre événement pertinent; d) De l’existence de mesures de protection; e) Des mécanismes existants de réexamen des décisions concernant l’enfant victime et témoin; f) Des droits pertinents concernant les enfants victimes et témoins en vertu de la législation nationale applicable, de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et des autres instruments juridiques internationaux, y compris la Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir adoptée par l’Assemblée générale dans sa résolution 40/34 du 29 novembre 1985; g) Des possibilités d’obtenir réparation du délinquant ou de l’État, par le biais du processus de justice, d’actions alternatives au civil ou par d’autres moyens; h) De l’existence et du fonctionnement de systèmes de justice réparatrice; i) De l’existence de services sanitaires, psychologiques, sociaux et autres ainsi que des moyens leur permettant de bénéficier de ces services ainsi que de conseils ou d’une représentation juridiques ou autres et d’une aide financière d’urgence, le cas échéant; j) De l’évolution et de l’aboutissement de l’affaire les concernant, y compris l’appréhension, l’arrestation, la détention de l’accusé et tout changement pouvant intervenir à cet égard, ainsi que de la décision du Procureur, des développements pertinents, après le procès et de l’issue de l’affaire. Article 10. Assistance juridique Pendant tout le processus de justice, l’État assigne gratuitement un avocat à tout enfant victime ou témoin: a) À la demande de l’enfant; b) À la demande des parents ou du tuteur de l’enfant; c) À la demande de la personne de soutien, s’il en a été désigné une; d) Conformément à une ordonnance rendue par le tribunal de sa propre initiative s’il considère que cela est dans l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. Article 11. Mesures de protection Lorsque la sécurité d’un enfant victime ou témoin apparaît comme pouvant être compromise, quelle que soit l’étape du processus de justice, le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] fait prendre à son intention des mesures de protection qui peuvent notamment tendre à: a) Éviter tout contact direct entre l’enfant victime ou témoin et l’accusé à tous les stades du processus de justice; b) Demander à un tribunal compétent de rendre une ordonnance restrictive et la faire inscrire dans un registre; c) Demander à un tribunal compétent d’ordonner la détention provisoire de l’accusé et, le cas échéant, de subordonner sa mise en liberté sous caution à la condition qu’il n’ait aucun contact avec l’enfant victime ou témoin; d) Demander à un tribunal compétent de placer l’accusé en résidence surveillée; e) Demander à la police ou autre institution pertinente d’assurer la protection de l’enfant victime ou témoin et d’empêcher que soit divulgué l’endroit où il se trouve; f) Prendre, ou demander aux autorités compétentes de prendre, les autres mesures de protection pouvant être jugées appropriées. Article 12. Langage, services d’interprétation et autres mesures spéciales d’assistance 1. Le tribunal veille à ce que la procédure dans laquelle l’enfant victime ou témoin est appelé à déposer soit menée dans un langage simple et compréhensible pour un enfant. 2. Si l’enfant a besoin de l’assistance d’un interprète pour comprendre la langue utilisée, il lui en est assigné un gratuitement. 3. Si, compte tenu de l’âge, du degré de maturité ou des besoins particuliers de l’enfant, lesquels peuvent être liés, sans que cette énumération soit limitative, à son handicap, à son origine ethnique, à sa pauvreté ou au risque qu’il soit revictimisé, l’enfant a besoin de mesures spéciales d’assistance pour témoigner ou participer au processus de justice, de telles mesures sont adoptées gratuitement. B. /l’enquête Les dispositions de la section B “Étape de l’enquête” de la présente Loi s’appliquent à toutes les autorités nationales compétentes appelées à participer à l’enquête sur des affaires impliquant un enfant victime ou témoin. Article 13. Enquêteur spécialement formé 1. Le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] désigne un enquêteur spécialement formé au travail avec les enfants pour guider l’interrogatoire de l’enfant en suivant une approche adaptée à l’enfant. 2. Dans toute la mesure possible, l’enquêteur évite de répéter l’interrogatoire pendant le processus de justice afin d’éviter une victimisation secondaire de l’enfant. Article 14. Examen médical et prélèvement de spécimens biologiques 1. Un enfant victime ou témoin ne peut faire l’objet d’un examen médical ou d’un prélèvement de spécimens biologiques que si sont réunies les deux conditions ci-après: a) Ses parents ou son tuteur ou la personne de soutien se trouvent présents, à moins que l’enfant n’en décide autrement; b) L’examen médical ou le prélèvement de spécimens biologiques a été autorisé par écrit par le tribunal, un officier supérieur de la police ou le Procureur. 2. Le tribunal, un officier supérieur de la police ou le Procureur n’autorise un examen médical ou le prélèvement de spécimens biologiques que s’il y a des raisons de croire qu’un tel examen ou un tel prélèvement est nécessaire. 3. S’il surgit à un moment quelconque de l’enquête un doute quant à la santé d’un enfant victime ou témoin, y compris sa santé mentale, les autorités compétentes chargées de la procédure veillent à ce qu’un médecin procède dès que possible à un examen médical complet de l’enfant. 4. À la suite de cet examen médical, l’autorité compétente chargée de la procédure fait le nécessaire pour que l’enfant reçoive le traitement recommandé par le médecin et, en cas de besoin, soit hospitalisé. Article 15. Personne de soutien Dès le début de l’enquête et pendant tout le processus de justice, les enfants victimes et témoins reçoivent le soutien d’une personne dotée de la formation et des compétences professionnelles requises pour assister les enfants d’âges et de milieux différents et communiquer avec eux en vue de prévenir tout risque de contrainte, de revictimisation et de victimisation secondaire. Article 16. Désignation d’une personne de soutien 1. L’enquêteur informe le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] de son intention d’inviter un enfant victime ou témoin à déposer et lui demande de désigner une personne de soutien. 2. La personne de soutien est désignée par le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente], laquelle consulte préalablement l’enfant et ses parents ou son tuteur, notamment au sujet du sexe de la personne de soutien à désigner. 3. La personne de soutien se voit donner le temps de faire connaissance avec l’enfant avant le premier interrogatoire. 4. Lorsqu’il invite l’enfant à déposer, l’enquêteur informe la personne de soutien du lieu, de la date et de l’heure de l’interrogatoire. 5. Lorsqu’un enfant victime ou témoin est invité à déposer dans le cadre du processus de justice, l’interrogatoire a lieu en présence de la personne de soutien. 6. Dans toute la mesure possible, la continuité de la relation entre l’enfant et la personne de soutien est assurée pendant tout le processus de justice. 7. Le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] ayant désigné la personne de soutien suit son travail et lui fournit l’assistance nécessaire. Si la personne de soutien ne s’acquitte pas de ses tâches et de ses fonctions conformément à la présente Loi, le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] désigne une autre personne de soutien pour la remplacer après avoir consulté l’enfant. Article 17. Fonctions de la personne de soutien Les fonctions de la personne de soutien sont notamment les suivantes: a) Fournir un soutien psychologique à l’enfant; b) Fournir à l’enfant une assistance adaptée à sa situation pendant tout le processus de justice, notamment en s’efforçant d’atténuer les séquelles de l’acte criminel sur l’enfant et en aidant celui-ci à mener normalement sa vie quotidienne et à régler les questions administratives découlant des circonstances de l’affaire; c) Indiquer si un traitement ou des conseils sont à son avis nécessaires; d) Assurer la liaison et communiquer avec les parents ou le tuteur, les membres de la famille, les amis et l’avocat de l’enfant, selon qu’il convient; e) Informer l’enfant de la composition de l’équipe chargée de l’enquête ou du tribunal et de toutes les autres questions visées à l’article 9 de la présente Loi; f) En coordination avec l’avocat représentant l’enfant ou, en l’absence de celui-ci, discuter avec le tribunal, l’enfant et ses parents ou son tuteur, des différentes formules pouvant être envisagées pour sa déposition, par exemple, lorsque de tels moyens existent, un enregistrement vidéo ou d’autres moyens, afin de sauvegarder l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant; g) En coordination avec l’avocat représentant l’enfant ou, en l’absence de celui-ci, discuter avec les services de détection et de répression, le Ministère public et le tribunal, de l’opportunité d’ordonner des mesures de protection; h) Demander que des mesures de protection soient ordonnées, si besoin est; i) Demander que des mesures spéciales d’assistance soient prises si les circonstances de l’enfant le justifient. Article 18. Informations à fournir à la personne de soutien Indépendamment des informations devant être fournies conformément à l’article 9 de la présente Loi, la personne de soutien est tenue informée à toutes les étapes du processus de justice: a) Des inculpations portées contre l’accusé; b) De la relation entre l’accusé et l’enfant; c) Des mesures de garde à vue dont fait l’objet l’accusé. Article 19. Fonctions de la personne de soutien en cas de libération de l’accusé Si elle est informée par l’autorité compétente que l’accusé gardé à vue ou en détention provisoire doit être libéré, la personne de soutien en avise l’enfant et ses parents ou son tuteur ainsi que son avocat et l’aide à demander que des mesures appropriées de protection soient adoptées si besoin est. C. Étape du procès Article 20. Crédit à accorder aux éléments de preuve produits par l’enfant 1. Tout enfant est, sous réserve d’un examen de sa compétence administré par le tribunal conformément à l’article 21 de la présente Loi, traité comme étant apte à témoigner et son témoignage ne doit pas être présumé irrecevable ou non fiable du seul fait de son âge, dès lors que son âge et sa maturité lui permettent de déposer d’une manière intelligible et crédible. 2. Aux fins de la section C, “Étape du procès”, l’enfant peut déposer notamment au moyen d’aides techniques ou avec l’assistance d’un expert spécialisé dans les rapports et la communication avec les enfants. 3. Le poids accordé à la déposition d’un enfant est fonction de son âge et de son degré de maturité. 4. Tout enfant, qu’il soit ou non appelé à déposer, se voit donner la possibilité d’exprimer ses opinions et ses préoccupations concernant les questions liées à l’affaire ou sa participation au processus de justice et en particulier ses préoccupations concernant sa sécurité par rapport à l’accusé, sa préférence sur l’opportunité ou non et sur la façon de témoigner ainsi que toute autre question pertinente pouvant l’affecter. Lorsqu’il n’est pas tenu compte de ses opinions, les raisons doivent en être clairement expliquées à l’enfant. 5. Un enfant n’est pas tenu de déposer dans le cadre du processus de justice contre sa volonté ou à l’insu de ses parents ou de son tuteur, lesquels sont invités à l’accompagner, sauf dans les cas ci-après: a) Les parents ou le tuteur sont les auteurs présumés de l’infraction commise contre l’enfant; b) L’enfant craint d’être accompagné par ses parents ou son tuteur; c) Le tribunal juge qu’il n’est pas dans l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant d’être accompagné par ses parents ou son tuteur. Article 21. Examen de la compétence de l’enfant 1. Il ne peut être ordonné un examen de la compétence de l’enfant que si le tribunal détermine qu’il y a des raisons convaincantes de le faire. La décision du tribunal est motivée. Lorsqu’une décision est prise sur la question de savoir si un examen de la compétence de l’enfant doit ou non être ordonné, l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant est la considération primordiale. 2. L’examen de la compétence de l’enfant vise à déterminer si celui-ci est apte à comprendre les questions qui lui sont posées dans une langue qu’il comprend ainsi que l’importance qu’il y a à dire la vérité. L’âge de l’enfant n’est pas à lui seul une raison convaincante de demander un examen de sa compétence. 3. Le tribunal peut désigner un expert pour examiner la compétence de l’enfant. Indépendamment de l’expert, les seules autres personnes qui peuvent être présentes lors d’un examen de la compétence de l’enfant sont: a) Le magistrat ou le juge; b) Le Procureur; c) L’avocat de la défense; d) L’avocat de l’enfant; e) La personne de soutien; f) Un sténotypiste ou greffier; g) Toute autre personne, y compris les parents ou le tuteur de l’enfant ou un tuteur ad litem, dont la présence est jugée nécessaire par le tribunal dans l’intérêt de l’enfant. 4. Si le tribunal ne désigne pas d’expert, l’examen de la compétence de l’enfant est mené par le tribunal sur la base des questions soumises par le Procureur et l’avocat de la défense. 5. Les questions sont posées d’une manière adaptée à l’enfant, compte tenu de son âge et de sa maturité, et ne portent pas sur les questions en cause, mais tendent seulement à déterminer si l’enfant est apte à comprendre des questions simples et à y répondre véridiquement. 6. Il n’est pas ordonné d’examen psychologique ou psychiatrique pour évaluer la compétence de l’enfant à moins qu’il ne soit établi qu’il y a des raisons convaincantes de le faire. 7. L’examen de la compétence de l’enfant n’est pas répété. Article 22. Serment 1. Le président du tribunal ou le juge peut décider que l’enfant témoin ne sera pas tenu de déposer sous serment, par exemple si l’enfant n’est pas apte à comprendre les conséquences d’un serment. En pareils cas, le président du tribunal ou le juge peut proposer à l’enfant de promettre de dire la vérité. Dans l’un ou l’autre cas, le tribunal entend le témoignage de l’enfant. 2. Un enfant témoin ne peut être poursuivi pour faux témoignage. Article 23. Désignation d’une personne de soutien pendant le procès 1. Avant d’inviter un enfant victime ou témoin à comparaître à l’audience, le magistrat compétent ou le juge s’assure que l’enfant est déjà assisté par une personne de soutien. 2. S’il n’a pas encore été désigné de personne de soutien, le magistrat compétent ou le juge en désigne une en consultation avec l’enfant et ses parents ou son tuteur et donne à la personne de soutien le temps de se familiariser avec l’affaire et de faire connaissance avec l’enfant. 3. Le magistrat compétent ou le juge informe la personne de soutien de la date et du lieu du procès ou de l’audience. Article 24. Salles d’attente 1. Le magistrat compétent ou le juge veille à ce que les enfants victimes et témoins puissent patienter dans des salles d’attente appropriées aménagées selon leurs besoins. 2. Les salles d’attente utilisées par des enfants victimes et témoins ne doivent pas être visibles ou accessibles pour des personnes accusées d’avoir commis une infraction pénale. 3. Lorsque cela est possible, les salles d’attente utilisées par les enfants victimes et témoins doivent être séparées des salles d’attente utilisées par les témoins adultes. 4. S’il y a lieu, le magistrat compétent ou le juge peut ordonner à un enfant victime ou témoin d’attendre ailleurs que dans les locaux utilisés pour l’audience et l’inviter à comparaître lorsque sa déposition est requise. 5. Le magistrat compétent ou le juge entend en priorité le témoignage des enfants victimes et témoins afin qu’ils attendent le moins possible avant de comparaître à l’audience. Article 25. Accompagnement psychologique des enfants victimes et témoins 1. Outre les parents ou le tuteur de l’enfant et son avocat ou autre personne appropriée désignée pour fournir une assistance, le magistrat compétent ou le juge autorise la personne de soutien à accompagner l’enfant victime ou témoin pendant toute sa participation à la procédure judiciaire afin de minimiser le stress et de le rassurer. 2. Le magistrat compétent ou le juge informe la personne de soutien qu’elle peut, tout comme l’enfant lui-même, demander au tribunal de suspendre l’audience lorsque cela est nécessaire pour ménager l’enfant. 3. Le tribunal ne peut ordonner que les parents ou le tuteur de l’enfant soient exclus de la salle d’audience que lorsque cela est dans l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. Article 26. Aménagement de la salle d’audience 1. Le magistrat compétent ou le juge veille à ce que la salle d’audience soit aménagée comme il convient pour les enfants victimes ou témoins, par exemple, sans que cette énumération soit limitative, en prévoyant des sièges surélevés et une assistance pour les enfants handicapés. 2. La salle d’audience est aménagée de telle sorte que, dans la mesure où cela est possible, l’enfant puisse se trouver pendant toute la procédure à proximité de ses parents ou de son tuteur, de la personne de soutien ou de son avocat. [Article 27. Contre-interrogatoire (option pour les pays de common law) Lorsqu’il y a lieu, et compte dûment tenu des droits de l’accusé, le magistrat compétent ou le juge interdit tout contre-interrogatoire d’un enfant victime ou témoin par l’accusé. Un contre-interrogatoire peut être mené par l’avocat de la défense sous la supervision du magistrat compétent ou du juge, lequel interdit qu’il soit posé une question pouvant intimider ou désemparer indument l’enfant ou constituer pour lui une épreuve.] Article 28. Mesures visant à protéger la vie privée et le bien-être des enfants victimes et témoins À la demande d’un enfant victime ou témoin, de ses parents ou de son tuteur, de son avocat, de la personne de soutien, de toute autre personne appropriée désignée pour fournir une assistance ou de sa propre initiative, le tribunal, en ayant en vue l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, peut ordonner que soient appliquées une ou plusieurs des mesures ci-après pour protéger la vie privée et le bien-être physique et mental de l’enfant et éviter à l’enfant une angoisse inutile et une victimisation secondaire: a) Suppression du dossier public des noms, adresses, lieux de travail, professions ou autres informations de nature à révéler l’identité de l’enfant; b) Interdiction faite à l’avocat de la défense de révéler l’identité de l’enfant ou de divulguer des documents ou informations de nature à la révéler; c) Interdiction de la divulgation de pièces de nature à révéler l’identité de l’enfant jusqu’à la date jugée appropriée par le tribunal; d) Affectation d’un pseudonyme ou d’un numéro à l’enfant, auquel cas le nom complet et la date de naissance de l’enfant sont révélés à l’accusé suffisamment à l’avance pour lui permettre de préparer sa défense; e) Dissimulation des traits ou du signalement de l’enfant devant déposer afin d’éviter de lui causer de l’angoisse ou un préjudice, notamment en lui permettant de témoigner: i) derrière un écran opaque; ii) au moyen de dispositifs d’altération de l’image ou de la voix; iii) en un autre lieu, la déposition étant retransmise simultanément dans la salle d’audience au moyen d’un système de télévision en circuit fermé; iv) par enregistrement vidéo réalisé avant l’audience, auquel cas le conseil de l’accusé assiste à l’interrogatoire et se voit donner l’occasion d’interroger l’enfant victime ou témoin; v) par l’entremise d’un intermédiaire qualifié et approprié, par exemple, sans que cette énumération soit limitative, d’un interprète pour les enfants souffrant de troubles de l’audition, de la vue ou de la parole ou d’autres troubles; f) Prononcé du huis clos; g) Exclusion temporaire de l’accusé de la salle d’audience si l’enfant refuse de déposer en sa présence ou s’il ressort des circonstances que l’enfant pourra hésiter à dire la vérité en présence de l’accusé. En pareils cas, l’avocat de la défense demeure dans la salle d’audience et interroge l’enfant de manière à garantir ainsi le droit de l’accusé d’être confronté avec les témoins à charge; h) Autorisation de pauses pendant la déposition de l’enfant; i) Tenue des audiences à des heures raisonnables pour l’enfant eu égard à son âge et à son degré de maturité; j) Adoption de toute autre mesure pouvant être jugée nécessaire par le tribunal, y compris, lorsqu’il y a lieu, protection de l’anonymat de l’enfant, compte tenu de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant et des droits de l’accusé. D. Étape postérieure au procès Article 29. Droit à indemnisation et à réparation [Option s’il existe un Fonds d’État pour les victimes: 1. Le tribunal informe l’enfant victime, ses parents ou son tuteur ainsi que son avocat des procédures à suivre pour demander une indemnisation. 2. Un enfant victime qui n’est pas un national a également le droit de demander une indemnisation.] [Option 1. Pays de common law 3. Après condamnation de l’accusé et en sus de toute autre mesure pouvant lui être imposée, le tribunal peut, à la demande du Procureur, de la victime ou de ses parents ou de son tuteur ou de l’avocat de la victime ou de sa propre initiative, ordonner au délinquant de verser une indemnisation ou une réparation à l’enfant, comme suit: a) En cas de perte, dommage ou destruction des biens d’un enfant victime à la suite de la commission de l’infraction ou de l’arrestation ou tentative d’arrestation du délinquant, le tribunal peut ordonner à celui-ci de verser à l’enfant ou à son représentant légal la valeur de remplacement desdits biens au cas où ceux-ci ne peuvent pas lui être restitués en l’état; b) S’il est causé un préjudice corporel ou psychologique à l’enfant à la suite de la commission de l’infraction ou de l’arrestation ou tentative d’arrestation du délinquant, le tribunal peut ordonner à celui-ci de verser à l’enfant une indemnisation pécuniaire en réparation du préjudice causé, y compris pour les dépenses afférentes à des programmes de réinsertion sociale et d’éducation, de traitement médical et de soins de santé mentale et ses frais de justice; c) Lorsqu’un enfant qui faisait partie du ménage du délinquant au moment des événements a été victime de dommages corporels ou d’une menace de dommages corporels, le tribunal peut ordonner aux délinquants de verser à l’enfant une indemnisation au titre des dépenses encourues du fait de son placement en dehors du ménage du délinquant.] [Option 2. Pays où le tribunal pénal n’a pas compétence en matière civile 3. Lorsque le verdict a été rendu, le tribunal informe l’enfant, ses parents ou son tuteur et l’avocat de l’enfant du droit d’obtenir indemnisation et réparation conformément à la législation nationale.] [Option 3. Pays où le tribunal pénal a compétence en matière civile 3. Lorsqu’il y a lieu, le tribunal ordonne qu’il soit versé une indemnisation ou une réparation à l’enfant et informe celui-ci de la possibilité d’obtenir une assistance en vue de l’exécution de l’ordonnance d’indemnisation ou de réparation.] Article 30. Mesures de justice réparatrice Si des mesures de justice réparatrice sont envisagées, le/la [nom de l’organe compétent] informe l’enfant, ses parents ou son tuteur et son avocat des programmes de justice réparatrice existants et des procédures à suivre pour en bénéficier ainsi que de la possibilité d’obtenir indemnisation et réparation en justice si le programme de justice réparatrice ne débouche par sur un accord entre l’enfant victime et le délinquant. Article 31. Information concernant l’issue du procès 1. Le magistrat compétent ou le juge informe l’enfant, ses parents ou son tuteur et la personne de soutien de l’issue du procès. 2. Le magistrat ou le juge invite la personne de soutien, si besoin est, à aider l’enfant, par son accompagnement, à s’accommoder à l’issue du procès. [Option pour les pays de common law: 3. Le tribunal informe l’enfant, ses parents ou son tuteur et son avocat des procédures applicables à la mise en liberté surveillée du délinquant et du droit de l’enfant d’exprimer ses vues à ce sujet.] Article 32. Rôle de la personne de soutien après la clôture de la procédure 1. Immédiatement après la clôture de la procédure, la personne de soutien se met en rapport avec les institutions ou professionnels appropriés pour que des conseils ou un traitement continuent, si besoin est, d’être fournis à l’enfant victime ou témoin. 2. Si l’enfant victime ou témoin doit être rapatrié, la personne de soutien se met en rapport avec les autorités compétentes, y compris le consulat de l’État dont il est ressortissant, pour faire en sorte que soient pleinement appliquées les dispositions nationales et internationales pertinentes régissant le rapatriement des enfants et pour aider à préparer le rapatriement de l’enfant. Article 33. Information concernant la mise en liberté de personnes condamnées 1. Si une personne condamnée doit être mise en liberté le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] en informe l’enfant, ses parents ou son tuteur par l’entremise de la personne de soutien, s’il y a lieu, ou de l’avocat de l’enfant. Cette information est communiquée par le/la [nom de l’autorité compétente] dès que possible après que la décision correspondante a été prise, et en tout en état de cause au plus tard la veille de la mise en liberté du condamné. 2. Le tribunal informe l’enfant victime ou témoin de la mise en liberté du condamné pendant une période de [...] ans au moins après que l’enfant est parvenu à l’âge de 18 ans. E. Autres procédures Article 34. Applicabilité à d’autres procédures Les dispositions de la présente Loi s’appliquent, mutatis mutandis, à toutes les questions concernant un enfant victime ou témoin, y compris en matière civile. [Chapitre IV. Dispositions finales] [Article 35. Dispositions finales (option pour les pays de tradition romaniste) La présente Loi entrera en vigueur conformément aux procédures prévues par la législation nationale de [nom du pays].] Deuxième partie Commentaire de la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels Introduction Dans sa résolution 2005/20 du 22 juillet 2005, le Conseil économique et social a adopté les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Ces Lignes directrices font partie de l’ensemble des Règles et normes des Nations Unies en matière de prévention du crime et de justice pénale, qui sont les principes normatifs universellement reconnus élaborés dans ce domaine par la communauté internationale depuis 1950. Pour aider les pays, les organisations internationales qui fournissent une assistance juridique aux États qui en font la demande, les institutions publiques, les organisations non gouvernementales et les organisations à assise communautaire, ainsi que les praticiens à mettre en œuvre les Lignes directrices, l’Office des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime, en coopération avec l’UNICEF, a élaboré une série d’outils techniques, notamment la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. La Loi type a pour objet d’aider les gouvernements à rédiger des dispositions législatives nationales pertinentes conformes aux principes reflétés dans les Lignes directrices et les autres instruments juridiques internationaux pertinents, comme la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant. Le présent Commentaire de la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels a été conçu de manière à faire mieux comprendre les dispositions de la Loi type. En outre, il contient des références à la législation et à la jurisprudence nationales et aux normes internationales ainsi que des explications et des exemples touchant les divers articles de la Loi type. Il importe tout d’abord de souligner que la Loi type pose le principe selon lequel plusieurs catégories de professionnels peuvent et doivent fournir une assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels pendant tout le processus de justice. Il a été dit cependant que cette assistance relève essentiellement de la responsabilité et des obligations des parents et qu’une intervention de l’État dans ce domaine pourrait empiéter sur leurs droits. Pour ce qui de sa portée, la Loi type est censée s’appliquer à tous les enfants et adolescents âgés de moins de 18 ans qui sont victimes ou témoins d’actes criminels et qui sont appelés à témoigner dans le processus de justice. Toutefois, la Loi type a également pour but de protéger et d’aider aussi bien les enfants qui peuvent être non seulement les victimes mais aussi les auteurs d’actes criminels que les enfants victimes qui ne veulent pas déposer. Conformément à la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, qui énonce les mêmes droits fondamentaux pour tous les enfants, la Loi type n’établit pas de différenciation entre les victimes qui sont également témoins d’actes criminels et les victimes qui ne le sont pas, ou entre les victimes et les témoins en conflit avec la loi et les autres. Sauf indication contraire, les dispositions de la Loi type sont donc applicables aux enfants aussi bien victimes que témoins. Comme les pays ont des systèmes juridiques différents et des traditions législatives différentes, la Loi type contient un certain nombre de dispositions et d’articles facultatifs visant à tenir compte de ces différences. Enfin, la Loi type est conçue de manière à pouvoir être appliquée en tout ou en partie, selon les besoins et les circonstances propres à chaque pays. Préambule Le préambule de la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels comporte deux options, l’une pour les pays de tradition romaniste et l’autre pour les pays de common law. Le quatrième alinéa de l’option conçue pour les pays de tradition romaniste contient une liste de droits des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Les droits énumérés dans cet alinéa sont tirés de différentes sources juridiques, à savoir la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, adoptée par l’Assemblée générale dans sa résolution 44/25 du 20 novembre 1989 et entrée en vigueur le 2 septembre 1990, et les Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels (résolution 2005/20 du Conseil économique et social, annexe), qui ont des incidences juridiques différentes. Si les droits visés dans la Convention ont un caractère contraignant pour les pays qui l’ont ratifiée, ceux qui sont spécifiés dans les Lignes directrices n’ont pas la même force juridique. Néanmoins, les droits reflétés dans ces deux instruments sont interdépendants, et c’est ce caractère ainsi que leur combinaison qui constituent le cadre d’un système complet et détaillé de protection des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Chapitre premier. Définitions 1. Les définitions de l’”enfant victime ou témoin”, des “professionnels”, du “processus de justice” et de l’expression “adapté à l’enfant” figurant dans la Loi type sont tirées du paragraphe 9 des Lignes directrices. Personne de soutien 2. Le concept de “personne de soutien” a été incorporé à la législation de plusieurs pays sous des intitulés différents et à des étapes différentes du processus de justice. Le dénominateur commun de cette institution est la fourniture d’un soutien et d’une assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins dès un stade aussi précoce que possible du processus de justice, par une personne spécialisée, grâce à sa formation, dans la fourniture d’une assistance aux enfants d’une façon que ceux-ci comprennent et acceptent. La présence d’une personne de soutien a essentiellement pour but de mettre l’enfant victime ou témoin d’un acte criminel à l’abri des risques de contrainte, de revictimisation et de victimisation secondaire. Tuteur de l’enfant 3. La Loi type renvoie aux dispositions légales pertinentes de chaque État Membre concernant la définition du “tuteur de l’enfant”. Victimisation secondaire 4. La définition de la “victimisation secondaire” figurant dans la Loi type a été tirée du Manuel sur la justice pour les victimes concernant l’utilisation et l’application de la Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir élaboré par l’Office pour la lutte contre la drogue et la prévention du crime en 1999. Revictimisation 5. La définition de la “revictimisation” figurant dans la Loi type est tirée de celle qui se trouve dans la recommandation du Conseil de l’Europe Rec (2006) 8 du Comité des Ministres aux États membres concernant l’assistance aux victimes d’actes criminels en date du 14 juin 2006. Chapitre II. Dispositions générales relatives à l’assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins Article premier. Intérêt supérieur de l’enfant 1. L’alinéa c) du paragraphe 8 du Lignes directrices sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels stipule que, bien que les droits des accusés et des condamnés doivent être préservés, tout enfant a droit à ce que son intérêt supérieur soit pris en considération à titre prioritaire. Le paragraphe 1 de l’article 3 de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant dispose également que l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant doit guider toutes les actions concernant les enfants. 2. Le concept d’”intérêt supérieur de l’enfant” se retrouve également dans plusieurs traités régionaux, en particulier la Charte africaine des droits et du bien-être de l’enfant, la Convention américaine relative aux droits de l’homme, la Convention interaméricaine sur le trafic international des mineurs, la Convention européenne sur l’exercice des droits des enfants et d’autres instruments juridiques. 3. Le concept d’”intérêt supérieur de l’enfant” est considéré comme se passant de commentaire dans la législation de plusieurs États, par exemple celle de l’Australie, tandis que d’autres pays, comme l’Afrique du Sud, ont préféré incorporé une définition à leur droit interne. Une approche intéressante est celle qui est reflétée dans la législation du Venezuela (République bolivarienne du), selon laquelle l’”intérêt supérieur de l’enfant” est considéré comme un principe d’interprétation et d’application de la loi. 4. Il a par conséquent été décidé de ne pas inclure de définition de ce principe dans la Loi type mais de laisser aux législateurs nationaux le soin de décider de la meilleure approche à adopter. 5. Il y a lieu de souligner toutefois que, dans le contexte d’une procédure pénale, le principe lié à l’”intérêt supérieur de l’enfant”, tout en devant constituer une considération primordiale, ne saurait compromettre ou saper les droits de l’accusé ou du condamné. Un équilibre judicieux doit être établi entre la protection de l’enfant victime ou témoin et la sauvegarde des droits de l’accusé. Le libellé de l’article premier reflète par conséquent cet équilibre et suit le texte de l’alinéa c) du paragraphe 8 des Lignes directrices. Article 2. Principes généraux L’article 2 définit les principes généraux qui doivent présider à l’application de la Loi. Article 3. Obligation de signaler les infractions impliquant un enfant victime ou témoin 1. Dans plusieurs pays, signaler les infractions commises contre des enfants à l’autorité compétente dès qu’elles sont connues est une obligation de caractère général imposée par la loi. Dans ces pays, permettre de signaler un tel crime peut constituer une infraction pénale (par omission). 2. Selon la législation nationale de certains pays, cette obligation est encore plus rigoureuse pour certaines catégories de professionnels qui travaillent avec les enfants, par exemple les fonctionnaires chargés de l’éducation, les travailleurs sociaux, les médecins et les infirmiers. 3. L’approche retenue dans la pratique consiste à stipuler expressément une obligation de signaler de telles infractions, l’inobservation de cette obligation ayant des conséquences juridiques pour les catégories spécifiques de professionnels qui travaillent en étroit contact avec les enfants, comme les maîtres, les médecins et les travailleurs sociaux. La Loi type laisse également aux législateurs nationaux la faculté d’étendre cette obligation de signalement aux autres catégories de professionnels jugées appropriées, conformément aux autres lois nationales. Article 4. Protection des enfants contre tout contact avec les délinquants 1. Plusieurs États ont établi des listes spéciales de personnes condamnées pour une infraction spécifique, comme les crimes sexuels. Ces listes peuvent être utilisées par la police pour surveiller les criminels, mais elles sont parfois communiquées aussi aux employeurs potentiels, qui s’en servent pour rassembler des informations concernant les antécédents judiciaires du candidat. 2. La Fédération internationale Terre des hommes, organisation non gouvernementale internationale, a établi un guide à usage interne en vue de prévenir le recrutement de personnes ayant eu maille à partir avec la loi du chef d’infractions contre des enfants. Ce guide contient d’importantes informations et indications à ce propos. 3. Aux termes de la Loi type, il est interdit à toute personne ayant été condamnée pour une infraction qualifiée contre un enfant de travailler dans un service, une institution ou une association qui fournit des services à l’enfance. Cette disposition a pour but d’empêcher que les enfants ne deviennent victimes de récidivistes. L’employeur qui ne respecterait pas les dispositions du paragraphe 2 de l’article 4 de la Loi type se rendrait coupable d’une infraction. Article 5. [Autorité] [Office] national(e) pour la protection des enfants victimes et témoins 1. Pour coordonner efficacement l’action des divers acteurs qui s’occupent de fournir une assistance aux victimes, il est souvent bon de commencer par créer une autorité ou un organisme gouvernemental centralisé. La Loi type comporte une disposition à cet effet qui reflète les meilleures pratiques. 2. Plusieurs États ont créé des autorités spécifiquement chargées de coordonner les activités visant à promouvoir et à protéger les droits des enfants. Dans certains pays, cependant, habituellement en raison d’un manque de ressources, ce sont surtout des organisations non gouvernementales qui, sous la supervision des autorités gouvernementales, fournissent protection et assistance à l’enfance. 3. Dans certains pays, les activités de protection de l’enfance sont coordonnées aux échelons local ou régional. Au Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord, par exemple, les Commissions locales pour la protection de l’enfance rassemblent des représentants des principales institutions et des professionnels qui s’occupent de la protection de l’enfance afin de coordonner les différentes activités devant être entreprises au plan local pour protéger les enfants. Ces Commissions, entre autres, élaborent les programmes de travail que doivent entreprendre localement les différentes institutions dans le cadre du programme national, aident à améliorer la qualité des programmes de protection de l’enfance au moyen de programmes de formation et s’attachent à sensibiliser la collectivité à la nécessité de protéger les droits des enfants. Des initiatives semblables ont été mises en œuvre dans des pays comme la Bolivie, l’Inde et la Tunisie. 4. En Belgique, une commission de coordination de l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitance a été créée dans toutes les circonscriptions judiciaires francophones. Ces commissions ont pour vocation d’informer les entités locales et de coordonner leurs efforts d’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitance afin d’améliorer l’efficacité de leur intervention. Ces commissions sont composées de représentants des partis politiques, de magistrats, de représentants des services de détection et de répression et de travailleurs sociaux. 5. Différents pays ont promulgué des lois en vue de mettre en place des mécanismes spéciaux de coordination de l’aide aux victimes de types spécifiques de crimes; tel est le cas notamment de la Bulgarie (pour les victimes de la traite d’êtres humains), de l’Estonie (pour les victimes de maltraitance et de sévices physiques, psychologiques ou sexuels), de l’Indonésie (pour les victimes de la traite d’enfants) et des Philippines (pour les victimes de la prostitution des enfants et d’autres types de sévices sexuels et de traite d’enfants). 6. L’organe de coordination devra comprendre des représentants de toutes les autorités compétentes. Aussi le paragraphe 2 i) de l’article 5 constitue-t-il une option visant à faciliter la nomination de tout autre représentant, selon la législation et les besoins locaux. 7. Pour faciliter l’application de cette disposition, qui risque d’être retardée par suite de contraintes budgétaires, il est également suggéré aux gouvernements de fixer un délai limité pour la désignation des membres de l’organe de coordination. Article 6. Fonctions de l’[Autorité] [Office] national(e) pour la protection des enfants victimes et témoins L’article 6 indique quelles sont les fonctions dont devra s’acquitter l’autorité ou l’office national chargé de la protection des enfants victimes et témoins. Article 7. Confidentialité 1. Le but de l’article 7 est de protéger la vie privée ou la sécurité des enfants victimes et témoins en stipulant que les membres de l’autorité créée en application de l’article 5 devront tenir confidentielles les informations les concernant. 2. Un bon exemple de législation nationale garantissant le caractère confidentiel de l’information concernant les enfants victimes et témoins est la loi des États-Unis d’Amérique relative aux droits des enfants victimes et témoins, qui stipule ce qui suit: “D) Protection de la vie privée. 1) Caractère confidentiel de l’information A) Toute personne qui agit en une qualité décrite à l’alinéa B) dans le contexte d’une procédure pénale doit: i) conserver tous les documents contenant le nom ou toute autre information concernant un enfant en un lieu sûr auquel n’a accès aucune personne n’ayant pas à en connaître le contenu; ii) ne divulguer les documents visés au sous-alinéa i) ou les informations concernant un enfant qu’ils contiennent qu’à une personne qui, en raison de sa participation à la procédure, doit avoir connaissance de cette information. B) L’alinéa A) s’applique: i) à tous les agents publics appelés à connaître de l’affaire, y compris les employés du Ministère de la justice et de tout service de détection et de répression impliqué dans l’affaire, ainsi qu’à toute personne recrutée par le gouvernement pour fournir une assistance dans le cadre de la procédure; ii) aux agents du tribunal; iii) au défendeur et à ses employés, y compris son avocat ainsi qu’aux personnes recrutées par le défendeur ou son avocat pour fournir une assistance dans le cadre de la procédure; et iv) aux membres du jury.” 3. Dans plusieurs États, habituellement sur la base des dispositions de la législation existante concernant les médias ou des dispositions des codes de protection de l’enfance ou de la jeunesse ou des lois relatives à la protection de l’enfance, l’interdiction de la diffusion publique d’informations concernant les enfants est renforcée par des dispositions interdisant la publication ou la diffusion de telles informations, y compris des photographies des enfants, par les médias, à tel point qu’il est interdit aux médias de diffuser de telles informations même lorsqu’elles sont connues à la suite de fuites. La diffusion des informations ainsi protégées peut constituer une infraction pénale. 4. Comme la plupart des législations nationales comportent déjà de telles interdictions, la Loi type ne contient pas de dispositions concernant spécifiquement la publication de telles informations par les médias. Article 8. Formation 1. Suivant en cela le paragraphe 40 des Lignes directrices sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, la Loi type stipule que les professionnels qui, dans leur travail, entrent en contact avec les enfants victimes ou témoins d’actes criminels, et en particulier les professionnels responsables de la fourniture d’une assistance à ces enfants, doivent recevoir une formation appropriée. 2. En Bolivie, (Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, art. 12) et en Bulgarie (paragraphe 6 de l’article 3 de la Loi de 2004 sur la protection de l’enfance), par exemple, les agents des services de détection et de répression qui sont appelés à entrer en contact avec les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels doivent obligatoirement recevoir une formation. 3. Idéalement, la formation des personnes qui s’occupent des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels devrait comporter un tronc multidisciplinaire commun pour tous les professionnels, combiné à des modules plus spécifiques adaptés aux besoins particuliers de chaque profession. Par exemple, si la formation des juges et des procureurs peut, pour l’essentiel, mettre l’accent sur la législation et les procédures spécifiques à suivre, il pourra être nécessaire de dispenser aux agents des services de détection et de répression une formation plus large englobant par exemple la psychologie et le comportement. La formation des travailleurs sociaux, quant à elle, pourrait être axée davantage sur l’assistance, tandis que le personnel médical devra être formé davantage aux techniques de médecine légale afin de rassembler des éléments de preuve solides. 4. Dans de nombreux pays, les agents des services de détection et de répression, qui sont ceux qui reçoivent les plaintes d’infractions pénales et qui font enquête sur ces plaintes, sont les premiers professionnels avec lesquels entrent en contact les victimes et les témoins d’actes criminels. Ils devront par conséquent recevoir une formation spécifique et appropriée pour apprendre à aider les enfants victimes et témoins et les membres de leur famille. Il importe de souligner qu’une formation adéquate des agents des services de détection et de répression peut faciliter l’enquête tout en réduisant au minimum les risques de conséquences négatives. 5. Cette formation devrait, entre autres: a) permettre aux agents des services de détection et de répression de bien comprendre et d’appliquer les principales dispositions des lois et des politiques touchant le traitement à réserver aux enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels; b) les sensibiliser aux questions visées dans les Lignes directrices et les instruments régionaux et internationaux pertinents; et c) permettre à ces agents de se familiariser avec des protocoles d’intervention spécifiques, en particulier pour ce qui est des premiers contacts entre un enfant victime et le service de répression, le premier entretien avec l’enfant, l’enquête concernant l’infraction et le soutien devant être fourni à la victime. 6. En outre, un agent spécialisé dans les questions concernant l’enfance devra également recevoir une formation pour pouvoir orienter les victimes et les témoins vers les groupes de soutien disponibles, fournir des informations et aider les victimes à faire face aux conséquences de la victimisation et à éliminer le risque d’une victimisation secondaire. Un bon exemple de loi concernant la formation spéciale qui doit être dispensée au personnel des services de police est la Loi indienne No. 56 de 2000 concernant la protection des enfants dans le cadre de la justice pour mineurs (art. 63). Des initiatives semblables ont été prises par d’autres pays, comme le Maroc (art. 19 du Code de procédure pénale) et le Pérou (articles 151 à 153 de la Loi No. 27 337 de 2000 portant Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence). Il conviendra également d’encourager l’élaboration et la diffusion au plan national de lignes directrices concernant la nature des rapports que la police doit avoir avec les enfants victimes et témoins. 7. Dans les pays de common law, la formation dispensée au personnel du Ministère public devra tendre à ce que les procureurs, lorsqu’ils préparent leur dossier et le présentent au tribunal, tiennent pleinement et véritablement compte des besoins spécifiques liés à la situation des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Lorsqu’ils dirigent l’enquête et préparent le dossier en vue du procès, les procureurs ont la possibilité de veiller à ce que soient respectés les droits des enfants victimes et témoins. Ils peuvent tenir l’enfant informé de l’avancement de la procédure, veiller à ce que les locaux utilisés avant le procès et à l’audience soient aménagés comme il convient et ensuite orienter l’enfant vers les services appropriés. La formation dispensée aux procureurs devra tendre à ce que ceux-ci fournissent un minimum d’assistance et d’information aux enfants victimes et témoins et, en particulier, les tiennent informés de l’avancement de l’affaire et des mesures spéciales qui peuvent être prises à leur intention, par exemple pour ce qui est de mettre des salles d’attente spéciales à la disposition des enfants victimes et témoins et des membres de leur famille. 8. Les procureurs pourront également être encouragés à élaborer des accords avec des organisations non gouvernementales pour que celles-ci fournissent des services indispensables aux enfants, y compris après la clôture de l’affaire et la condamnation du délinquant. Au Royaume-Uni, le Judicial Studies Board a élaboré à l’intention des avocats et des magistrats, sur la base de la Loi de 1998 relative à la protection des droits de l’homme, un programme de formation à la procédure à suivre lorsqu’un enfant est appelé à témoigner. Il s’agit d’un cours autodidacte suivi d’un programme de formation d’une journée. En outre, une trousse de formation à l’assistance à fournir aux victimes et aux témoins publiée par Magistrates’ Courts Committees contient des informations détaillées sur les indications qui permettent de penser qu’un témoin risque d’être vulnérable et intimidé. Les participants, après avoir assisté à la projection d’un enregistrement vidéo illustrant l’expérience vécue par la victime, sont invités à s’interroger eux-mêmes sur les sentiments de vulnérabilité qu’ils ont pu éprouver. Enfin, le Crown Prosecution Service du Royaume-Uni a élaboré un programme de formation à l’aide à fournir aux victimes et aux témoins dont les quatre volets tendent à: a) sensibiliser les agents du Ministère public aux questions concernant les témoins et les victimes et leur rôle et responsabilités; b) leur apprendre à identifier les témoins vulnérables ou faisant l’objet de mesures d’intimidation et à déterminer si des mesures spéciales doivent être prises pour les protéger; c) à assurer un soutien adéquat des témoins et une gestion efficace des dossiers; et d) à garantir une communication appropriée, notamment en ce qui concerne les décisions prises par le Ministère public. 9. Un autre exemple est celui du Mexique, où le Ministère public a élaboré un programme de sensibilisation et de soutien des victimes de la délinquance, qui comprend, entre autres, des stages de formation et de sensibilisation à la protection des victimes (paragraphe VIII de l’article 22 de la Loi de 2003 District fédéral concernant l’appui aux victimes de la délinquance). 10. Il conviendra également d’encourager l’élaboration au plan national de lignes directrices concernant ce que doit être l’attitude du Ministère public à l’égard des enfants victimes et témoins, comme les Lignes directrices élaborées au Canada pour le Ministère public. De même, le Ministère public sud-africain a élaboré un Guide du Procureur concernant les lois relatives à la protection de l’enfance (Pretoria, 2001), qui est le manuel utilisé dans l’ensemble du pays pour la formation des procureurs. 11. Dans les pays de tradition romaniste où la législation stipule que les victimes doivent être assistées par des avocats désignés d’office, il sera bon de prévoir à l’intention de ces derniers une formation semblable à celle décrite ci-dessus. En raison de la relation spéciale qui s’établit entre un enfant victime et son avocat, qui est désigné expressément pour protéger ses droits, c’est cet avocat qui est le mieux à même de veiller à ce que l’enfant victime reçoive toute l’assistance disponible appropriée. En France, plusieurs barreaux ont pris l’initiative de créer des groupes d’avocats spécialisés qui suivent une formation continue concernant les questions liées à l’enfance, notamment par le biais de programmes de recyclage et d’échanges avec d’autres professionnels, comme psychologues, travailleurs sociaux et juges. 12. De même, il importe au plus haut point que tous les juges soient formés aux questions concernant les enfants, ou tout au moins soient informés comme il convient à ce sujet. Les juges spécialisés dans la justice pour mineurs n’existent pas dans tous les pays et, même dans ceux où ils existent effectivement, ils doivent très fréquemment passer, dans le cadre du système de justice, des questions pénales aux questions civiles, des questions de caractère général aux questions spécifiques et inversement. Cependant, dans beaucoup de pays, les affaires faisant intervenir des enfants sont réservées à une catégorie spéciale de magistrats ayant reçu une formation appropriée qui les a spécialisés dans ces questions. Fréquemment, ces magistrats s’occupent exclusivement de ces questions, lesquelles peuvent englober non seulement le droit de la famille et la justice pour mineurs mais aussi les mesures de protection de l’enfance et les mesures à adopter à l’intention des enfants ayant besoin d’une protection spéciale (voir par exemple l’article 145 de la Loi brésilienne No. 8 069 de 1990 portant Statut de l’enfance et de l’adolescence). 13. Les professionnels de la santé pourront également être appelés directement à fournir une assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels étant donné que ce sont fréquemment eux qui ont les premiers contacts avec les enfants ou même ceux qui découvrent qu’ils ont été victimes d’actes criminels. Il conviendra par conséquent d’élaborer des programmes de formation et des protocoles concernant l’attitude que doit avoir le personnel des hôpitaux ainsi que les droits et les besoins des enfants victimes et témoins, et notamment sur les plans médical et psychologique, et de rédiger à l’intention du personnel médical un code de déontologie adapté aux victimes. Un bon exemple de ce type de programme de formation des professionnels de la santé est le programme de formation à la protection des enfants victimes de sévices et de maltraitance élaboré par l’École de formation des travailleurs sociaux de l’Université de Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth. En Belgique, la loi stipule qu’au moins un membre du personnel de chaque centre d’assistance médico-social doit recevoir une formation spécifique concernant les questions liées aux enfants victimes (article 11 du Décret de 1998 relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances). 14. Les travailleurs sociaux ont également un rôle important à jouer en fournissant une assistance et des soins appropriés aux enfants victimes et témoins étant donné que, du fait de leurs fonctions, ils se trouvent uniquement placés pour intervenir et défendre l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. L’on pourra mieux sensibiliser les travailleurs sociaux à ces questions en organisant des ateliers et des cours de formation spécifiques, comme ceux qui existent en République islamique d’Iran, où un expert des questions concernant l’enfance de chaque province a été sélectionné pour recevoir une formation dans ce domaine et où il a été organisé à l’intention des travailleurs sociaux des ateliers consacrés aux droits de l’enfant. Un programme de formation et de coordination est également organisé à l’intention des travailleurs sociaux en Ukraine (Loi de 2001 relative au travail social avec les enfants et les jeunes). En outre, des brochures et opuscules de sensibilisation de cette catégorie de professionnels ont été diffusés dans plusieurs pays. 15. En somme, il est bon, pour sensibiliser comme il convient tous les professionnels qui ont pour responsabilité commune de protéger les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, de centraliser la formation au sein d’une institution unique qui puisse déterminer si toutes les catégories de professionnels reçoivent une formation appropriée et notifier les mesures à adopter à cette fin. Un bon exemple à ce sujet est celui de l’Égypte, où l’Administration générale du Ministère de la justice chargée de la protection juridique des enfants élabore des programmes de formation et de perfectionnement à l’intention des membres des professions juridiques, des sociologues et des psychologues plus particulièrement responsables des questions concernant les mineurs (par. 14 e) du Décret No. 2235 de 1997 relatif à la protection juridique des enfants). Des initiatives semblables ont été prises par d’autres pays, comme la Bulgarie (par. 3 et 4 de l’article premier de la Loi de 2004 relative à la protection de l’enfance) et la Malaisie (par. 2 g) de l’article 3 de la Loi No. 611 de 2001 concernant l’enfance). 16. La Loi type confie les responsabilités en matière de formation à l’autorité nationale de coordination et comprend une liste non exhaustive des sujets sur lesquels peut porter la formation, que les législateurs devront adapter aux besoins spécifiques de leur pays. Chapitre III. Assistance aux enfants victimes et témoins pendant le processus de justice A. Dispositions générales Article 9. Droit d’être informé 1. Conformément aux principaux instruments internationaux relatifs à l’assistance aux victimes aux paragraphes 19 et 20 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels et à la législation nationale de plusieurs États, la Loi type souligne l’importance qu’il y a à faire en sorte que les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels aient accès à l’information en rapport avec leur affaire ainsi qu’aux informations nécessaires pour faire valoir et exercer leurs droits. Le meilleur moyen de mettre l’information pertinente à la disposition des victimes d’actes criminels consiste à diffuser des brochures ou dépliants d’information dans les postes de police, hôpitaux, salles d’attente, services sociaux et autres services publics et sur Internet. 2. L’on peut également, à ce propos, s’inspirer des lois qui stipulent que les victimes doivent recevoir opportunément les informations pertinentes qui les intéressent. L’on pourra y parvenir, par exemple, en exigeant de la police qu’elle fournisse les informations voulues aux victimes dès leurs premiers contacts avec elles. La législation de certains États dispose que cette information ne doit être communiquée à la victime que si celle-ci la demande expressément, suivant en cela une politique “positive”. Cependant, bien qu’une telle option positive évite que les victimes se sentent harcelées par l’information qui leur est fournie sans qu’elles en fassent la demande, il se peut que les victimes ne reçoivent pas les informations utiles dont elles pourraient sans doute avoir connaissance. Le même respect du souhait de la victime de ne rien savoir de la procédure peut être assuré en remplaçant le système “positif” par une option “négative”, la victime recevant alors toutes les informations pertinentes à moins d’en avoir expressément demandé le contraire. 3. Dans beaucoup de pays où les ressources sont limitées, l’accès à l’information concernant l’affaire peut être entravé pour différentes raisons, comme le manque de ressources du système de justice, l’analphabétisme des victimes et le manque de moyens de transport ou de moyens de communication. L’on peut remédier à ces problèmes en désignant des travailleurs sociaux et des organisations communautaires chargées d’aider les victimes à participer au processus de justice. 4. Quelques États, allant au-delà du droit des victimes d’être tenues informées de la procédure, reconnaissent le droit des enfants victimes de recevoir des juges des explications concernant la procédure et les décisions rendues, comme en Bulgarie (paragraphe 3 de l’article 15 de la Loi de 2004 relative à la protection de l’enfance), au Costa Rica (alinéa d) de l’article 107 de la Loi No. 7739 de 1998 portant Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence) et en Nouvelle-Zélande (article 10 de la Loi de 1989 relative aux enfants, aux jeunes et aux membres de leur famille). Une telle approche doit être encouragée. 5. Dans les pays où les victimes sont représentées par un avocat, c’est celui-ci qui devra les tenir informées de l’avancement de la procédure. Cependant, la relation entre l’avocat et son client n’est pas toujours symétrique et ce système peut s’avérer insuffisant. Joindre l’information communiquée par l’avocat aux renseignements provenant d’autres sources permet de mieux protéger le droit de la victime d’être informée. Le plus souvent, l’assistance fournie par la personne de soutien (voir les articles 15 à 19 de la Loi type) constitue le meilleur moyen de faire en sorte que la victime soit opportunément tenue informée de tous les aspects de l’affaire. 6. Dans tous les systèmes juridiques, il faut, pour garantir le droit de la victime d’être tenue informée, déterminer quelles seront les personnes chargées de communiquer les renseignements voulus aux victimes. La répartition détaillée des responsabilités à cet égard devra être réglementée, comme c’est le cas par exemple aux États-Unis (alinéas a et c), Services aux victimes, de l’article 10607 du chapitre 112 du Titre 42 du United States Code). 7. S’agissant du contenu et du type de l’information à communiquer aux enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, la Loi type reflète les dispositions de la législation en vigueur à ce sujet dans plusieurs pays. 8. La Loi type stipule que les informations pertinentes doivent être fournies par une autorité compétente désignée par le gouvernement. Elle ne prévoit pas d’option positive ou négative, mais les législateurs nationaux pourront envisager d’en adopter. Article 10. Assistance juridique 1. Comme indiqué au paragraphe 22 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, une aide judiciaire pourra s’avérer nécessaire pour qu’une assistance efficace puisse être fournie aux enfants victimes et témoins pendant la procédure. Les États devraient envisager de fournir gratuitement une aide judiciaire aux enfants victimes lorsque cette assistance est nécessaire pendant le procès pénal. La principale considération à avoir à l’esprit à cet égard est le principe de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. 2. Dans les pays de common law, comme les victimes ne sont pas parties à la procédure, elles n’ont généralement pas de droits acquis à une aide judiciaire pendant la procédure. C’est pourquoi, hormis quelques exceptions notables, la plupart des pays qui reconnaissent le droit des victimes à une aide judiciaire appartiennent aux pays de tradition romaniste. La plupart de ces pays reconnaissent le droit des enfants victimes à une aide judiciaire, par exemple l’Arménie (paragraphes 3 et 4 de l’article 10 du Code de procédure pénale de 1999), la Bulgarie (paragraphe 8 de l’article 15 de la Loi de 2004 relative à la protection des enfants) et les Philippines (article 35 b) de la Loi No. 9262 de 2004 relative à la lutte contre la violence contre les femmes et leurs enfants). Cette assistance est fournie à ceux qui n’ont pas les moyens de rémunérer un conseil, par exemple en France (article 706-50 du Code de procédure pénale), en Islande (article 60 de la Loi No. 80 de 2002 relative à la protection de l’enfance) et au Pérou (article 146 de la Loi No. 27337 de 2000 portant Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence). On a parfois trouvé des solutions originales pour réduire le coût de l’aide judiciaire pour l’État. En Colombie (conformément à l’article 137, Intervention des victimes dans l’action pénale, de la Loi No. 906 de 2004 portant Code de procédure pénale), les victimes qui n’ont pas les moyens de rémunérer leurs conseils peuvent recevoir une assistance d’autres membres des professions juridiques et d’étudiants en droit et, s’il y a plusieurs victimes, le nombre d’avocats les représentant dans l’affaire peut être limité à deux. 3. Quelques pays de common law reconnaissent également le droit des enfants victimes à une aide judiciaire en matière pénale aux frais de l’État. Tel est le cas par exemple au Pakistan conformément à l’Ordonnance de 2000 relative au système de justice pour mineurs. Dans les pays où tel n’est pas le cas, reconnaître que les enfants victimes d’actes criminels ont le droit à une aide judiciaire pourra promouvoir la protection des enfants victimes et témoins pendant leur participation au processus de justice. 4. Il y a lieu de noter à ce propos que la Cour pénale internationale a établi une longue liste des droits qui doivent être reconnus aux victimes, pour exemple pour ce qui est du droit d’être assisté par un avocat. Article 11. Mesures de protection L’article 11 décrit les mesures qui devraient être adoptées à toutes les étapes du processus de justice pour protéger la sécurité de tout enfant victime ou témoin considéré comme pouvant être exposé à des dangers. Article 12. Langage, services d’interprétation et autres mesures spéciales d’assistance 1. Le paragraphe 25 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels reconnaît la nécessité d’élaborer et d’appliquer des mesures visant à faciliter le témoignage des enfants. 2. Les dispositions et règles énoncées à l’article 12 de la Loi type sont inspirées des législations nationales de plusieurs pays, dont l’Afrique du Sud, la Colombie, le Costa Rica, la France, le Kazakhstan, le Mexique et la Thaïlande. B. Étape de l’enquête Article 13. Enquêteur spécialement formé 1. Selon le paragraphe 29 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, les professionnels devraient prendre des mesures pour éviter des épreuves aux enfants pendant l’enquête. Aux termes du paragraphe 41 des Lignes directrices, les professionnels devraient être formés de manière à protéger efficacement les enfants victimes et témoins et à répondre à leurs besoins. 2. Selon les systèmes juridiques internes de l’État, des professionnels comme les agents de police, procureurs, avocats et professionnels de la justice pénale peuvent être appelés à participer à l’enquête menée sur une affaire dans laquelle se trouve impliqué un enfant victime ou témoin. Il est essentiel que ces professionnels reçoivent une formation spécifique concernant les questions en rapport avec les enfants avant de commencer à travailler avec des enfants victimes et témoins. 3. Des progrès notables ont été accomplis en matière d’enquêtes grâce à l’adoption du modèle dit de “plaidoyer en faveur des enfants”, qui repose sur une approche pluridisciplinaire. La composante la plus importante de ce modèle est le fait que les agents des services de détection et de répression sont accompagnés par des pédiatres et des psychologues pendant l’interrogatoire des enfants. Ce modèle permet de mieux protéger non seulement l’enfant mais aussi l’accusé car il permet d’obtenir lors de l’interrogatoire des réponses plus complètes et plus exactes. Article 14. Examen médical et prélèvement de spécimens biologiques 1. L’article 14 a trait au droit de l’enfant d’être traité avec dignité et d’être mis à l’abri d’épreuves pendant le processus de justice. Les examens médicaux, surtout en cas de sévices sexuels, peuvent être très éprouvants pour les enfants, et il est préférable que de tels examens ne soient ordonnés que lorsqu’ils sont absolument nécessaires et qu’ils soient aussi peu intrusifs et aussi limités que possible. 2. Lorsqu’un examen médical fait apparaître un problème de santé, l’enfant a le droit de recevoir des soins médicaux. 3. Les dispositions de l’article 14 sont fondées sur les meilleures pratiques suivies par plusieurs États Membres. Article 15. Personne de soutien 1. Les fonctions de la personne de soutien sont décrites au paragraphe 24 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, mais cette expression n’y est pas définie. 2. Selon la législation nationale de plusieurs pays, la personne de soutien a pour mission d’accompagner psychologiquement les enfants victimes et témoins et d’atténuer le caractère traumatisant d’une comparution à l’audience en garantissant que les enfants soient accompagnés à tout moment par un adulte dont la présence sera utile si l’expérience est trop éprouvante pour eux. 3. Ainsi, la présence d’une personne de soutien peut aider l’enfant à exprimer ses vues et à participer efficacement à la procédure. Il s’agit d’une mesure que les juges pourront ordonner pour que la comparution de l’enfant à l’audience se déroule dans les meilleures conditions. L’accompagnement d’une personne de soutien peut également être demandé par le Procureur ou, lorsqu’il y a lieu, l’avocat de l’enfant. 4. Un autre aspect important des fonctions et du rôle de la personne de soutien est la continuité. En effet, un appui ne peut véritablement être apporté à l’enfant que s’il existe des rapports de confiance entre celui-ci et la personne de soutien, et l’on pourra notamment à cette fin désigner une personne de soutien dès le début du processus de justice (c’est-à-dire dès qu’est signalée l’infraction pénale) en veillant à ce que la même personne accompagne l’enfant pendant l’ensemble du processus. 5. Enfin, le principe qui doit présider aux attributions et aux activités de la personne de soutien est que celle-ci doit principalement s’attacher, dans le contexte du processus de justice, à protéger l’enfant contre les épreuves de toute sorte. Article 16. Désignation d’une personne de soutien 1. Aux termes de la Loi type, la personne de soutien doit être nommée par l’autorité compétente désignée par l’État dès que les responsables de l’enquête décident d’interroger pour la première fois l’enfant victime ou témoin, le principe sous-jacent étant que la personne de soutien doit accompagner l’enfant dès son premier contact avec le processus de justice. 2. Il ressort de la pratique des États que les critères appliqués à la nomination d’une personne de soutien varient d’un pays à l’autre. En Italie, l’article 609 decies du Code pénal stipule qu’un enfant victime d’exploitation sexuelle doit être assisté à toutes les étapes de la procédure. Dans certains États, comme en Suisse, il est prévu que la personne de soutien doit être du même sexe que la victime. Dans certains pays de common law, la décision de nommer une personne de soutien pour accompagner un enfant victime est prise par le juge de sa propre initiative ou à la demande du Ministère public ou de la défense. Dans d’autres pays, le pouvoir de nommer une personne de soutien est expressément prévu par la loi, par exemple au Canada (paragraphe 1 de l’article 486.1 du chapitre 46 du R.S.C. 1985). L’assistance d’une personne de soutien peut également être demandée par la victime ou le témoin, comme en Autrice (paragraphe 2 de l’article 162 du Code de procédure pénale). 3. La façon dont la personne de soutien est définie varie selon les systèmes juridiques, et on peut en citer comme exemples une “personne du choix de l’enfant”, une “personne de confiance”, un “adulte”, un “parent ou tuteur de l’enfant”, un “ami ou membre de sa famille”, une “personne spécialement qualifiée”, une “autre personne proche de l’enfant” ou toute autre “personne approuvée par le tribunal. La Loi type stipule à ce propos que la personne de soutien doit être quelqu’un ayant la formation et les compétences professionnelles nécessaires pour communiquer avec l’enfant et l’aider en vue d’écarter le risque de contrainte, de revictimisation et de victimisation secondaire. D’une manière générale, pour déterminer qui devrait être désigné personne de soutien, il importe de respecter le choix de l’enfant. Il faut veiller néanmoins à éviter de manipuler ce choix. La Loi type stipule en outre qu’avant la désignation de la personne de soutien, l’enfant doit être consulté sur ses préférences concernant le sexe de cette personne. 4. La personne de soutien doit veiller à deux autres conditions importantes: a) elle doit offrir un soutien complet et concret à l’enfant; et b) elle ne doit pas entraver l’administration de la justice. Les groupes de soutien aux enfants victimes ou les services d’aide aux victimes peuvent proposer des personnes spécialement qualifiées à cette fin. Article 17. Fonctions de la personne de soutien 1. La Loi type a développé les fonctions de la personne de soutien sur la base des pratiques optimales. Les législations nationales montrent que la présence d’une personne de soutien aux côtés de l’enfant victime ou témoin a pour but d’apporter à celui-ci un soutien psychologique et d’atténuer l’épreuve que suppose la comparution devant un tribunal en veillant à ce que l’enfant soit à tout moment accompagné par un adulte dont la présence serait utile si la situation est particulièrement éprouvante pour l’enfant. 2. Les fonctions de la personne de soutien, telles qu’elles sont définies à l’article 17, découlent de cet objectif et reflètent les meilleures pratiques nationales. 3. Par exemple, l’alinéa i), concernant les droits des enfants victimes et témoins, de l’article 3509 du chapitre 223 du Titre 18 de l’United States Code stipule ce qui suit: “Le tribunal peut, s’il le juge bon, permettre à un adulte de demeurer à proximité de l’enfant pour rester en contact avec lui pendant qu’il dépose. Le tribunal peut autoriser cette personne à tenir la main de l’enfant ou permettre à l’enfant d’être assis sur les genoux de cette personne pendant la procédure. L’adulte qui accompagne l’enfant ne donne pas à celui-ci la réponse à une question qui lui est posée pendant sa déposition et ne cherche pas à l’influencer. L’attitude de la personne qui accompagne l’enfant pendant que celui-ci dépose ou est interrogé est enregistrée sur bande vidéo.” 4. La législation de l’État américain de l’Arizona envisage pour la personne de soutien un rôle plus actif, surtout pour ce qui est de préparer le témoignage de l’enfant victime et de lui fournir assistance et dispose ce qui suit: “Le représentant du mineur accompagne celui-ci pendant toute la procédure ... et, avant la comparution de l’enfant à l’audience, lui explique la nature de la procédure et lui indique ce qu’il lui sera demandé de faire, et notamment qu’il devra dire la vérité. Le représentant du mineur est disponible pour lui prêter assistance concernant tous les aspects de l’affaire afin de consulter le tribunal, le cas échéant, au sujet des besoins particuliers du mineur. Ces consultations ont lieu avant la déposition du mineur. Le représentant du mineur ne parle pas des faits et des circonstances de l’affaire avec l’enfant témoin ... à moins que le tribunal n’ordonne le contraire s’il considère que cela est dans l’intérêt supérieur du mineur.” Article 18. Informations à fournir à la personne de soutien L’article 18 stipule que la personne de soutien est informée des chefs d’inculpation portés contre l’accusé, de la relation entre celui-ci et l’enfant et des mesures de garde à vue dont le suspect fait éventuellement l’objet. Cette information est le minimum nécessaire pour que la personne de soutien puisse s’acquitter de ses fonctions. Les autres types d’informations à fournir doivent être ajoutés à cet article. Article 19. Fonctions de la personne de soutien en cas de libération de l’accusé La mise en liberté de l’accusé peut être éprouvante pour l’enfant victime ou témoin. En pareil cas, c’est la personne de soutien qui reçoit cette information des autorités et qui la communique à l’enfant d’une façon adaptée à celui-ci. C. Étape du procès Article 20. Crédit à accorder aux éléments de preuve produits par l’enfant 1. Conformément au paragraphe 2 de l’article 12 de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, le principe à prendre comme point de départ pour le témoignage d’un enfant est que l’enfant doit se voir donner la possibilité d’être entendu. Cependant, ce droit n’est pas absolu. Ladite disposition stipule que ce droit est exercé “conformément aux règles de procédure prévues par la législation nationale”. 2. Les législations nationales prévoient habituellement de telles règles de procédure pour faire en sorte que le tribunal puisse accorder crédit au témoignage d’un enfant dans le cadre d’une procédure judiciaire ou administrative. Il surgit généralement à cet égard deux obstacles juridiques. Selon les systèmes juridiques dont il s’agit, l’un ou l’autre, ou les deux, peuvent être invoqués par le tribunal. La première question tient à la recevabilité des éléments de preuve produits par un enfant. La deuxième question se rapporte à la fiabilité de la déposition d’un enfant. 3. La question de la recevabilité est de savoir si le tribunal peut tenir compte du témoignage de l’enfant pour statuer. La question de la fiabilité a trait au poids que le tribunal doit par la suite attacher aux éléments de preuve fournis par un enfant qui ont été considérés comme recevables. 4. Dans la plupart des systèmes juridiques, il appartient au tribunal de statuer, au cas par cas, sur les questions de recevabilité et de fiabilité. Si besoin est, il peut avoir recours à l’assistance d’un expert comme un psychologue spécialisé dans la pédiatrie ou un spécialiste des questions liées à la maturation des enfants. Les normes internationales comportent néanmoins une restriction clef. Pour statuer sur la responsabilité et/ou la fiabilité des éléments de preuve produits par un enfant, le tribunal ne doit pas se fonder exclusivement sur son âge. Cette restriction est énoncée au paragraphe 18 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels: le témoignage d’un enfant “ne devrait pas être présumé irrecevable ou non fiable du seul fait de son âge, dès lors que son âge”. 5. Néanmoins, le tribunal peut s’interroger sur la question de savoir si l’âge et le degré de maturité de l’enfant lui permettent de déposer de façon intelligible et crédible. Le tribunal peut, par exemple, tenir compte de tels éléments lorsqu’il prend en considération les éléments de preuve produits par un enfant dans le contexte de l’ensemble de l’affaire. S’il y a des raisons convaincantes de le faire, il peut également faire administrer des tests pour déterminer la mesure dans laquelle l’enfant peut produire un témoignage valable. Ces tests pourront alors évaluer les compétences de l’enfant et par exemple la question de savoir s’il peut comprendre les questions qui lui sont posées et l’importance qu’il y a à dire la vérité. 6. Au Royaume-Uni (article 53 de la Loi de 1999 relative à la justice pour mineurs et à la preuve en matière pénale), par exemple, les critères de compétence d’un témoin sont indépendants de leur âge. La question de la compétence vise plutôt la capacité du témoin de comprendre les questions qui lui sont posées et de fournir des réponses compréhensibles. Si un témoin ne veut pas comprendre les questions posées ou fournir des répons intelligibles, son témoignage est généralement considéré comme irrecevable. 7. Dans le cas des enfants victimes et témoins, toutefois, il ressort des normes internationales que le témoignage d’un enfant ne doit pas être jugé irrecevable à la légère. Le paragraphe 18 des Lignes directrices, par exemple, est fondé sur la présomption selon laquelle “tout enfant devrait, sous réserve d’un examen, être traité comme étant apte à témoigner”. Il ressort effectivement des législations nationales que, quel que soit son âge, les bonnes pratiques exigent que l’enfant soit présumé apte à témoigner. 8. L’article 20 de la Loi type suit ces bonnes pratiques en stipulant que l’enfant est réputé comme un témoin apte à déposer et que son témoignage est recevable (à moins que la preuve du contraire ne soit apportée à la suite d’un examen de ses compétences). L’article 21 de la Loi type explique qu’il ne peut être dérogé à cette présomption – et qu’un examen des compétences de l’enfant ne peut ensuite être administré – que si le tribunal considère qu’il y a des raisons concluantes de le faire. Il va de soi que ces raisons ne peuvent pas être uniquement liées à l’âge de l’enfant. 9. Si les résultats de l’examen de ses compétences sont négatifs, les éléments produits par l’enfant doivent être déclarés irrecevables aux fins de la procédure. Il va de soi que, dans le cas contraire, son témoignage est recevable. L’important est que les enfants victimes et témoins ne peuvent pas être systématiquement soumis à un examen de leurs compétences. Il faut plutôt qu’il existe des raisons concluantes pour que le tribunal puisse ordonner un tel examen. Cette approche est appuyée par la pratique nationale. Aux termes de la Loi de 2008 relative à la preuve de la Nouvelle-Zélande, par exemple, le juge ne peut pas donner pour instruction au jury de passer particulièrement au crible les éléments de preuve produits par de jeunes enfants, ni suggérer au jury que, d’une façon générale, les enfants ont tendance à inventer ou à déformer les faits. Lorsqu’un enfant dépose lors d’un procès avec un jury, le juge doit informer le jury qu’il n’est pas interdit à l’enfant de déposer du seul fait de son âge et qu’il n’y a pas d’âge fixe à partir duquel un enfant doit être considéré comme compétent. Le juge doit dire au jury que la compétence d’un enfant dépend de sa capacité de comprendre la différence entre le vrai et le faux et son devoir de dire la vérité. 10. Lorsqu’un enfant produit des éléments de preuve jugés recevables, la Loi type prévoit un autre obstacle juridique. Selon le paragraphe 3 de l’article 20 de la Loi type, le tribunal peut accorder un poids particulier au témoignage de l’enfant en fonction de son âge, de son degré de maturité et de son aptitude à donner un compte rendu intelligible des faits. Dans ce cas également, le tribunal ne peut pas fonder sa décision exclusivement sur l’âge de l’enfant. Il doit plutôt porter une appréciation générale sur la validité et la fiabilité du témoignage de l’enfant, comme il le ferait pour tout autre témoin. S’il y a précédemment eu un examen des compétences de l’enfant, ses résultats peuvent également entrer en ligne de contact dans cette appréciation. Il ressort des législations nationales qu’il est effectivement approprié de tenir compte d’éléments comme l’âge et le degré de maturité de l’enfant pour évaluer le crédit à accorder à son témoignage. 11. Enfin, les paragraphes 4 et 5 de l’article 20 de la Loi type contiennent deux importantes garanties. Le paragraphe 4 dispose que, sans égard à la question de savoir si l’enfant déposera ou si son témoignage sera jugé irrecevable, il devra se voir accorder la possibilité d’exprimer ses vues concernant sa participation au processus de justice. Le paragraphe 5 précise qu’un enfant ne peut être forcé de déposer à l’audience contre sa volonté ou à l’insu de ses parents ou de son tuteur. Cette disposition garantit également que les parents ou le tuteur de l’enfant appelé à déposer seront invités à être présents à l’audience. Toutefois, la Loi type prévoit un certain nombre d’exceptions logiques pour les cas dans lesquels les parents ou le tuteur sont accusés d’être les auteurs de l’infraction, lorsque l’enfant a peur d’être accompagné par ses parents ou son tuteur ou lorsque le tribunal considère que cela n’est pas dans l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. Article 21. Examen de la compétence de l’enfant 1. L’article 21 de la Loi type définit les procédures à suivre pour l’examen de la compétence de l’enfant visées à l’article 20. Il stipule qu’un tel examen ne peut être mené que si le tribunal détermine qu’il a des raisons concluantes de le faire. Comme indiqué à l’article 20, le témoignage de l’enfant ne peut être déclaré irrecevable que si les résultats de cet examen de ses compétences sont négatifs. L’article 21 précise que l’objet de l’examen est de déterminer si l’enfant peut comprendre les questions qui lui sont posées ainsi que l’importance qu’il y a à dire la vérité. 2. L’alinéa c) de l’article 3509, concernant les droits des enfants victimes et témoins du United States Code prévoit que, dès lors qu’une partie présente des raisons concluantes à l’appui, le juge peut ordonner que l’enfant se soumette à un examen de ses compétences. L’examen est mené par le tribunal, autrement qu’en présence de jury, sur la base de questions soumises par les parties. Les questions doivent être adaptées à l’âge et au degré de maturité de l’enfant, ne doivent pas concerner les questions en cause et doivent tendre principalement à déterminer si l’enfant est apte à comprendre les questions simples et à y répondre. 3. Il importe de souligner que la disposition du paragraphe 7 de l’article 21 aux termes de laquelle l’examen des compétences de l’enfant ne doit pas être répété n’affecte aucunement le droit d’appel de l’accusé. En fait, le tribunal peut, sans répéter l’examen, en évaluer les résultats à la lumière des circonstances de l’espèce. L’on évite ainsi le risque qu’un avocat de la défense cherche à saper la crédibilité de l’enfant au moyen d’un contre-interrogatoire qui pourrait constituer pour lui une épreuve. Article 22. Serment 1. Dans la plupart des pays, les témoins appelés à déposer dans un procès pénal doivent déposer sous serment, qui est un engagement solennel de dire la vérité. Dans presque tous les pays, ne pas dire la vérité lorsque l’on dépose sous serment constitue une infraction pénale. 2. Certains systèmes juridiques nationaux exemptent les enfants de moins d’un certain âge de l’obligation de déposer sous serment. La principale conséquence d’une déposition faite autrement que sous serment est que l’enfant est à certains égards à l’abri des suites que peut avoir un faux témoignage. L’article 22 de la Loi type dispose qu’un enfant témoin jouit de l’immunité complète de poursuites pénales du chef d’un faux témoignage, sans égard à la question de savoir si le tribunal l’a ou non autorisé à déposer autrement que sous serment. 3. Il importe de noter que le fait qu’un enfant dépose autrement que sous serment ne doit en soi avoir aucune influence sur le poids que le tribunal accordera à cette déposition. Au Royaume-Uni, par exemple, la loi de 1999 relative à la justice pour mineurs et à la preuve en matière pénale considère la question de savoir si le témoin a déposé sous serment ou non comme distincte de la question de la compétence du témoin. Le tribunal doit accorder le même poids à une déposition faite sous serment et les autres formes de déposition. Toutefois, le fait qu’il se peut qu’un enfant ne saisisse pas comme il convient l’importance particulière qu’il y a à dire la vérité inhérente à un serment peut dans certains cas être invoqué par les parties à la procédure comme une indication de la maturité de l’enfant et par conséquent du poids à accorder à son témoignage. Aux États-Unis, par exemple, le tribunal peut ordonner qu’il soit procédé à un examen des compétences du témoin si une partie présente des arguments convaincants à cette fin. 4. L’on trouve en Nouvelle-Zélande un bon exemple de formule de remplacement à un témoignage sous serment. Dans ce pays, l’enfant est autorisé à promettre de façon informelle à dire la vérité dès lors qu’il a été établi qu’il comprend le caractère solennel de l’occasion. Cela vaut en particulier dans le cas d’adultes inculpés de violences sexuelles contre des enfants. Cette option spécifique a été prévue dans la Loi type. Article 23. Désignation d’une personne de soutien pendant le procès L’article 23 complète l’article 15 en stipulant que le juge doit, au début du procès, déterminer s’il a été désigné une personne de soutien pour accompagner l’enfant victime ou témoin et ordonner qu’il en soit désigné une s’il n’a pas été nommé une personne de soutien au stade de l’enquête. Article 24. Salles d’attente 1. Le moyen de mettre l’enfant à l’abri d’épreuves pendant le processus de justice et de protéger la vie privée de l’enfant consiste à aménager à l’intention des enfants des salles d’attente spécialement aménagées. 2. L’on pourra par exemple, dans les salles d’attente réservées aux enfants, mettre à leur disposition des jouets, de quoi dessiner, des livres ou des bandes dessinées pour les occuper. Selon le climat, les enfants pourront attendre non pas nécessairement à l’intérieur d’un bâtiment mais dans un jardin ou tout autre lieu approprié. L’on pourra également prévoir des toilettes, des lits, des boissons et des aliments de sorte que l’enfant se sente toujours à l’aise. Par-dessus tout, les enfants devront se tenir dans une salle séparée, autrement qu’en la présence de l’accusé, des avocats de la défense et des autres témoins. 3. Bien que, lorsqu’il s’agit d’affaires faisant intervenir des enfants, la rapidité de la procédure soit importante, il convient, lorsque sont fixées les dates des audiences, de tenir compte de la capacité des enfants de supporter la situation difficile que peut leur causer la longueur des audiences. Tous ceux qui sont appelés à les déclarer doivent par conséquent trouver le moyen de faire en sorte que les enfants passent le moins de temps possible dans les locaux du tribunal et que les audiences soient fixées à des heures qui tiennent compte de la vie privée et des besoins des enfants. En définitive, la qualité du témoignage d’un enfant sera d’autant meilleure que celui-ci n’aura pas à subir des épreuves inutiles. 4. Les tribunaux pourront envisager d’autres procédures adaptées aux enfants et, par exemple, prévoir qu’ils seront appelés à témoigner les jours où ils n’ont pas à aller à l’école. De telles procédures ne sont pas prévues dans la Loi type, mais pourront l’être dans les règlements ou lignes directrices adoptés par les pays. Article 25. Accompagnement psychologique des enfants victimes et témoins L’article 25 stipule que la personne de soutien devra se trouver présente dans la salle d’audience pour apporter un accompagnement psychologique à l’enfant. Article 26. Aménagement de la salle d’audience 1. Selon l’alinéa d) du paragraphe 30 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, les professionnels doivent aménager comme il convient les locaux du tribunal pour tenir dûment compte de la situation des enfants victimes et témoins. 2. La solennité de la procédure et de l’environnement du tribunal en général peut être intimidante pour les enfants. Le respect du décorum peut certes être considéré comme de nature à créer un sentiment de respect pour le système judiciaire, mais il peut aussi engendrer un sentiment de crainte chez les enfants ou les amener à garder le silence. Le manque de locaux adaptés aux enfants, par exemple lorsqu’il n’est pas prévu de sièges appropriés ou de microphones pour que la déposition du témoin puisse être entendue partout dans la salle, en particulier par le juge, les avocats, le jury et l’accusé, de même que les toges des juges et des avocats, pourront affecter la qualité du témoignage de l’enfant. 3. Dans certains pays, les victimes de moins de 18 ans doivent être interrogées dans un climat convivial et dépourvu de formalisme. Le cérémonial de l’audience, qui peut effrayer les jeunes enfants, est également tenu en compte par le Règlement concernant la déposition des jeunes témoins aux stades préliminaires du procès, au Royaume-Uni, qui prévoit que les enfants témoins peuvent exprimer leurs vues concernant le formalisme de l’audience, laquelle peut être supprimée, si besoin est. 4. S’agissant de l’environnement dans lequel l’enfant doit être interrogé, la législation de certains pays stipule que l’enfant doit être interrogé par un agent de police de sexe féminin ou du même sexe de l’enfant dans des cas déterminés, en particulier dans les cas de viol ou de sévices sexuels. L’article 26 de la Loi type autorise le juge à ordonner de telles mesures si besoin est. Article 27. Contre-interrogatoire (option pour les pays de common law) 1. L’alinéa b) du paragraphe 31 des Lignes directrices souligne la nécessité d’empêcher que l’enfant soit soumis à un contre-interrogatoire mené par l’auteur présumé de l’infraction si cela est compatible avec le système juridique et avec les droits de l’accusé. Selon le système de procédure suivi par les pays de common law, le droit de soumettre les témoins à charge à un contre-interrogatoire constitue un élément essentiel du droit de l’inculpé de contester le témoignage de celui qui l’accuse. Ce contre-interrogatoire est habituellement mené par le conseil de l’accusé. Cependant, lorsque celui-ci refuse d’être assisté par un conseil et veut assurer lui-même sa défense, un contre-interrogatoire direct de témoins vulnérables, comme les enfants, peut soulever des problèmes. 2. Dans certains pays, il est interdit à un accusé non assisté par un conseil de procéder au contre-interrogatoire d’enfants témoins, surtout dans le cas d’infractions sexuelles. Tel est le cas par exemple au Canada (paragraphe 1 de l’article 486.3 du chapitre C-46, Code pénal, R.S.C. 1985), en Nouvelle-Zélande (paragraphe 1 de l’article 23 F de la Loi de 1900 et article 95 de la Loi de 2006 relatives à la preuve) et au Royaume-Uni (article 34 A de la Loi de 1988 relative à la justice pénale). Dans ces États, les juges doivent opposer une fin de non-recevoir lorsqu’un accusé non assisté par un conseil demande à procéder au contre-interrogatoire d’enfants témoins. Dans certains pays, il est également prévu que le juge peut désigner un représentant de l’accusé aux fins spécifiques de ce contre-interrogatoire, ledit représentant transmettant les questions posées par l’accusé afin d’éviter tout contact direct et tout risque d’intimidation; tel est notamment le cas en Australie (article 8 de la Loi de 1992 portant modification de la Loi de l’Australie occidentale concernant le témoignage des enfants). 3. Le juge doit suivre et superviser de près le contre-interrogatoire des enfants. Dans les pays de common law, il est interdit de poser des questions pouvant intimider ou harceler les témoins ou porter atteinte à leur dignité (voir par exemple les Directives nationales applicables aux victimes d’infractions sexuelles publiées par le Ministère de la justice et du développement constitutionnel de l’Afrique du Sud et le paragraphe 1 du chapitre 10 des Directives nationales applicables au Parquet en matière d’infractions sexuelles élaborées par le Ministère de la justice de l’Afrique du Sud (Pretoria, 1998) ainsi que l’article 274 de la Loi de 1995 relative à la procédure pénale applicable en Écosse). D’une manière plus générale, comme dans le cas des autres types d’interrogatoires, le contre-interrogatoire doit être mené en ayant à l’esprit qu’en présence de témoins vulnérables, et notamment d’enfants, les questions doivent être posées de façon simple, réfléchie et respectueuse. En cas de besoin, il appartiendra au juge de rappeler cette importante règle aux parties. 4. La Loi type stipule que l’enfant victime ou témoin ne doit pas être soumis à un contre-interrogatoire par l’accusé. Le contre-interrogatoire mené par l’avocat de la défense doit être supervisé de près par le juge. Article 28. Mesures visant à protéger la vie privée et le bien-être des enfants victimes et témoins 1. Aux termes de l’article 28 de la Loi type, des mesures de protection peuvent être ordonnées afin de protéger la vie privée et le bien-être physique et mental de l’enfant et épargner à celui-ci des épreuves inutiles et une victimisation secondaire. 2. Lorsqu’il dépose, l’enfant devra souvent regarder dans les yeux l’accusé et, lorsque celui-ci est inculpé de sévices contre l’enfant, ce contact peut être traumatisant pour l’enfant. La disposition figurant à l’alinéa b) du paragraphe 31 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels a pour but d’atténuer autant que possible le sentiment d’intimidation que peuvent éprouver les enfants victimes et témoins lorsqu’ils comparaissent devant un tribunal, en particulier lorsqu’ils sont confrontés à l’inculpé. 3. Différentes mesures peuvent être adoptées pour faciliter le témoignage des enfants et la recevabilité des éléments de preuve qu’ils produisent. Ces mesures pourront notamment consister à faire un enregistrement vidéo de leur déposition avant le procès et à permettre à l’enfant de témoigner sans devoir être mis en présence de l’accusé, qu’il soit interrogé dans une salle spéciale du palais de justice au moyen d’un système de télévision en circuit fermé ou qu’il dépose derrière un écran amovible ou un rideau pour ne pas avoir à soutenir le regard de l’accusé. Une telle confrontation peut être évitée aussi en ordonnant à l’accusé de quitter la salle d’audience. 4. L’usage d’écrans séparant l’enfant de l’accusé est souvent considéré comme une formule moins onéreuse que l’utilisation d’un système de télévision en circuit fermé. Les écrans, beaucoup plus faciles à installer et à déplacer, sont de divers types, et il peut s’agir par exemple d’une cloison amovible qui empêche tout contact visuel entre l’enfant et l’accusé, d’un miroir sans tain qui permet à l’accusé de voir l’enfant et pas inversement ou d’une cloison opaque amovible équipée d’une caméra vidéo qui retransmet la déposition de l’enfant sur un écran visible pour l’accusé. L’utilisation de ces appareils est prévue par la législation interne de plusieurs pays, comme le Canada (paragraphe 1 de l’article 486.2 du chapitre C-46 du Code pénal, R.S.C. 1985) et l’Espagne (paragraphe 3 de l’article 448 et article 707 de la Loi relative au procès pénal). 5. Ces mesures sont ordonnées par le juge et peuvent être automatiques ou facultatives. Le juge peut ordonner une telle mesure de sa propre initiative ou à la demande d’une partie, y compris l’enfant ou ses parents ou son tuteur. À Fidji, par exemple, les parents ou le tuteur peuvent demander au Procureur d’entourer l’enfant d’un paravent, et le Procureur transmet la demande au tribunal. Certains pays, par exemple le Brésil (article 217 du Code de procédure pénale), le Kazakhstan (paragraphe 3 de l’article 352 du Code de procédure pénale) et la Suisse (paragraphe 4 de l’article 5 et alinéa b) de l’article 10 de la Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions) stipulent que l’accusé doit être exclu de la salle d’audience pendant le témoignage de l’enfant. L’accusé est habituellement autorisé à suivre la déposition de l’enfant sur un écran placé dans une pièce distincte. 6. Une autre mesure visant à protéger les victimes et les témoins, y compris les enfants, consiste à interdire la divulgation de l’information concernant leur identité et l’endroit où ils se trouvent. L’étendue de ces restrictions peut varier selon les circonstances et les risques. L’on peut par exemple commencer par autoriser la victime ou le témoin à ne pas révéler son adresse et son lieu de travail. Parfois, aux fins des notifications, la victime ou le témoin peut donner comme adresse un poste de police (article 706-57 du Code de procédure pénale de la France) ou bien, comme au Honduras (article 237, protection des témoins, du Décret No. 9-99-E portant Code de procédure pénale), le tribunal lui-même peut être utilisé comme adresse à ces fins. 7. Les droits de la défense peuvent se trouver affectés davantage lorsqu’il est totalement interdit de divulguer des informations concernant l’identité de la victime ou du témoin, qui peut alors être autorisé à déposer de façon anonyme. Cela constitue toujours une mesure exceptionnelle, comme en France (article 706-58 du Code de procédure pénale) et aux Pays-Bas (article 226 a) du Code de procédure pénale de 1994). Dans les pays où une telle mesure est autorisée, l’on peut permettre aux victimes ou aux témoins de témoigner et d’être confrontés à l’accusé par vidéoconférence, au moyen de dispositifs qui altèrent la voix ou l’image (France, article 706-61 du Code de procédure pénale). À titre exceptionnel, et il s’agit là d’une mesure qui n’est habituellement autorisée que dans le cas d’affaires impliquant la criminalité organisée, l’on peut donner à un témoin anonyme l’autorisation de changer d’identité (France, paragraphe 2 de l’article 706-63 du Code de procédure pénale) ou bien faciliter la réinstallation (alinéa a) du paragraphe 1 de l’article 3521, protection et réinstallation des témoins, du chapitre 224, Protection des témoins, du Titre 18 du United States Code). 8. La législation néozélandaise prévoit une série intéressante de mesures de protection des enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Indépendamment d’une interdiction générale de la publication du nom de tout enfant ou adolescent de moins de 17 ans appelé à témoigner, les enfants victimes peuvent être autorisés, dans certains cas, à déposer par écrit, et il peut être décidé que leur déposition ne donnera pas lieu à un interrogatoire ou à un contre-interrogatoire. Lorsque l’enfant dépose oralement, seules les personnes nommément agréées par le juge ou demandées par l’enfant peuvent être présentes. Le tribunal peut interdire la publication d’informations concernant certaines questions, comme les actes que la victime aurait été forcée d’accomplir ou les actes auxquels la victime aurait été forcée de consentir. La déposition de la victime peut également être prise par enregistrement vidéo pendant la phase préliminaire du procès. 9. Dans le cas d’infractions sexuelles dirigées contre des enfants, le juge peut, lorsque le Ministère public en fait la demande avant le procès, donner des instructions précises concernant les modalités selon lesquelles la victime devra déposer. Premièrement, lorsqu’un enregistrement vidéo de la déposition de la victime était projeté lors de l’audience préliminaire, le juge peut ordonner que cette preuve soit admise telle quelle, avec les coupes éventuelles qu’il peut ordonner. Deuxièmement, si le juge considère que les installations et le matériel requis sont disponibles, il peut demander à la victime de témoigner en dehors de la salle d’audience mais dans les locaux du tribunal, la déposition étant retransmise dans la salle d’audience par un système de télévision en circuit fermé. Troisièmement, le juge peut décider que, pendant que la victime témoigne ou est interrogée au sujet de sa déposition, elle soit protégée par un écran ou un miroir sans tain de sorte que la victime ne puisse pas voir l’accusé mais que le juge, le jury et l’avocat de l’accusé puissent voir le plaignant. Quatrièmement, lorsque le juge considère que les installations et le matériel requis sont disponibles, il peut ordonner que la victime dépose derrière une cloison spécialement aménagée qui permette au public se trouvant dans la salle d’audience de voir la victime mais empêchant celle-ci de voir la salle, la déposition étant retransmise par liaison audio appropriée. Cinquièmement, s’il considère que les installations et le matériel requis sont disponibles, le juge peut ordonner que le plaignant dépose en un lieu situé à l’extérieur des locaux du tribunal, auquel cas, la déposition est enregistrée sur bande vidéo, avec les coupes éventuelles que le juge peut ordonner. Lorsque l’enregistrement vidéo de la déposition de la victime doit être projeté à l’audience, le juge donne les indications appropriées quant aux modalités de l’interrogatoire ou du contre-interrogatoire de la victime. D. Étape postérieure au procès Article 29. Droit à indemnisation et à réparation 1. L’article 29 de la Loi type est inspiré du paragraphe 35 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels. Le paragraphe 37 des Lignes directrices contient une liste non exhaustive des mesures de réparation pouvant être envisagées. L’article 29 de la Loi type a pour but de donner des indications plus précises à ce sujet. 2. Le paragraphe 8 de la Déclaration des principes fondamentaux de justice relatifs aux victimes de la criminalité et aux victimes d’abus de pouvoir (résolution 40/34 de l’Assemblée générale, annexe) dispose ce qui suit: “Les auteurs d’actes criminels ou les tiers responsables de leur comportement doivent, en tant que de besoin, réparer équitablement le préjudice causé aux victimes, à leur famille ou aux personnes à leur charge. Cette réparation doit inclure la restitution des biens, une indemnité pour le préjudice ou les pertes subis, le remboursement des dépenses engagées en raison de la victimisation, la fourniture de services et le rétablissement des droits.” 3. Le paragraphe 12 de la Déclaration se lit comme suit: “Lorsqu’il n’est pas possible d’obtenir une indemnisation complète auprès du délinquant ou d’autres sources, les États doivent s’efforcer d’assurer une indemnisation financière a) Aux victimes qui ont subi un préjudice corporel ou une atteinte importante à leur intégrité physique ou mentale par suite d’actes criminels graves; b) À la famille, en particulier aux personnes à la charge des personnes qui sont décédées ou qui ont été frappées d’incapacité physique ou mental à la suite de cette victimisation.” 4. Au paragraphe 8 de sa recommandation Rec (2006) 8 relative à l’assistance aux victimes d’infractions adressée aux États membres du Conseil de l’Europe, le Comité des Ministres recommande ce qui suit: “L’indemnisation devrait être accordée au titre des soins et de la rééducation nécessités par les préjudices physiques et psychologiques. Les États devraient envisager d’accorder une indemnisation qui prenne en compte la perte de revenus, les frais funéraires et la perte d’aliments pour les personnes à charge. Les États peuvent aussi envisager d’indemniser la douleur et la souffrance. Les États peuvent envisager d’accorder une indemnisation pour les dommages résultant d’infractions contre les biens.” 5. Il se peut que les Principes fondamentaux et directives concernant le droit à un recours et à réparation des victimes de violations flagrantes du droit international des droits de l’homme et de violations graves du droit international humanitaire (résolution 60/147 de l’Assemblée générale, annexe) ne sont pas applicables dans la plupart des affaires habituelles dans lesquelles se trouvent impliqués des enfants comme victimes, mais les définitions figurant dans cet instrument international peuvent beaucoup aider à définir la portée des mesures de réparation à ordonner dans des cas déterminés. 6. S’agissant de la traite de personnes, les Principes fondamentaux et directives peuvent s’appliquer dans une large mesure et doivent être pris en considération étant donné que, très fréquemment, les droits fondamentaux des victimes de la traite de personnes sont violés lors de la procédure judiciaire du fait qu’elles ne sont que trop souvent considérées comme ayant contrevenu à la législation nationale, par exemple à la législation concernant l’immigration, plutôt que d’être considéré comme de véritables victimes. 7. Les Principes fondamentaux et directives décrivent les types de réparations qui doivent être envisagés, selon qu’il convient, dans une affaire déterminée. Il y a lieu de citer notamment les suivantes: a) Restitution. Cette forme d’indemnisation, plus généralement applicable dans les affaires de traite de personnes, peut être applicable aussi en partie dans le cas des enfants victimes de maltraitance au foyer: i) Jouissance des droits de l’homme (vie familiale); ii) Retour sur le lieu de résidence; iii) Restitution de l’emploi (y compris la possibilité d’une éducation continue) et des biens; b) Indemnisation (réparation pécuniaire des dommages qui se prêtent à une évaluation économique): i) Le préjudice physique ou psychologique; ii) Les occasions perdues (y compris en ce qui concerne l’emploi, l’éducation et les prestations sociales); iii) Les dommages matériels et la perte de revenu, y compris la perte du potentiel de gains; iv) Les frais encourus pour l’assistance en justice ou des expertises, pour les médicaments et les services médicaux et pour les services psychologiques et sociaux; Réadaptation (prise en charge médicale et psychologique ainsi que l’accès à des services juridiques et sociaux). Option 1. Pays de common law 8. Cette option s’adresse aux pays de common law où le tribunal pénal peut assortir la condamnation d’une ordonnance de réparation. Cette disposition type est inspirée de la législation canadienne (paragraphe 2 de l’article 738 du chapitre C-46 du Code pénal, R.S.C. 1985), qui contient des dispositions plus détaillées touchant la définition de la valeur de remplacement, la définition des dommages pécuniaires et le problème que soulève la réparation lorsque l’enfant doit quitter le foyer qu’il partageait avec l’auteur de l’infraction. Option 2. Pays où le tribunal pénal n’a pas compétence en matière civile 9. Le paragraphe 36 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels stipule que, pour autant que les procédures soient adaptées aux enfants et respectent les Lignes directrices, il faudrait encourager des poursuites jumelées au pénal et en réparation. Cependant, cela peut ne pas être possible dans certains pays. L’option 2 permet de faire en sorte que l’enfant soit, à la fin de la procédure pénale, informé de la procédure à suivre pour obtenir réparation. Option 3. Pays où le tribunal pénal a compétence en matière civile 10. Dans beaucoup de pays de tradition romaniste, le tribunal peut statuer sur l’action civile dans le cadre de la procédure pénale. L’option 3 s’adresse à ces pays. Article 30. Mesures de justice réparatrice 1. Le paragraphe 36 des Lignes directrices en matière de justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels prévoit qu’une action en réparation peut être combinée à des mesures de justice réparatrice. L’article 30 de la Loi type reflète cette option, étant entendu que des recours formels pourront être intentés si les mesures de justice réparatrice échouent. 2. La justice réparatrice englobe tout processus dans le cadre duquel la victime et le délinquant et, s’il y a lieu, les autres personnes ou les membres de la communauté affectée par une infraction participent activement, ensemble, au règlement des questions découlant de l’infraction, généralement avec l’aide d’un facilitateur. La justice réparatrice suppose un processus de règlement des conséquences d’un crime, l’accent étant mis sur la réparation du préjudice causé aux victimes, la nécessité de tenir le délinquant pour responsable de ses actes et, fréquemment, la participation de la communauté au règlement du conflit. 3. Les programmes de justice réparatrice présentent les caractéristiques suivantes: a) une intervention souple tenant compte des circonstances de l’infraction, du délinquant et de la victime qui permet d’aborder chaque cas à la lumière de sa spécificité; b) une réaction, face à l’infraction, qui limite la dignité et l’égalité de chaque personne, tend à créer un climat de compréhension et encourage la paix sociale en favorisant la compréhension entre les victimes, les délinquants et la collectivité; c) une approche qui peut être utilisée parallèlement aux processus traditionnels de justice et à des sanctions; d) une approche qui comporte un élément de solution du problème et s’attaque aux causes profondes du conflit; e) une approche qui tend à réparer le préjudice subi par la victime et qui tient compte de ses besoins; et f) une intervention qui reconnaît le rôle qui incombe à la collectivité en tant qu’instance la mieux à même de prévenir la délinquance et le désordre social et d’intervenir en cas de besoin. 4. Comme ces processus sont fondés sur l’accord des parties, ils ne réussissent pas toujours et il faudra parfois renvoyer à nouveau l’affaire devant les tribunaux pour obtenir un règlement judiciaire. 5. Il convient de noter toutefois que le processus de justice réparatrice peut comporter certains risques pour la victime, surtout lorsque celle-ci est un enfant. Il faut donc réfléchir soigneusement avant de recourir à ce processus dans les affaires dans lesquelles se trouvent impliqués des enfants victimes. 6. L’on trouvera de plus amples informations concernant les programmes de justice réparatrice en matière pénale dans les Principes de base concernant le recours à des programmes de justice réparatrice en matière pénale (résolution 2002/12 du Conseil économique et social, annexe), et des informations plus détaillées sur les caractéristiques de ces programmes dans le Manuel sur les programmes de justice réparatrice publié par l’Office des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime. Il conviendra également de se référer à la recommandation No. R (99) 19 du Comité des Ministres du Conseil de l’Europe concernant la médiation en matière pénale. Article 31. Information concernant l’issue du procès Le droit des victimes d’être informées de l’issue du procès ainsi que des autres décisions affectant leurs intérêts est reconnu dans plusieurs États. La Loi type adopte cette disposition en tant que bonne pratique. Article 32. Rôle de la personne de soutien après la clôture de la procédure La personne de soutien fournit une assistance à l’enfant aussi longtemps que celle-ci est nécessaire. Elle pourra être appelée notamment, à l’issue de la procédure, à orienter l’enfant vers des programmes de soins et de traitement ou à aider à rapatrier l’enfant dans son pays d’origine. Article 33. Information concernant la mise en liberté de personnes condamnées Plusieurs États reconnaissent le droit des victimes d’être informées de la situation du condamné ainsi que, le cas échéant, de sa mise en liberté. La Loi type adopte cette disposition en tant que bonne pratique. E. Autres procédures Article 34. Applicabilité à d’autres procédures Les dispositions de la Loi type doivent s’appliquer également dans le cadre des procédures administratives faisant intervenir des enfants victimes et témoins afin que les enfants jouissent de la même protection que celle à laquelle ils ont droit en vertu de la loi et ne subissent pas d’épreuves inutiles. Chapitre IV. Dispositions finales [Article 35. Dispositions finales (option pour les pays de tradition romaniste) Cet article est une option pour les pays de tradition romaniste. * L’introduction, qui constitue une note explicative concernant la genèse, la nature et la portée de la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels, ne fait pas partie du texte de la Loi type. ** Pour une compilation des règles existantes des Nations Unies concernant la prévention du crime et la justice pénale, voir http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/justice-and-prison-reform/compendium.html. *** Nations Unies, Recueil des Traités, vol. 1577, No. 27531. --- Notes iv iii 60 60 v 62 Justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels 21 Première partie. Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels 23 Deuxième partie. Commentaire de la Loi type sur la justice dans les affaires impliquant les enfants victimes et témoins d’actes criminels 63 57 Nations Unies, Recueil des Traités, vol. 1577, No. 27531. Ibid., vol. 2171 et 2173, No. 27531. Nations Unies, Office pour le contrôle des drogues et la prévention du crime, Handbook on Justice for Victims: on the Use and Application of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power (New York, 1999). Paragraphe 1.2 de l’appendice à la recommandation (2006) 8. Charte africaine des droits et du bien-être de l’enfant en Afrique, juillet 1990, article 4 et article 9, paragraphe 2. Convention américaine relative aux droits de l’homme: Pacte de San José (Nations Unies, Recueil des Traités, vol. 1144, No. 17955), article 17, paragraphe 4. Convention interaméricaine sur le trafic international des mineurs, adoptée à Mexico le 18 mars 1994, alinéas a) et c) de l’article premier et articles 11 et 18. Convention européenne sur l’exercice des droits des enfants (Nations Unies, Recueil des Traités, vol. 2135, No. 37249), paragraphe 2 de l’article premier; alinéa a) de l’article 6; et paragraphe 1 de l’article 10. Bureau international des droits des enfants, The Rights of Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime: a Compilation of Selected Provisions Drawn from International and Regional Instruments (Montréal, Canada, 2005). Australie, High Court, Secretary, Department of Health and Community Services (NT) v JWB and SMB (Marion’s Case) (1992), 175 CLR 218 F.C. 92/010. Afrique du Sud, Loi de 2005 relative à l’enfance, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 juin 2006, sect. 7, par. 1. Venezuela (République bolivarienne du), Ley Organica para la Protección del Niño y del Adolescente (1998), Gaceta Oficial, No. 5.266, art. 8. Le contenu de ce principe est reflété en détail au paragraphe 1 de l’article 8 de la loi. Par exemple: Bélarus, Loi No. 2570-XII de 1993 relative aux droits de l’enfant (telle que modifiée en 2004), art. 9, al. 3; Maroc, Code pénal, art. 40 (tel que mentionné dans le rapport sur la mission du Rapporteur spécial chargé d’examiner les questions se rapportant à la vente d’enfants, à la prostitution des enfants et à la pornographie impliquant des enfants dans le contexte de l’exploitation sexuelle commerciale des enfants au Maroc (E/CN.4/2001/78/Add.1, paragraphe 75); Portugal, Lei de protecção de crianças e jovens em perigo, Loi No. 147/99 de 1999, art. 4, par. 3; Fédération de Russie, troisième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/125/Add.5), par. 170 (maltraitance des enfants). France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 40; Code de l’éducation, art. L.542-1. France, Code de la santé publique, art. L.2112-6 et Code de l’action sociale et des familles, art. L.221-6. France, Code de déontologie médicale, art. 43-44. France, Décret No. 93-221 du 16 février 1993 relatif aux règles professionnelles des infirmiers et infirmières, art. 7. Canada, Loi relative à l’enregistrement des informations concernant les délinquants sexuels, S.C. 2004, C-16; Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord (Angleterre), projet de loi No. 79 de 2006 concernant la protection des groupes vulnérables soumis à la Chambre des Lords, notes explicatives, par. 4; Royaume-Uni (Écosse), article premier du projet de loi No. 61 de 2002 sur la protection des enfants soumis au Parlement écossais. Voir le site web à l’adresse: http://www.terredeshommes.org. Par exemple, Canada (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q. chap. A13.2) (1988), art. 8 (Bureau d’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels); Islande, art. 5 à 9 (Ministère des affaires sociales) de la Loi No. 80 de 2002 relative à la protection de l’enfance; Italie, création de la Commission parlementaire pour l’enfance et de l’Observatoire national de l’enfance, art. 1-2 de la Loi No. 451 de 1997; Mexique, art. 4 à 6 de la Loi de 2003 du District fédéral relative à l’appui aux victimes de la délinquance. Par exemple, Belgique, Décret instituant un délégué général de la Communauté française aux droits de l’enfant (2002), art. 2; Costa Rica, Décret No. 17.733-J de 1987 portant création de l’institution du Défenseur des enfants; Danemark, notification concernant la création d’un Conseil de l’enfance, No. 2, 1998; République dominicaine, Décret No. 2981 de 1985 portant création de la Direction générale pour la promotion de la jeunesse; Égypte, Décret No. 2235 de 1997 portant création de l’Administration générale pour la protection juridique des enfants; Islande, Loi No. 83 de 1994 relative à l’Ombudsman des enfants; Islande, Arrêté No. 49 de 1994 relatif au conseil pour la protection de l’enfance; Indonésie, deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/65/Add.23), par. 32; Kenya, chapitre 141 (Service de protection de l’enfance du Ministère de l’intérieur et du patrimoine national) de la Loi relative à la protection des enfants et des jeunes; Luxembourg, Loi du 25 juillet 2002 portant institution d’un comité luxembourgeois des droits de l’enfant appelé “Ombuds-Comité fir d’Rechter vum Kand” (“ORK”), No. A-N.85 (2002), art. 2-3; Malaisie, article 3 de la Loi No. 611 de 2001 (Conseil de coordination pour la protection de l’enfance) relative à l’enfant; Malte, paragraphe 1 de l’article 11 (Conseil consultatif pour l’enfance et la jeunesse) du chapitre 285 de la Loi de 1980 relative à la protection des enfants et des jeunes; Mauritanie, rapport au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/8/Add.42), par. 6-7 (Conseil national pour l’enfance); Pakistan, deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/65/Add.21), par. 5 (Commission nationale pour la protection et le développement des enfants); Pérou, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence (Loi No. 27.337 de 2000), art. 27 et 29; Qatar, rapport initial présenté au Comité des droits de l’enfant conformément au Protocole facultatif à la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant concernant la vente d’enfants, la prostitution des enfants et la pédopornographie (CRC/C/OPSA/QAT/1), par. 102 (Bureau Ami des enfants); Suède, Loi No. 335 de 1993 relative à l’Ombudsman des enfants; Ouganda, deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/65/Add.33), p. 3 (Programme national d’action en faveur de l’enfance); Royaume-Uni, chapitre 31 (Commission pour la protection de l’enfance) de la Loi de 2004 relative à la protection des enfants; États-Unis d’Amérique, United States Code, Titre 42, chapitre 112, art. 10605, création du Bureau des victimes de la délinquance, alinéas a)c) (Bureau d’aide aux victimes de la délinquance). Par exemple, Myanmar, art. 63 de la Loi No. 9/93 de 1993 relative à l’enfance. http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/lscb. Par exemple, Bolivie, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, art. 176 (Commission de l’enfance et de l’adolescence); Inde, art. 29, 37 et 39 (Commission pour la protection de l’enfance) de la Loi No. 56 de 2000 relative à la protection des enfants dans le cadre de la justice pour mineurs; Tunisie, Code de la protection de l’enfant, 1995, art. 3-6 (Délégué à la protection de l’enfance). Belgique, Décret relatif à l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitances, 1998, art. 3-6 (Commission de coordination de l’aide aux enfants victimes de maltraitance). Par exemple, Bulgarie, Programme national de 2006 relatif à la prévention et à la lutte contre la traite d’êtres humains et à la protection des victimes; Estonie, Loi de 2003 relative à l’aide aux victimes (RT I 2004, 2, 3) (entrée en vigueur en 2004), art. 3-4 (négligence, maltraitance et sévices physiques, psychologiques ou sexuels); Indonésie, Rapport sur les lois et procédures concernant l’exploitation sexuelle commerciale des enfants en Indonésie (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 45-46 (service de lutte contre le trafic d’enfants); Philippines, Loi No. 7610 de 1992 relative à la protection spéciale des enfants contre les sévices, l’exploitation et la discrimination, art. II, sect. 4 (prostitution des enfants et autres sévices sexuels, traite d’enfants, publications obscènes et spectacles indécents). États-Unis d’Amérique, United States Code, Titre 18, chapitre 223, art. 3509, Droits des enfants victimes et témoins, alinéa d) (protection de la vie privée), par. 1-2 et 4. Par exemple, Bangladesh, Loi relative à l’enfance, art. 17 (mentionnée dans le Rapport sur les lois et procédures concernant l’exploitation sexuelle commerciale des enfants au Bangladesh (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 37); Bolivie, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, art. 10 (Anonymat) al. 2; Canada (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse, L.R.Q., chap. P34.1, 1977, art. 83; Canada, Code pénal, R.S.C. 1985, chapitre C-46, articles 276.2-276.3, 486.3-4) et article 486.4.1; Islande, Loi No. 80 de 2002 relative à la protection de l’enfance, art. 58; Irlande, Loi de 2001 relative à l’enfance, art. 252; Italie, Code de procédure pénale, art. 114; Japon, Loi de 1999 (mise à jour en 2004) relative à la répression de la prostitution des enfants et de la pédopornographie et à la protection de l’enfance, art. 13; Kenya, Loi relative à l’enfance (Chap. 586 of the Laws of Kenya, 2002) (mentionnée dans le deuxième rapport périodique du Kenya au Comité des droits de l’enfant, CRC/C/KEN/2), par. 212), art. 76 (5); Philippines, Loi No. 7610 de 1992 relative à la protection spéciale des enfants contre les sévices, l’exploitation et la discrimination, art. XI, sect. 29, par. 2; Fédération de Russie, projet de loi fédérale relative à la lutte contre la traite de personnes, 2003, art. 28 (3), (5)-(6); Afrique du Sud, Loi relative à l’enfance, 2005, Government Gazette, vol. 492, 19 juin 2006, sect. 74; République arabe syrienne, Loi de 1974 relative à la délinquance juvénile, art. 54 (mentionnée dans le rapport initial présenté au Comité des droits de l’enfant conformément au Protocole facultatif à la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant, concernant la vente d’enfants, la prostitution des enfants et la pornographie mettant en scène des enfants (CRC/C/OPSC/SYR/1), par. 230); Thaïlande, Loi relative aux tribunaux pour mineurs et aux tribunaux de la famille et aux procédures applicables par ces tribunaux, art. 98 (mentionnée dans le deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/83/Add.15), par. 516); Tunisie, Code de la protection de l’enfance (1995), art. 120 (mentionné dans le rapport initial au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/83/Add.1), par. 242); Turquie, Loi de 1999 relative aux tribunaux pour mineurs, art. 40 (mentionnée dans le rapport initial au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/51/Add.4), par. 511); Royaume-Uni, Loi écossaise de 1995 relative à l’enfance (chapitre 36), sect. 44, par. 1; Zambie, rapport initial au Comité des droits de l’enfant, 2002 (CRC/C/11/Add.25), par. 527. Par exemple, Italie, Code pénal, art. 734 (a); Sri Lanka, deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/70/Add.17), par. 65; Royaume-Uni, Loi écossaise de 1995 relative à l’enfance (chapitre 36), sect. 44, par. 2; Zambie, rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/11/Add.25) para. 527. Canada, Ministère de la justice, A Handbook for Police and Crown Prosecutors on Criminal Harassment (Ottawa, 2004), part. IV. Voir par exemple, en France: http://www.barreau-marseille.avocat.fr/textes.cgi?rubrique=9. Office des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime, Independent Evaluation Report: Juvenile Justice Reform in Lebanon (Vienne, juillet 2005), par. 38. Iran (République islamique d’), deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/104/Add.3), par. 36. France, Ministère de la justice, Direction des affaires criminelles et des grâces, “Enfants victimes d’infractions pénales: guide de bonnes pratiques; du signalement au procès pénal” (Paris, 2003). Par exemple, États-Unis (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Titre 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-62. Par exemple, Suisse, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, Recueil systématique du droit fédéral (RS) 312.5, 1991, art. 6 (1). En ce qui concerne, dans le contexte de l’article 9 a) de la Loi type, les procédures à suivre dans le cadre du processus de justice pour adultes et pour mineurs, y compris le rôle des enfants victimes et témoins, l’importance, les modalités du témoignage, ainsi que les modalités de l’”interrogatoire” pendant l’enquête et le procès, voir Islande, Loi No. 80 de 2002 relative à la protection de l’enfance, art. 55, par. 1; Kazakhstan, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 206 de 1997, art. 215 3); Nouvelle-Zélande, Loi de 2002 relative aux droits des victimes, sect. 12, par. 1; et États-Unis (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Titre 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-72; en ce qui concerne l’article 9 b) de la Loi type, concernant les mécanismes d’accompagnement de l’enfant dans le contexte du dépôt d’une plainte et de la participation à l’enquête et à la procédure judiciaire, y compris la désignation d’un avocat pour la victime, voir Canada (Québec), Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse (L.R.Q., chap. P-34.1), 1977, art. 5; Canada (Québec), Loi sur l’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (L.R.Q., chap. A-13.2), 1988, art. 4; Canada, Principes fondamentaux de justice pour les victimes de la criminalité, 2003, principe 7; Colombie, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 906 de 2004, art. 136, par. 1-2 et 6; Costa Rica, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, Loi No. 7739 de 1998, art. 20; Pays-Bas, “Directives De Beaufort”, 1989, par. 6; Nouvelle-Zélande, Loi de 2002 relative aux droits des victimes, art. 11 (1), 12; Nicaragua, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 406 de 2001, art. 110 (1); Royaume-Uni, Loi écossaise de 1995 relative à l’enfance (chapitre 36), art. 20, par. 1; et États-Unis (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Titre 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-62 (1), (7); en ce qui concerne l’article 9 c) de la Loi type concernant la date et le lieu des audiences et les autres événements pertinents, voir Canada, Principes fondamentaux de justice pour les victimes de la criminalité, principe 6; Colombie, Code procédure pénale, Loi No. 906, 2004, art. 136, par. 12 et 14; Nouvelle-Zélande, Loi de 2002 relative aux droits des victimes, art. 12, par. 1 d); Espagne, Loi No. 35 de 1995 du 11 décembre 1995 relative à l’assistance aux victimes de délits violents et d’atteinte à la liberté sexuelle, art. 15, par. 4; États-Unis, United States Code, Titre 18, chapitre 237, art. 3771, droits des victimes de la criminalité, alinéa a), 2); États-Unis (Alabama), Code of Alabama 1975, Titre 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-72 (2). Cour pénale internationale, paragraphe 5 de la règle 90 du Règlement de procédure et de preuve et règle 83.2 du Règlement de la Cour. Colombie, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 906 de 2004, art. 11 j); Costa Rica, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, Loi No. 7739 de 1998, art. 107 b); France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 102; Kazakhstan, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 206 de 1997, art. 75 (6); Mexique, Loi de 2003 du District fédéral relative à l’aide aux victimes de la délinquance, art. 11, sect. V; El Salvador, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 904 de 1997 (telle que mise à jour en 2006), art. 13, sect. 3; Thaïlande; Code de procédure pénale, art. 13 (mentionné dans le deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, par. 515). Par exemple, Australie (Western Australia), Loi de 1906 relative à la preuve, art. 106E; États-Unis, United States Code, Titre 18, chap. 223, art. 3509, droits des enfants victimes et témoins, alinéa i). Suisse (Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, 1991, art. 6 (3)). Par exemple, Canada, Code pénal, R.S.C. 1985, chapitre C-46, art. 486.1, par. 1. Par exemple, Argentine, Code de procédure pénale, art. 80 c); Autriche, Code de procédure pénale, art. 162, par. 2); Costa Rica, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, Loi No. 7739 de 1998, art. 107 c); Pérou, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, Loi No. 957 de 2004, art. 95, par. 3; Suisse, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 7 (1). Par exemple, États-Unis, United States Code, Titre 18, chap. 223, art. 3509, droits des enfants victimes et témoins, alinéa i). Par exemple, Bulgarie, Loi de 2004 relative à la protection de l’enfance, art. 15, par. 5); République dominicaine, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 76-02 de 2002, art. 202; Honduras, Code de procédure pénale, Décret No. 9-99-E de 2000, art. 331; Kazakhstan, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 206 de 1997, art. 215 et art. 352 (1); Mexique, Loi de 2003 du District fédéral relative à l’aide aux victimes de la délinquance, art. 11, sect. XVI; Norvège, Loi No. 25 de 1981 portant Code de procédure pénale (telle que modifiée le 30 juin 2006), art. 128; Oman, Code de procédure pénale, art.14 (mentionné dans le deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/OMN/2), par. 29 et 30); Pérou, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 957 de 2004, art. 378, par. 3; El Salvador, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 904 de 1997 (tel que modifié en 2006), art. 349. Par exemple, France, Code de procédure pénale (tel que modifié par la Loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la répression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Afrique du Sud, Ministère de la justice et du développement constitutionnel, “National Policy Guidelines for Victims of Sexual Offences; Department of Justice – National Guidelines for Prosecutors in Sexual Offence Cases” (Pretoria 1998), chapitre 7, par. 1; États-Unis (Delaware), Del. Code Ann. Iti.11, §5134 (1995). Par exemple, Costa Rica, Code de l’enfance et de l’adolescence, Loi No. 7739 de 1998), art. 107 c); République tchèque, Règlement de procédure pénale, No. 141, 1961, art. 102, par. 1); République dominicaine, Code de procédure pénale, (Loi No. 76-02 de 2002), art. 202; France, Code de procédure pénale (tel que modifié par la Loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la répression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Indonésie, Rapport sur les lois et procédures concernant l’exploitation sexuelle commerciale des enfants en Indonésie (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 52; Kirghizistan, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 156 de 1999, art. 193 et 293; ex-République yougoslave de Macédoine, Code de procédure pénale, art. 223, par. 4); Mexique, Loi de 2003 du District fédéral relative à l’aide aux victimes de la délinquance, art. 11, sect. XVI; Norvège, Loi No. 25 de 1981 portant Code de procédure pénale (telle que modifiée le 30 juin 2006), art. 239; Pérou, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 957 de 2004, art. 378, par. 3; El Salvador, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 904 de 1997 (telle que modifiée en 2006), art. 349; Thaïlande, deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005, par. 148 et 511. Par exemple, Bulgarie, Loi de 2004 relative à la protection de l’enfance, art. 15, par. 5). Par exemple, Australie (Queensland), Loi de 1977 relative à la preuve, art. 21A (2) d); Autriche, Code de procédure pénale, art. 162, par. 2); France, Code de procédure pénale (tel que modifié par la Loi No. 98-468 du 17 juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la répression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu’à la protection des mineurs), art. 706-53; Royaume-Uni, Ministère de l’intérieur, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, Including Children (Londres, 2006), art. 4.28; Royaume-Uni, Loi écossaise de 2004 sur la protection des témoins vulnérables, art. 271H, par. 1 d). États-Unis (Arizona), Arizona Revised Statutes (Ariz.Rev.Stat.) §13-4403 (E). Par exemple, Australie (Queensland), Loi de 1977 relative à la preuve, art. 9; Thaïlande, Code de procédure civile et commerciale, art. 95 (mentionné dans le deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 par. 105); Royaume-Uni, Loi de 1999 relative à la justice pour mineurs et à la preuve en matière pénale, art. 53, par. 1); États-Unis, United States Code, Titre 18, chapitre 223, art. 3509, droits des enfants victimes et témoins, alinéa c), par. 2. Nouvelle-Zélande, Loi de 1908 relative à la preuve, art. 23H, par. c). Nouvelle-Zélande, R. v. Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354, p. 359. Ibid. Par exemple, Honduras, Code de procédure pénale, Décret No. 9-99-E de 2000, art. 331, alinéa 3. Par exemple, Algérie, Code de procédure pénale, 1966, art. 228; République du Congo, Loi No. 1-63 du 13 janvier 1963 portant Code de procédure pénale, art. 91 et 382; Égypte, Code de procédure pénale, art. 283 (mentionné dans le rapport présenté par l’Égypte au Comité des droits de l’homme conformément à l’article 40 du Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques (CCPR/C/EGY/2001/3), 2002, par. 570); France, Code de procédure pénale, art. 108; Haïti, Code d’instruction criminelle (tel que modifié en 1985), art. 66; Indonésie, Rapport sur les lois et procédures concernant l’exploitation sexuelle commerciale des enfants en Indonésie (ECPAT International, Bangkok, 2004), p. 50; Oman, Code de procédure pénale, art. 196 (mentionné dans le deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/OMN/2), par. 107); Thaïlande, Code de procédure civile et commerciale, art. 112 (mentionné dans le deuxième rapport périodique au Comité des droits de l’enfant (CRC/C/83/Add.15), 2005 par. 105). Voir la Loi de 1999 relative à la justice pour mineurs et à la preuve en matière pénale, chapitre 23, art. 55 à 57. Par exemple, États-Unis, United States Code, Titre 18, chapitre 223, art. 3509, droits des enfants victimes et témoins, alinéa c), par. 3. Nouvelle-Zélande, R. v Accused (CA 245/90) (1990) 6 CRNZ 354. Par exemple, El Salvador, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 904 de 1997 (telle que modifiée en 2006), art. 13, par. 13; États-Unis (Colorado), Code de l’enfance, Titre 19, art. 19-1-106(2). Royaume-Uni, Crown Prosecution Service, Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings: Guidance for Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses, including Children (Londres, 2006), art. 4.28. Royaume-Uni, Crown Prosecution Service, Children’s Charter, 2005, art. 4.19. Par exemple, Suisse, Loi fédérale sur l’aide aux victimes d’infractions, RS 312.5, 1991, art. 6, par. 3). http://www.fijiwomen.com/. Les victimes de la traite de personnes sont parfois menacées de poursuites pour être entrées illégalement dans le pays; aucune assistance spéciale ne leur est fournie pendant leur garde à vue par la police, même lorsque les victimes sont très jeunes, et aucune mesure de protection n’a été ordonnée. Toute la question de la traumatisation causée par la traite et des viols répétés n’a guère fait l’objet d’une étude détaillée, si tant est que des études aient été réalisées. Office des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime, Manuel sur les programmes de justice réparatrice (publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente: F.06.V.15), p. 5-8. Publication des Nations Unies, numéro de vente: F.06.V.15. Par exemple, Arménie, Code de procédure pénale, 1999, art. 59, sect. 1, par. 11; Colombie, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 906 de 2004, art. 11 g); Kazakhstan, Code de procédure pénale, Loi No. 206 de 1997, art. 75, par. 6; Mexique, Loi de 2003 du District fédéral relative à l’aide aux victimes de la délinquance, art. 11, sect. XIX; Pays-Bas, “Directives De Beaufort”, 1989, par. 6.1; Nouvelle-Zélande, Loi de 2002 relative aux droits des victimes, art. 12, par. 1 e); Royaume-Uni, Ministère public “Code for Crown Prosecutors” (Londres, 2004), sect. 5.13; États-Unis (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Titre 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-63 a), 15-23-72 (1) et 15-23-75 (1); États-Unis (Alaska), Constitution de l’État de l’Alaska, droits des victimes de la criminalité, art. I, sect. 24; États-Unis (Connecticut), Connecticut Joint Resolution No. 13, par. 2; États-Unis (Idaho), Constitution de l’État de l’Idaho, droits des victimes de la criminalité, art. 1, sect. 22, par. 3); États-Unis (Illinois), Constitution de l’État de l’Illinois, droits des victimes de la criminalité, sect. 8.1, alinéa a) (5); États-Unis (Michigan), Constitution de l’État du Michigan, art. 24, par. 1 (9); États-Unis (Oregon), Constitution de l’État de l’Oregon, art. 1, sect. 42 (1) b); États-Unis (Caroline du Sud), Constitution de l’État de la Caroline du Sud, art. 1, sect. 24 (3); États-Unis (Tennessee), Constitution de l’État du Tennessee, Amendement relatif aux droits des victimes, 1998, par. 5; États-Unis (Texas), Constitution de l’État du Texas, art. 30, droits des victimes de la criminalité, par. b) (5); États-Unis (Virginie), Constitution de l’État de la Virginie, art. 1, sect. 8-A, par. 6; États-Unis (Wisconsin), Constitution de l’État du Wisconsin, art. 1, sect. 9 m) (9). Par exemple, Australie, Loi No. A1994-83 de 1994 relative aux victimes de la criminalité (telle que modifiée le 13 avril 2004), art. 4, par. l); Canada, Loi relative au régime pénitentiaire et à la liberté surveillée, S.C. 1992, chapitre 20, art. 26, par. 1; Royaume-Uni, projet de loi écossaise No. 50 de 2003 relative à la justice pénale, art. 16; Royaume-Uni, Loi de 2004 relative aux victimes de la violence au foyer et de la criminalité (Titre 28), chapitre 2, art. 35, par. 4 et 5; États-Unis, United States Code, Titre 42, chapitre 112, art. 10606, droits des victimes, alinéa b), par. 7; États-Unis (Alabama), Code of Alabama, 1975, Titre 15, art. 3, sect. 15-23-75 (5), 15-23-78; États-Unis (Alaska), Constitution de l’État de l’Alaska, droits des victimes de la criminalité, art. I, sect. 24; États-Unis (Arizona), Constitution de l’État de l’Arizona, art. 2.1 (A), par. 2; États-Unis (Idaho), Constitution de l’État de l’Idaho, droits des victimes de la criminalité, art. 1, sect. 22, par. 3; États-Unis (Illinois), Constitution de l’État de l’Illinois, droits des victimes de la criminalité, art. I, sect. 8.1, par. a) (5); États-Unis (Louisiane), Amendement constitutionnel relatif aux droits des victimes, art. I, sect. 25; États-Unis (Michigan), Constitution de l’État du Michigan, art. I, sect. 24 (1) 9; États-Unis (Oregon), Constitution de l’État de l’Oregon, art. 1, sect. 42 (1) b); États-Unis (Caroline du Sud), Constitution de l’État de la Caroline du Sud, art. 1, sect. 24 (2) et (10); États-Unis (Tennessee), Constitution de l’État du Tennessee, Amendement relatif aux droits des victimes, 1998, par. 5; États-Unis (Texas), Constitution de l’État du Texas, art. I, sect. 30, droits des victimes de la criminalité, par. b) (5); Constitution de l’État de la Virginie, art. 1, sect. 8-A, par. 6; États-Unis (Wisconsin), Constitution de l’État du Wisconsin, art. 1, sect. 9 m) (9). Centre international de Vienne, B.P. 500, 1400 Vienne (Autriche) Téléphone: (+43-1) 26060-0, Télécopie: (+43-1) 26060-5866, www.unodc.org Imprimé en Autriche